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ABC News Breakfast -

View in ParlView

(generated from captions) President Obama heads to

Colorado to help the victims

mourn. Hemingway said, the

world breaks us all, but

afterward we're stronger in the broken places. This Program is Captioned Live. is Captioned Live. Syrian

forces bombard Damascus and

Aleppo to try to take back

rebel-held areas. A new warning

tore Australia's economy - we

can't relie on the mining boom

to keep the butt jet in

surplus. And oh so close - Adam

Scott misses out on the British

Open. Good morning, it's

Monday, 23rd July. I'm Michael Rowland. And I'm Beverley

O'Connor. The top story on ABC News Breakfast - President

Obama is on his way to Aurora, Colorado, to pay his respects

to the victims of Friday's

cinema mass shooting. A girl of

6 was among the 50 injured when

a gunman opened fire at the

opening of the new Batman film.

24-year-old James Holmes is

expected to front court

today. The Governor says his

State is still coming to terms

with the shooting. The world breaks us all, but breaks us all, but afterward

we're stronger in the broken

places. That's what we heard in the hospitals yesterday - we

went to many hospitals and

visited many of the families

and victims and there was a

buoyan say, already a re-sill

yency, people were not going to

let this define their life,

they were going to fight back. North America

correspondent Jane Cowan joins

us now from Denver. Jane,

President Obama due to touch

down in over an hour or so.

What will he be doing on his

visit? Bev, he is visiting. It

is designed to be a fairly

low-key visit. Le be on the

ground for only two and a half

hours. He won't be attending a

public vigil, a prayer vigil

planned here for tonight. Le be

meeting privately with families

who have lost loved ones in

this shooting and meeting with local leaders. Really he is

following in the footsteps of

so many other presidents now

who have had to respond to shootings that unfortunately

have become such a part of

American life. Remember, George

W. Bush went to Virginia tech

and Bill Clinton visited

Colombine after that shooting.

And psychologists say that this

kind of thing, having the

leader in the role of

consoler-in-chief actually can

help. It allows the President

to kind of put his arms around

the nation as it grieves and it

is said that that does good

because the officer - because

the office of the President can

transcend that. I'm sure the

community also want to know

why, what was the motivation

behind this young man. Is any

more emerging as to what his

motivation was? Beverley, still

not a lot is known about this

accused shooter. He is being

held in jail here, apart from

other prisoners because of the high-profile nature of this

case. He is said not to be

cooperating with investigators

now after not resisting the

original arrest. Police are

saying that they have managed

now to retrieve a computer from

his apartment now that they've

been able to get into it disit was disarmed of all those

explosives and they're hoping

that that computer might be

able to shed some light on that

motive and also how he managed

to learn to booby trap his

apartment in such a

sophisticated fashion. Still,

many, many more questions than

answers about how this fellow

who was originally a

high-achieving student, who

graduated with honours, was

pursuing a doctorate in

neuroscience, how he could be

accused of bombing his

apartment, and killing 12

people. Neighbours are telling

the story of someone who very

much kept to himself. They say

sometimes they saw a strange

purple light from his

apartment. Sometimes neighbours

sauce his windows covered with newspaper, but they're saying

that there was really no sign

that they could tell that this

was going to happen. He is

being described as someone who

was as vanilla as a glass of

virtually no impression on the water, someone who made

people that met him. He was

interestingly, by one account,

pursuing a subject before he

dropped out that went to the

originals - the genetic

originals of mental illness,

but really this all remains still very much a

mystery. Jane, when you look

back at the history of these

kinds of massacres, these

tragedies, so many are in the

United States. Does at any

point the gun debate move any

further. Do the community look

at this issue as a real

significant way of trying to

lessen these kinds of incidents? Look, this is the

thing, isn't it? Always after

these shootings there are calls

for tighter gun control, but

gun rights in this country are

enshrined in the Constitution

and there is the powerful gun

lobby that really strong arely

resists any attempt to wind

back those rights. So the usual

calls are being heard now. It

is reactivating that whole gun

debate, but it is also

activating a debate about

mental illness, too, because

you do have the suggestion that

the suspects said to police

when he was arrested that he

was The Joker, that he had died

his hair orange, and so there

is some discussion about how

society can better recognise people who might be going off

the rails. There is also a

suggestion that his grades had

gone downhill rapidly in the

year leading up to the attack.

It is the gun debate, but also

mental illness. Jane Cowan in

Denver, thanks for your time.

Now to Michael with the rest of

the day's news Norway has been

remembering its own mass

shooting tragedy one year on.

Services have been held at the

sites where 77 people died in gun and bomb attacks in Oslo

and on the island of Utoya. Norway's king and Prime

Minister laid wreaths to honour

the lives of the victims. Anders Behring Breivik who carried out the attacks is

still on trial. Syria's army

has stepped up its campaign to

drive rebel forces out of the capital, Damascus. Troops

backed by helicopters have

reportedly launched a renewed

assault in several rebel-held

continuing in the large suburbs. Fighting is also

northern city of Aleppo where

rebels have taken over several quarters. Their local commander is vowing to liberate that

city. The Government has been

warned not to relie on the

mining boom to keep the Federal

Budget in surplus. A Deloitte Access Economics report says

the boom is about it peak and a

slowdown is inevitable . It

also predicting falling mineral

prices, housing sector slump

and sluggish financial markets

will lead to a drop in

government revenue. The

national Climate Commission

releases its latest report

today warning that extreme

weather events like bushfires

will become much more frequent

in Victoria. The remember says

the number of days hotter than

35 degrees in Melbourne has

risen over 10 years and will

continue to rise. It says solar

power could meet Victoria's

energy needs twice over, but the potential for renewable

energy is being held back by

political uncertainty. The heaviest rain storms to hit

China in 60 years have left

tens of thousands homeless.

