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(generated from captions) Australian lawyer Melinda Taylor is

Taylor is finally free after a

month-long detention in

Libya. Cover-ups and suicides,

the Catholic Church forced to

defend its handling of sex

abuse by clergy. Our problems

are your problems - people

smugglers to top the agenda

today When we are faced by

these hard issues, we turn

towards each other, towards each other, rather than

turning away. COMMENTATOR: Is

the missile going to hit the

target for the 21st time? Yes,

he does. Britain's Mark

Cavendish takes out the first sprint stage at the Tour de

France. Good morning, it's

Tuesday, July 3rd. I'm Andrew

Geoghegan. And I'm Andrew

Geoghegan. The top story on ABC

News Breakfast, the Australian

lawyer Melinda Taylor has been

released from custody in Libya.

Ms Taylor and three colleagues

were arrested last month. They

were held after meeting the son

of Moamar Gaddafi to discuss

his war crimes trial. Ms Taylor

will travel to Italy before

being reunited with her family

at the Hague. Our correspondent

Lisa Millar is at the criminal

court in The Hague and she

joins us now via broadband.

Lisa, do we know where Melinda

Taylor is now? She is en

route, is what we know. It is a

long journey and I have just

literally spoken to the main

spokesperson for the ICC, we've

just done an interview and he

has told me she has left

Tripoli, heading for Rome, on

an Italian military aircraft.

She is still with the

Australian ambassador David

Richie who has been involved

with this throughout and quite

a delegation, I'm told, heading

to Rome where they will then

make their way via a commercial

airliner, we're told, to the Netherlands here in the Hague

where she will be finally

reunited with her husband,

Jeff, and her 2-year-old

daughter, a moment many have

wondered how long it will take

to come. So a lot of

celebrations and happy looks on

faces here at the ICC. Indeed,

there must be a good deal of

relief, not only for the

family, of course, but also her

ICC colleagues? Absolutely.

It's a relatively young

organisation, only 10 years old

the this month and this is by far

the most challenging moment

they have faced, and they have

reiterated today about what

went on during those moments to

get this release, that critical

moment when they offered not

quite an apology, but certainly

offering the regret that

perhaps there had been

misunderstandings from these

four ICC members in four ICC members in Libya, and

might have been that they were sorry that there

misunderstandings, but also

critically that they said that

they would have an internal investigation. As soon as

Melinda Taylor and her three

colleagues arrived back here in

the Hague, that they would

start working their way through

the information that the Libyan

officials were going to give

them about what they believed

were the crimes that they had

accused Melinda Taylor of

damaging national security -

that's still on the table, and

the ICC has promised that they

will do an internal

investigation, and that was the

message again passed on by the

ICC President himself who went

to Libya for these last hours

of the negotiations before the

actual release. Lisa, do we

have any idea of what Melinda

Taylor's immediate future

holds? No, the ICC spokesman is most reluctant to be offering

her up to the media when she

arrives back here, I can tell

you that. He believes that and

rightly so, that she deserves

some private time and her

daughter who is about to have

her third birthday, so she will

be very excited to know her mum

is going to be home for that.

Melinda Taylor's parents told

the ABC that Jeff Roberts,

Melinda's husband had been

telling their daughter that,

"Mum r Mummy was away on a

holiday," and that was the way

they were getting through the

last few weeks and now he can

tell her that she will be back

for Yasmina's birthday. It's 10

o'clock at night and she is not due in now until tomorrow

morning. We're not sure what

time that will occur here, but

certainly the first priority

for the ICC is to assure that

get some private time with she and the other colleagues

their families who have been,

of course, so worried over the

last few weeks . Lisa, thanks

very much. Here's Karina with

the rest of the day's

news. Good morning. Julia

Gillard will meet the

Indonesian President Susilo

Bambang Yudhoyono in Darwin

today. The two leaders have an

agreement to meet every year to

forge closer ties. The Prime

Minister says tough issues like

people smuggling will be on the

agenda. The talks will also

focus on trade and humanitarian

aid. Sydney Archbishop focus on trade and humanitarian

Cardinal George Pell has

defended the Church's handling

of child sex abuse allegations

after more claims of cover-ups.

The ABC has revealed cases

where priests were merely moved

on when accusations of abuse

were made against them. An

investigation into the rigging of inter-bank interest rates.

The chairman of Barclays has

resigned after the company was

fined for manipulating the rate

at which banks lend to each

other. Other banks under investigation include

Citigroup, HSBC and the Royal

Bank of Scotland. The United

Nations says the Syrian

Government and Opposition are

carrying out serious new human rights violations. The Security

Council says both sides appear

to have committed war crimes.

There has been renewed violence

overnight with reports of shelling in Damascus.

Opposition groups are meeting

in Cairo for talks organised by

the Arab League. Melbourne drug trafficker Tony Mokbel will be

sentenced in the Supreme Court

today. In 2007 Mokbel was

arrested in Athens after one of

Australia's biggest manhunts.

jail on drug charges. Four of He could face up to 30 years in

the seven initial charges were

dropped after Mokbel struck a

plea deal with prosecutors. Two

boys have died in northern

Queensland after a stormwater

drain collapsed on them. The

accident happened at a property

south of Townsville. Paramedics

14-year-olds after pulling them performed CPR on the 12 and

from the ditch. They died after

being rushed to hospital. Let's

take a quick look at finance.

