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ABC News Breakfast -

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(generated from captions) The rift widens - more

senior Labor figures join the

attack on the Greens xgt If

this keeps going, it will be

the end of the Nobel tradition

of light on the hill. That's

been now taken up by the

Greens. This Program is

Captioned Live. The High Court

challenge - residents of a

London tower block trying to

stop missiles being out on

their roof during the

Olympics. If this case is

unsuccessful, it would set a

Ministry of Defence can come to precedent which means the

your home, anyone's home and

install military hardware on

your roof or on your lawn

without ever asking. 600

workers walk off the job at a

Coles distribution centre in Melbourne. And Australia's

at the Tour de France. Good Cadel Evans slips off the pace

morning. It's Tuesday, 10th

July. I'm Andrew Geoghegan And

I'm Karina Carvalho. The top

story on ABC News Breakfast -

tensions are growing between

the Labor Party and the Greens

just two years after the Greens

signed a partnership deal with

Julia Gillard, several senior

ALP figures are criticising

them for being a protest party.

Doug Cameron says they are

intransigent and immature. And

Chris Bowen called the Greens

naive in relation to asylum

seekers. He has called for the

Greens to not automatically get

Labor's preferences at the next

election. Bob Brown says any

rift will only bolster support

for the Opposition Leader Tony

Abbott If this Keims going this

will be the end of the noble

tradition of light on the hill.

It is a gift to Tony Abbott.

How hurting is it for Labor

voters. Their only option is to

come across to the

Greens. Winsome denier has

more. This rift continues to

deepen? Yes, Bass in the Dust

kicked off this,. sax Dasty

arddy kicked off this campaign

on the weekend and he will move

a motion at the State Conference

Conference this weekend to

preference the Greens last at

the next federal election and

we've been hearing from several

different voices from the Labor

ranks since then. Yesterday we

heard from senior ministers

like the Climate Change

Minister Greg Combet speaking

out against the Greens and

really separating themselves,

separating Labor from the

Greens, and we continue to hear

this throughout reporting and

throughout the evening, and one

of - the other members of the

Labor Party, Victorian Labor

MP, Michael Dan by has added

his voice. Now, a lots of these

people are saying that the

impasse on asylum seeker policy

in Parliament, we saw the

Greens side with the Coalition

on this and block Labor's plans

for the Malaysia Solution has

been what's really been burning

this issue amongst Labor MPs,

so let's take a little bit of a

listen to what Michael Danby

had to say. We think that

voters symbolically should know

that the Labor Party doesn't

automatically consider itself

an ally of the Green political

party. They're very different

to us on a whole range of

issues. Labor backbenchers

across the country were furious

of the decision of the Green

political party to support the

Liberals and block any real

deal on compromise on asylum seekers. People in the Labor

Party across the country are

saying enough is enough. And

Winsome, meanwhile, Malcolm

Turnbull has made his position

on gay marriage clear? That's

right, Karoon nah. Last night

Opposition member Malcolm on the quay quay program, the

Turnbull was questioned on his

approach to gay marriage. He

says he does support gay marriage, but it's not something that he would cross

the floor on and therefore give

up his position with the party.

Let's have a listen to what he

had to say last night.

As a member of the Shadow

Cabinet, I cannot vote against

the... If you cross the floor

you would have to resign If I

cross the floor I have to

Cabinet. Did you consider resign from the Shadow

that? Yes rs it's something

I've weighed up, and I've taken

the view that there is a

greater benefit and value for

my constituents can be served

by me staying within the Shadow

Cabinet rather than resigning

and crossing the floor on every

issue or any issue which I

disagree with the collective

on. But that's something that

Shadow Cabinet ministers and as

Chris would know as a Cabinet

minister, I've been one, too, this is something you have to

live with, you've got to form

Turnbull saying he won't give that judgment. That's Malcolm

up that position. Winsome Denyer in 'Canberra', we'll

speak to you later on. Now with

the rest of the day's news with

Andrew Residents in East London

have gone to the High Court to

try to stop missiles being put

on their roof during the

Olympics. Their public housing

block is one of six across

London earmarked by the

military for surface -to-air

missiles. The residents claim

their human rights are being

breached. In Egypt, tensions

remain high between the country's President and

military leaders. Egypt's

Supreme Court has rejected a

call by President Mohamed Morsi

to reconvene Parliament. Army

forces have now withdrawn to

allow MPs to enter. The first

witnesses testified at the War

Crimes Tribunal of former

Bosnian Serb commander Ratko

Mladic. The man was a teenager

when Serb force as tacked his

village in 1992. He fled but

around 150 people died in the

massacre. Blood blood is

charged with crimes against.

Mladic is charged with crimes

against humanity. Another

victim at the centre of a 'Four

Corners' investigation has come

forward to allege that the

Church turned a blind eye. The

priest known as Father F is

accused of sexually abusing

altar boys in the 1980s. The

man says his family told the

Church hierarchy but nothing

was done. About 600 workers at

one of Coles' distribution

centres have walked off the job indefinitely. They're expected

to set up a picket line this

morning. They're threatening to

leaving the building. The stop trucks from entering or

warehouse has been outsourced

and Coles is refusing to give

workers the same conditions

offered to other workers across

the country. The body of the

Australian soldier dilled in

Afghanistan last week has

arrived back in Australia.