Flash flooding in the capital,

Beijing, has killed at least 10

people. Hundreds of airport

flights are been cancelled,

leaving travellers stranded.

Residents have been warned to

prepare more for - for more bad

weather to come. India has a

new President. Pranab Mukherjee

has been elected. Mr Mukherjee

is a political veteran from the

Congress party which leads the

current coalition government.

Now the position is largely

ceremonial, but he is expected

to take a much more active role

than his predecessor. Now more

to that situation in sir where

the country's army has stepped

up its campaign to drive the

rebels out of Damascus.

Fighting also continues in

Aleppo where rebels have taken

over several quarters. Al

Jazeera's Jane Ferguson

reports. A government fighting

for survival. In the heart of

the capital, shelling has been

stepped up. These images appear

to show the effects. Those

inside Damascus say the battle

for control is ferocious This

is the first time Damascus has

ever witnessed such a fierce

shell ing. This is the first

time ever here. Helicopters are

increasingly patrolling the

skies over Damascus. Free

Syrian Army fighters have also

been pushed back to the suburbs where activists say government

troops have arrived in full

force. Almost 15 tanks have

arrived and a big, big number

of soldiers using military,

pick-up trucks. They're now

arresting people and this is

something new - they're use ing

laptops to check all the

people. They used to only have

paper lists but now they're

using laptops. Serious

strategic commercial centre in

Aleppo. The fight for Aleppo is

a crucial one and rebels are

digging in around the city.

President Assad appears on

state TV on Saturday, meeting

his new Chief of Staff. The

station has also been showing

images of dead rebel fighters

on the streets, and images of

government military might. But

as battles continue across the country, the government knows

it must keep hold of Damascus

and Aleppo to stand any chance

of surviving. The Government

has been warned not to relie on

the mining boom to keep the

national Budget is in

surplus. A report has found the

mining boom is about to peak

and a slowdown is inevitable. Melissa Clarke joins us from

Canberra. Welcome back. This

report paints a very grim

picture for that treasured

Budget surplus? It certainly

does. It warns that although

there are a lot of positive

economic parameters for

Australia and Australia's

economic growth is good, the

unemployment rate is low,

Australia is in a much more

enviable situation than other

parts of the world, the fact is

the economic situation today isn't anywhere

isn't anywhere near as good as

it was when Wayne Swan handed

down his Budget in May. There

have been a number of key things that have happened

between now and then that has

Deloitte Access Economics

saying if Wayne Swan were to be

delivering that Budget today it

would be as it stands because

growth in China has slowed and

tax revenue in Australia has

slowed. The share market hasn't

been doing too well. House

prices have been falling over

the last 18 months, prices for

coal and iron ore are down and

that means Australia's budget

position isn't as strong as it

was on even the relatively high

Australian dollar isn't enough

to counter act those falling

tax revenues. So overall they're saying Australia's economic picture is a glass half-full, still a very good

situation here, but given how

determined the Government is to

try to get the Budget into

surplus, as things stand as

they are at the moment, they

will need to make more cuts or

shuffle more of their spending

around if they are to keep that

prol miss of getting $1.5

billion surplus for

2012/13. The report holds out

at least one more interest rate

cut if the economic situation

remains the same as it has been

over the last six months? And

that depends on Europe's growth

remaining steady and China's

growth collapsing. It says it's

heading in the direction of

disaster and that Europe's

moment of truth is coming quite

close, about you if we don't sink into another global

financial crisis, then Deloitte

Access Economics is saying in

its business outlook that there

is likely to be at least one

more rate cut from the Reserve

Bank because underlying

inflation remains very low, and

also that the variable mortgage interest rates are still quite

high, so that there is some

impetus for the Reserve Bank to

still have a further rate cut.

But it also warns not anyone to

expect any further large rate

cuts like we've seen in recent

times of half a percent even in

big chunks. They've made it

clear that Australia's economic situation doesn't really give

room for that, and when we look

where we are in the world it's

more likely we will start

seeing interest rates heading

in the opposite direction as we

get further down the track on

the big proviso that Europe

doesn't come tumbling down and

bringing the world economy into

a crisis. Thank you, Melissa To

the front pages of the major

newspapers around the country

and in the 'Daily Telegraph'

the man suspected of killing 12

people at a Colorado cinema on

the weekend believes he is

acting in a movie and has shown

no remorse. The

ADVERTISEMENT:'S top story, most of the weapons stockpiled

by the 'Dark Knight' gunman

were collected legally via mail

order. In the 'Sydney Morning

Herald', a prominent economic forecaster is predicting the

end of Australia's mining boom

within just two years. The

'West Australian' reports the

State's mining boom is about to

peak. Projects are at risk of being shelved and wage growth

is expected to slow In the

'Financial Review', the

Treasurer will have to make

further budget cuts to deliver

a surplus due to falling

commodity prices. 'The

Australian' says the Federal

Government will introduce

sweeping education reforms and

dramatically increase funding

in response to the independent

gone ski review. 'The Age', -

the Gonski Review 'The Age'

