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Live. The search for a

solution, can the Federal

Government break the deadlock

over asylum seekers. Australian

people have had a gutful of this and they want it

sorted. We need regional

policies that focus on

deterrence. Time to party, huge

crowds in London bid farewell

to the Olympic Games. I to the Olympic Games. I think

you only need two words to sum

up these games - Britain

delivered. Iran counts the cost

of two powerful aerk dy

earthquakes as its search for

survivors is called off. And

workers at a Melbourne car

parts maker end their strike and avert an industry-wide

shutdown. Good morning, it's

Monday, 13 August, I'm Paul

Kennedy. And I'm Karina

Carvalho. The top story - the

political deadlock over asylum

seekers will dominate debate when Parliament resumes this

week. The Government's expert

panel will release its findings

today. The Prime Minister wants

a deal by the end of the week

but there's still no sign of

compromise. The Greens are

refusing to back offshore

processing and the Coalition is

sticking with its opposition to

Malaysia. Our political correspondent Melissa Clarke

joins us now from Parliament

House. And Melissa, good

morning. What can you tell us

about what is expected from the

panel today? Well the panel's

going to release its report at

about lunch time in Canberra

but the details of what

conclusion they've come to have

been closely guarded by Angus

Houston who's leading the

panel. The Government is

hopeful that it will recommend the Malaysia solution in some

form, either in combination

with other elements or even if

it is further down the track,

as part of a broader suite of

policies, but they are hoping

for some backing from the

expert panel for their

arrangement to swap asylum

seekers and send them back to

Malaysia in exchange for taking

more refugees from there. And they're hoping that the

recommendations will put

pressure on the Opposition and the Greens to support either

their policy or some new form

of their policy. So they will

be getting that report ahead of

a cabinet meeting earlier this

morning and then everyone else

will get the chance to see it

at lunch time. Any signs of

compromise at all from the

Opposition or the Greens? It

certainly doesn't look like it

at this stage. What we have is the Opposition being quite

dismissive off whole process.

From the beginning they've said

they don't need a committee to

tell them what their policy is,

that they stand by their policy

of reopening the detention

centre on Nauru, of turning

boats around where possible and

reintroduce ing temporary

protection visas. They've said

that unless the - effectively

said unless the panel comes up

with those ideas and agrees

with their policies that

they're not going to change.

Now, we've also got the Greens

on the other hand who could

also help the Government

deliver the numbers for a

policy change but while they've

said they're willing to

consider the findings of the

panel they've made it clear they're not going to accept

offshore processing, that

that's a move that they cannot

accept as a policy platform

which effectively means the

chances of them agreeing to a

compromise deal aren't any

better now than they were six

weeks ago when Parliament rose.

So it's still look like a tough

road ahead for the

Government. So how will it play

out in Parliament when they

resume tomorrow? Are we looking

at another marathon sitting? It

looks like the Government would

like to have a debate because

what they want is the issue to

be debated on the ploor - floor, they want some kind of resolution through parliament

by the end of this week. Now

that may well not happen. It

depends on there being viable

legislation and agreement to

debate that legislation and

with the Opposition and the

Greens at the moment not

looking like the willingness to

compromise in any way, shape or

form it's hard to see how we

get to that point but it's

certainly the outcome the

Government wants and that the

Government needs. It's going to

be difficult for the Government

because if they compromise any

further we may see the Labor

left speak out more than they

have. But at the moment the

need to get this issue sorted with is going to drive the

Government to do what it can to

get this resolved by the end of

the week. Melissa, thanks very

much. We'll speak to you later

in the program. And Sarah

Hanson-Young from the Greens

will talk to ussen on News Breakfast too. Here's the rest

of the news. Zblt The final

medals have been won and the

closing ser men - ceremony has

just begun. Crowds have packed

Hyde Park for a farewell

concert. The closing ceremony

will celebrate 50 years of

popular music with a line up of British and international performers. The United States

topped the medal tally followed

by China and bulletin Britain

in third place. Australia was

in 10th place with 7 gold, 16 silver and 12 bronze

medals. Iran has called off the

search for survivors after an

earthquake. The death toll

stands at 227. Almost 1,400

people were injured. Officials

will now concentrate on

providing food and shelter for

the thousands of people left

homeless. A strike threatens to shut down production at Ford

and Holden has ended. Workers

at the Dair car parts factory

in Melbourne have voted to end

their 5-day strike. More than

100 workers walked off the job

on Wednesday in a dispute over

redundancy payments. Tensions

between Egypt's President and

the military have reached

boiling point. Mohammed Morsi

has ordered the retirement of

the head of the country's armed

forces. He's also cancelled a constitutional declaration that

could have curbed his powers.