Let's go to Canberra now

where the WIN some denier joins us. Prime Minister Julia

Gillard hosted a dinner with President Susilo Bambang

Yudhoyono last night. A fairly

warm relationship they have and

discussing regional issues? That's right, this

meeting happening today between

the Prime Minister and the

Indonesian President is

actually the second of annual bilateral talks that bilateral talks that were set

up a couple of years ago. The

first was held last year in Indonesia and in Julia

Gillard's speech last night at

that state dinner she said just

how far the relationship

between Indonesia and Australia

has come in the past couple of

years. The Opposition Leader

Tony Abbott was at that state

dinner last night and both the

Prime Minister and the

Opposition Leader spoke and we

can bring you some of their

speeches now. I believe

problems which once threatened

to divide us now only bring us

closer together. For two such

diverse and dynamic nations, to

achieve a relationship of such

stability and maturity is the

real proof that we, you and I,

our nations, can meet the goal

you set in Canberra in 2010 you set in Canberra in 2010 to

build a fair dinkum

partnership. Indonesia is the

world's fourth largest country,

third largest democracy, and

largest Muslim nation.

Australia has larger economic

and historical relationships,

but in some respects, the

relationship with Indonesia is

our most important one because

of Indonesia's

of Indonesia's size, proximity

and potential. So that's Tony Abbott and the Prime Minister,

of course, speaking there, and

Winsome, what can we expect

today on the agenda? Obviously

there are broad issues that the

Prime Minister and the

Indonesian President are going

to have to cover off today but some of the key ones they will

be focusing on are the drug trade, the draft trade, the draft management and

the issue of people smuggling

and asylum seeker policy which

of course Australia's

government still doesn't have

an official policy on that, and

interestingly we're starting to

see some broader effects now

with news out this morning that

a representative from the

shipping industry has come out

and said that effects on cargo

ship workers are starting to

show. They're being affected by

mental health issues because,

of course, cargo ships are

often the first people on the

scene of an asylum seeker boat

accident, if there is one to

sink out at sea, and they

arrive on the scene and there

are people in the water, it can

be quite distressing, and there

are just calls now for Australia's Government to

really knuckle down and get a

policy together because the

longer this impasse continues,

the more issues we will be

seeing like this develop. Thanks very much Let's get more now on that new

inquiry into banking in Britain. Britain. Announcement comes

less than a week after revelations that a key interest

rate was rigged by Barclays and

other banks. The parliamentary

investigation will go wider

than rate-rigging scandal

alone, but still not far enough

for Labor who wants a fully independent investigation along

the lines of the Leveson Inquiry.

Inquiry. The chairman of

Barclays Marcus Agius has

resign as the BBC's Rob Preston

reports. After the cloud of

scandal that descended on the

city with the interest rate

rigging scandal it is the

Government trying to lift it by

toughening relevant laws and

forcing higher standards on

banks. These will be based on

reforms to be proposed by a new

parliamentary committee. But

this is the right approach

because it will be able to

start immediately t will be

account bility to this House

and it will get to the truth

quickly so we can make sure

this never happens again. The

banking reform Committee will

consist of MPs and peers who

will take evidence under oath

and report by January. It will

investigate the broken culture

and declining standards of banks and it will decide if

there needs to be new and

greater punishments for conduct. Labour wants conduct. Labour wants a more

independent inquiry along the

lines of Lord Justice Leveson's

media ethics inquiry A full and

open inquiry, independent of bankers and independent of politicians. That is the only

way, in my view, that we can

build trust in the City of

London and financial

services. The bruised chairman

of the Royal Bank of Scotland

agrees reform may be agrees reform may be necessary. The public's anger

at some the things that have happened in the banking

industry is very obvious and I

think some more process and

more formal process to address

that anger and address some of

the evident failings of the

banking industry is very sensible. When people talk

about the rotten culture of

banking, when they say that

standards have declined,

they're not talking about the

tens of thousands of frontline

staff who work staff who work in branches like

this one, they're talking about

senior executives and highly

paid investment bankers, but it

is the frontline staff who in

most banks have been losing

their jobs and it is the frontline

frontline staff who have to

encounter the public's anger on

a daily basis. In recent days,

that anger has been directed

most at Barclays and its chief executive Bob Diamond,

following the bank's admission that it tried to rig important

interest rates. But Barclays

board doesn't want to lose Mr

Diamond, so the chairman Marcus

Agius is taking responsibility

by resigning. Mr Agius said:

So what does a So what does a former

Barclays director make of all

of this? I think it's very sad.

Marcus is an honourableable and

he Haas done the honourable

thing. I can't help but think

he is taking the flak for Mr

Diamond. I think it's

inevitable that Bob will go

now. Mr Diamond's survival

depends on what he says when

interrogated by MPs on Wednesday. At stake will be his Wednesday. At stake will be his reputation, Barclays' reputation and arguably

confidence in the honesty and

integrity of the City of London. That was Robert Preston

from the BBC. Let's check the

front pages of the major

newspapers around the country. Starting with the 'Financial

Review'. It says planning is

under way for a military

exercise next year involving

Australia, the US and

Australia, the US and Indonesia. 'The Australian'

reports on a committee's

finding that carbon pricing

could lead to the closure of

one or more power generators in

Victoria's Latrobe Valley. The

'West Australian' says families

already paying a premium for clean, green power will still

be hit with the carbon tax. The front page of the 'Sydney

Morning Herald' reports on a

confidential memo that reveals

there's no cap on the number of public public sector redundancies in New South Wales The 'Canberra

Times' says house prices in the

capital have rebounded with a

2.2% increase recorded last

month. 'The Age' reports on a

new IVF trend where women spend

thousands of dollars to select

embryos without the same

genetic issues The

'Courier-Mail' leads with an

appeal from Daniel more come's parents to parents to have their son's

remains returned. The 'Northern

Territory News' reports on a

house fire during and the arrest of Jonathan

Stenberg. The Dale. 'Daily

Telegraph' says Australian

Olympic athletes will be banned

from using Stilnox and other

sleeping pills during the

Games. The 'Herald Sun' reports

athlete's rooms might be raided

if they're suspected of using

sedatives. The 'Advertiser'

says the Australian Olympic

Committee is re-writing its he

had Cal manual to include the

ban. And the mercury say the

AFL has been called in to

investigate claims of betting

from players participates in

Tasmanian State league games.