reports police allowed a

notorious paedophile priest to

live out his life in Britain

because detectives didn't think an overseas travel request

would be granted. The 'Herald Sun' reports the family of a

woman buried in the wrong grave fear the bungle could be

repeated after the funeral home

tried to cover up the

incident The in the murk murk p

a Tasmanian Labor senator has

broken ranks with his federal

colleagues over concerns a

large trawler could damage

Tasmania's fish stocks. The

'Courier-Mail' reports green

groups are outraged by new laws

which slash regulations for major developments and give

opponents less time to object

to proposals Who will carry Australia's flag in the Opening

Ceremony? There is a lot of

pressure for the Australian

Olympic Committee to nominate a

female for the very, very high

honour. Natalie Cook who won

gold, one of the girls from the

beach volleyball team is

leading this charge, saying

they will protest if a woman

doesn't get the honour,. Abnah

Meares, Sally Pearson, a lot of

women who would be very

deserving, but it's a funny

time to bring up this

discussion. Who knows, maybe

they would have those ena woman

anyway Yes. It is a tricky one

to put it so frontly and

squarely on the agenda and I'm

not sure it will backfire I

think it will backfire. There

have been at least two female

flag bearers. Raelene Boyle in

1976 - she has been quoted as

saying the whole argument for

having a female flag bearer is

nonsense. She says it should

come down to both merit and

inspiration, but gender, according to Raelene Boyle, one

of the very small number of

Olympians to actually carry the

flags, thee believes what

Natalie Cook and others are

going on about is Po tntionly

harmful to the entire Olympic

effort in London. Let us know

what you think. Send your

emails to:

To the weather around the

country now:

The top stories on ABC News

Breakfast this morning -

President Obama is on his way

to Aurora, Colorado to pay his

respects to victims of

Saturday's mass shooting.

24-year-old James Holmes is

expected to appear in court

later today. Syria's army has

stepped up its campaign to

drive rebel forces out of

Damascus. Fighting also

continues in Aleppo where

rebels have taken over several

quarters. And the Federal

Government has been warned not

to relie on the mining boom to

keep the Budget in surplus. A Deloitte Access Economics

report says the boom is about

to peak and a slowdown is

inevitable. Now, to finance and

the Greek Prime Minister

Antonis Samaras has likened the

country's economic situation to

that of America during the Great Depression. International

lenders are due to arrive in

Athens this week to push for further austerity measures. To

know that Greece is now going

through a crisis unpress

depthed in times of peace uks I

mentioned to you that we are

already in the fifth year of a

recession and all this brings

about bitter memories. You had the Great Depression in the

United States. This is exactly

what we're going through now in

Greece. It's our version of the

Great Depression. Now, let's

have a quick look at how

markets closed on Friday:

To the sport headlines and

we're joined by Amy Bainbridge.

Very good Monday morning to

you. Good morning But not a

good Monday morning for Adam

Scott. No We all felt for

him. Absolutely and devastating

for fans worldwide who were

hoping that Adam Scott would

secure his maiden Open victory,

losing by just one stroke.

Rocky Elsom won the Open after

Scott. Ernie Els won the Open.

Scott was poised for victory as

he maintained with 6 holes to

play, but then the 32-year-old dropped strokes at each of the

last four holes and it allowed

else to slip through and land a

winning 2 under par 68. I'm

very disappointed but I played

so beautifully for most of the

week. I certainly shouldn't let

this bring me down. I feel for

my buddy, Adam Scott. I feel

very fortunate and you're going

to win many of these. You have too much talent. (APPLAUSE) . Very . Very disappointing day there

for Adam Scott. British cyclist

Bradley Wiggins has become the

first Briton to win the Tour de

France. The triple Olympic gold

medallist clinched the coveted

yellow jersey after safely

negotiating the 20th and final

stage of the great race.

Wiggins led team-mate Chris

Froome by 3 minutes and 21

seconds. Cadel Evans finished

7th overall. 100% concentrating

on the leadout for Cav, so

obviously a different focus.

Now I'm just trying to go

through with the flow, getting

pulled left and right and not

realty moment. Congratulations. The Congratulations. The Olympics

your key focus now. Yes, going

for gold No. 4, so I have

to. Later in sport we will

speak to James Bennett who is

at the Champs Elysees. Now to

London where the final week of

Olympic preparations is about

to begin. Our reporter Mary

Gearin is at the Olympic Park.

She joins us now. How are

preparations

going? Preparations are going

very well. As you can tell,

it's coinciding with some clear

skies behind me. I think you

can just see the Olympic

Stadium here, over to this

angle here. It has just started

to be lit up. It's con I sided

with a beautiful break to the

dismal weather they've been

having. It is the start of the

school holidays. The news about

the scandals, staffing problems

and security problems , they've

all just started to fade a

little, so maybe the organiser

also get the break they need.

It is the week before the

Olympics. The tide is turning

and maybe people will start

actually thinking about the

Games. Here's hoping! Great

news about the waegts they are

but not so good news for our

equestrian team. Can you bring

us up to date? Defer stating

news for Shane Rose. He was the

event in competition but fl he

had to pull out because his

horse Taurus had a soft tissue

injury. He agreed with the

vet's say-so on that, but he is absolutely devastated because he chose this horse

specifically for London four

years ago. It takes that long

to actually prepare these

horses T comes also as a really poignant echo of what happened

to him in 1996 when he was

preparing for Atlanta and his

horse then went lame and he had

to pull out. In the meantime

also in 2005 he was actually

hit in the head by a horse and

had to be put into a medically

induced coma and had steel

plates in his head. Things started to look up in Beijing.