Relations with the military

have been stained - strained

since the election in

June. NATO forces say they've

foiled a planned terrorist

attack. They arrested 5

militant s who were alenledly

planning suicide attacks planning suicide attacks on politicians. A large number of

weapons and suicide vests were

seized as well as Afghan army uniforms. There's more evidence today that Australia's response

to the homeless is in crisis. A

new survey by the Australian

Council of Social Service have

found services to the homeless

are stretched to breaking

point. It says welfare agencies

can no longer meet the growing

demand and community legal

services are chronically

underfunded. Let's get more on

the Olympics. David Cameron has

paid tribute to the British

public for making the London

Games such a second. I thess -

think you only need two words

to sum up these Games - Britain

delivered. We showed the world

what we're made of, we reminded

ourselves what we can do and

yes, we've demonstrated that

you should never ever count

Team GB down and out. The idea

actually that the greatest

member of Team GB was the

British public may have been an

advertising slogan but it

turned out to be spectacularly

true. The closing ceremony of

the Olympic Games has just

started. Lisa Millar joins us

now from Olympic Park. Good

morning, Lisa, what are we

expected to see from this

show? Karina I've just been

taking a peak on the television

set while I've been waiting to

have a chat to you and it looks

like they've recreated the

River Thames inside the stadium

behind me with paper mache Big

Bens and Tower Bridges and

black kabs. It's going to go

for about 3 hours which for about 3 hours which was

about the length of the opening

ceremony. It's going to cost a

little bit less and it tends to

be a bit more informal but it's

going to certainly focus on the

British music scene again.

There's been a huge amount of

speculation about who was

performing and who wasn't. We

do know we're going to see the

Spice Girls, we will probably

see Elton John and the Pet Shop

Boys and maybe George Michael. They're basically promising

people, if you managed to be

one of the lucky 80,000 inside

the stadium then you're pretty

much going to get a rock

concert that will end at about

midnight here. No doubt a

spectacular show ahead. The

actual sporting events have

wrapped up as well. They have

and there were two events today

that everyone was keeping a

very close eye on. First of all

the marathon. It is, if

anything, symbolise whas the

Olympics is about. This is the

marathon, it's always on the

last day, endurance, speed, stamina, you name it and we got

a surprise winner and it was a

wonderful story because it was Ugandan Stephen Kiprotich who

managed to deliver gold for his

country, the first gold medal

that country has had since

1972. So you can imagine they

would have been celebrating

there. Only 23 years old, he

beat the favourite who was from

Kenya and all smiles at the end

of it. Then the other big game

we were watching was the

basketball final, the men's basketball final. Everyone thought the US would pretty

much run away with it but Spain

took them right to the edge. So

the end result was 107 to 100.

So the US were really put on

notice. This is supposedly the

dream team that everyone talks

about, so clearly they've been

told OK, there are other teams

out there who are ready to take

you on. So in some incredible

sport after 16 days right to

the very end we got some great

games. Well it just has been

such an incredible 2 weeks,

Lisa. How are the Games being

considered in terms of

success? Well, when I first

started chatting to people here

about the Olympics you couldn't

find a taxi driver who wasn't

grumpy and bemoan ing the fact

they were coming to London.

Right now at the end of it I

think everyone here is pretty

happy that they've gone off

without a hitch. We were

talking before they started

about the security problems,

the transport problems, the

weather problems. We thought it

was going to rain for the

entire Olympics but it managed

not to. I think you can say it surpassed expectations and of course everyone looks to the

IOC president Jacques Rogge to

get his opinion about what he

thinks of the Games. Here's

what he had to say. I'm a very

happy and graceful man. We're

very happy to the Games and

we're grateful to LOCOG. On 6

July in 2005 in Singapore

London promised these Games

that's what we got. 44 that's what we got. 44 world

records, 17 Olympic records and

I would say history being

written by many, many athletes.

I think of the double treble of

Usain Bolt, I think of Michael

Phelps, I think of Chris Hoy

and 6 medals, I think of Ben

Ainslie and 5 medals, Murray

winning his first major title.

Seb Coe is the head of the

organising committee for London

2012. He was right there at the

very beginning when they were

bidding for it and now he's

seen it all the way through.

He's going to take on another

role of looking after the

legacy. David Cameron the Prime

Minister has just announced

that over the last day or two.

But clearly he was a pretty

happy man when he was there at

the final press conference today. Let's have a

listen. Simply put, Britain is

at the top of its game in terms

of event management.

Capitalising on everything that

we've witnessed in the last

fortnight and actually I think

in the last 7 years is going to

be important. I don't think any

country that has staged the Games, or any city that's

staged the Games is ever the

same afterwards. I think I've

seen that in so many cities

that have staged the Games. We

have, of course, been trusted

to do this on 3 occasions. Well

of course the British have done

unbelievably well, Lisa, how is

the Australian team's performance been judged? It's

been a bit of a mixed

been a bit of a mixed bag, hasn't it? We saw the first

week where we were expecting

great performances from the

swimmers and that didn't happen

but then whe got these lovely

surprises from Weymouth and the

sailing as well as some other

medals, even just yesterday

another four, two silvers and

two bronze, so certainly it

picked up ending with 35 medals

in total. When I was speaking

to John Coates, the AOC

president last week, he said he

was hoping Australia would get

past 30 so they managed to get

to 35 so their expectations had

been dropping. They will be

pretty happy with this. The

chef de mission of the AOC,

Nick Green, was asked by the

media how he saw the performances. 35 medals, 7

gold, 16 silver and 12 bronze,

all of those tell a wonderful

story about these Games. As I

said earlier, I'm completely

proud of this team and the way

the team has gone about their

business and what's pleased me

the most as an observer of the

team, like all of us, is the

way we as Australians go about

our business. We're humbled in

defeat , we're gracious in

victory, we conduct ourselves

as we would all expect as an

Australian and Australians and

I think our team is proud of

the culture of our team that we

have and we continue to support

one another. A lot of these

athletes don't know each other,

they come together every 4

years. The friendship we've

formed around the high performance environment we're

creating is exciting. Zblt

they've - They've just been so

many highlights, haven't there? It's been extraordinary.