You can contact us:

My was ABC Andrew G if you

care to follow. A quick look at

the weather in the capitals:

The top stories on ABC News

Breakfast - Australian lawyer

Melinda Taylor has been

released from custody in Libya.

She is due to arrive at the

Hague this afternoon. Ms Taylor

and three colleagues from and three colleagues from the International Criminal Court

were detained last month. The

ABC has detailed cases in ABC has detailed cases in which

priests were merely moved on

after the Church was made aware

of abuse claims against them.

Many of the victims committed

suicide. Julia Gillard will

meet with Indonesian President

Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono in

Darwin today. The two leaders

will discuss trade and

humanitarian aid. The Prime

Minister says the issue of

people smuggling will also be on the agenda. on the agenda. And we've just

got a quick update on the

release of Melinda Taylor. The

Foreign Affairs Department has

issued a statement saying that

Melinda and her colleagues will

be travelling on an ICC charter

flight from Rome to The Hague

in the early hours of 3rd July

European time, so they won't be

on the ground in Rome for very

long. We'll keep you across

developments on that story over

the course of the

the course of the morning. Well, Queensland

Premier has stood by his threat

to cut government power

contracts with Origin Energy

despite report it is could cost

taxpayers more Campbell Newman

was in Townsville for a

regional Cabinet meeting on the

eve of his Government's first 100 days in office. The

People's Day at the Townsville

Show and one of the attractions

was State Cabinet. Hi, how was State Cabinet. Hi, how are

you? How are you? It was the

LNP's first Cabinet meeting in

a regional city The members

from the north have been

forceful advocates for getting

Cabinet up herein side 100 days. The Premier days. The Premier made more

than 50 commit pentment s for

the first three months of his

Government We believe tomorrow

we will have delivered and you

can tick of all of the things

we had in our 100-day

booklet. The Opposition says

public sector job cuts and

social housing changes are

major disappointments These are

the two biggest issues that

people are coming up to me and

talking about constantly - the

loss of jobs in the community

and also the social housing upheaval. The Premier's focus

has been paying down debt and

his sights are still firmly on

cutting government contracts cutting government contracts

with Origin Energy in response

to price hikes, despite

possible penalties. He needs to

say to the Queensland taxpayers

how much taxpayers' funds are now

now going to be lost for breaching those contracts.

That's assuming that it's

going to cost. The bottom line

is here that we are not going

to do business with a company

that is going to engage in such

huge non-justifiable price

increases. But he is also

willing to spend money on a

study into establishing a high

school at Townsville's James

Cook University. It will provide basically a high school

of excellence for people in the

north of the State. His local

members had some excellent

advice of their own. Keep away

from the chips, mate. A

description of his first few

months in office the Premier would

would be happy with. A long Winter of Discontent continues

for Australia's Rae tailers

with a takeover bid for David

Jones ending even before it got

off the ground. Late yesterday

EPB withdrew its bid That's

left investors saying was the deal serious in the first

deal serious in the first

place. It's the stocktake sale

that never was. The takeover

bid for David Jones by a UK

private equity firm has

collapsed leaving behind some

red faces and burnt fingers. Frankly, the bid doesn't look serious. The

structure of it seems absurdly

complicated and the people

behind it doesn't look

credible. So I think it has

been revealed gradually as a been revealed gradually as a hoax. David Jones shared as

much as 20% on Monday on news

EB private equity had

approached the company about a

takeover, but by Monday morning

the scepticism was growing. By

day's end, they had lost

another 5% after David Jones had revealed

had revealed that EB had walked

away saying recent publicity

around its proposal made it

difficult to proceed. It is a mysterious mysterious bid, that's for

sure. Little is known about EB

Private Equity itself. The

firm's website says it is a

real estate investor and

developer. David Jones says it

has had two approaches from EB

Private Equity, the most recent

last week valuing the retailer

at $1.6 billion, or more than at $1.6 billion, or more than $3 a share compared with last

week's price of $2.25 So really

more like a 30, 35% premium

which is on the high side for

David Jones. While the bid has

finished, it has highlighted at

track shun of the flagship

stores in Melbourne and Sydney

CBDs. Investors are weighing up

the possibility of David Jones

undertaking a similar transaction to what transaction to what Myer did in

2007 where it sold and leased

back three-quarters of its

Melbourne floor space and sold

the rest outright to commercial

developers. There is no doubt

when Myer did it, they did it

at absolutely the right time,

they sold off the properties at

the right time, and they

floated the companies at the

right time. You would not get

the same result if you were

trying to buy David Jones at the moment. the moment. Obviously the business

business itself is under a lot

of pressure at the moment,

about you with that type of

sale of the property and then

leasing back over the longer

term, some attractive returns

could be generated. But the

question now is whether there

is a serious bidder out there

for David Jones. I think the

David Jones brand is still very

strong and if one was to take a longer-term view of the

business, there is a good case

to be made that it is an

attractive business attractive business if done

under the right terms and if

the right catch tal structure

was employed.

