Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Disclaimer: The Parliamentary Library does not warrant the accuracy of closed captions. These are derived automatically from the broadcaster's signal.
ABC News Breakfast -

View in ParlView

(generated from captions) Snoop This Program Is

Captioned Live. Call for a

compromise. The Federal

Government urges NSW and

Victoria to get onboard the plan for disability insurance.

Tony Abbott under fire for

questioning investment by

foreign Governments. And I

think that is reckless. I think

for this country's it is really dangerously dumb

interests. On the eve of the

Olympics, Australian athletes

warned to stop whinging and get

on with the job. An honour to

represent this country at the

Games and if athletes feel they

don't want to be part of this

team and the honour of

representing this country, they'll have that conversation

with them. And south Sydney

star Greg Inglis Three matches.

Good morning. It's Thursday, 26

July. I'm Michael Rowland. I'm

Beverly O'Connor. The tap story

on ABC News Breakfast -

Victoria and NSW will seek

further meetings with the

for the Disability Insurance Government on the way forward

Scheme. At yesterday's COAG

meeting both states refused to

get on board with the national

launch without more Federal

money. SA, Tasmania and the

ACT have agreed to launch host

sites. The Government says

there will be no more discussions until NSW and

Victoria are ready to compromise. Premier of NSW, a

big strong State, the Premier

of Victoria, a big strong

State, wouldn't do it. What

Barry O'Farrell was asked for

today was $70 million of new money over three years. That's

on the whole NSW Budget. What

Premier Bale was asked for Premier Bale was asked for was

around 40 and while they say

they value being involved in a Disability Insurance Scheme and

having a launch site, they

wouldn't put forward those

relatively small amounts of

money to get it done for their

people in their states. Julia

Gillard, the Prime Minister

there. Our political

correspondent Melissa Clarke is

with us now from Parliament

House. We're hearing the mixed

messages about whether there

will be further talks to today

to try and nut out an

agreement. There is confusion

about it. Yesterday the NSW

Premier Barry O'Farrell tweeted there would be more meetings

with the Federal Minister in

charge here, Jenny Macklin, however, Jenny Macklin's office

said unless NSW and Victoria

are prepared to stump up the

cash there's no point in

talking and there won't be a

meeting. We have the NSW

disability services Minister

flying to Melbourne where he'll

be with the Victorian Community

Services Minister Mary wooldrum

and the two of them hope to

meet with Jenny Macklin in the Melbourne Commonwealth offices

to be able to talk this over

but at the moment it seems the

meeting won't take place

because Jenny Macklin is

insisting they agree to

contribute more money or thrz

no point in talking. It's got

to this confusing position

where the states say they're

interested, want to be engaged

but have concerns about punding

arrangements, want the risks underwritten by the

Commonwealth but the

Commonwealth is saying unless they're prepared to pay their

fair share there's not going to

be much movement going on

here. There's been a lot of

criticism of the Labor outcome

saying it a squandered

opportunity because people are

playing politics again.

Particularly because it has

come clearly along partisan

lines. We have those states led

by Conservative lead rpz on one

side of the coin and the states

led by the Labor Party on the

other side. We've seen COAG fracture directly down

political lines, leading to the

likes of the dib services

commission Graham Innes saying

what needs to happen is there

needs be an adult compromise,

probably reflecting what people

are feeling about the

frustrating outcome of

yesterday's COAG meeting. We'll

hear more from Graham Innes

this morning. Also we're

hearing from Tony Abbott on the

world stage strutting his stuff

as an international statesman.

Bob Carr's not that impressed

though? He's garnered lot of

Abbott, he's first in the US attention from the trip, Tony

then China, back to Australia

today. The foreign affairs

Minister Bob Carr has been very

critical of some of Tony

Abbott's comments to the

Chinese business community

where he said in a speech that

the Coalition doesn't support the nationalisation of

Australian companies by the

Australian Government let alone

foreign companies that are

owned or are led by State-owned

enterprises which has raised

quite a few eye brows about

what that will mean for foreign

investment in Australia and Bob

Carr, as soon as he was back in

Australia after his travels,

was quicker with the

opportunity to point out what

he says are the difficulties

with Tony Abbott's comments

when he spoke on the Lateline

program last night. It just

disturbs me that he is striking

in three or four of the things

he said about China what can

only be seen and will be seen

by them, I think, as an

and I think that is reckless. I adversarial approach with China

think it is really dangerously

dumb for this country's interests. That's Bob Carr

speaking on Lateline there,

echoing the comments of some of

his front bench counterparts,

calling Tony Abbott's comments

dumb and reckless which is

pretty strong language as we

see when it comes to this

foreign affairs field which is

usually a bit more of a

hands-off area when it whiches

to the battle of Federal

politics. Thanks, Melissa.

Let's get the rest of the day's

news with Michael. Australia's

chef demission Nick Green has

been laying down the law to

Olympians who grumble in

public. Speaking after reports that John Steffensen and Josh

Ross, unhappy with team selections, were considering

pulling out. He says athletes

should talk to him otherwise

get on with their job. A strike

that's threatened to disrupt

travel into Britain on the eve

of the Games has been called

off. British border guards have reached an agreement with the

embarrassment on what's Government to avoid

expected to be one of

Heathrow's busiest days.