I've loved watching the rowing

even though I have to confess I

didn't make it to one event in

person, I watched a lot of it

on television. Not one of the

lucky ones to pick up the

tickets though I tried hard. It

was in the athletics stadium

where characters shone. Great

Britain had some terrific wins,

so did we with Sally Pearson.

And then of course there was

the man from Jamaica who has

such a terrible confidence

problem, Usain Bolt, who

considers himself a bit of a

legend and he's happy to tell

anyone what he thinks of

himself as well. Let's hear from the man himself. Feeling

great. I'm happy I did what I

did and I came here to become a

legend, I am now so I'm very

happy with myself. It's a

wonderful feat. We always come

out here and give it our best.

For me it was an honour to

share with these guys and do

wonderful things and to do extraordinary things so for me

I'm very happy. If you didn't

know who he was you've been

living under a rock for a

couple of weeks, u Usain Bolt

there. Thanks, Lisa we'll leave

it there. We've asked on Friday

what your highlight of the

Games has been. There's been a couple of big ones over the

weekend, I have to say. The

marathon was really good. It

was a good finish. I didn't get

to watch the end of it but just

watched the highlights and the

first 20 k and Kiprotich and

the one from Uganda got up.

That was a big shot to the

Kenyans, I bet. Mo Farrah in

the 5,000 metres was

extraordinary for Britain,

taking out the double, the 5

and 10,000 metres, the first

time that's been done on home

soil during the Olympics. Mo

Farrah has probably gone past

Bradley Wiggins and Chris Hoy

and all of those great British sort of people that were

headlining the Games. Mo Farrah

is probably the one home grown

athlete that's stole the show

there. So your highlight as

well as do you think well as do you think these

Games have been the best ever?

You can send emails to:

Let's take a look at the

front pages of the papers and

in the 'Herald Sun' Federal MPs

are under pressure fo solve the

asylum seeker crisis as reports

of another asylum seeker boat tragedy emerge. The 'Australian' says Labor is

considering reopening an asylum

seeker processing centre on

Nauru in a bid to end the

deadlock overoffshore processing. The 'Mercury'

reports Olympic's hockey stars

have set their eyes on gold in Rio. The Federal Government is

trying to find $3 billion in

savings to fund major education

reforms, that story in the 'Financial Review'. The 'Daily

Telegraph' reports hundreds of

Indian students have been

paying for fake work references

in a multimillion dollar

residency scam. 'The Age' says

a high ranking Australian Embassy official has been

caught in a sex spy

scandal. The 'Canberra Times'

reveals a senior Australian official failed to declare a

relationship with a Vietnamese

spy accused of receiving

millions in spies. Another

brutal attack on a teenager in

Darwin's CBD. The 'Advertiser'

says coastal councils in South

Australia have been warned some

foreshore areas will be lost to

rising sea levels. And the

'Courier Mail' up to 4,000 jobs

will be cut at Queensland

Health as the Newman Government

continues to slash public

sector jobs. And the 'West

Australian' reports on abusive

spectators at Patterson Stadium

after a visiting AFL coach

complained about craid

behaviour. Well let's take a

quick look at the weather:

These are the top stories on

ABC News Breakfast. The Federal

Government's expert panel on

asylum seekers will hand down

its report today. It will set

the scene for another week of fierce dewait in Federal

Parliament as the Government

searches for a solution to the deadlock. The London Olympics

closing ceremony is under way.

Huge crowds have gathered in

Hyde Park for a farewell

concert. The United States topped the medal tally. Australia finished in 10th

position. And Iran has ended

the search for more survivors

from the 2 powerful earthquakes

that struck the north-west of

the country at the weekend.

More than 200 people have died

and almost 1,400 others have

been injured. Let's Let's get

more on the situation in Iran

where the focus is on relief

operations with thousands of

people moving to emergency

shelters. This report from

Al-Jazeera. Whole villages are

reduced to rubble and homes

lost under tonnes of rock. This

is how it looks a day after two

earthquakes and more than a

dozen aftershocks hit Iran's

north-west province which is

called East aiz bay January.

Despite the destruction State

television says its search and rescue operations in the

earthquake zone have finished.

They're no longer searching for

survivors but concentrating on helping thousands of people.

Thoufr, there - however there

are other reports relief

workers still haven't reached

up to 20 remote villages.

TRANSLATION: More than 1,000 of

the injured were moved. 11

search and rescue team and

tracking devices were deployed.

Around 400 merge, vehicles and

aid despatched. Tent camps are

now being set up to shelter

some 16,000 people. Many have

lost their homes, others are too afraid to return to the

area. Government officials are touring villages. TRANSLATION: The reality is

that they have responded really

well with the resources to this

sudden disaster. They work

seption - exceptionalry well

and very hard. There are field

hospitals to treat people. More

than 2,000 have been injured.

Contacting the area has been

very difficult. Thousands of

tents, blankets and food is

being sent to the earthquake

zone. It's reported the towns

of Aha and Verzakan have been badly damaged while large

cities are in better shape.