He won a silver medal there and

has been going really well ever

since, but Ted came the news

that they had to make this

decision and Shane Rose

explained in a press conference

today just why he can't just

pick up another horse and keep

going. Our horses never get to

see the fences that they jump

until they're on course

competing. We get to look at it

a few days' prior, so they need

absolute faith in me as a rider

to be able to put them in a

position that they can trust

that they will not be hurt, and

the training involved is sort

of like saying, "I would like

to take up hockey. Can I go to

the Olympics tomorrow?" It's

just not realistic, and horses

of this calibre are really hard

to find, and it takes probably

four, five years to train them

to this level. Oh, Shane Rose

there. You really do feel for

him. I guess, Mary, some

happier news, swimmers have

finally joined the camp? Yes,

it's always exciting when the

outfits are being dragged out

and they're grabbing all of

their free clothes, but essentially also for those swimmers, they've come from a

base in Manchester where

they've been in a little bit of

a bubble. They've had their

camp. Now they're joining the

village and it is that real

sense of being part of a team

that's really started to kick

in, particularly for the

debutants, and I had a bit of a chat to Bronte Campbell,

first-time Olympian. Her sister

is alongside her, Cate, who was

in Beijing and won a bronze medal. She is bunking with her,

giving her a little bit of

advice. Let's list tone a bit

of what she had to say. Yes,

it's going to be great. There

are so many things I can do in

front of Cate that I wouldn't

do in public normally, so she

will be a great roomy and I'm

looking forward to T A bit of

an advantage almost over

athletes who don't have their

best friend and sister with them.

Yes, I won't get homesick,

she is part of my home,

bringing my home with me. I

know she hates me deep down

inside and loves me even

deeper, so it's alright. Those

sisters have already become

such stars of our Olympic

campaign, but, Mary, what's happening over the next couple

of days? Well, there will be

more people coming in to get

their outfits as well. Also the

people that we didn't hear from

today in that outfitting were

people like Leisel Jones, James

Magnussen, Eamonn Sullivan,

Stephanie Rice spoke - I don't

think she was supposed to speak

today, but they were trying to

keep those swimmers for a press

conference tomorrow and

apparently there was a hint

that they might actually be

revealing a little bit about

something of the next couple of

days, just a few clues as to

what we can expect, perhaps

even from the oepdz, who

knows? Mary Gearin, thanks for

bringing us up to date. We will

speak to you later on in ABC

News Breakfast. Spaniard

Fernando Alonso has stretched his Formula One Championship

lead to 34 points after a win

in the German Grand Prix.

Sebastien Vettel finished

second but was relegateded to

5th with a time penalty. Jenson

Button finished third, but

moved into second position.

Mark Webber finished 8th, now

on 120 championship points,

trailing Alonso who is leading the competition on 154 points. The Waikato Bay of

Plenty Magic have become the

first New Zealand team to win the trans-Tasman Netball

Championship. The Magic staged

an impressive comeback from

being five goals down to beat

the Vixens 41 to 40 yet. Re-an

der debrain was named player of

the match. The girls were just

so happy. They did string their

season pretty nicely. To peak

at the right time. To notch up

a 12th straight win is

fantastic. They were down for

most of the game. Yes, they

always manage to pip us at the

post. I hate it when New

Zealand win. Whatever sport. It

makes for good rivalry. A great match. Fantastic atmosphere

there. I was there yesterday

afternoon and it was really great. Just heartbreak for Adam

Scott. You have to feel for

hem. Ernie Els els getting

closer and closer and those

final holes really unsettling

his nerves. We've seen Greg

Norman with even bigger leads

go in and totally crumble. He held it pretty much until the

end, but how do you pick up and

carry on something like

this? That's the question, Bev.

Sport is such a

confidence-based thing and when

you have such a public and painful failure like this, how

do you drag yourself back from

oblivion? Exactly. We will

speak to Steve Pearce our

golfing expert who has had no

sleep watching this overnight

and we'll tease out some of

those issues with him in sport

next hour Thank you, Amy. ABC

News Breakfast can be watched

live on the web. Just go to the

main ABC News website at

abc.net.au/news and Liu find a link to News 24 which is

streamed live every day Let's

check out the weather and those

floods in Beijing are getting

pretty serious, Vanessa

O'Hanlon. Yes, powerful storm

which unleashed widespread rain

and thunderstorms, equates to

Beijing's heaviest rain not

only in 60 years but also for

this time of year. It unleashed

about 170mm over the city. One

district was hit by 460mm. The

July average for the city is 185mm and that falls over 14

days of the one good thing to

come out of the heavy rain -

the official pollution index

went from unhealthy rating to

excellent rating on Sunday. For

us, cloud has redeveloped over Western Australia as a low

pressure system causes showers

and the odd storm. Sydneysiders

will be relieved to know that

the low behind their coldest

weekend this year is now moving

towards New Zealand. A high

generating southerly winds. A

few of the shower also fall

along the coast of New South

Wales, but plenty of fog and

frost this morning but tomorrow

a sunny day. Tomorrow, a change

to South Australia. The high

will increase shower as long

the east coast and onshore wind

as long Tasmania. The low and

front will push through the south-east on Wednesday. Around the states for today:

You're watching ABC News

Breakfast. Lot as head. Still

to come, we'll have a look at

today's newspapers. To help us

do that this morning we'll be

joined by the host of the

Australia Network's Newsline

program, jimmied Dell tonne. A new Climate Commission report

is warning Victoria is heading

for more bushfires and floods.