Frankly I think the whole

sector is in a terrible state

that I would be surprised if

there were too many rival

bidders out there. In other

words, David Jones shareholders

may be waiting a long time

before a genuine takeover

emerges. Checking the markets

now:

The national Director of

lobby group, GetUp! has been

cleared by doctors after collapsing on national

television. Shy mon Shake

appeared to lose consciousness on the 'Q&A' on the 'Q&A' program last

night He has been told by

doctors to rest. Let's take a

look at what happened last

night. And to pretend that the

Coalition's policy position has

no cost is entirely fallacious

and I just give you one brief

example. The cost of putting

solar panels. I'm not quite

sure what Simon is dog

there. There is a

problem. Simon is not OK.

problem. Simon is not OK. Oh my

god. Something has happened to

him. It is a seizure. I'm

sorry, I've passed out. Are you

OK? Are you alright,

mate. Are you OK. We'll just

take you off the panel there,

Simon. Just go for a wander out

the back. Really extraordinary

scenes on 'Q&A' last scenes on 'Q&A' last night.

Really quite awful watching it

back. Simon tweeted from

hospital last night that he was

in hospital and thanks for all

your support, that GetUp! has

put up a written statement

saying Mr Shape is running a

number of campaigns at the

moment and has been burning the

candles at both ends. Doctors

say he needs to rest and get

well. While, some of us suffer

from that but perhaps from that but perhaps not on

national television Yes, we

just wish him all the best in

his recovery. Indeed. Sport now

with Paul Kennedy. The Tour

goes on. What happened last night? Mark Cavendish won

again, not a big surprise but

this one should be viewed in

the context of dish desh dish

riding this year without a big

lead-out train which means all

of the help he has had in the

past from Mark Renshaw and others in

others in the team, that team

is now driven towards winning

Bradley Wiggins the Tour. So

Mark Cavendish did what he

could last night, including

jumping on the wheel of Andre

Greipel and then choosing his

moment perfectly. He now sits

6th on the all-time list, just

one behind Lance Armstrong.

Let's take a look at the finish

and watch for Matt Goss from Green Edge slotting Green Edge slotting into third

spot. COMMENTATOR: Mark

Renshaw boxed in at the moment

in the centre. Cavendish has

picked up the wheel of Greipel.

Can he launch himself from it.

As they start going shoulder to

shoulder. This is it now.

Greipel is holds off his move

as as for as long as he has

to. Cavendish can he get around his his old team-mate and win. Is

the missile going to hit his

target for the 23rd time? Yes,

he does. Mark Cavendish get it

is on the line. Win No. 25.

That's Matty Goss diving across

to get the wheel of Cavendish.

The destraktors of this man,

Phil, I don't know why they

don't leave the books behind

because when he has because when he has to come up

to the big occasion, he knows

how to do it. Maria Sharapova

is out of Wimbledon upset by Sabine Lisicki. Christ Chris

Christ is also out of the

tournament. She is due to

retire after the US Open and

after she has played the

Olympics. She was totally

outplayed. Serena Williams has

gone through. She won 7-5 in the

the third set and she will play

against Petra Kvitova. Roger

Federer has gone through to his

33rd consecutive Grand Slam

final. He had a bit of a sore

back during that match but was

able to win it in four sets. To

the netball last night, the

Firebirds can no longer defend

their title. They were beaten by The Magic

by The Magic last night by 10.

53-43 in the end. The magic has

been on a tear at the moment.

The nine games in a row. Sergio

van Djik doing the shooting

down one end . Casey Williams,

terrific, goal defence at the

other end and you can see the pressure that the New

Zealand-based team put on

there. They've slotted now into

third position The Magic and

they will have a home final, so that's big

that's big news. Let's hear

from the skippers. I thought

our second half was a lot more

controlled, so happy with that.

Probably looking for more

consistency so we will build on that.

Always a big ask coming over

here to play against the Magic,

certainly the in-form team. Not

the result we were hoping for,

but to their credit, they

played really well. We are in a position that we position that we would have

liked to be going into this

game, so we really let

ourselves down. Let's go to the rugby league because although

we're gearing up for Game 3 of

the State of Origin, there was

a match last night, the Raiders

pipped the Dragons with a try

in the final 3 minutes.

Robinson's try sealed the win

for Canberra, in Canberra.

22-18. Let 's look at the

action.

action. COMMENTATOR: Lee up

against Nightingale. Cooper, a

ball for Goodwin. Williams

again. Out the back it goes to

Robinson. Off the right foot.

Cooper with his hands full this

time. A big difference as they

go wide. Through the line. He

has Robinson with him again.

The pass was OK. Robinson is

away. Nightingale chasing. He

won't get there. He has added

plenty. Robinson, he has been

enormous, Robinson. Looking to get across

get across again. He has done

it! Shall

Williams holding it up. Giving it to Robinson. He pours

into the gap. The hoodoo! The

hoodoo comes into play once

again. And that's it for sport.