Sergeant Blaine Diddams was

shot during an attack on in sur

gents. His family and friends

gathered at the RAAF base in

Perth yesterday to pay tribute

to Sergeant Diddams. Let's take

a look at the markets:

Well, the ibt national peace

ebb voi Kofi Annan has held

what he describes as candid and

constructive talks with Syria's

President in Damascus. The

talks with a last-ditch effort.

Mr Annan says the pair had

agreed to a new political

approach to end the violence, but President Bashar al-Assad

is refusing to agree to opposition demands to step

aside. Mr Annan says he hasn't

given up on the peace

plan. Discussed the need to end

the violence and ways and means

of doing so. We agreed an

approach which we would also

share - which I will share with

the armed opposition. I also

the stress the importance of

moving ahead with the political

dialogue which the President

accepts. That's Kofi Annan.

India's Supreme Court is

hearing a case that could have

a major effect on the health

care in a developing world. A

Swiss-based company is taking

on India's generic drug manufacturers which have become

a global supplier of cheap medicines. Richard Lindell reports. Mohammed contracted

tuberculosis four months ago.

After months of waiting he and

his wife are finally receiving

treatment and are on a lengthy

course of Jenneric drugs paid

for by the Government

TRANSLATION: If cheap drugs are

available, people will survive.

When the main breadwinner is

sick, what are your options?

Should we try to feed ourselves

or buy medicines? Without

treatment, TB is highly

infectious, particularly in the

crowded homes and slums of the

poor. We have millions of

patients relying on the Jenner

Rick drugs supplied by the

Government and to a large

extent the success of the

program is because of these

free medicines and againeric

drugs. This Government program

is now under threat. P the

Government denied a patent on

an updated version of its 11-year-old anti-cancer drug.

Patients are needed to foster

innovation, but opponents say

the changes are minor and

they're seeking to weaken

patents law with implications

well beyond this Not just

stopping a particular category

of anti-cancer drugs, we're talking about the complete

broad category of medication

and pharmaceutical industry in

India as a whole. Medecins Sans

Frontieres has been leaving a

global campaign demanding that

they drop the case The again

Erics are going to Central p

Asia, Thailand itself. We are

convinced for HIV treatment

this would be a disaster. Last

year it was announced a billion

dollars would be spent on drugs

for the poor. It is a huge

undertaking and one dependent

on Supreme Court win and a

continuing supply of generic

medicines. Back home and the

prosecution in a Queensland

murder case has been criticised

for taking too long. Gerard

Baden-Clay is accused of

killing his wife, Allison in

April A Brisbane magistrate

says he is flabbergasted it

could take until November for a

forensic account nt to examine

his financial affairs. Donna

foold has this report. Gerard

Baden-Clay reported his wife missing from their Brookfield

home earlier this yore. So days

later her body was found on a

creek bank. A month ago, police

charged the 41-year-old with

murder and he was denied bail.

The court was told the

prosecution is compiling a

brief of evidence against him

that runs to several volumes

and includes more than 300

statements. It also heard a

forensic accountant is

examining Baden-Clay's bank accounts, investments and

insurance policies. When told

that would take until November,

magistrate Chris Callaghan said he was flabbergasted:

He ordered the evidence to

be given to Baden-Clay's

lawyers within six weeks and the financial information as

soon as possible. His lawyers

say he will defend the charges.

The court also heard the most

mortem report on Allison

Baden-Clay isn't finalised but

it should be available along

with phone and computer records

within the six-week time-frame. Gerard Baden-Clay wasn't

required to appear for today's

mention. He has been remanded

in custody and his case will be back in court in September.

Well, let's check the front pages of the newspapers around

the country. The financial

review says Labor and the

Coalition have signaled they're

prepared to cut the renewable

energy target after coming

under pressure from industry leaders. The 'Sydney Morning Herald' says the New South Wales Government has ruled out

joining Queensland and the

Fortescue Metals Group in a

High Court challenge against

the mining tax. The top story

in the age age, the rift

between Labor and the Greens

has escalated into a public war

with senior government

ministers weighing in to attack their partner in minority government 'The Australian'

reports senior figures from

Labor's Left faction have

backed calls for a harder line

against the Greens. The 'Daily

Telegraph' says the impasse over asylum seekers and

offshore processing is

threatening the Gillard

Government's waiver-thin budget

surplus. In the 'Herald Sun', a

dumped ministerial adviser has

accused a police corruption

watchdog of destroying his

career after charges against

him with droched. Buying spree

- the 'Advertiser' leads with a

report on BHP steaking its

claim over a staking its claim

over a large swathe of land in

the South Australian outback to

search for new mineral deposits. The 'Courier-Mail'

says Queensland is preparing to

scrap its school grading system

in favour of joining the

national system. The 'Canberra

Times' reports a proposal to

build a new mosque in the

capital is dividing locals. In the 'Northern Territory News',

a mother speaks out after her

9-year-old son was slapped by a

stranger. And fill up while the

price lasts - the 'Mercury' is

reporting petrol prices have

hit an 18-month low in

Tasmania, but the prices are

unlikely to stay down And in

the 'West Australian', gold

medallist Daniel Kowalski

claims Swimming Australia is underpaying its Olympic

athletes. Now, let's just

return to that story which is

dominating most headlines today

about the growing rift between

the Greens and Labor. We would

like to know what you think.