Emergency teams now have the

massive job of rebuilding homes

and villages. They say they

don't need international help

and have the situation under control but with thousands of

people living in tents and

hundreds dead, Iran may soon

find some help useful. Well a

cash-strapped budget airline in

Italy has suspended all its

flights leaving hundreds of

passengers stranded. Italy's

national carrier has been

trying to buy the struggling Wind Jet but those talks have

failed. About 200 Israeli

tourists spent the night at Rome's international airport

after their flight was

cancelled. 5 other domestic

flights have also been

grounded. More chaos is

expected with up to 300,000

people having booked tickets to

fly with Wind Jet in coming

weeks. Let's have a recap of

our how the markets fared on

Friday. The Dow closed 43

points higher:

Believe it of not, the

Olympics has finished, there's

more sport that's talked about that happened over the weekend. We might have to re focus on

the football now to the football now to get our

fix. Amy Bainbridge good

morning. Good morning. We'll

have a look at the overnight

Olympics results in a moment

but first some domestic sports

news. We'll look at round 20 of

the AFL. North Melbourne has

beaten Essendon by 24 points.

The Kangaroos' 24-point win

means they've moved above

Geelong into 6th spot on the

ladder. Essendon is now in 8th

place. In other games

yesterday, Hawthorn defeated

Port Adelaide by 72 points but

the win came at a cost with

forward Cyril Rioli injured forward Cyril Rioli injured and

Richmond claimed a 70-point win

over the Western Bulldogs. To

the NRL, the Canterbury

Bulldogs have staged a comeback

victory beating the Broncos

22-14 in Sydney. And in

yesterday's other match the Canberra Raiders beat the

Panthers 20-10 at Penrith

Stadium. Let's have a look at

the tryings from those two

matchings.

Now to the results of the final day of the London

Olympics. The USA of course has

ended up on top of the medal

tally ahead of China and Great

Britain. Australia finished on

10th position. While the final

gold medal of the Olympics has

been handed out with the closing ceremony under way,

Uganda's Stephen Kiprotich won

the man's marathon to win his

country's second gold medal

win. To a look at the basketball results the United

States beat Spain 107-100 to

win the gold medal. It was the

closest final since the Soviet

Union beat the Americans 51-50,

that was 40 years ago and it's

the second closest final in

Olympic history in the was d

basketball. LeBron James had 19

and Kobe Bryant scored 17

points. Chloe Espozito was the

last Australian to complete for

the Games in the modern

pentathlon, she finished in 7th

place. It includes fencing,

swimming, horse riding,

shooting and cross country

running. Had a great story

about Chloe on 'Contact Sport'

a couple of weeks ago. She is

just 20 years old and has a

bright future. The marathon was

impressive and they did the first

first 5 ks in 15 minutes 23

seconds. They fly, don't they? It's hard to believe. A great comment on 'Grandstand' last night that to get a sense of how fast they're actually running you need to run 100 metres in 17 seconds and then back up lap after lap and that's how fast you run. It's quite incredible. And the basketballers it was a close game for the big weekend in the footy, what was your highlight over the weekend. Well it's kind of a low light really. Of course I'm a Bombers supporter and I was desperately hoping we might move into 6th position but not to be. But we're still in 8th but aitsd just very tight jostling at the bottom of the top 8 at the moment. It's a log jam. The Bombers are trying to

hang on. Fremantle are still, yeah, in the hunt as well. But really big win there for Hawthorn. Cyril Rioli, a nasty injury there and Jack Riewoldt loving it again for Richmond. I think he kicked 5 or 6 goals yesterday. And the AFL will be happy because he they become even more relevant. A bit more air after the last couple of weeks. Thanks very much, Amy. ABC News Breakfast can be watched live on the web. Visit the main ABC News website at abc.net.au/news and you will

find a link to News 24 which is

streamed live every day. Now,

Vanessa is back with us to talk

about the weather and we'll get

your run down on how Kokoda was

later on. Good morning, out of

the wilderness. This morning a powerful cold front is

triggering across southern WA.

A lot of rain. So far it's

dumped 19 mm in Perth and as

high as 44 in Bickley. Today it

high as 44 in Bickley. Today it

will weaken as it tracks east wards into South Australia and

over to the south-east

tomorrow. A high in the

south-east has been directed

gusty winds up into the Northern Territory Northern Territory and we've

seen the odd shower along parts

of the east coast. This high of the east coast. This high is

also producing frost and fog

with road alerts from both

Melbourne and parts of

Tasmania. Currently minus 6 at Tasmania's Liawini.

You're watching ABC News

Breakfast. Still to come -

we'll be speaking to our Olympics

Olympics reporter Amanda

Shalala at Hyde Park where a

large crowd has gathered to

watch the farewell concert.

Greg Barton joins us to Greg Barton joins us to review

the newspapers and can the

Federal Government find a

solution to the asylum seeker

dead lock? We'll be speaking to

the Greens' Sarah Hanson-Young

to get her views but first

here's the news with

Paul. Leading the news this

morning, the Federal

Government's expert panel on asylum

asylum seekers will release its

report today. The political deadlock over asylum seekers is set to dominate when Federal Parliament resumes this week.