Thousands of troops are headed

to Aleppo to battle Syrian

forces. Fighter jets and

helicopters have been deployed

meanwhile activists have released video

released video from Damascus

shattered by shell fire when Government forces retook

rebel-held areas there last

week. A survey by the union responsible for aircraft

engineers has found an

extremely high level of

dissatisfaction amongst Qantas

workersion. The poll of almost

3,000 employees suggests they have little faith in their management. The airline says

the survey is not an accurate reflection of Qantas's 30,000 workers. The Federal Court's

released more documents in the

sexual harassment case against Government Speaker Peter

Slipper including text messages

between his staffer James Ashby

and others who Mr Slipper

claims conspired to damage his

reputation. The case came to an

unexpected halt on Monday over

a constitutional argument and

it's not expected to return to

court until October. Let's see what the markets have been up

to: Let's get more on the

situation in Syria where the UN

secretary-general says the

country is slide nothing to

civil war, comments we've of

course heard before. Ban Ki

Moon says the international

community is being tested and

must act to at the end of the

day bloodshed. Speaking during

a visit to because nia - to Bosnia, he's called on the

world to end the violence.

There is a slide into civil

war, growing sectarian strife,

the United Nations is doing all

that we can but action,

meaningful action, will take

the con serted efforts of

international community.

Without unity, there will be

more bloodshed, more deaths.

That is why here in the heart

of healing Bosnia and hurts

gove nu-I make a plea to the

world - do not delay, come

together and act. Act now to

stop the slaughter in

stop the slaughter in Syria. A survey conducted by the union responsible for aircraft engineers has found an

extremely high level of dissatisfaction among Qantas

workers. Almost 3,000 airline

employees were questioned. It

found they had little faith in the airline's management and

the board. Steve Purvinas, the national secretary of the

Australian licensed aircraft engineers, says those surveyed

think the company is on the

slide. The direction is

airline is going in is

something that nearly all staff

oppose and think the airline

and the group of companies will

be worse in 12 months time. For

example, only 4% of Qantas

engineers think senior management are taking the

airline in the right direction and only

and only 43% of Qantas managers

think that Qantas management

are taking the company in the

right direction. This isn't a

war between our union or their

unions and Qantas, this survey

was a snapshot of the entire

industry in our country and it

show s clearly that Qantas are

leaps and bounds behind every

other airline when it comes to

the efforts that the staff are

willing to put in or the

consideration that they have

for the direction being given

by their senior management

teams. Qantas has released a

statement in response to that

survey and we can take a look

at what some of it said now.

The survey was conducted,

according to Qantas,:

Let's go to Tasmania where

there's growing speculation

about how much native forest

will be protected under the

peace deal. The deal was due to

be finalised this week but

parties have been given another

two weeks to reach a deal. Meanwhile, there are claims

half a million hectares of

forest could be protected, a

figure the Tasmanian Opposition

says is concerning. The Federal

Government is rolling out more

cash to help diversify

Tasmania's struggling economy.

There needs to be an expansion

of employment opportunities

here in Tasmania. Tasmanian

bakeries has been given a

$700,000 grant. It's going to

help Tasmanian Bakeries

modernise their plant, enable

them to hire another 22 staff

We had plans to expand over the

next five years. In this process we're going to expand

over the next two years and

bring that employment forward.

The bakery is one of 28

businesses receiving a slice of

an $8 million investment fund.

It will help create about 270

jobs, particularly in areas

affected by the forestry

downturn. We are interviewing

a few of those guys as we

speak. The Opposition believes

more losses are a certainty.

News Limited is reporting groups involved in the peace

talks are considering

protecting 525,000 hectares of

native forests from logging.

It's little wonder Lara

Giddings wanted this

information kept secret. It is

bad news for Tasmania's forest

industry and for the State. It

doesn't matter what speculation

there is around numbers, the

reality is there is no

agreement on final numbers. Signatories are

refusing to reveal any detail

about their preferred plan

which is being tested to see if

it's workable. There's also

speculation the wood supply for

veneer producer Taa Ann is to

be cut. We're concerned about

these figures and indeed commitments previously given to

the industry. Those guarantees

have been worthless Until

there is final agreement I

can't say what would be going

into reserve and what would be

available for wood supply. The waiting game continues. Let's

take a look at the front pages

of the major newspapers around

the country. 'The Age' has

revealed a German thalidomide

maker ignored and covered up

repeated warnings the drug

could damage unborn babies year

before it was withdrawn from

sale. In the 'Advertiser', rank your bank. Federal Government

Minister Bill Shorten is

calling on banks to reveal detailed information about

mortgage lendong a suburb by

suburb basis to increase public

scrutiny. The 'Canberra Times' leads with the ACT signing up to the Disability Insurance Scheme while Liberal Premiers

from the four big states are

refusing to join. In the

'Mercury', independent Andrew

Wilkie accused Labor of

spreading lies, disinformation

and nonsense as it steps up its

campaign to unseat the

Tasmanian MP. Labor buries

Greens costings. 'The

Australian' says back bench rrz

angry the Government blocked

the release of the Treasury's

costings of green policies. The

'Financial Review' reports

Qantas is edging closer to

securing an alliance with the

world's largest international

carrier to help save its

loss-making international arm. The 'Herald Sun', AFL coach clar clr clar has been banned

for a month for swearing at an

umpire's adviser at his son's

under 9s football match. And a

good decision too. The top story in the Western

Australian, police are hunting

for an armed gang who left a

teenager are horrific head

injuries in a random attack.