Clear ly we've heard Bob Brown

this morning. He is essentially

saying that Labor is losing the

plot, that the Greens have now

become the so-called light

often the hill, whereas those

in Labor are saying, look, the

Greens are purely a protest

party Interestingly Tony Abbott

has weighed into the debate

saying that this is just

carefully choreographed and stage-managed as World Championship wrestling, so what

do you think? Do you think the

Greens have turned into a party

of protest? And do you think

this rift will continue to

deepen and widen? You can

contact us:

Let's take a quick look at the weather:

The top stories on ABC News

Breakfast - the rift between

Labor and the Greens is

growing. Immigration Minister

Chris Bowen has joined the

attacks saying the Greens are naive in relation to asylum

seekers, and a key member of

Labor's Left, Doug Cameron has

labelled the Greens

intransigent and immature The

British military's plans to put

missiles on the roof a London

tower block during the Olympics

is being challenged in the High

Court. The move is part of the

security for the Games, but

residents say it breaches their

rights. And 600 workers at a

Coles distribution centre has

walked off the job. They're

threatening to stop trucks

enter ore leaving the centre.

An international coral reef

symposium is being held in

Cairns this week. Scientists

from more than 80 countries are discussing ways to protect the

world's reef. Today's topic

looks at the effect of climate

change. Conor Duffy spoke with

the Director of the global change Institute at the

University of Queensland ahead

of today's discussions. Today's

theex will be ocean

acidification, winners and

losers and to discuss this

we're joined by one of the

world's leading experts on the

impact of glarm ing on coral

reefs, Ove. Thank you What is

ocean acidification? Ocean

acidification is carbon dioxide

increasing its concentration in

the atmosphere and this is from

the burning of fossil fuels and

land use change, about you that

carbon dioxide doesn't just

stay in the atmosphere and a

lot of it goes into the ocean.

When it goes into the ocean, it

reacts with the water and

changes the chemistry and

becomes more acidic and that

has conferences for marine

life. In terms of marine life,

what will be the winners and

losers? In the short term will

have differences in between

corals, some are affected a

lot, others are not. What we

expect to see in coming decades

is some corals doing better and others perhaps doing worse.

That goes for a lot of other

organisms as well. But in the

long term, because we're

pushing conditions well beyond

those we've seen for the past

million probably 40 million

years, bacteria that goes over

rocks might well be the

winner. It's not all gloomy, is

it? Some specieses will be

adapt and thrive under this? On

the issue of the ocean, the

jury is out. Phenomenal rates

of change compared to even an

Ice Age transition, so this is

really testing long-lived

organisms like corals to be

able to rapidly adapt. Most

scientists are feeling there

are big questions about whether

biology will keep up. There are

reports of coral performing at

ever higher latitudes as the

oceans get warmer, and you've

even dived some of these new

reefs yourself, won't this

replace the lost

habitats? Well, there is no

question that some organisms as

waters are warming that they're

being able to penetrate those.

In Japan, for example, corals

have been found much more north

than they have in the past. But

the important issue here is

that a single coral arriving

oen a reef at a high latitude

is not the same as Kay coral

with all the ecosystems that

depend on it arriving. I think

it's put into sharp relief when

you consider how fast the grief

grieve would have to move to

higher latitudes if it's to

keep up with climate change,

and that number, which is

essentially moving from the

north to the south of the Great

Barrier Reef is between 15 and

20km per year. Now, we've not

seen that and it's certainly a

tall order to think of all

those corals, all those fish

suddenly moving at that

phenomenal rate every year.

Again, I think with such an

important issue to hope that

that would happen, I think

maybe not the best

thing. Thanks very much for

joining ABC News

Breakfast. It's been a

pleasure. Conor Duffy and ABC

News 24 will broadcast a

special future forum about the reef. Experts from the

conference will be asking the

question can coral reefs

survive the 21st Century.

That's on Saturday July 22nd To

finance news and Spain's borrowing rate has soared to

record levels of the yields on

its 10-year bonds rose 7% as

Eurozone finance ministers met to discuss Spain's bank

bailout. That's the same rate

that triggered bailouts in

Greece, Ireland and Portugal,

and in another worrying

development, Italy's borrowing

rate has also climbed to

dangerous levels, going above

6%. To the markets:

Let's check sport now and it

wasn't a particularly great day

for Cadel Evans on the Tour? It

was a very significant stage

last night. Bradley Wiggins has

opened up a substantial lead

over Cadel Evans in the Tour de

France. Last night's stage was

a 41.5km time trial and the top

riders averaged almost 47km/h.

Cadel Evans finished the stage

in 6th place and he is now 1

minute and 56 seconds off

Wiggins' pace for the overall

race for the overall jersey.

Here is how the two finished

Stage 9. COMMENTATOR: Cadel

Evans is not racing now for the

yell Le jersey, actually racing to stay second overall in the Tour de France. It will be very, very close.