I'm going to get on the tweet

this morning and find a few

stories, one of them involves

Michael Phelps, but we've run

out of time, so that will be

for next half-hour Thanks,

Paul. ABC News Breakfast can be

watched live on the web. Just

visit the main ABC News website

at abc.net.au/news and you will

find a link to News 24 which is

streamed live every day. Let's

check the weather with Vanessa O'Hanlon. Good morning. A

complex system causing heavy

rain over the south-east. It is moving towards New Zealand but

still directing very cold air

flow over the region. In

Victoria, minor flood warnings

for Yarra, and a moderate

warping for the Watts River at

Healesville. With a weak front

that's passing, more showers

are expected over the

south-east and we are expecting

that throughout the south coast

of South Australia and

Victoria. Tomorrow it will

direct cooler showery wind as long the New South Wales coast

and behind the front we have

this strengthening high

pressure system with Canberra

expecting a week below 0.

Warmer for Western Australia's south-west until a frontal

system brings a change on

Friday. For your State today:

This program is not subtitled You're watching ABC News

Breakfast. Still to come on the

program, we'll be speaking to

Foreign Affairs Minister Bob

Carr, he is in New York at the

moment. We will be speaking to

him about the release of

Australian lawyer Melinda

Taylor from Libya. He travelled

to Tripoli where he met the

Prime Minister and Deputy

Foreign Minister to try to

secure Ms Taylor's release. And

today she will be joined by

James Dunlevie, the digital

editor of the NT News. Now here's the news with Andrew

Geoghegan Australian lawyer Melinda Taylor has been

released from custody in Libya.

Ms Taylor and three colleagues

from the International Criminal

Court were arrested last month

over spyingal gayses. Ms Taylor

is due to arrive at the Hague

this afternoon where she will

be reunited with her family.

Julia Gillard will meet with Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono in Darwin

today. The two leaders have an

agreement to meet every year to

forge closer ties. The talks

will focus on people smuggling,

trade and humanitarian aid. The

Archbishop of Sydney Cardinal

George Pell has defended the

way the Church manages child

sex abuse allegations after more claims of cover-ups. The

ABC has detailed cases where

priests were merely moved on

when the church was made aware

of abuse claims against them.

Many of the victims committed suicide. The British

Government has launched a parliamentary inquiry into

country's banks. The move

follows an investigation into

the rigging of interbank

interest rates. The chairman of

Barclays has resigned after the

company was fined for manipulating rates at which

banks lend to each other. The

United Nations says the Syrian

Government and Opposition are

carrying out serious new human

rights violations. The Security

Council says both sides appear

to have committed war crimes.

Renewed violence overnight with

reports of shelling in

Damascus. Well, let's get more

now on our top story and the

release of the Australian

lawyer Melinda Taylor. Our ABC

correspondent Lisa Millar is at the International Criminal

Court in the Hague and she says

Melinda Taylor is now on a

plane heading home - heading to

Rome. She is en route, is what

we know, and it is a bit of a

long journey and I have

literally just spoken to the main spokesperson for the ICC,

we've just done an interview

and he was able to tell me that

she has left Tripoli, she is she has left Tripoli, she is on

a plane heading for Rome, she

is on an Italian military

aircraft. She is still with the Australian ambassador David

Richie who has been involved in

this throughout and quite a

delegation, I'm told, heading

to Rome where they will then

make their way via a commercial

airliner, we're told torkts Netherlands here in the Hague

where she will be finally

reunited with her husband,

Geoff and her 2-year-old

daughter, a moment that many

have wondered how long it was

going to take to come, but

finally today, so a lot of

celebrations and happy looks on faces here at the ICC. Well,

indeed there must be a good

deal of relief not only for the

family, of course, but also her ICC colleagues? Absolutely.

It's a relatively young

organisation, only 10 years old

this month, and this is by far

the most challenging moment

they have faced, and they have

reiterated today about what

went on during those moments to

get this release, that critical moment where they offered... We'll leave

correspondent Lisa Millar at

the Hague to bring you some

pictures that are just coming into us at ABC News Breakfast

that. Is the ICC lawyer Melinda

Taylor. This is on the tarmac in

in Rome where she has just

arrived, where she is, of

course, having been freed from

Libya with three of her ICC

colleagues. They've been

captured - or they were

detained for almost a month,

Andrew Yes, and the Italians

flew Melinda and her colleagues

to Rome there and then, of

course they will be flown to

The Hague where she lives with

her husband and daughter, and

obviously looking very much to

being reunited with them after

being in detention, following a

misunderstanding, from the

ICC's point of, as to what they

were doing in Libya and their talks with Moamar Gaddafi's

son, Saif al-Islam, over his

forthcoming trial. So there we

have pictures of Melinda

Taylor. You can see her

smiling, laughing and conversing with the people

around her. She has hopped off

one plane, now likely to hop on

another plane and travel to the

Hague. As we heard from our

correspondent Lisa Millar

earlier, it's her daughter's

third birthday coming up. Her

husband has in fact been

telling their daughter that,

"Mummy has been o way on a

holiday," and that's what's

been able to get him through

the last few weeks. No doubt a

very, very warm homecoming it

will be when she arrives at the

Hague. I think we can see there

the ICC President who flew to

Tripoli in order to get the

delegation of ICC people back

to The Hague, and I think we

might be able to - looks as

though he may be able to speak

to the media. Let's see if we

can pick that up. The

International Criminal Court.