The 'Courier-Mail' reports

workers told stay home at

hundreds of people are admitted

to Queensland hospitals with

the flu. In the Northern

Territory News, a top economist

warns a new plan to offer no deposit loans to help home

booirers is ver risky. The 'Daily Telegraph' reports the NSW Government has been forced

to rehire a sacked Government

lawyer after losing a costly

legal battle. There's lots of

anger at the AOC in London, we

saw the Olympic chef chef

laying down the law overnight to the Australian athletes,

thankfully only a small number,

who are whinge in public about

selection commiings in Josh

Ross threatening to go home

because he didn't get his way

which has angered officials.

Earlier in the week see saw a

fracas against John Steffensen

bring up claims from the

Beijing Games even though they

were backed by his team-mate

Steve Hooker, saying if you're

here, get on with why you're

here and that are is to compete

in the Olympics and if you have

issues, go behind the scenes

and talk to your coaches. Come

to him directly. He's opened

his door for discussion but

doesn't want it aired in

public. We're going to be

exploring the issue a lot this

morning. Shortly Amy Bainbridge

is both to speak to Olympic

veteran, the highly respected

Chris Hoy, the equestrian. But

over to you, what do you thing

about the whinging in public by

Australian athletes? Should Australian athletes? Should it

stup? Should the AOC take a

much firmer line?

In fact I meant Andrew Hoy.

And lots of gossips coming out

about who the flag bearer might

be and lots of controversy

about Leisel Jones and whether

she's in form. Hot tip she

might be the one name. That

was my bet. I made it on tip

about two days ago. My wish

for Leisel Jones. We put

serious money on it. It was 50

cents. A quick look at the weather now. The top stories on ABC News

Breakfast - Victoria and NSW

will today seek further

meetings with the Federal

Government on a way forward for

the Disability Insurance Scheme and yesterday's COAG meeting

both states refused to get on

board in the national launch

without more Federal money.

Foreign Minister Bob Carr is

accusing the Opposition Leader

Tony Abbott of making

dangerously dumb comments about

Chinese investment on a visit

to Beijing Mr Abbott said it

would rarely be in the national

interest to allow a foreign

Government to control an

Australian business. And

Australia's Chef d'Mission Nick

Green has been laying down the

law to Olympians who grumble in

public. Mr Green says if

athletes do not want to be part

of the team they should talk of the team they should talk to

him otherwise get on with their job. New figures show the British economy is still in

recession. Growth fell by 0.7%

between April and June. A much

sharper decline than expected

and the third quarter in a row

the economy has shrunk. These

are obviously very disappointing figures and they

show the extent of the economic

difficulties that we're

grappling with, not least the

situation right across the Eurozone where our neighbours

are also really struggling so

it's vitally important we

redouble all our efforts to get

on top of our debts, deal with

our deficit, get our economy

moving. US Treasury secretary

Timothy Geithner says he'd warned British authorities

about problems with the LIBOR

interbank lending rate in

2008. He told a Congress

committee he alerted

appropriate authorities Earlary

on to stop fraudulent manipulation of that interest

ratech. I felt that we did the important and fully appropriate

thing which is to bring the

attention not just to the

people in Washington but to the

British - not just the reports

and concerns broadly dealt with

in the market in the public

domain but also of the range of

problems in the way the rate

was designed that created the vulnerability. We brought those concerns to their attention and

we felt - and I still believe

this - that it was really going to

to be on them to take responsibility for responsibility for fixing

this. Timothy Geithner thru.

Now let's get to the markets.

Amy's coming up to talk about

sport and speak to Andrew Hoy,

our veteran Olympic athlete.

Things are hotting up. We'll

hear from Vanessa O'Hanlon

later. London has experienced

its hottest day, I'm not sure

if it's this year or this

summer, but they're sweltering

in had heat. It's all relative compared to the Australian

heat. Compared to the 12 degrees and misserability

weather they'd been having,

this a bright spot. Let's hope

it continues. And let's hope

Australian athletes are

showered with gold medals. Amy

joins us now for sport.

Starting at home before we head

to London and speak to Andrew

Hoy. In the NRL, Greg Inglis

has been suspended for three

matches after having his dangerous contact charge

downgrade at the NRL judiciary

last night. The Rabbitohs

fullback risked a 5-match ban

by challenging his shot on Dean

Young that left had him

unconscience tious. After the

hearing, the charge was lowered

to a grade throw. Inglis teat

twooeted it was an unlucky

result but admitted three weeks

was better than 5. Hawthorn

coach Alistair Clarkson has

been suspened from officiating

in his son's junior Football

League for four weeks for

swearing. In a special hearing

last night Clarkson pleaded

guilty to using abusive,

insulting or obscene language.

It came after he confronted a

19-year-old official in a match

at east Bentley. The code of conduct applies to all

individuals despite their

external standing. Clarkson

will also have to write a

letter of apology. Two daze out

from the start of the London

Olympic Games, 9 track and field athletes have been

suspended for doping. Moroccan

1500m runner Mariem Alaoui

Selsousi has been provisionally

suspended after testing

positive for a diuretic at a

Diamond League meet earlier

this month. The international

association of athletics

federations says it's uncovered

sophisticated doping cases,

some involve synthetic

testosterone and human growth

hormone. Three athletes were

suspended following retesting

of tests taken at last year's championships in South Korea. Australia's Chef d'Mission

appears to be losing patience

with some disgruntled athletes

on our Olympic team. John

Steffensen has reportedly

considered a boycott of the

4x400m relay after selection of

team-mate Steven Solomon to run

in the individual event. Now

Josh Ros has told Fairfax media he's considering withdraw over

a lack of explanation from

officials for not being put

forward for the event. Chef

d'Mission Nick Green has had

thf. It is an honour to

represent this country in the

Olympic Games. If any athlete

doesn't want to be participate

of the team I'll have that conversation with them. My

suggestion would be to get into

the village and concentrate on

your job, to run and compete

for this country. Nick Green,

Australia's Chef d'Mission.