The time he have' calculated is

Cadel Evans has to stop the

clock in 53 minutes and 21

seconds if he wants to stay in

second place overall, otherwise

he will be beaten by Chris

Froome. In the alps after the

rest day tomorrow. He lines up

to the finish. 53:21 is the

time he has got to beat to lead

for the mountains on - to leave

for the mountains on Wednesday

in the Tour de France. He is

going to get it, Paul. He will

hold onto second here, but he

won't like the gap s to Bradley

Wiggins. 53:07. He lost a

couple of seconds just over the

last moment, but he has fought

himself inside-out. He will

ride to the line, with his face

a grimace of pain. It's his

sixth Tour de France. He has

never won a stage. The stage

victory will be for him, his first ever in the Tour de

France. He is in yellow, Paul,

he will increase his lead tonts

as he wins the stage. Bradley

Wiggins racing there and they

will have a rest day tonight

before headings into the alps

later in the week. Seven-time

Tour de France winner Lance

Armstrong has filed a lawsuit

to try to stop the US Anti-Doping Agency from laying

charges against him. The lieu

suit claim s, the Accuses the

agency's chief executive of

waging a personal vendetta

against him. Armstrong has denied ever using performance-enhancing drugs. Back home and to last

night's NRL match, the Cronulla

Sharks and the Sydney Roosters

played out a 14-all draw in

Sydney. The rooststers scored a

try late in the second half to

draw level with the Sharks, but

neither side could convert

their field goal chances in

golden point extra time. The

result means the Sharks have

finished Round 18 in third

position on the ladder on 25

points, one point behind

second-placed Canterbury. They're now one

They're now one point ahead of

three teams - Brisbane, Manly

and South Sydney. Yes, it is

the one point you want to win,

but I suppose it's better than

nothing. Both teams put in and

at the end of the day we both

take away one point, so what

can you do? One of them games, tough conditions. I would like

to think that with the amount

of ball we had late we would be

able to put it away, but not to

be. Back to training at St

George next week with a few

things to work on. Waikato has

won its 10th game in a row to

eliminate Adelaide from the

trans-Tasman netball finals.

The Magic are now into the

preliminary final after a

one-goal victory in Hamilton,

New Zealand. Neil Cross

reports. With a home crowd in

full voice, the Magic appeared

pretty relaxed and with good

reason, having beaten Adelaide

by 17 goals just a couple of

weeks ago. With sufficient

access to Sergio van Djik the

New Zealanders established the

early lead. The Thunderbirds

were guilty of were guilty of poor

execution. And it began to have

a major effect on Adelaide

shooter Carla. Down by 8, the

Thunderbirds made defensive

changes but it was in the

attacking circle where the

turnaround came and Carla was

the fen fishery and she did

plenty of her own work. The

Thunderbirds held a 3-goal

advantage at

half-time. Increasingly desperate, there was push and

shove under the net at one end

and in turn more of the same at

the other. The Thunderbirds

held on grimly as the Magic

surged with Erin Bell calmly

shooting at a 100% success rate

for the quarter. The margin was

gust a goal to the Thunderbirds at the last change and the

battle restarteded with some more defensive hero ics from

the Magic and the home side leveled

leveled the score with 3.5

minutes on the clock. Bell

missed her first shot of the

second half with a minute left,

but van Dijk took her chance

when it came to secure a

memorable victory and put the

Thunderbirds out of the

finals. So it will be

Australian versus New Zealand,

no matter the result. We

already know the Vixens are

in. Got to love the trans-Tasman rivalry. That's

right. Just going back to the

Tour. Cadel Evans is almost 2

minutes behind the leader. At

this point of the race, is that critical? It's not great, but

not insurmountable. Still got a

week and a half of racing.

Bradley Wiggins is an excellent

time trial cyclist. He is from

that background and it suits

him to the year. This year

features three time trials

which is more than usual for

the Tour de France, the other

thing is Chris Froome who came

third in that overall, a great

young cyclist and that was a

bit of a surprise but he is on

the same team as Bradley Wiggins. His job now is not to

be racing for himself but to be

supporting Bradley Wiggins. 1

minute, 53, it's more than

probably Cadel Evans would feel

comfortable with, however, we

don't know what will happen in

the mountains. Still a bit to

go yet? Indeed Thank you. How

is the weather looking,

Vanessa? We did have clear

skies but that's given way to

strong rain and cloud in the

east. Seven nights in a row

managing 5.3. That's been

Canberra's coldest spell in 47

years but warmer nights for the

rest of this week under this

cloud. In the east today a

deepening low pressure system

is making its way southwards.

This is dumping a lot of rain

over the eastern states and if

we go over to the west a low

has been drawing energy from warmer-than-normal waters in

the Indian Ocean. Currently 2

degrees above average. That

rain will spread into the

central wheatbelt before it

tracks on Friday. Rain across Queensland, it will be heavy

over the central districts including the central coast.

You're watching ABC News

Breakfast. Still to come, we'll

take a closer look at that

strike at a Coles distribution

centre in Melbourne. 600

workers have walked off the job

and our reporter Tony Nichols

is there. Also ahead we'll have

a review of some of the

newspapers. This morning we

will be joined by 'The

Australian''s Chip Le Grand,

but here is Andrew with the

news. Tensions are growing

between the Labor Party and the

Greens. Several senior ALP

figures say the Greens are just

a protest party. Labor senator

Doug Cameron says they're

intransigent and immature and

Immigration Minister Chris

Bowen has called them naive in

relation to asylum seekers. Residents in East London have gone to the high

Cowt to try to stop missiles

being put on the roof during

the Olympics. Their public

housing block is one of six

site as cross London earmarked

by the military for the

surface-to-air missiles. In

Egypt, tensions remain high

between the country's President

and its military leaders.