REPORTER: (Inaudible

question) Well, I'm very happy

to bring them all back to the

freedom and taking this

opportunity, I would like to

express my deep sense of gratitude to the Italian

Government, in particular the

foreign ministry, for arranging

all this, you

all this, you know, - the

airplane transport of these

four people. Without the

Italian Government support like

that, it would not have been

possible for these four people

of my court to

of my court to be released and

go home to be united with their

family. I really thank the

Italian Government. REPORTER: (Inaudible question) tell us

something more about that? I didn't... REPORTER: Did you

offer your apologies to the Libyan Government for the

behaviour of our team? What

exactly happened in

Libya? Well, it will gradually

emerge later on because the

Libyan Government gave me their version of the investigation.

We will do our own separately,

so, you know, the results will

be known after some weeks.

REPORTER: Ms Taylor, how is she

feeling? Well, she is - I'm - I

was very glad to find that she

was in good spirits, and good

health. Thank you very much.

Thank you very much. That was

the President of the International Criminal Court

speaking on the tarmac there in

Rome. Our apologies, that was

not live. Those pictures were

very recent though of Melinda

Taylor just arriving, obviously

in good spirits when she

arrived at the airport in oem

and we anticipate she will then

be transferred to The Hague The

ICC President z there, Song, in

response to a question how

Melinda Taylor was doing, he

said he was glad to see her in

good spirits and good health

when he met her. He will now

take that journey back to The

Hague with the ICC officials

she was detained with as well

as the ICC President. We will

bring you more stories of that

when it comes in. Back home now

and Professor Ross Garnaut has

criticised politicians for

triflial eyesing the carbon tax

debate. He says there is too

much point-scoring and not

enough discussion about how it works. Mr

works. Mr Garnaut says the market-based position is the

most effective way There is no

- you will reduce emissions at

a lower cost by a specified

amount at lower cost if you

achieve that result with an

economy-wide price on emissions

rather than through government

trying to intervene in

particular sectors to reduce emissions. One is the operation

of the market where businesses

respond to incentives and find

the lowest-cost way of doing

things. The other is government

second-guessing business, and

deciding that certain areas are

the areas in which we will try

to reduce emissions in certain

ways, other areas will not be.

It is of the nature of market

operations that businesses find

ways of doing things at lower

costs that no bureaucrat will

ever think of, and that's why

in general market-based

solutions are more efficient

than direct interventions and

central planning. That's

Professor Ross Garnaut. Two

boys aged 12 and 14 have died

after a stormwater drain

collapsed on them in northern Queensland. The accident

happened at a property at Ayr

south of Townsville. Our

reporter Francene Norton joins

us now from Brisbane. Good morning, Francene. What more

can you tell us? Good morning,

Karina. Details are still trickling through so only have

early information at the

moment. At the moment we know

it involves two boys, one aged

12 and one aged 14. We know

that they were playing in or

very close to an earth earn

stormwater drain at a property

at Ayr late yesterday when the

drain collapsed on them,

burying them. The alarm was

raised when they failed to

return home last night and

authorities were called to

authorities were called to that private property and that's

when they discovered that

collapsed drain. The boys were

pulled from the rubble and CPR

was performed on them. The

authorities rushed the two boys

to hospital but sadly they

died. We don't know yet whether these two boys were related or

just friends but this has

happened in the middle of the

school holidays. What are

authorities likely to do next in this investigation,

Francene? Well, authorities are yet to

yet to speak publicly and so,

too, community leaders, but

investigation also be

continuing today into how this

earth earn stormwater drain

collapsed on the two boys, but

no doubt this will rock the

community. Ayr is a tiny town,

just south of Towns vl. It has

a population of less than

10,000 and no doubt people are

still waking up to this news

this morning but given it is

such a close-knit community, no doubt it will shock the community today. Francene

Norton, we will leave it

there. Thanks, Karina. We are

watching ABC News Breakfast.

The top stories: Australian

lawyer Melinda Taylor has been

released from custody in Lib

ya. She is due to arrive at the

Hague this afternoon. Ms Taylor

and three colleagues from the International Criminal Court

were arrested last month over

spying allegations. She has now

arrived in Rome with her

colleagues. Cardinal George

Pell has defended the Catholic

Church's management of child

sex abuse allegations. The ABC

has detailed cases in which

priests were merely moved on

after the Church was made aware

of abuse cases against them.

Many of the victims committed

suicide. Julia Gillard will

meet with Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono in

Darwin today. Twot leaders will

discuss trade and humanitarian aid. The Prime Minister says

the issue of people smuggling

will also be on the agenda.

Now, for all of those people

who are watching the ABC's

'Q&A' program last night, you

might be interested to hear how

GetUp!'s Simon Shake is doing

this morning. The lobby group's national Director has been

cleared by doctors after collapsing on national

television. Simon appeared to

lose consciousness while taking

part in the 'Q&A' program. He

was taken to the hospital in

Sydney. Mr Shake says he is

suffering from the flu and has

been told by doctors to

rest. You can see he tweeted

from his hospital bed last

night saying: GetUp! issued a statement this morning saying that the

organisation is running a number of campaigns and Mr

Shake has been burning the

candle at both ends. I think a

bit of shock from everyone on

the panel there, not quite what was

ing on at the time That's what

happens sometimes on live television. But hopefully he

will be fine. Let's now be

joined by James Dunlevie, good

morning, good to have you here.

Thank you. Great to have

someone from somewhere else in

the world and there is a bit

happening in Darwin. Yes, a

bit happening Well, we'll start

off with 'The Age' and Tony

Mokbel. Well, we don't have

much cause to report on Mr

Mokbel in Darwin but we are

constantly on the receiving end

of emails suggesting we can't

write this, we can't write

that, so I think the

newspapers, both 'The Age' and the 'Herald Sun' have done a

great job. They do do driem

stories well and I guess crime

stories sell They do, yes.