Gee, he's had his work cut out

for him in the leadup to these

Olympics. I guess we call them

dummy spits by athletes. John

Steffensen is never a stranger

to controversy. He's had enough

this time around and he's lap happy to have that conversation

with him if they don't want to

compete. I don't remember it

being this bad in previous

Olympics. He seems to be

stumbling over lots of issues.

Maybe he's new at this, fairly

green at the job. Nick Green's

green. I like that. With the

athletes it is very

self-indulge nt. In some ways

but one of the difficulties is

athlet Ics Australia came out

in the leadup to the games and

said, "We're not going to take

any athletes unless they run an

A qualifying time," which is

the golden benchmark and then

there's another B qualifying

time for athletes from less

advantaged countries who can

make that mark and still race

then you run through a heats

process, make a semi and then a

final and then natural attrition anyway but on top of

that, whether you run an A or B

there's what's called a discretion ary policy which

means it's up to which ever

sport it is to make a

discretionary decision. The

young chap picked for the 400m

running ahead of John

Steffensen, they've looked at

him and said, "He's 19 years

old and has lot of potential

and we thing he'd experience

from going to the Games like

this." You can't discount that.

I guess it's the discretionary

nature of that and picking some

athletes ahead of other. Nick

Green has also bought into the

controversy of Leisel Jones. Newspapers running pictures of

her and basically calling her

fat. This is what Nick Green

said about that. Firstly, I

just want to make some comments

on the articles in regards to

Leisel Jones that were done

overnight. I think they're

disgraceful to be honest. I'm

disappoint would the article

and I think they're extremely

unfair on Leisel Jones and the

work she's done for this

country at this level. Nick

Green there and it was very

disappointing. We did tog about

this. Interestingly in the

world of social media, some

swimmers took to Twitter. With

a ferocious response, defend

ing Leisel Jones And Cathy

Freeman saying was un-Australian. Hayley Lewis as

well and Lisa Curry. And you

wereself will weigh in on the

ABC The Drum website. Yes, I

wrote a piece about gender in

sport and the Olympics. That

will be post later this

morning. Andrew Hoy is an

Australian equestrian rider

competing at his 7th Games,

also a triple gold medal winner. It's my great pleasure

for him to join us now from

Olympic Park. Andrew Hoy,

thanks so much for being there.

Congratulations on your seventh

Olympic Games. Thank you.

Competition is yet to start so

I've got to prove at 7. That's

right. The equestrian team

really hasn't had the ideal

leadup. There's been quite a

bit of disruption. Are things

calming down now you've got

your new member? Yes,

obviously very disappointing

that Shane Rose was out but

Megan Jones has come in and

she's a strong competitor the same as the

same as the other members in

the team. Going to more pointy

issues, does Nick Green, our

Chef d'Mission, have a point? Should athletes, in

particularly some of our track

and field athletes who've been

in the headlines, should they be pulling their head in and

being happier to be in London?

I really don't know what's been

happening with other athletes

because I've been so focused on

what I'm doing and I haven't

been listening to the radio or

the television and reading the

newspapers as to what's

happening in Australia so I

can't comment. Have you heard

the news about Leisel Jones and

her treatment in the media and

the questions being raised

about her fitness? No, I

haven't. Andrew Hoy, it sounds

as though your preparations - it sounds like you're in a bit

of a bubble. Talk us through

what your preparations are like

if you're managing to block out some of these more controversial elements in the

leadup to the Games. The one

thing I've always been very

clear with my preparation is to

really just focus on what I'm

doing and I can't change

anything else of what anyone

else is doing but I can change

what I do so for me the preparation has been really

good. We went into a training

camp on 17 July and then moved

into the Olympic village on the

23rd so the preparation

throughout that time with my

horse has been excellent and

competition starts very soon.

We have the very first phase of

that on the 27th and then 28th

and 29th, we have two days of dressage. At this moment in

time it's not been decided the

running order of had five

members of our team so that's

going to discussed in the next

day or so and then once the

first phase is over, which is

where have the a horse

inspection where the team then

has to state the running order,

we will then find out probably

just before that obviously. Do

you think it's easier for

somebody like you who's now

facing your 7th Olympic Games,

is it easier for you to block

out all the goings-on in the

village, all the goings-on in

the rest of the Australian team

and focus on the job at hand?

Over the passage of time, are

you finding that's something

that's become more natural to

you? Yes and it's are been - I

believe any athlete who is

successful and wanting to

compete at that very top level,

they have to just focus on

their own performance and their

own goals and if you start

worrying what about other

athletes and what other

performances there are out

there, you miss your own

performance. Some of the

athletes I guess have been

raising grievances though about

qualifying for these Games and

the fact that some of our

sprinters have run B qualifying

timestism must be very

difficult for them to focus on

running in a relay when they

feel there's been some sort of

mistreatment of the actual

selection process. Look,

obviously for any athlete we

all feel that if we've had good

performances we all feel we

should be worthy of a spot but

the thing with any team, there

is limited number of places to

represent your country and so

in our particular sport it's

five members to the team and

there are many athletes out

there wanting to be in the team

and I think if you went and

asked so many individuals they

would say, "I'm worthy of being in the team," but at the end of

the day it's the selector's

decision and we superto accept

that. We can't change it. If

you're not in you're not in.