Egypt's Supreme Court has

rejected a call by President

Mohamed Morsi to reconvene

poorltd. Army forces

surrounding the parliament

building have now withdrawn to

allow MPs to enter. Another victim of a priest at the

centre of a 'Four Corners'

investigation has come forward

investigation has come forward

to say that the church turned a

Blyde eye to his complaints. He

says his family told the Church

hierarchy b you nothing was

done. 600 workers as one of

Coles' national distribution centres in Melbourne have walked off the job indefinitely. The striking

workers have set up a picket

line and are threatening to

stop trucks from entering or

leaving the building. More now

on our top story and the

growing rift between Labor and

the Greens. Federal Labor MP

Michael Danby says MPs are

losing patience with the Greens

policies. We think that voters

symbolically should know that

the Labor Party doesn't automatically consider itself

an ally of the Green political

party. They're very different

to us on a whole range of issues. Labor backbenchers

across the country were furious

at the decision of the Green

political party to support the

Liberals and block any real

deal on compromise on asylum

seekers. People in the Labor

Party across the country are

saying enough is enough. Well,

former Greens leader Bob Brown

says voters will punish Labor

if they preference the

Coalition over the Greens If

this keeps going, it's going to

be the end of the noble

tradition of light on the hill.

That's been now taken up by the

Greens. Dastyari's position,

Paul Howes' position is a gift

to Tony Abbott. How hurting is

that for Labor voters? Their

only option is to come across

to the Greens. Former Greens

leader Bob Brown. Let's get

more on that strike at a Coles national distribution centre in

Melbourne's north. Hundreds of workers

workers have walked off the job

indefinitely. Our reporter Tony

Nichols is at the centre and he

joins us now Good morning.

Around 200 union workers here

are picketing the entrance to

this national Coles distribution centre. Very early

in the morning, freezing

conditions and they're full of

voice. They're refusing to let

trucks come or go, refusing to

let these truck drivers start

their day's work in demand for

enterprise bargaining agreement

negotiations to start again

immediately. Joining us in

union organiser Kathryn Hill.

This is planned industrial

action that we've been working

towards for quite some time.

Basically our members have

conditions that they would like

to have at their workplace that

Coles workers across the

country already have, so what

they're looking for is equality

and that's what we're here for

this morning. This is a holing

warehouse under tols, so

doesn't it stand to reason that

there would be differences Yes,

all Coles sites and tols sites,

but the members would like some

basic conditions that have very

common throughout the

warehousing industry, such as

afternoon shift loading for

their entire shift, rostered

days off, union rights, some

rights for casuals so they can have secure and permanent work

and that's really what the

members are fighting for. Of

course, Victoria Police are on

site here just behind the

picket line. Beyond just

stopping trucks, what's the

union's aim this morning? Look,

there is no aim behind that. I

guess our position is that our

members are asking that the

trucks not to pass the strike.

At the moment no truck has

wanted to go past, but it is

early days. We've been on

strike for half an hour. And where

where to in the negotiation

process? We meet with the

company again at midday

tomorrow and we're hopeful as

ever to negotiate an

outcome. Thanks for joining us

this morning Thank you. Kathryn

Hilt, the organisers for the

workers. Residents of a council

tower block in East London have

taken the British ministry of

Defence Force to the High

Court. They're trying to stop

anti-aircraft missiles being

placed on the roof during the Olympics. Philip Williams

reports from London. Fred wick House, an East London tower

block, notable only for its

ugliness until now. The

ministry for Defence decided

the roof provided a great

platform for anti-aircraft

missiles. Many residents are

less than impressed with the

tests Me being a father of

young children, I would have

some reservations on having it

placed here, yes.

We are against it, yes. We

are against it. We don't think

it's safe. Why? Well, this is a residential area and I mean,

if there is a if there is a missile fired

from here it could create a lot

of damage. What do you think of

the plan for missiles on this

building? Well, I think it's

wrong. Anything could happen to

us in there. There are five

other missile sites, one within

a residential complex, but the

Fred Wik tower is the only one

with missiles on top of

housing. Residents have taken

legal action in the High Court

to try to stop it I'm not

saying don't defend the

Olympics, absolutely do it, but

don't defend it by putting

missiles in a residential block

of flats, there by putting the

hundreds of people in that

block at risk. Demonstrators

set up a small protest outside

the court to highlight what

they say is a dangerous and illogical plan. If they are

going to defend us against

aeroplanes crashing into the

Olympics by shooting them down

over somewhere else, all it

does is move the dead, it

doesn't protect us. Lawyers

representing the Ministry of

Defence denied the missile

battery would attract a

terrorist attack. They said the

decision was taken after rig

rouse scrutiny including from

the Prime Minister. The

missiles are just part of a

massive security shield for London during the Games.

Everything from warships to fighter planes, helicopters and

assault boats. But none of that

arsenal comes anywhere near as

close to the people the

military seeks to protect here, an interface that just isn't working. The government said

this is all about keeping all Londoners and visitors safe.

However, many residents here

still believe that their safety

is compromised, not enhanced by having the missiles in their

midst. A local superannuation

industry has been warned to be

on alert for sophisticated

fraudsters looking to steal

retirement savings. Regulators

say they're stepping up efforts

to track down international

criminal cartels who are

targeting Australian investors.

targeting Australian investors.

Sue Lannin reports. I

figure. Fake stocks and fake investment companies are not

just in the movies. A report by

Australian regulators has found

real fraudsters have fleeced

more than $117 million from

local investors since 2007. I

got a cold call. I had

certainly researched where I

was spending my money and what

I was making on my money, quite

heavily, I thought, for this

company. It was an investment

scam and Michael lost $250,000.