John Sylvester is a great

writer, I've been following him

for a long time and Anthony

Dowsley does great staff and Mr

Dagg where they've spoken to

Tony's mum where she has said

Tony is a good boy and can't

have done anything wrong. What

else does the story go on to

say in That he could be facing

30 years in jail. The 'Herald

Sun' story mainly talks about

his mum and her love for her

boy and how he possibly can't

have done anything wrong and

Jesus is the judge in all of

this, whereas 'The Age' story

talks more about the background

of the case, but they're both

very good reads. Let's move

onto the front page of the

'Herald Sun' and this rather

curious story about sedatives

and the Olympics? Stilnox,

apparently you mix it with Red

Bull and it gives you a bit of

a kick. Not that we're

encouraging anyone No, don't

try this That just came out of

Grant Hackett's revelations. I

think also Ben Cousins fell

victim to that. The problem I

see is that testing people are

going to these athletes' rooms and they won't be there,

because I've heard the Olympics

is a hot bed of romance, so

no-one will be in their rooms,

so I don't know that that will

stop them going through their drawers. Drug-testing, very stringently, back in '88, Alex

Watson, our pent agent athlete

was picked up for drinking too

much coffee, having too much

coffee in your system -

caffeine in your system. I

don't understand why these

people just aren't drinking

water and a celery stick in the

lead-up to potentially 8

minutes of their lives or

whafrt the event they're competing in, why they wouldn't

be paying strict attention to

their diet. I'm sure that they

are, but these things seem to

get through. I guess the

sedatives as well can sometimes

be used in order to ease

be used in order to ease the

nerves and get them to sleep

That's right, get them to

sleep Before big performances.

I don't know you, if I was

running around a track 8 or 10

times, I would have a pretty

good sleep at night. I wouldn't

need Stilnox. Susie O'Neill,

the Australian champion swimmer

saying in 2000 she really

struggled to get any quality

sleep at all throughout the two

weeks, or the certainly the

first week that they were

swimming, although she resisted

to turning to Stilnox or any of those

those drugs. What's likely to these athletes if they get

caught? I think they will be

turfed out which would be an

awful way to end your career,

being turfed out for sleeping

tablets. I'm hoping that none

of them run the risk and stick

them in the bottom of the shoe

and take a chance, but, who

knows? Let's move onto your

home turf, the NT News, what's

going on? We have noticed you have

have had the odd crocodile on

the front page recently, but

you've got big news at the

moment with the visit of the

Indonesian President, but I

don't think he made the front

page, did he? Well, if he had

gone down in the croc cage, if

he was prepared to be submerged

in the cage of death with Bert

who is a notoriously grumpy

croc, he might have made the

front, but we're in heavy

negotiations there, but it

didn't come off. We do have a croc in the top right-hand

corner, you will notice. But

that's the one from the

Philippines, is it? I don't

know. That might be a stock

image, who knows? It's in

reference to It is, and sadly

Cassous, the biggest croc in

Australia, which I might point

out was in Cairns, about you

did originally come from the

noompbt, we had a bit of a fight over, there he has pass

add way, so now this crocodile

in the Philippines is the

biggest, but we're working on

it. Where does the Indonesian

President's visit... Rate? Yes I think he

may be page 5. Are you saying

after the visit of Barack Obama

that perhaps you're a bit weary

up there of state vice tit

its? No, no, we love them. We

love a bit of pomp and

ceremony. Bring it on. I would

say it is slightly lower down

on the rank than from

Obama. What, he had to just hop

across the pond, as

such? That's right, yes, and I

notice that in the vision that

I did see of his arrival, the

media were really up close,

they were sticking their boom

microphones over the top and

you couldn't get within coup-ee

of Obama and my mates in Darwin

tell me it was the Indonesian

media that were the worst, they

were putting in the hip and

shoulder to get close, no, we

love them. The mo, - the more,

the merrier, come along. Let's

move along and wrap up in the

State of Origin? Well, the

'Daily Telegraph' has the blue

cover and I don't know if you

can see with that graphic, but

in the top left-hand corner, it

actually says rather than

Tuesday or Wednesday it says

Bluesday. They're clearly

pinning their cards pinning their cards to the

chest on that one. Let's hope

they do well, but... Do you

think anyone outside of New

think anyone outside of New South Wales and Queensland

really care about this? Well,

there is a lot in Darwin. A lot

of rugby league fans in Darwin

who are very interested, and

there are many events - pubs do

a great trade in Blue and

Maroon balloons, but also AFL

is probably slightly stronger

up there, but, yeah, I think

so. Just quickly, you have a

tip on who will win? It's hard

to go past Queensland, isn't

it? There you go, your northern

neighbour. James, thanks very

much. You're welcome. Just

before the sport headlines, we

can update you on the release

of Australian lawyer Melinda

Taylor from custody in

Libya. We have pictures of

Taylor arriving in Rome a Taylor arriving in Rome a short

while ago where she has changed

planes. We understand she is on

her way to the Hague where she is due

is due to arrive this afternoon

Australian time, obviously to

be reunited with her husband

and daughter and she has been

in custody in Libya for almost

a month and we will be speaking

to the Foreign Affairs Minister

Bob Carr in about an hour's

time. We'll just - before we go

to the sport headlines, we'll

just update you on a story that

the ADF is saying that an

Australian soldier has been

involved in an operational

incident in Afghanistan. That's all the information we have for you at the moment, butt the Prime Minister Julia Gillard

and the Defence Minister

Stephen Smith are due to hold a

press conference at quarter

past 8 Eastern Standard Time.