It's like I was not in for

selection - I was not selected

for the Beijing Olympics. I

felt I was worthy but in the

end I had to put myself in a

situation that I would get into the team. There's only one way

to do that and that's with your

performances. Given you've

been through that and you

didn't compete in Beijing, what

advice would you have to those

athletes who are struggling

with their selection grievances

at the moment? Look, life goes

on. There is life after the

Olympics and we all have to

take the highs and the lows in

any sport. There is a saying

that's been around for a long

time - when the going gets

tough, the tough get going. If

you're not selected and you

feel you're worthy of it, in

the following years you have to

put yourself in the situation

that there is no question as to

whether you're in or

out. Andrew Hoy y know you say

you haven't been paying

attention to the media, there has been some discussion about

a woman being the flag bearer

for the Opening Ceremony. What

do you think? Would you like

to see a woman carrying the

Australian flag? Look, for me,

male or female carrying the orp

flag, it makes no difference.

There are many athletes who are

worthy of carrying the flag so

it's a decision that is made by

the Australian Olympic

committee and it's not something that you can train

for and it's just an honour

that you are given to carry the

flag and so I don't have an

opinion as to whether it should

be male or female. Just finally

y know it's getting pretty hot

over there. Nothing I guess

your horses are nl used to, but

what do you do over the next

couple of days in preparation

to keep the calmness among the

team and make sure the heat

doesn't get to you all? I

think the important thing is

not to over-train at this point

in time. You need to - for me

and my horse, it's just

important that I focus on the technical skills and the fitness is already there. You

are not going to improve your

fitness with two days running

into a competition. It's your

technical skills that will

actually win you a

medal. Andrew Hoy, we wish you

the very best of luck and

congratulations once again on

making your seventh Olympic

team. Thank you. Andrew Hoy,

our champion equestrian rider

there. Some sage advice for

those who missed out this year

or are going through their own grievances. Your performance

will speak louder than anything

else. ABC News Breakfast can

be watched live on the web.

Just go to the main ABC News

website and you'll find a link

to news 24 which is streamed

live every day. Let's check

out the weather. First,

Vanessa, you have spectacular

images from China? I certainly

have. These images come after

days of rain. Tourists are

flocking to the north of the

country to see multiple

waterfalls that have merged

into the water fp fall of the

Yellow River. The waterfalls

are so close to each other that

they appear to be connected for

several hundreds of metres.

Back home, we've got a number of cold fronts marching over

the southeast this morning.

There's lot of activity in the

southeast corner, producing a cold wintery blast with showers

and isolated thunderstorms and

possible nofalls of 15 to 25cm into the knked with this

weather pattern it will

continue through to Sunday.

This morning there's a front

causing showery winds in SA,

another front and low are

affecting Victoria inland to

NSW and northern Tasmania but

in the west there is a high dominating at the moment,

bringing cold mornings.

Yesterday was the coldest

morning since July 2010 and

onshore winds along the south

coast. The next cold front is

due on Tuesday in the west but

here is where the rain is

falling today. Overnight we've

seen rainfalls around 17mm at

Perisher valley, 5 in

Melbourne, 3 in Adelaide,

nearly 20s ibsome suburbs and

2mm in Canberra. You're watching ABC News Breakfast. Thanks for your

company. Still to come, RN

presenter Jonathan Green joins

us on the coach to look at the

day's newspapers. Can

Government subsidies save the struggling car industry inwe'll

talk to the manufacturing union

to get its view. And just what

is the future for the

Disability Insurance Scheme?

The bigger states are refusing

to sign up to the plan so is it

doomed? We'll find out what

the disability discrimination

commissioner thinks a bit later

on and just a hint, he's not

happy. First the news with Bev. Leading the news remains

that big story that Victoria

and NSW will possibly seek

further meetings with the

Federal Government on a way

forward for that Disability

Insurance Scheme. At

yesterday's COAG meeting both states refused to get involved in the national launch without

thyr Federal money. SA,

Tasmania, the ACT have agreed

to host launch

sites. Australia's Chef

d'Mission, Nick Green, has been

laying down the law to

Olympians who grumble in

public. He was speak after

reports athletes John Steffensen and Josh Ross were

unhappy with team selection

decisions and were considering

pulling out. Mr Green says if athletes don't want to be part

of the team they should talk to

him. A strike that threatened

to disrupt travel into Britain

on the eve of the Olympics has

been called off. British border

guards have reached a deal with

the Government on what's

expected to be one of

Heathrow's busiest days.

Thousands of Syrian troops are

heading to Aleppo to join the

battle against Government

forces. A survey by the union

responsible for aircraft engineers has found an

extremely high level of

dissatisfaction among Qantas

workers. The poll of almost

3,000 employees suggest they have little faith in their

management. The airline says

the survey is not an accurate

reflection of Qantas's 30,000

workers. More now in our top story and the Prime Minister

says she's disappointed the

biggest states did not agree to

the trial of the National Disability Insurance Scheme. Julia Gillard says the states

have been asked to pay their

fair share. Budgets are about

choices and what you value and

if you put your hand on your

heart and say, "I value having

a national Disability Insurance

Scheme," you've got to take the

tough choices in your Budget to

make that happen. We did that

in the last Federal Budget

where we had $35 billion worth

of savings, we put together a

billion dollars worth of money

for launch sites around the

country. That wasn't easy to do

but it was our way of saying

this isso important we're going

to do the tough things to make

it possible. The Premier of

NSW, a big, strong State, the

Premier of Victoria, a big,

strong State wouldn't do it.