The report found at least 2,600

local investors have fallen

victim to fraudsters over the

past five years. As criminals

cold-call people, offering

too-good-to-be-through investments. Those figures mean

that there will be on average

10 victim this week. Last year

authorities set up a taskforce

to track organised investment

fraud. Now every Australian

household will be sent a letter

warning them about the

scams. Criminals are a business

and they are innovative and the

way in which they construct

their businesses are there to

actually trick you into making

investments in what are

basically completely false

investment schemes. The crime

gangs are usually based

offshore, including in eastern Europe, Hong Kong and other

parts of Asia, making them

extremely difficult to track

down and prosecute. Earlier

this year, authorities swooped

on a fraudster gang based on the Gold Coast xgt The

Australian Crime Commission

says the fraud is carried out

by organised crime cartels who

may be involved in other

serious offences as well, such

as money laundering and drug

trafficking. It says some

people may not even know they

are victims. They may find out

their investment fund is fake

when they retire and seek

access to their

superannuation. The fraudsters

often get people's names from legitimate mailing lists and

the criminals are also

targeting retirees with

self-managed super

funds. Especially the growth in self-managed

self-managed super growing as

it is from 25% potentially to

30% in the next so years. The report found most victims are

male, middle-aged or elderly

and educated. They lost an

average of around $17,000

each. A lot of it goes

unreported just through

embarrassment, that people get

taken in, and what's really

tragic is when they get other

people in The self-managed

super fund industry is also educating financial

advisers. We've been talking to the Crime Commission about information that we can provide

to our members so that they can

put that through to their mums

and dads who are investors in self-managed superannuation

funds. So the best advice from

the regulators is have a

healthy dose of scepticism and

if you get a phone call from an

unsolicited person, hang

you. We are watching ABC News

Breakfast. The top stories -

the rift between Labor and the

Greens is growing. Immigration

Minister Chris Bowen has joined

the attacks saying the Greens

are naive in relation to asylum

seekers, and a key member of

Labor's Left, Doug Cameron has

labelled the Greens as

intransigent and immature. The

British military's plan to put

missiles on the roof of a

London tower block during the Olympics is being challenged in

the High Court. The mo of is

pat of security measures for

the Games, but residents say it

breaches their human

rights. And 600 workers at a

Coles distribution centre in

Melbourne have walk walked off

the job. They've set up a

picket line at the centre and

they're trying to stop trucks

from going in or out of the

building. For a look at today's

national papers we're joined by

'The Australian''s Chip Le

Grand, good morning Good

morning. We will start with

your newspaper and this growing

rift between Labor and the

Greens The story has been

kicking around since the

weekend so getting a bit of

steam up. The latest is more

and more Labor ministers basically coming out and

slamming the Greens and backing

the call by Sam Dastyari as the

New South Wales State Secretary

to rethink their preference s

towards the Greens. What exactly that means no-one is

spelling out. The real

threshold question, of course s

whether they preference the

Liberal Party ahead of the

Greens or the Greens ahead of the Liberal Party at the next

election and other various

by-elections coming up. They're

having plen toy to say on the

issue and the interesting thing

is in 'The Australian' story,

these are people less from the

right of the faction of the

party, but also key figures on

the Left like Stephen Jones who

is the factional convenor for

the Left. People like Greg

Combet who is more left

a-Lyled. Kim Carr, they're all

lining up with the right and

saying, "We have to rethink how

we treat the Greens.Al" What's

your point? Do you think this

is tactical as far as the Labor

Party is concerned? Do you

think there is a feeling of

them being held hose Taj by the

Greens? I think it 's both. I

think there is also a bit of

pent-up anger and we saw it

really spill over with the lack of any solution that came forward with the boat people

issue. So I think there are two

levels. The hard heads of the

party are having a bit of a

think about how to address this

rising threat on the left side

of the party, but at the same

time they're really annoyed at

the refusal of the Greens to

compromise on pretty key

policies. But they do need to

think this through particularly

when it comes to how the

numbers fall in the Senate

after 2013? That's right, the

Senate is the big run. The

House of Reps isn't Tiley a big

issue as far as Labor is

concerned. When the Greens got elected in Melbourne it was off the back of Liberal Party

preferences but in the Senate

the Greens relie on Labor prefecture representses and

also the laich relies on Greens

preferences for some of its

seats in the Senate. Adam Bandt

is saying that, who is the Greens member in Melbourne,

this is just a gift to Tony

Abbott that you will just help

elect an Abbott Government and

also give them majority in the

also give them majority in the Senate. We can see it is the

front page of the age age as

well. That's right. When

readers look at those

headlines, what will they be

feeling? Is the Labor Party

imploding? Well, lit it's less

about the Labor Party imploding

and more about a thawing in the

relation between thesing

cousins. Remember how comfy

things were when Julia Gillard

sat down with Bob Brown to sign

the formal agreement that they

would work as a would work as a coalition in

this government and that the

Greens would help the Labor

Party to have the numbers in the Lower House, and obviously

that relationship is really

falling out. It's interesting

it has come after Brown has

left politics and the

relationship clearly isn't as

warm as it is with Christine

Milne. This there be a tension

running right through the next election. Let's turn to the

front page of the 'Daily

Telegraph' and the issue that

has been dogging the Coalition

as well and that's Tony

Abbott's policy on turning back

boats? There are two elements

to this story. One to this story. One is Tony Abbott, probably to the

surprise of no-one saying that

he is will not be involved in

this multiparty committee which

you will recall was what Julia

Gillard set up to assist the

three -member panel that is

being headed by our former

Defence Chief Angus Houston to

try to find some sort of

resolution. Tony Abbott said,

"No, we don't want a bar of it.