But there's still no sign of compromise from the Opposition

or the Greens. The closing

ceremony for the London

Olympics is under way. Huge

crowds have packed London's

Hyde Park to watch the farewell

concert. The closing ceremony

will celebrate 50 years of

popular music with a big line

up of British and

up of British and international

performers. Iran has called off the search for more survivors

from two powerful earthquakes

that hit the country's

north-west at the weekend. At

least 250 people have died and

more than 2,000 others have been injured. Officials will

now concentrate on providing

food and shelter for the

thousands of people left

homeless. A strike homeless. A strike threatening

to shut down production at Ford

and Holden has

and Holden has ended. Workers

at the Dair car parts factory

in Melbourne have voted to end

their 5-day strike. More than

100 workers walked off the job

on Wednesday over a dispute of

re-Dunn dance si payments. There's nor evidence today that

the Australia's response to the

homeless is in crisis. A new

survey has found that services

to the homeless are stretched

at breaking point. It says

welfare agencies can no longer meet the

meet the growing demands and

community legal services are

chronically underfund ed. The

US Republican candidate Mitt

Romney has hit the campaign

trail with his newly appointed

running mate. Congressman Paul

Ryan says American voter will

have a stark choice on who to

trust on the economy in the upcoming

upcoming election. This is a

man who knows this, who

believes it, who practices it.

This is a man who when he

This is a man who when he was

governor of Virginia lowered

the unemployment rate. Under

Barack Obama it's gone up. This

is a man who as governor of

Massachusetts increased and

improved the credit rating of

Massachusetts. Under President

Obama's watch for the first time in our history the US

credit rating was downgraded. Republican

congressman Paul Ryan. For more

on this North American

on this North American correspondent Brendan Trembath joins us from Washington. Good

morning. What more do we know

about Paul Ryan? Good morning.

Well he's 42 years old, he's

been a congressman, he's been

in the US House of

Representatives for 13 years.

Before that he worked as a

political staffer. So he's had

a career in politics unlike

Mitt Romney who has had a

career in business. So they

complement each other in that respect. Ryan

respect. Ryan is also a favourite of the Tea Party

movement so that's the movement

that favours limited government

and low taxes and that's something that he's spoken

about previously, how he thinks

the Government is too big and

spending too much. And how have

these two performed together on

the road so far? Quite well.

Initially he was mistakenly introduced as

introduced as the next

president of the United States,

Mitt Romney had to correct that

though it was a mistake Barack

Obama made when he was

introducing his VP pick four

years ago. He said Joe Biden

would be the next president. He

was of course the next vice-presidential candidate.

But just in their latest

appearances they've been in

North Carolina, in one of the

appearances they appeared at an

appearances they appeared at an

institute for racing car technicians, part of Nascar circuit which is hugely popular

in North Carolina and that

certainly helped attract a big

crowd to the event. But both of

them worked pretty well. They

had their sleeves rolled up and

they talked about each other's

strengths. And so what's going

to be their approach on this

campaign? Well, what's expected to

to happen next is that they

split up, that they will do

different parts of the country

trying to cover as much ground as possible and both doing

similar things, that is

attacking the record of the

President Barack Obama and

trying to put forward an

alternative. Now he says that

Mitt Romney is the first person

to manage the economy because of his business experience and

he brings his own political experience to

experience to this dynamic. Brendan Trembath in

Washington, we'll leave it

there. And I guess one of the

things I found most interesting

about Paul Ryan is that he likes

likes to wrestle cat fish with

his bare hands and he likes to

walk - Shouldn't be too hard,

shoulted - should it? Likes to

walk around Congress listening

to hard

to hard rock. I read an interesting story yesterday

about the Wikipedia battle over

him too because in high school

he was voted prom king or

whatever the term is there but

also voted the biggest brown

noser and so his supporters

have been continually taking

that off Wikipedia and of

course his opponents probably

want it there. They see it as

not so good. But anyway, it's a public

public relations battle, I guess. Yes, and unfortunately

when you enter into politician

- politics those awards you

receive in high school stay

with you. More news from overseas, tensions between

Egypt's President and the

military have reached boiling point. Mohammed Morsi has ordered the retirement of the

country's head of armed forces.

He's ordered a constitution of declaration

declaration that would have

curbed his powers. Relations

with the military have been

strained since Mr Morsi's

election in join. NATO forces

say they've foiled a planned

terrorist attack in Kabul.

They've arrested 5 Taliban

militants who were allegedly

planning suicide attacks on

politicians. They say the

country's vice-president was

among those being targeted. A

large number of weapons and

suicide vests were seized as well as Afghan

well as Afghan army uniforms.

The WA Premier Colin Barnett

has used his address to the Liberal State conference to set

up law and order as a key State

issue. He announced tough

measures to tackle out of

control parties including up to a

a year in jail for

irresponsible party hosts. A

Premier's address didn't get

off to an ideal start when

off to an ideal start when he

thanked the Liberal Party

faithful for supporting

Labor. We support the Labor - sorry, we support the Liberal

Party. With the State election

7 months away the Premier says

law and order will be front and

centre. He says the public is

particularly concerned by the

recent spike in out of control

parties. He announced new plesh

- measures in tackling

- measures in tackling them

providing police with two riot

buses to secure offender.

Legislation has been drafted to

give police the power to enter

private property and disperse trouble makers and irresponsible hosts face a fine

up to $12,000 or a year in

prison. For juveniles, those

under 18, the police will be

given the ability to take them

off the site, to take them to a

secure place and require their parents or a

parents or a responsible adult

to come and collect them. The

Police Minister says the

legislation will include clear

guidelines outlining when the

police powers can be

used. We're not going to have

police targeting backyard

barbecues. We'll examine the

details of that when we

eventually see it because we've

still not got it. The Premier

says Labor has opposed every

law and order measure put

forward by the Government and

doesn't want it to be an

election issue. Look, I think

we'd be very happy to see law

and order as a key election

issue because it's an area that the Barnett Government has

really dropped the ball on.