We'll bring that to you live on

ABC News Breakfast. In the

meantime, let's check sport.

Paul? Yes, straight to the Tour

de France and check out the

stage. They're still in Belgium

at the moment. Keep an eye

at the moment. Keep an eye in

the yellow helmet sitting on

the back of Andre Greipel's

wheel, that's Mark Cavendish,

the world's best sprinter. He

didn't have a leadout train

this time, so very ee sourceful

the way de. He won that race,

his 23rd stage win and that

will probably not shall the

last of this Tour. On his right

last of this Tour. On his right

Matt Goss, not far behind the

Cav, but is still there. Karina Carvalho is out Carvalho is out of Wimbledon beaten by Sabine Lisicki.

Christ clays Christ who is due

to retire at the end of the US

Open after she plays in the

Olympics as well, she is also

out. She was beaten badly by

the German Angelique Kerber.

Remember Serena Williams is

through,. That was a tight one.

She will go through to play Petra Kvitova in the

quarterfinals and Roger Federer

is also through to his 33rd

consecutive Grand Slam

quarterfinal. The Magic have

beaten the Firebirds by so in

the trans-netball competition.

Sergio van Djik and her team

have won nine in a row. The

Firebirds won the tournament

last year but will not be able

to defend their title. And in

rugby league, the Raiders have

pipped the Dragons in Canberra.

St George got right back after

trailing. They actually hit the

front and then Canberra broke

their hearts right at the end

for a win 22-18, and that

continues a long, long run for St George not being able to win

in Canberra. Paul, thanks very

much. Thank you. Let's check the weather now with

Vanessa. On the satellite image

and there is a complex low

pressure system that caused

heavy rain in the south-east

but is now moving towards New

Zealand. Still directly a very

cold south-easterly air flow

over the region. A weak cold

front passing more showers over

South Australia and Victoria.

Today it will direct cooler

showery winds up along the New

South Wales coast and a high is

directing south-easterly winds

up into the north. Around the

states for today:

Van necessary sa, thanks

very much. Of course, we have

just heard the news that

Melinda Taylor has landed in

Rome after being freed from

detention in Libya. She is now

on her way to her home in The

Hague And we've got some

pictures from Rome where she

touched down a short time ago

en route to The Hague where she

was accompanied by the ICC

President Song who said that

Melinda Taylor is in good spirits and good health along

with her three ICC colleagues.

They will now make their way

back to the Hague. President

Song said he was very happy to

bring them back and there was a deep sense of gratitude to the

Italian Government for helping

facilitate their transfer.

Australian lawyer Melinda

Taylor is finally free after a month-long detention in

Libya. Well, I'm very happy to

bring them all back to freedom. This Program is Captioned

Live. Cover-ups and suicides -

the Catholic Church forced to

defend its handling of sex

abuse by its clergy. Our

problems are your problems -

people smuggling to top the agenda at talks between

agenda at talks between

Australia and Indonesia. When

we are faced by these hard

issues, we turn towards each

other, rather than turning

away. COMMENTATOR: Is the

missile going to hit his target

for the 23rd time? Yes, he does. And does. And Britain's Mark

Cavendish takes out the first sprint stage at the Tour de

France. Good morning, you're

watching ABC News Breakfast on

Tuesday, 3rd July. I'm Karina

Carvalho. Coming up on the

program this morning we'll

speak to the Foreign Affairs Minister Bob Carr about the

release of Melinda Taylor from

Libya overnight. He personally

intervened in the case and flew

to Libya two weeks ago and met

the Libyan Prime Minister and

Deputy Foreign Minister. Now a

first-hand account of World War

I through the eyes of a

25-year-old soldier. We don't

have any surviving World War I

diggers to tell us their

stories, so from that point of

view, the diary is really

important. A digger's diary

from the Great War is among

memorabilia on display at the

New South Wales State Library.

We'll bring you that later in

the program, but first here is

Andrew with the news. Melinda

Taylor has touched down fore

for a stopover in Italy a short

time ago. Ms Taylor and three

colleagues from the

International criminal court

were arrested last month over

spyingal gayses. She will

arrive at the Hague this

afternoon Australian time to be

reunited with her family. Julia

Gillard will meet with

Indonesian President Susilo

Bambang Yudhoyono in Darwin

today. The two leaders have an

agreement to meet every year to

forge closer ties. The Prime

Minister says tough issues like

people smuggling will be on the

agenda. The talks will also

focus on trade and humanitarian

aid. Sydney Archbishop Cardinal

George Pell has defended the

Church's handling of child

abuse allegations after more

claims of cover-ups. The ABC

has detailed several cases in

which priests were merely moved

on when the Church was made

aware of abuse claims against them. Many of the victims committed suicide. Cardinal

Pell has defended the way the

Church has handled the issue.

The British Government has

launched a parliamentary

inquiry into the country's

banks. It follows an

investigation into the

investigation of interbank

interest rates. The company was

fined after manipulating the

rates at which banks lend to

each other. Other banks under

investigation include

Citigroup, HSBC and Royal Bank

of Scotland. The Security Council says both sides appear

to have committed war driems.

There Haas been renewed violence overnight with reports

of shelling in Damascus.

Opposition groups are meeting

in Cairo for talks organised by

the Arab League. And a check

the Arab League. And a check of

finance and in the US, the Dow
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