We think it is a pre-determined

outcome." The other thing is talking about the aimpact that

the arrivals and rate of

arrivals will potentially have

the federal Budget. It's firly

crude maths but 'The Telegraph' has worked out that the May

budget which set aside about a billion dollars to deal with

arrivals, it was predicated on

about 450 boat arrivals a

month. Since the Budget was

handed down, it's running at

about twice that rate and, you

can do the maths and whether or

not this will blow out the

Budget and I suppose turn

around the forecast for a

surplus and tow is back to sea.

Zl that headline can be taken a

couple of different ways, can't

it?, as far as Abbott saying he

is not interested, they don't

have the money to deal with the

boats or he is going to deal with the boats in such a way

that he is pulling the plug on

them. I guess it depends on how

people interpret that

particular headline? Well, I

suppose he benefits either way

out of this situation, but I

guess the bottom line there is

he certainly doesn't want to be part of a solution if indeed

one was going to come out of

this multiparty committee.

What I found most interesting

was what I read in 'The

Australian' today, your paper,

and that's the comments he made

on ABC Local Radio in Perth

yesterday when he was asked

about his stance and turning

back asylum seeker boats was un

Christian and he said it was un-Christian for the asylum

seekers to come in the back

door when there is a front

door Yes, and again Malcolm

Turnbull spoke of this

extensively last night on 'Q&A'

where he said, yes, absolutely

it is a cruel measure to tow

these boats back, but there is

no way of solving this in a

nice way. Let's move on from Federal politics. Let's talk

about the front page of the

'Herald Sun'. Yes, this is a

story that has been brewing for

a little while, for national

listeners and watchers, this is

Tristan Weston, he was a police

adviser in the early months of

the Baillieu Government. He is

a former policeman and his role

as a ministerial adviser to

Peter Ryan, the Police Minister

here, came to all sorts of

grief about a year ago which

coincided very closely with the

departure of Simon Overland as

Victoria's police chief. Now,

there was a very scathing

report written by the Office of

Police Integrity, the police

watchdog, about Tristan

Weston's role and how he had

worked tounder mine Simon

Overland, and it also flagged

the potential for various

charges, including fairly

serious charge of misconduct in

public office to be laid

against Tristan Weston. Now,

what's happened just in the

last week is that there is a

new boss of the OPI, Ron benigh

tonne, who used to run the

defence singles electorate in

Canberra. He has written to

Tristan Weston saying, "No,

you're not going to be charge.

We don't find the grounds for

charging you. It's all over."

* tab tan Weston has now come

out and let the OPI have it

between the eyes. It does seem

to be overtly political in

Victoria? It has and the thing

that's made it particularly so

is the role of the various

watch bog dogs, where you've

had the OPI and criticisms that

the OPI, particularly under

Michael Strong was too close to

Simon Overland. The new OPI

boss and the Ombudsman in OPI,

a kind of turf war going on

between those two agencies and

the OPI still has another

report to tail on this. They've

got to report to the Ombudsman.

The Ombudsman has been critical

of the OPism, so the politics

is very thick in all this and

by the time Tristan Weston was

made a police adviser, he was much more a full-time politician, than a full-time

cop, it's fair to say. Let's stay with the police theme and

move west? This is another

string story about policing.

This happened last year where

Cold Chisel were playing a gig

in the Margaret River and you

have a little court sequel to

that today where a policeman

who was driving 50km over the

limit was Constable Shane

chaerk. He has been fined $1250

for speeding. His excuse is the

interesting part of the story.

He said that they were running

late and he was really worried

that if Barnesy and the boys

didn't get to Margaret River in

time they could have a civil

disorder on their hands. I love

that quote The magistrate

thought it was a bit of a

"cheap wine" and stripped his

licence for six months. That's

the best I could do at this

hour of the morning. Chip,

Michael will be very happy that

it's still here even though he

isn't. The Yl new people from

Elcho Island danced on a giant

sand sculpture. To warm the

start of a week-long course

across Darwin Harbour. In

recent years they've revived an

ancient ceremony. It's used for

peace-making and mediation. So

that the two parties can talk

about or two tribes can talk

about and trying to come into a

type of reconciliation. The

course is part of a masters

degree offered by Charles

Darwin University. Listen to

where the other people are

coming from. Students from

around Australia are learning

how Yolngu people solve

disputes. Many have jobs as

lawyers and teachers in Aboriginal communities. Two

different cultures that come together and how to understand

each other and how to

communicate. Since the

intervention, legislation has

prevented Aboriginal customary law from being taken into

account by courts. Some believe

it should be changed again to

allow judges to consider

cultural practices. By

excludeing Yolngu customary

law, and indeed Aboriginal

customary law across the board,

it compromises Aboriginal

people's respect and faith in

the system. Yolngu elders say

courses like this help

relations between Indigenous communities and the legal system Working together and try

to establish a commob ground

for our discussion. For the

next week, students will camp

with Yolngu people, getting a

rare insight into their

ceremonial life. Let's check

the sport headlines. Amy is

with us. A lot of work to do

for Cadel Evans? Indeed there

is, particularly after Stage 9

which was last night. British cyclist Bradley Wiggins has seized control of the Tour de

France. He had a powerful

performance in the time trial

overnight. Wiggins posted the

quickest time over the 41.5km

course. He has opened up a 1

minute and 53 second lead over

Australia's Cadel Evans who

finished 6th in that stage.