What Barry O'Farrell was asked

for today was $70 million of

new money over three years.

That's on the whole NSW Budget.

What Premier ballue was asked for was around 40 whilst they

say they value being involved

in a National Disability

Insurance Scheme and having a

launch site, they wouldn't put

forward those relatively small

amounts of money to get it done

for their people in their

States. Julia Gillard, the

Prime Minister. Now Foreign

Minister Bob Carr has described comment by the Opposition

Leader on Chinese investment as

dangerously dumb. Tony Abbott

said yesterday that forcing Governments, foreign

Governments, should rarely own

or control Australian

companies. Mr Carr says those comments are dangerously

advringsarial. It just

disturbs me that he is striking

in three or four of the things

he said about China what can

only be seen and which will be

seen by them y think, as an adversarial approach with China

and I didn't think the that is reckless. I

reckless. I think it is really dangerously dumb for this

country's interests. He's

moving towards a blanket prohibition on Chinese

investment by State-owned

companies. That is crazy.

You've got farm communities of

Australia that are guaranteed

prosperity because Chinese a

urbanisation is seeing people

buy their foodstuff from supermarkets stocked with

Australian produce. You've got

5,000 mining jobs in Australia

directly dependent on Chinese

investment. You've got one iron

ore project in WA jointly owned

by Australians and a Chinese

entity that was set up by Prime

Minister Bob Hawke and his

Chinese counterpart 20 years

gow - ago. The Chinese buy half

their iron ore from Australia, encouraged by the fact that

they, like the Japanese before

them, are able to buy shares in

those mines. Take what you said

on China, this adversarial tone

towards China, and you take

what he said about Indonesia, sending the boats back, which

would be guaranteed in his first week as Prime Minister f

he's elected too, produce a

crisis in our relations with

our nearest, most important

neighbour. And you take what he

said about the Anglosphere, now

taken together, this would send

the message to the world under

an Abbott Government that somehow Australia is retreating to

to its old certainties of the 1950s. Foreign Minister Bob

Carr there. Now back home, a

survey conducted by the union

responsible for aircraft

engineers has found an extremely high level of

dissatisfaction among Qantas

workers. Almost 3,000 airline

employ as were cessioned. If

found they had little faith in

the airline's management and

its board. Steve Purvinas,

national secretary of the

licensed aircraft engineers,

says those surveyed think the

company is on the slide. The

direction the airline is going

in is something that nearly all

staff oppose and think the

airline and the group of

companies will be worse in 12

Ming time. For example, only 4%

of Qantas engineers think

senior management are taking

the airline in the right

direction and only 43% of Qantas managers think Qantas

management is taking the

company in the right direction.

This isn't a war between our union or their unions and Qantas, this survey was a

snapshot of the entire industry

in our kunl scpry it shows

clearly that Qantas are leaps

and bounds behind every other

airline when it comes to the effort that the staff are

willing to put in or the

consideration that they have

for the direction being give

bine their senior management

teams. Steve Purvinas. Now

Qantas has released a statement

in response to that union

survey. Lets look at what the airline's saying this morning.