They have failed. She says the

Premier is also trying to

distract the public from

another big election issue, the

cost of living. Tasmania's

hospital ity industry has formed a plan to

formed a plan to turn around

dwindling tourist numbers. The

industry's developed its first

strategic plan to look at how

it's faring and what needs to

be done to lift businesses out of the doldrums. It's the first

time all the players in the

hospitality industry have been

heading in the same direction. The hospitality is an industry that can continue

to grow and we can continue to

employ people if we can get

things right. So we're really excited about the opportunities this plan's going

this plan's going to make. The joint Government and industry

project has been a year in the

make. It takes a look at how valuable accommodation, pubs

and restaurants are to

Tasmania. It's the third

biggest employing industry. The

plan sets out close to 100

strategies. Jobs are a major

focus, prompting a $100,000 government training

government training handout. We

want to see more skills in

training in the hospitality

industry, better career paths

for hospitality workers and a

stronger and more resillant

sector. Much of the State's

best produce goes straight to export markets and has to be

bought back at an inflated

cost. A lot of mainlanders do

come down for the Tasmanian

produce and we're not able to supply

supply the majority of supply the majority of what

they want. So it gets exported

out of the State. It also looks

at helping regional areas

hardest hit by the industry

downturn and ways into the

debate on balancing workers'

wages against turning a

profit. If they're going to pay

a staff member three times the

normal wage on a Sunday then

the basic economics says you're going to close the doors and

that's not going to be good for hospitality

hospitality or tourism. It's

hoped the hospitality plan will

help drive tourist demand as

flights increase to the State

in the coming months. Let's go

to London now and our reporter

Amanda Shalala joins us from

Hyde Park where a huge crowd has gathered to say farewell to

the Games. Amanda, looks like a

bit of fun there, can you tell

us what's going on? This has been one of

been one of the hottest tickets

in town for months. This sold

out a long, long time ago and

tens of thousands of people

have packed out to celebrate

the end of Olympic Games. For

the past 2 weeks we've seen

some sporting excellence, tonight it's all about the

music and having a good time.

The evening kicked off with

Bombay bikl club and we were

transported back to time and

transported back to time and

there's a bit treat for all the

fans here, it's the one and

only Blur. Fantastic. So what

else has been promised there? I

guess people aren't too

disappointed about not being

actually inside the stadium. It

looks like they're having just

as much fun? It doesn't matter

at all. People really have come

here to see Blur who is currently playing behind me.

currently playing behind me.

The band only reformed a few

years ago. They played sold out

gigs at the same venue in Hyde

Park in 2009. They're back on

the scene and it is absolutely

going crazy here. It is

incredible. It's like a full-on

rock concert with people just

so happy to see the culmination of what's been an incredible

couple of weeks coming here,

coming to Hyde Park, sharing it

coming to Hyde Park, sharing it

with their fellow Londoners,

fellow tourists and really just

reflecting on what has been an

amazing Olympic Games. We know

right now that you're a great

music fan, we can see that too,

and tell us what has been your

highlight of the Games in the

sporting a - arena? I think

Usain Bolt striking not once,

not twice, but three times is

not twice, but three times is

surely one of the greatest athletic feats that we have

seen in modern times and he

will go down in history, I

think, as one of the best

all-time sprinters and his

showmanship and the way he entertained, everything around

him as well was just absolutely

something special to watch. And

from an Australian perspective

our golden girls , Anna Meares

and Sally Pearson, they won

silver on the same day 4 years

ago, and then 4

ago, and then 4 years later in

London they won gold on the

same day. So a really beautiful

moment for Australia and

wonderful role models for

Australian women as well. So

they're my top 2 picks I

think. Have people been talking

about whether or not it's

important for the IOC President

to say it's been the best games

ever or where are people at

with that? They don't care

with that? They don't care at

all. They are all about just

having a good time here and

really more about talking up

the feats of their individual

athletes. Mo Farrer has really

come out as one of the standout

athletes of theaz Games,

talking to the crowd just even

they're there are Mo Farrer

masks everywhere. Of all the

great British feats we've seen,

his double winning the 5,000

and 10,000 metres really stands out amongst the

out amongst the British

fans. Amanda, have fun and we

might speak to you again. She

doesn't go down and start

getting involved in the mosh

pit. Looks like a lot of fun there. We've been asking for

your favourite moments from the

London Olympics and Sarah says

that one big problem has been

the time zone but she's

probably being picky. Also

there's the double one this morning on whether or not it's the best the best Games ever.

the best Games ever. Michael

writes in "The best Games will

always be Sydney. The IOC will

never fall into the trap again

of having the host cities compete." It was interesting

that David Cameron is thanking

the great British public and

making it the Games for Great

Britain and not just London so

I think that's been a smart move. Absolutely. So please keep those comments coming in.

Your favourite moment from the

Games as well as whether you

Games as well as whether you

think London has been the best Games Games ever.

You're watching ABC News

Breakfast and the top stories - the Federal Government's expert

panel on asylum seekers will hand down its report today. It

will set the scene for another

week of fierce debate in Federal Government as the government searches for a

solution to the deadlock. The

solution to the deadlock. The

London Olympics closing

ceremony is under way. Huge

crowds have gathered in Hyde

Park for a farewell concert.