Wiggins's team-mate Chris

Froome finished second in the

time trial to move to third

place overall. The rider also

have a rest day before heading

into the alps. Meanwhile, seven-time Tour de France

winner Lance Armstrong has

filed a lawsuit to try to stop

the US Anti-Doping Agency from

laying doping charges against

him. The lieu suit claims the

agency's rules violate agency's rules violate Armstrong's Constitutional

right to a fair trial. It also accuses the agency's chief

executive of waging a personal

vendetta against him. Armstrong has denied ever using performance-enhancing drugs.

The Cronulla Sharks and Sydney

Roosters played out a 14-all

draw in last night's NRL match

in Sydney. The Roosters scored

a try late in the second half

to draw level, but neither side

could convert their field goal

chances in golden point time .

On 25 points, one point behind

the second-placed

Canterbury. And to the

trans-Tasman netball league and

the Waikato Bay of Plenty Magic

eliminated Adelaide from the

finals series overnight. The

Magic had had a one-goal victory

victory in New Zealand, 49

halfback 48. The team is now

into the preliminary final against the northern Mystics.

The winner will play the Vixens

who have already secured their

Grand Final berth. Of cows,

moving on from Wimbledon

yesterday and that depressing

loss for Andy Murray, the

British press is now very excited about Bradley Wiggins

and the Tour de France. They've

got to find a winner somewhere.

They've got the Olympics coming

up. Indeed. Bradley Wiggins is

a three-time Olympian. Is he 32

years old and a very slim chap

at the moment. He has been

working very hard to try to

lose a lot of weight for this

yore's Tour de France and have

that power-to-weight ratio a

bit better on the bike. I will post some international

articles, good ones from the

'New York Times' and also from

the BBC this morning. I will

post those on my Twitter

account this morning so people

can have a look. Thank you, Amy. Now Vanessa with the weather. In the east a

deepening low pressure system

making its way southwards and dumping a lot of rain over the

eastern states. Over in the

west' low has been drawing

energy from warmer-than-normal

waters in the Indian Ocean. The

low will spread to the central

wheatbelt before it track noose

the Bight tomorrow. Rain across

Queensland, heavier over the

central districts including the

central coast:

Coming up, we'll have more

on the growing rift between

Labor and the Greens. Lots of

your comments coming into us.

Dan says Julia Gillard has

broken her agreement with

Andrew Wilkie and lied about

the carbon tax, and now the

Greens are under fire. The crazy Australian Labor Party."

And Ray says, "Labour's attack

on the Greens is like beating up your little brother instead

of the school bully." Also,

Ben says, "We need the Greens

because who else will push for

their policies?" We'll also

find out why the Australian

Crime Commission is warning

retirees to be on the lookout

for fraudsters trying to steal

their savings. We'll be

speaking to the bosses there.

If you have any experience of

online fraud or having your

savings stolen, we'll'd love to

hear from you. We will be back

after this short break.

The rift widens - more senior Labor figures join the

attack on the Greens If this

keeps going, it will be the end

of the noble tradition of light

on the hill. That's now being

taken up by the Greens. This

Program is Captioned Live. A

High Court challenge -

residents of a London tower try

to stop missiles on their roof

during the Olympics If this

case is unsuccessful, it would

set a precedent which means the Ministry of Defence could come

to your home, to National

Party's home and install

military hardware on your roof

or on your lawn without ever

asking. 600 workers walk off

the job at a Coles distribution centre in Melbourne. And Australia's Casell Australia's Casell Evans slips

off the pace at the Tour de

France. Good morning, you're watching ABC News Breakfast on

Tuesday, 10th July. I'm Karina

Carvalho. Coming up on the

program, how have you been

coping since the glfs? We'll be looking at a new survey that

has been tracking the lives of

financial meltdown began. Also several Australians since the

ahead, how to relax in a war zone. We've got zone. We've got organised PT

three times a week, just to

foster morale and esprit de

corps and physical fitness,

just talk amongst ourselves and

make sure we check on each

other's mental health and

special wellbeing. It's part of our

special series into life as an Australian soldier in Afghanistan. We'll get an

insight into how soldiers spend

their downtime. That's later in

the program but first here is

the news with Andrew

Geoghegan Good morning.

Tensions are growing between

the Labor Party and the Greens

just two years after the Greens

signed a partnership deal with

Julia Gillard. Several senior

ALP figures are criticising

them for being a protest party.

Labor senator Doug Cameron says

they're intransigent and

immature and last night the

Immigration Minister Chris

Bowen called the Greens naive

in relation to asylum seekers.

He has backed calls for the He has backed calls for

Greens to not automatically get

Labor preferences at the next

election. Former Greens leader

Bob Brown says any rift with

Labor will only bolster support for Opposition Leader Tony

Abbott. Resident ntion East

London have gone to the High

Court to try to stop missiles

being put on their roof during

the Olympics. Their public

housing block is one of six

site as cross London earmarked

by the military for the

plan is part surface-to-air missiles. The

plan is part of security

measures for the Games. The

residents claim their human

rights are being breached.

About 600 workers at one Coles' national distribution About 600 workers at one of

centres have walked off the job

indefinitely. The striking

workers are expected to set up

a picket line this morning.

They're threatening to stop

trucks enterer og leaving the

building. The work has been

outsourced and Coles is

refusing to give the workers

the same cond