Let's go to the United States

where despite a barrage of

attack ads, national opinion

polls show Mitt Romney and

Barack Obama in a virtual dead

heat in the race for the

presidency. A new poll shows

most voters view Mitt Romney's

business background as a

strength but find Barack Obama

more likable. Thave aralso

been mounting calls within

Republican ranks for the Romney

camp to do more to make their

man more transparent andern

personable. Craig McMurtrie

reports. He ran unsuccessfully

for the Senate, managed a

winter Olympics, was governor

of Massachusetts and this is

his second tilt at the

presidency. Yet Mitt Romney

remains a mystery to most

Americans. We want to make

America more like America, with

conviction that freedom is

right. He's been dubbed the

Tin Man, aloof, distant,

awkward, a strait-laced 65-year-old gift for comedians. Mitt Romney has

gotten this reputation as a guy

who can't identify with the

common man no matter how hard

he fires them. (LAUGHTER) I

drive A Mustang and a shvey

pickup truck. Anne drives a

couple of Cadillacs. I'm not

sure about these cookies, they

came from the local 7/11

bakery. Morning, yaul. I

started this morning with a

biscuit and cheesy grits. I'm

learning to say yaul and I like grits and strange things are

happening to me. Possibly one

of the shortcomings of his

campaign so far is he's chosen

to not voluntarily reveal more

about himself. Ron Scott comes

from Salt Lake City and like

Mitt Romney s a Mormon. His

family has known the Romney

family for years. As a church

lead here was good at relating

to people. He may have been

mechanical in that in some

areas. The veteran journalist

says he has a lot of time for

the presumptive Republican

nominee. He's convinced that

Mitt Romney has to let go of

his famous reserve to make

himself more real to ordinary Americans. The Tin Man

reference came from a leading

businessman here in Boston who

was talking about the fact that

he lacked hard or seemed to

lack heart, did want have the

kind of human empathy it would

take to run for office. Willet

Mitt Romney had a privileged up

bringing, tyBeded Mormon

university, was a missionary in

France, went to Harvard

business school remember married

married his school sweetheart

and by his mid 30s had become a

bishop in Hinze church. The

Obama campaigners targeted his

over seas bank accounts and his

record at Bane accuse him of

sending jobs off shore. Famous

for his cool analytical

approach, he's also come under

fire from his own side for

refusing to release more of his

tax records. There's obviously

something there that

compromises what he's said in

the past about something but I

think the bigger thing is it's

arrogance. For frustrated

Romney supporters like Ron

Scott, he remains the hidden

man. Can he be elected if he

doesn't let the real Mitt

Romney emerge in No. He

cannot. Inwant to see the real

Mitt emerge. I don't think I've

seen it yet and I'm hoping it

will. And if it does, the

long-time Romney observer

predicts a photo finish this

November. Craig McMurtrie

reporting there. The real

problem for the Republican

kanled sdt I don't think

there's a real Mitt. What you

see is what you get and there's

no ability there. Mistakes and

all. Yes. Flick the switch to

vaudeville or whatever, he's

going to stay what he's always

been and try to win the presidency that way. Still, going to be a very tight

contest indeed. You're watching

ABC News Breakfast. The top

stories - Victoria and NSW will

today seek further meetings with the Federal Government on

way forward for the national

Disability Insurance Scheme. At

yesterday's COAG meeting, both states refused to get involved

in the national launch without

more Federal money. Foreign Minister Bob Carr has accused

the Opposition Leader Tony

Abbott of making dangerously dumb comments about Chinese investment. On a visit to

Beijing, Mr Abbott said it

would rarely be in the national

interest to allow a foreign

Government to control an

Australian business. And Australia's Chef d'Mission Nick Green has been laying down the

law to Olympians who whinge in

public. Mr Green says if athletes don't want to be part

of the team they should talk to

him otherwise they should get

on with their job.

Getting on with the job is

Jonathan Green who joins us to

take a look at the national

papers. Good morning, Sir.

Getting on with it. Why not?

Straight to the disability

insurance scheme and you've fossicked away in the 'Herald

Sun'? There's lot on this

today and depending on which

paper you read, this either the

Federal Government or Prime

Minister's failure to bring

home a deal or the intransigence of the key State

Governments in NSW and

Victoria. 'Herald Sun',

slightly nuanced take here in

their editorial. They say of course the victims, the tragedy here are disabled people and

their carers and make a deal is

what this editorial says. The

interesting part in this

editorial though is it says - and this perhaps goes to what

the states are anxious about -

that the amounts they're

wanting to - being asked to

commit now are small but the

event ual cost of the scheme is

very large. The editorial

points out that for Victoria,

for example, the eventual costs

of the scheme could be double

what they now contribute to

this area in funding which is

another way of saying that

perhaps the State's put in half

what they should. This is very

much a proxy debate before the

full scheme, the mump more expensive scheme, is rolled

out. It makes the states look

fairly intransigent right now.

That's a big sticking point that the Commonwealth

underwrites this no matter what

happens and how it might blow out. It's a tough political

thing for all parties here

because I think the justice of

the cause is outerly self-affidavit. We've got a lot

to rip through. Let's rip. Or

let's zip. Tony Abbott has

been attracting a bit of

coverage this morning. He has

and Jennifer Hewitt does a good

column on the second page of the Australian 'Financial

Review'. These are his comments

both on political - the

political direction, wanting

more political liberty in China

which Mr Abbott has said in his

visit, and also the comments on

overseas investment which is

playing to his National Party

constituency but is causing

considerable anxiety. China is

our biggest trading partner.

The stuff he's saying, as

Jennifer Hewitt points out, to

what end is he saying these

thicks and? The end does not

seem to be coherently political

or in necessarily the national

interest. It's Tony Abbott

sticking to his guns and being

a conviction politician on

thing he's thinks are of

particular significance which

would be Democratic freed

examine no State-owned

enterprises running businesses

but now that plays in the real

world of trade and politics -

when you've got Craig Emerson

saying you're dangerous and

stupid - de Did he say it or

sing it? Indeed. Do you not

think Abbott was playing a

little bit into domestic

politics in terms of ramming

home that fear that is among

lot of people- This is what

Wayne Swan said yesterday, he's

now got foreign policy run by

Barnaby Joyce, that of course within particularly rural

communities there's anxiety

about own ship although as Bill

Shorten points out, 6% of

Australian farms are over

seas-owned. It ain't huge.

'The Australian' looks at the

issue of faith in Australia.

This is digging into the

This is digging into the census data. Hasn't that been a rich

mine of information? It always

is. Week after week. The

enclaves, religious enclaves

around the country. Places like

Wadeye for example in the

Northern Territory, 92%

Catholic, Lakemba in NSW, 57%

of people there are of the

Muslim faith. Areas around the

country are very, very focused on particular religious and

consequently, I think, ethnic

identities, but it really

suggests that, yes, we have

really close sort of tribal gatherings around the

country. Media plans, again

this is on the 41 page of the

Fin Review. Our democracy's

under threat. According to the

Business Council of Australia's

Tony Shepherd. He throws this

forward. We know that the

Federal Government wants to

potentially regulate media

businesses. He's saying that

this could be just the thin end

of the wedge, that any business

with a public interest

dimension may be liable to the

same sort of regulation. This

is not pleasing the business Council. They're not pleased

about lot of things. They're grurchly. They're grumpy in

small doses. They rarely come

out and swing the bat. They

time their attacks. Tony

Shepherd today has done a big

opinion piece in the AFR

arguing that case. That

continues to roll on. I think

all the big media players are

having their say on that and

are not happy. I notice that

the article about Julia Gillard

writing to them trying to back

away from this has dis

appeared. We're not sure if

that was accurate or not or if

she trying to quickly avoid

that fight. Her communications

Minister seems keen. Very

keen. We haven't heard much

from Senator Conroy though which probably says a lot.