The United States topped the

medal tall I y. Australia

finished in 10th . And Iran has ended

ended the search for more

survivors from the two powerful

earthquakes that struck the

country in the north-west. At

least 250 people have died and more than 2,000 others have been injured.

been injured. For a look at the

national papers today we're

joined by Professor Greg Barton

from the School of Politic And

Social Inquiry at Monash

University. We're going to

start with the front page of

'The Age' and the Olympics. The

'Age' is saying it was a

success for London and it's

hard to argue for that. A lot

of us before the Games were

worried about all the things that could go

that could go wrong and nn -

none of them did. Security has been really a non-issue, hasn't

it? It seems to have right from

the build up right through, it really hasn't been an

issue. It's that old image of

the ducks on the pond, looking

calm but furiously paddling

under the water. What we're not

seeing is the people in the

back room working at the intelligence

intelligence aingele and it's

worked. Tell us about the

coverage and how it's been back

home? The 'Guardian', I think,

which may have been partly the

source of 'The Age' article carries interesting figures

from a poll. It said it asked

Londoners was it worth ?9

billion and 55% said it was

worth it. Perhaps even more

importantly it said looking at

Mo Farrer who was born in

Mo Farrer who was born in

Somalia, do you think multiculturalism has been good

for the UK and 68% said yes and

that sort of picks up on that

theme of the opening

ceremony. And not just that,

it's also where the Games have

been built and hosted in that

part of East London where it's

just had a massive regeneration

and they talk about in that

'Age' article in particular the fact that so many

fact that so many host cities

end up being wastelands

afterwards where they build the

Olympic park and so on and what

they're going to find in East

London is it's the other way

around. They've done it in an

air wra in order to regenerate

the area. I think once the

euphoria dies down there will

be a critical examination of

whether East London benefits or

whether we've got a kind of

walled sports enclave and the

surrounding suburbs don't benefit.

benefit. It does look like

. Seb Coe has got a new job as

the boss of the Games leck -

legacy and I wonder whether

they're learning from Sydney in

that regard not just with the

sports but with infrastructure

as well to make the most of

it? It's very sensible, isn't

it? Just as well he's such a

nice guy and likeable guy it is

good they're focussing on that because they're

because they're riding a wave

now but if they're not careful

when people sort of get over

the hangover, they will be

saying you know, has it really helped us particularly in East

London. I think it will but they're going to have to work

on that. He was so passionate

even 7 years ago in the lead up

to the Games being announced. I

remember being in London

working at the BBC at the time

and no-one was paying attention

to the announcement because

everyone thought Paris was

going to be the host city and then

then we saw that last-minute

haggling and lobbying by Tony

Blair in Singapore and then the

next morning the announcement

was made and it was in fact

London and I think Londoners

and Britain got right behind

them from that moment. On that

theme the 'Guardian' has

another story looking at the

preparations of the bid. It was

a very carefully prepared bid,

mostly below the radar but they

went at it very hard and he was

there at the front so

there at the front so let's

hope they follow through the

next few years. Asylum seekers, we're talking about that this

morning. We've got the expert

panel report coming in. It's

over the papers as we'd expect.

'The Age' has a very

interesting op ed, picking up

on the question of what do we

do now. This op ed is based on fairly

fairly notable people. Form , former assistant secretary of the United Nations and they

make a 6-point plan talking

about regional engagement,

talking about a Malaysia

solution mark 2 and this is, as

we've dussed before, a very

hard problem to solve. Their

proposal seemed very sensible

but there's no panacea, there's

but there's no panacea, there's no silver

no silver bullet. The 'Australian' of course is

running a story on the front

page of the opinion page of the opinion section

suggesting that the Labor Party

may return to Nauru if it's a

way of swinging back. And in

this op ed they're very much

against Nauru as against Nauru as a

suggestion. It's only a way of

getting the Malaysia solution back on the agenda but

back on the agenda but it's

hardly likely that Nauru would

serve as a disincentive as it

has in the past. There's a bit

of panic at the moment because

the arrival numbers have

spiked. The 'Herald Sun' runs a photograph inside the paper

showing the faces of some of

the 67 people whose lives are feared to be at risk at the

moment from a boat

moment from a boat that's

missing. And that's been

missing since June, they think,

so the more likelihood is

- You'd have to say

unfortunately we can't expect

to see these people and this

reminds us what's at stake.

It's the lives of people who

once we get to know them are

just like us and to the credit

of the 'Herald Sun' for running

that. Before you leave us,

we've got to get your take on

what's happening in the US at the moment over the

the moment over the weekend

with Paul Ryan named Mitt

Romney's running mate. This is

a big story over our papers,

every paper picks up on it. The

'Australian' has a nice

graphics on the world page.

Interesting because Romney is

in trouble in the polls, he's

consistently lagged, as we can

see from this graphic, and he's

at the moment down a bit and

many analysts are saying well

this is a bold move

this is a bold move in the

fashion of the yes, minister

comment that this is courageous

minister because tacking to the

right like this with a known fiscal conservative a man who

featured in ads ran last year

over his Medicare proposal

pushing granny off the cliff

may well backfire on Romney. It

leaves him no space to tack

back to the centre ground. That says something about his

position at the moment. It

does. He's a credible figure

does. He's a credible figure

but in in the Australian's

coverage today it says it

doesn't look like the move of a winner. Does Paul Ryan's youth

have an appeal? He's a very

impressive guy in every respect

except he's clearly out there

hard on the fiscal right. To

his credit he's a genuine

his credit he's a genuine conservative, an intellectual

of consistent policy but is

this what America wants at this

time? It might work against

Obama but I suspect the Obama camp will turn this

around. Because the economy

will be the key issue this

election is fought on. Ryan's

biggest claim to credible

policy position is that the way

the demographicings are going

in America, more retirees than

new workers entering the work

new workers entering the work

force, Medicare and social

security just can't carry on,

there isn't the money to keep

funding them. That's a credible

position but how do we get

there. And the best moment for

you in the Games, have you

watched a heap of it? I've

watched quite a bit of it for

someone who is not a sporting

buff. It just draws you in. I

didn't see this coming to see our success in sailing, that was big for me. You

was big for me. You can't

ignore what Usain Bolt

achieved, that's just

incredible. Perhaps the biggest impression though was to see

how people came so close to

victory and missed out and then

sort of held up underneath it.