To find out more we'll be speaking to Climate Commission

chief, Tim Flannery. And how

long will the mining boom last?

We'll be looking at a new

report that's predicting it's

about to peak and warning the

Government's surplus is under

threat. But first here is the

news with Bev. President Obama

is on his way to Aurora, Colorado, to pay his respects

to the victims of Friday's mass

cinema shooting. A girl of 6

was among 12 people killed and

50 injured when a gunman opened

fire during the filming of the

new Batman film. 24-year-old

James Holmes is expected to appear in court later today.

Norway has been remembering its

own mass shooting just one year on. Services have been held at

the sites where 77 people died

in gun and bomb attacks in Oslo and on

and on the island of Utoya.

Anders Behring Breivik who

carried out the attacks is

still on trial. Syria's army

has stepped up its campaign to

drive rebel forces out of the capital, Damascus. Fighting

also continues if the large

northern city of Aleppo where

rebels have taken over several

quarters. Their local commander

has vowed to liberate the city.

The Government has been warned

not to relie on the mining boom

to keep the Federal Budget in

surplus. A Deloitte Access Economics report says the boom

is about to peak and a slowdown

is inevitable. And the national

Climate Commission releases its

report today, warning that extreme weather convenients

like bushfires will become more

frequent in Victoria.-the-report says the number of days hotter than 35

degrees in Melbourne has risen

over 10 ooh years and will

continue to increase. Now,

we're talking Olympics a fair

bit at the moment because it's

only a week to go, but a bit of

disturbing news coming to us

this morn ing ahead of the

opening of the London Games

Saturday morning our time and

that is that police in the UK

believe the Israeli Olympic

team is being targeted by an

Iranian terrorist group based

in Europe. Scotland Yard has

told reporters it's tracking a

man believed to be involved in

last week's suicide bomb attack

on that bus in Bulgaria. The

Israeli Government is on alert

on more plots to kill its citizens overseas and as a

result already shaef I have

security undoubtedly, but

security has been tightened

around the Israeli Olympic team

in London. More on that over

the course of the morning as

well. To our top story and as

President Obama heads to

Colorado, Jane Cowan says

attention is now turning to the

a-alleged gunman and just what

motivated this shooting

rampage. Still, not a lot is

known about this accused

shooter. He is being held in

jail here apart from other

prisoners because of the high-profile nature of this

case. He is said not to be cooperates with investigators

now after not resisting the

original arrest. Police are saying that they have managed

now to retrieve a computer from

his apartment now that they've

been able to get into it since

it was disarmed of all those

explosives and they're hoping

that that computer might be

able to shed some light on the

motive and also how he learned

to booby trap his apartment in

such a sophisticated fashion.

But still at this stage you

have to say there are many,

many more questions than

answers about how this fellow who was originally a

high-achieving student who

graduated in honours in

California and was pursuing a

doctorate in neuroscience, how

he then came to be someone

accused of building bombs in

his apartment and killing 12

people in this dark movie

theatre. Neighbours, Beverley,

are telling stories of someone

who very much kept to himself.

They say sometimes they saw a

strange purple light from his apartment, apartment, sometimes neighbours

saw his windows covered with

newspaper, but they're saying

that there was really no sign

that they could tell that this

was going to happen. He is

being described as someone who

was as vanilla as a glass of

water, someone who made

virtually no impression on the

people who met him. He was

interestingly, by one account,

pursuing a subject before he

dropped out that went to the

originals - the genetic

originals of mental illness,

but really this all remains

still very much a

mystery. Jane, when you look

back at the history of these

kinds of massacres, these

tragedies, so many are in the

United States. Does at any

point the gun debate move any

further? Do the community look

at this issue as a real

significant way of trying to

lessen these kinds of incidents?? Look, this is the thing, isn't it? Always after

these shootings there are calls

for tighter gun control, but

gun rights in this country are

enshrined in the Constitution

and there is the powerful gun lobby that really strongly

resists any attempt to wind

back those rights. So the usual

calls are being heard now. It

is reactivating that whole gun

debate. But it is also activating a debate about

mental illness, too, because

you do have the suggestion that

the suspects said to police -

that the suspect said to police

when he was arrested that he

was The Joker, that he dyed his

hair orange, and so there is

some discussion about how

society can better recognise

people who might be going off

the rails. There was also a

suggestion that his grades had

gone downhill rapidly in the

year leading up to the attack,

so it is the gun debate but

also mental illness. Jane Cowan

there. A church service has

been held in the town of

Aurora, Colorado, for the

victims of that weekend

shooting spree As we just

heard, 12 people died and more

than 50 were injured in that

shooting. Locals say they're

still trying to come to grips

with that disaster. Unfortunately it's something

that can happen anywhere and

just trying to go on, just

telling myself, hey, I was

lucky that I wasn't there, but,

like I said t could happen

anywhere and just try to move

on as best you can, really. You

have to have faith that

everything is going to be OK, I

guess. . I just feel sorry for

the people who have lost loved

ones and those who are still

trying to get well and stuff.