There's a bit of tension there

I suspect. Lets gore to Leisel

Jones. Let's preface this

conversation - we're all aware

by now of those photos which

ran in newspapers yesterday

which essentially implied

Leisel Jones was fat. And

certainly out of form. And may

not win medals. This is what

Nick Green, the Chef d'Mission,

said overnight. Firstly I want

to make some comments on the

art klsz in regards to Leisel

Jones that - the articles in

regards to Leisel Jones that

were done overnight. I thing

they're dis grace ful to be honest. I'm disappointed with

the article and I think they're

extremely unfair on Leisel

Jones and the work sheer done

for this country at this level.

That was Nick Green of course

the Chef d'Mission and his

sentiment was ecoafed widely

and resoundingly. It was

really interesting yesterday.

It was the Fairfax papers that

let off at this. Today we have

the inevitable day two story,

pictures of Leisel in a far

more flattering swimsuit and in

fine shape. I think you knew

yesterday when you saw those

stories that there would be a

day two run on this in which we would

would be reassured Leisel was a

great swim were a great

pedigree and would be there

doing her darnedest but it's

provoked extraordinary

discussion. Fairfax are kind of

sticking to their guns today while going back on the

everyone thinks she's in fine

shape, also saying it's

legitimate to question whether

an athlete's at the peak of

their preparation. It's not

necessarily a fat thing, it's-

Especially in this forum, the

peak athletic forum in the

world. And a lot of people

have spent lots of time getting

to this point so it's a

legitimate thing to question.

Also, I have to say it Also, I have to say it always happens with the girls and

never the boys. Merv Hughes.

Nothing had to be said about

that. Maybe the whole cricket

team needed to look at

themselves in those days. I

think we might have discussed this yesterday. Thorpie was a

bit out of shape when he was

making his comeback. Grant

Hackett carried a bit. He's

carrying something else at the

moment. We won't go into that.

They float better, I think, the

swimmers. Have you ever seen a

fat whale? No, sorry, who said

that? I didn't hear a thing.

Amy Bainbridge joins us now and

it's certainly this controversy

has kicked into a second day.

I think it's the treatment of

the story that really is the

most disappointing aspect. Yes,

there were questions about

Thorpie when he came back but

he did want get a gallery

online of the most flattering

pictures and that's the

difference here, who gets

treated which way and it's

legitimate to bow questioning

the fitness of our athletes when they are on

taxpayer-funded dollars going

over there. But how you treat

it and there's no need for

putting a double-page stred in

a tabloid newspaper. And look

at the times she's doing, look

alt the fact she's qualified.

And I don't know it's not a

story of someone who's grown up

from being a highly strung

teenager to a woman who's

relaxed and enjoying the

preparations and swimming

really fast at the moment.

We'll look at the rest of sport today and Australia's Chef

d'Mission appears to be losing

his patience with some of the

other athletes on our Olympic

team. Nick Green says if those

athletes don't want to be part

of the team he's happy to speak

to them. He's speaking about

John Steffensen who's

reportedly thinning of a

boycott over the 4x400m relay after John Solomon was selected

to run the event. Josh Ross

says he's considering

withdrawing over a lack of

explanation over why he wasn't chosen for the individual

event. Nine track and field athletes have been suspended

for doping two days from the

start of the London Games.

Moroccan 1500m runner Mariem Alaoui Selsousi has been

provisionally suspended after

testing positive to a diuretic at a Diamond League meet

earlier this month. The

international association of

athletics federations says it's

uncovered sophisticated doping

cases, some involve synthetic

testosterone and human growth

hormone. South Sydney's Greg

Inglis has been suspended for

three matches. He risked a

5-match ban by challenging the

grading of his high shot on the

Dragons Dean Young which left

him unconscious. The panel

lowered the charge from a great

5 to a 3. Inglis admitted three

weeks was better than five.

Hawthorn coach Alistair Clarkson has been suspended

from officiating in his son's junior Football League for 4

weeks for swearing. Last night

Clarkson pleaded guilty to

using abusive, insulting or obscene languagetism came after

he confronted a 19-year-old

official at an under 9s match.

That's his 8-year-old son.

Disgrace. Thank you. Vanessa's

here with the weather now.

Today' satellite - cloudy with

showers and alpine snow across

NSW, eastern Victoria huedof a

cold front and another front is

generating cold winds over SA

and western Victoria. Until Sunday, further fronts will pass over the southeast

maintaining showers and snow

and a high is giving the west a

couple of cold morning and

directing onshore winds along

parts of the south coast. The

next cold front is due on

Tuesday. This

Program Is Captioned Live. On

the eve of the Olympics,

Australia's athletes are warned

to stop whinging and get on

with the job. Absolute honour

to represent this country at

the Games and if athletes feel

that they - any athlete feels

they don't want to be part of

this team and the honour of

represent