That's part of the human drama

of the Olympics that really

gets you in and your heart goes

out when somebody has put so

much on the line and doesn't

make it. We saw that with the

mountain bike yesterday. Four more years that they have

more years that they have to

wait. Yeah, I mean getting up

at 5:30 in the morning,

training. Greg Barton, thank

you . And let's take a look at

what happened in the last

stages of the Olympics, we're

joined with the sport headlines

from Amy Bainbridge. We've got

a wrap up, a quick wrap up from

the results of the final day of

the Olympic. The final gold

medal has been handed out. It

was in the marathon.

was in the marathon. Uganda's

Stephen Kiprotich won to secure

his country's second gold medal

in Olympic history. He beat the

more fancies Kenyan. Kenya

filled the minor placings.

Australia's Michael Shelley

motored home to finish 16th in

2 hours 14 minutes 10 seconds.

Martin Dent was 28th and Jeff Hunt was

Hunt was 63rd. The United

States beat Spain 107-100 to

win the gold medal in the

basketball. It was the closest

final since the Soviet Union beat

beat the Americans 51-50 40

years ago and the closest years ago and the second

closest in Olympic history.

Kevin Durant scored 30 points

while LeBron James had 19 and

Kobe Bryant 17 points. Round 20 of the AFL,

of the AFL, North Melbourne has

beaten Essendon by 24 points.

The Kangaroos' win means

they've moved above Geelong

into 6th spot on the ladder.

Essendon remains in 8th place.

In the other games yesterday

Hawthorn defeated Port Adelaide

but the win came at a cost with

Cyril Rioli injuring his shoulder. The Canterbury

Bulldogs have staged a comeback victory in

victory in the NRL beating the

Broncos 22-14 in Sydney.

Brisbane took a 14-0 lead in

the first 14 minutes but

remained scoreless for the rest

of the game as the Bulldogs ran

through 4 tries. And the

Raiders beat the Panthers 20-10

at Penrith. In golf, Rory

McIlroy leads by 2 shot midway

through the final round of the

through the final round of the

PGA championship. McIl-Roy is

10-under par after 9 holes with

Ian Poulter in second place.

Adam Scott is in a tie for 4th

place for 4-under. We'll keep you updated on the golf throughout the morning. Let's go to the weather now and it's

a very warm welcome back to

Vanessa O'Hanlon. Today's

satellite image, there's a cold

front spreading rain across the southern parts of

southern parts of WA. It's moving east and will reach

South Australia today and the

south-east by tomorrow. A high

in the south-east is directing

gusty winds into the Northern Territory. Seeing the odd

shower along parts of the east

coast and it's a cold morning

and foggy about the south-east. In Queensland:

we'll take a look at the

stadium now in London as the

closing ceremony is under way

and there will be plenty of

fireworks going on there fairly

soon although the ceremony has

been going for about an hour

now. It looks like such now. It looks like such an extraordinary setting and Chris

has tweeted in saying it was

the best Olympics until

the best Olympics until One

Direction performed. It killed

it for me. So he was really

enjoying it up until now. There

will be more musical groups

coming up. We'll be back after

a short break but we'll leave

you with some images of the Olympic Games.

This Program is Captioned

Live. The search for a

solution, can the Federal

Government break the deadlock

over asylum seekers? Australian

people have had a gutful of

this and they want it

sorted. We need regional

policies that focus on deterrence.

deterrence. Time to party,

huge crowds in London bid

farewell to the Olympic

Games. I think you only need

two words to sum up these Games - Britain delivered. Iran

counts the cost of two powerful

earthquakes as a search for

survivors is called off. And

workers at a Melbourne car

parts maker end their strike

and avert an

and avert an industry-wide shutdown . Good morning, you're watching ABC News

Breakfast on Monday, 13 August,

I'm Karina Carvalho. Coming up

- can a report by the

Government's expert panel break

the deadlock over asylum

seekers. We'll speak to Sarah Hanson-Young for her view. And

the curtain falls on the London Olympics. We'll be speaking

Olympics. We'll be speaking to our Olympics reporter Amanda

Shalala who's at Hyde Park

where a huge crowd has gathered

for a wear far farewell

concert but first here's the

morning's news. Good morning. The Federal Government's expert

panel on asylum seekers will

release its report today. The

political deadlock over asylum

seekers is set to dominate when Federal Parliament resumes this week but there's still

week but there's still no sign

of compromise from the

Opposition or the Greens. The

final medals have been won and the closing ceremony has just

begun. Huge crowds have packed

London's Hyde Park for a

farewell concert. The closing ceremony will celebrate 50

years of popular music with a

big line up of British and

international performers. The

United States topped the m