It's so senseless, what

happened, and I would like to

know what kind of materials has he

he been reading? What's in his

house besides all those

explosions? What was on his

computer? What was he looking

at? What kind of books? What

kind of people did he associate with? Even though we should

remember the victims, I still

want to know what caused this

to occur. And the President

Obama is expected to arrive in

Colorado in the course of the

next hour or so. He of course

will keep that visit, as Jane

Cowan mentioned, very low-key.

He will meet families of the

victims, no public comments

planned by the President, but

certainly lots of public debate

in America once again. Sadly,

these debates happen at a

rather frequent clip these days

about whether gun laws should

be tightened, but as Jane Cowan

was saying, given how firmly enshrined in the Constitution

gun laws are in the United

States, it is, it's not likely

to change. If you do look at

the historical role out of

these kind of tragedies, the

United States is so overrepresented, you would

think at some point that they

would want to tackle this. But,

no, as you say, it seems to

stall T goes for a little while

after these events and then

stalls once again. Interesting,

too, Jane talking about how

important it is to look at

mental illness, the fact that

he may have been spiraling out

of control, how to identify and

to bring that to the forefer as

a way of perhaps countering

these kinds of events. And in

about an hour's time on ABC

News Breakfast we will be

looking in some detail at all

of those issues and plans to

increase pressure on the Obama

Administration to tighten gun ownership laws in the States.

Let's move on and Zimbabwe's Prime Minister Morgan

Tsvangirai is in Australia for

high-level meetings. Mr

Tsvangirai has already held

talks with Julie Bishop. Australia is the third largest

donor to Zimbabwe behind the

United States and Britain.

Let's go to Tasmania now where

30 years of forest conflict

could be finally resolved. The

signatories of the peace deal

are due to meet today in their

final attempt to thrash out a

deal, but as Jackson Vernon

reports, there is still no sign

of an agreement. Peace deal

D-Day, but it's the flu rather

than the pressure of resolving

30 years of forest conflict

that's getting the Premier

down. A good dose of horse

radish, garlic, you don't want

to get too close to me at the

moment. Signatories to the

federally funded deal have been

locked in late-night talks. The

deadline was extended last month, but still industry and

environmental parties are

remaining tight lipped. I

haven't had any further update.

I will be meeting with the

signatories tomorrow afternoon

and I expect there to be fully

briefed. It's understood the

key sticking points include

which new forest re serves

should be established and future wood supply

arrangements, but some remain

doubtful From what I'm

gathering, it will be very

hard, in fact possibly leaning

towards the Government to have

to make a decision at the end

of it. The Premier has ruled o

the a further extension, but

isn't saying what Plan B is We

are very hopeful and I remain

very optimistic that in fact agreement will

agreement will be reached. I

don't think it's particularly

helpful to speculate on any

outcome of the process, simply

out of respect for the people

who are sitting at that table

right now thrashing out a

deal. Tomorrow's deadline marks

moor than two years since

roundtable talks began.

Whatever the outcome, the

Liberals say there is only one

response They have not given a

mandate for this process. Deal

or no deal, Lara Giddings needs

to call an election. Without

the agreement, the State risks

missing out on $100 million in

Commonwealth funding. In Queensland, there is a growing

campaign against the State

Government's changes to civil

union laws A new lobby group

has been set up to fight the

changes which include the

removal of surrogacy rights for

gay couples of Jonathan Hall reports. Parents, politicians,

lawyers and a farmer stood side

by side. It is a diverse group

with one message This petition

has been signed by mums, dads, colleagues, brother,

sisters. Last month the Newman Government

Government repealed civil union

legislation leaving couples

like Alexis and Kylie in limbo.

They've been together 10 years

and have twin 4-month-old

girls We registered for a civil

union and we're absolutely

heartbroken when it got diluted

down to a - what is it? A

registered relationship. The

Government also plans to change surrogacy laws to exclude

same-sex couples. The lobby

group Queenslanders for

Equality has vowed to fight

those changes. Farmer Dave is

an LNP supporter and is gay We

want to discuss things with you

in a plain-talking manner. I'm

a country bloke. A lot of those

people in that Parliament are

country blokes. We want to sit

down and have a talk and say,

"This will affect us in a really bad way." Psychologist

Paul Martin founded the campaign You cannot remove

equal rights from a minority

groups which are already

stigmatised. It's inhuman and

cruel. The Queensland State

Government says the changes are

already having a psychological

impact on the gay community Psychological

disorders including suicide, depression, anxiety. The Government says Cabinet will

consider a submission on the

surrogacy changes in the next

two months. You're watching ABC

News Breakfast. These are our

top stories this morning -

President Barack Obama is on

his way to Aurora, Colorado, to

pay his respects to the victims

of Friday's cinema mass

shooting. 24-year-old James

Holmes is expected to appear in

court later today. Syria's Army

has stepped up its campaign to

drive rebel forces out of the

capital, Damascus. Fighting also continues in the large

northern city of Aleppo where

rebels have taken over several quarters. And the Government

has been warned not to relie on

the mining boom to keep the

Federal Budget in surplus. A

Deloitte Access Economics

report says the boom is about

to peak and a slowdown is

inevitable. Let's now take a look at the national papers.

Today we're joined by the

presenter of Newsline, Jim

Middleton. Great to have Wu

us. Good morning, Bev and

Michael. The Melbourne

by-election dominating the

newspapers as to what message

is sends to the Federal Government and the domestic

market Dominating the

'Melbourne Age' and also the

'Melbourne Herald' Sun as well.

Yes, I think relief for Julia Gillard, although measured

relief, I think, for the Labor

Party, but the Greens will be

feeling a little bit like Adam

Scott, actually, having blown

what was a golden opportunity

to take this seat from the

Labor Party. They were

outmanoeuvred both tacticly and

strategically by Labor, I think

n this election. They ran a

big-party campaign. They had

more money apparently than the

Labor Party. They had

advertisements in the

newspapers and all that sort of

thing, but they weren't able to

get enough of the very

substantial student vote that

has helped them with Melbourne

University in the seat and

other institutions as well.

RMIT, get them to the polls to

actually vote for them, whereas

Labor instead of trying to

attack them from the left,

attack them from the right,

attack their credibility on financial responsibility and

the kinds of promises they

made. They were found wanting

and in the end although Labor's

primary vote was very low, it

was able to get enough

preferences to get across the

line. It was all about the

preferences and the Labor Party

machine almost mechanically

went about that process of

securing those preferences

Yes, that's why I say they were

outmanoeuvre ed tacticly. The

Greens ran a classic big-tent

campaign that ignored the importance of getting the

smaller, the preferences and

the preference deals and the

postal votes. Also,

interestingly enough, I suspect

that there was a measure of

discontent, too, for the

Greens, having got Labor and

having got Julia Gillard to

break a promise about the

carbon tax, one good turn may

well have been perceived by

some voters as deserving

another, and when all the

attention focused in the last

days of Federal Parliament

before the winter break on

asylum seekers, they stood on principle

principle rather than, as would

be perceived by a number of

middle-class voters, as being

about saving lives, they were

not prepared to compromise, and

this goes to what the very

unassuming but quite effective Victorian Opposition Leader

Daniel Andrews pointed out

about them being commentators,

rather than actually wanting to

have a piece of government. Is

there any take-up for the

Victorian Government as

themself snoos There is for

the Coalition in general which is whether they can any longer

afford to stay out of contests

where in otherwise heartland

Labor seats, where they are

under threat in inner city

areas from the Greens , whether

they can fail to contest it,

because one thing that also

came out about it and this only

means something for Victorians,

rather than for the rest of the

country was that Daniel

Andrews, who was an unknown

figure effectively before this

election, got some profile. Ted

Baillieu's Government got

nothing. In fact, within the

seat of Melbourne, Daniel

Andrews behaved like a Premier,

forcing the Greens to account

for their policies - where is

the money coming from? When

they came up with their

"solutions ""they were found

wanting. Ted Baillieu's

government is not that popular,

doesn't have that much of a

majority and I think they will

need to rethink this strategy of avoiding by-election

contests in safe Labor seats. Indeed. The Prime

Minister has some breathing

room as a result of this win A

little. A little, and let's not

forget it is far from a great result for the Labor Party.

31% of the blue ribbon -

well, that's not the right

term. Heartland seat never held

by anyone else but the Labor

Party in all its time as a

seat. The breathing space is

this: It means that the drum beat that there has been about

replacing Julia Gillard, that

she gets breathing space on

that. But nevertheless, an

immense amount of work to do, although within the result,

there may be the glimmerings

of-a-would deal with the Greens

which is that they have their uses on environmental policy

perhaps, but they are by no

means friends of the Labor

Party and that there are more

votes for Labor to win in the

centre than there is on the

left of the further - the more

they can push the Greens to the

left and fight in the centre,

they tend to fight on one front

rather than two, and also they

have the opportunity to harvest

more votes there, too. OK. The

Gonski Report, remember that?

I do remember that, indeed. I

remember it. Many others may

not. Just in, the Australian

education's reporter has a

story which despite the fact

that it will cost a lot of

money, $6.5 billion under

current estimates, that in fact

the Gillard Government is

intending to proceed with it. Justine fer rahcy Justine fer rahcy says

Education Minister Peter

Garrett has already taken it to

Cabinet once. The question

there will not only be the cost

but also getting the states on

board because Gonski was

envisaging a 70/30

federal/state split in terms of

funding. The state Governments

are under pressure. They will

probably want to resist that as

well. The other question is

value for money, whether

Canberra will be able to find a

way of making sure that the

money that is being spent is

being well spent, that it

improving education, that

teachers get better, that the

curriculum is improved. Not an

easy task It is not taking on a

battle because there are a

number of Liberal governments

now ensconced and this would be

a very ripe battleground? It

would be indeed, and it is

right up Julia Gillard's alley,

an area of deep interest to

her. It is an area of deep

interest to parents and

particularly middle-class

parents, and this is an area of

the electorate that Labor needs

to regain confidence if they

are to have any hope at all at

the next federal election. So,

yes t could be a very happy hunting ground for the

Government if they can push the

states into a corner and

suggest that it's the Coalition

that's anti-students and Labor

that is on the side of

parents. Now, we're just about

out of time, Jim. Let's change

gears altogether and look at

the 'Herald Sun' story on who

should carry the Australian

flag in the Opening Ceremony?

Well, not just the 'Herald Sun'

reporting this, but it is the

'Herald Sun' in particular

which is suggesting that there

is a push on for a woman to

carry the flag at the Olympics

for the first time since 1992

when Jenny Don net, the diver

carrieded it. Only two other

women, Raelene Boyle and Denise, the sprinters.

Australian women tend to do

better at the Olympics than the

men and it is a long time.

There is even a suggestion from

one of the beach volleyball

ers, Natalie Cook, that if a woman doesn't carry the flag,

she will have a sit-down

protest. That's just silly.

Yes, considerable support from

the men, Rix Charlesworth, the

hockey great and also a man who

carrieded the flag at one of

the Olympics saying, "It is

time as a woman." And I can

only say as a father of four

daughters I wholeheartedly

agree otherwise I will get

killed at breakfast Not worth

going home with four girls at

breakfast. Indeed It would

have been if they had it behind

closed door snoos

It would have been better if

a lot of complaints from the

athletes have been held behind

closed doors. Yes, and there

have been a lot of them Far

too many. Go home safely.

Thank you. Amy Bainbridge,

firstly what do you think about

the flag bearer. Absolutely, I

agree wholeheartededly. Natalie

Cook has done a real service to

the Australian team by putting

it in the spotlight. The

pressure is on Nick Green

now. Right, OK. Anna Meares, a name we

name we threw into the mix. A

very, very worthy person. Lots

of very worthy women, but what

happens now because it's become

such a big issue It has become

a big issue. Lauren Jackson is

another one I will put in there

as well. OK Adam Scott has

missed out on the maiden Open

victory by just one stroke.

South African golfer Ernie els won the British Open after

Scott crumbled on the last four

holes. Scott started the last

round with a four-shot lead and

was poised with victory as he

maintained with six holes to

play, but the 32-year-old

dropped strokes at each of the

last four holes and it allowed

els to slip through and land a

winning 2 under par 68. British cyclist Bradley Wiggins has become the first Briton to win

the Tour de France. The triple

Olympic gold medallist clinched

the coveted yellow jersey after

safely negotiating the 20th and

final stage of the race.

Wiggins led British team-mate

Chris Froome by 3 minutes and

21 seconds. Mark Cavendish won

the sprint finish ahead of

Australia's Matt Goss. Cadel

Evans finished 7th overall.

Spaniard Fernando Alonso has

stretched his Formula One championship lead to 34 points

after a win in the German Grand

Prix. Sebastien Vettel finished

second in the race, but was

relegated to 5th with a

20-second time penalty. Jenson

Button finished third but moved

up into second position. Australia's Mark Webber

finished in 8th position. The

Waikato Bay of Plenty Magic

have become the first New

Zealand team to win the

trans-Tasman netball championship. The Magic staged an impressive comeback from

being five goals down to beat

the Melbourne Vixens 41-38 in

Melbourne. It's the Magic's

12th consecutive win. Their

defender was named player of

the match. Well, returning no

you to the Tour de France and

earlier I spoke to our reporter

James Bennett about Bradley

Wiggins's victory. Yes, certainly. Look obviously he

was ecstatic and he was a very, rehumble Bradley Wiggins who

did obviously claim the first

ever British victory in the

Tour de France, and I think a

real measure of his

professionalism was that today

was spent with a different goal

in mind and that was getting

Mark Cavendish, the sprinter,

over the line in first place.

We actually saw Bradley Wiggins

on the front of the peloton

leading Mark Cavendish out. It

is a mark of just how

professionally he has

approached this race and

obviously the amount of

planning that has gone into it

to deliver that result, you're

right, very, very relieved and

it was quite interesting

speaking to his team-mate

Richie Porte, the Australian

after the rate race, he had

quite a good insight into just

what was involved in getting to

that point and being able to

achieve what they did. People

don't see the six weeks we did

at altitude and, God, we worked

hard for this. I think we

worked harder than any other

team, you know, certainly going

to enjoy the champagne

tonight. James, Cadel Evans, of

course, it was somewhat of a

disappointing Tour. He finished

7th, but obviously suffered some illness throughout the

race as well, but wasn't the

only Australian and some others

performed really well? Indeed.

Obviously a lot of people, a

lot of Australian fans had been

hoping that Cadel Evans would

be able to defend his title

from last year. Ultimately that

wasn't the case and I think for

Cadel Evans he was really,

really disapoint. Speaking to

him on the Champs Elysees

afterwards, he described it as

riding badly this Tour but did

give a very clear indication

that he does plan on returning

to make amends and he will

certainly be on the start line

again next year. Of course, the

other major thing from the

Australian point of view was

the effort of the GreenEDGE

team specifically to get Matt

Goss a stage win or try to get

the green jersey and they ultimately weren't successful

in that effort either, but

nonetheless, a lot of those

Australians were very proud of

having been the first ever

Australian-backed team to enter

this race. James Bennett on the

Champs Elysees. Next hour, woo

he will speak about the

golf. Vanessa O'Hanlon with the

weather. A low pressure system

causes showers and the odd

system over sauce. A low

pressure system has moved

towards New Zealand, is in the

blustery weather along the New

South Wales coast but this high is generating southerly winds

and a few showers mainly along

the New South Wales north

coast. Tomorrow, a cooler

change to South Australia as it

reaches the south-east on

Wednesday. But in Queensland today:

Thanks, Vanessa. Stay with

us, we'll be taking a look at

that new report that says

Australia's mining boom is

coming to an

President Obama heads for

Colorado to help mourn the

victims of the movie cinema massacre. The state is

heartbroken. I think it was

Hemingway who said, "The world

breaks us all, but afterward

we're stronger in the broken places." This Program is

Captioned Live. British police

investigate a terrorist threat

against Israel's Olympic team. New warning for