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Live. Public support for the

carbon tax falls to a record

low as the political battle

heats up. The thing about the

carbon tax is that it will hit

every Australian family's cost

of living. Australians will be

able to judge for themselves

rather than listening to the

politicians. A man wanted over

a NSW murder to face

extradition from Darwin.

Turkish war planes on high

alert as tensions with Syria

flare again. And Spain 2 goals

up in the Euro final against

Italy.

Good morning, it's Monday, 2

July, I'm Andrew Geoghegan. And

I'm Karina Carvalho. The top

story - the Prime Minister's

begun the fight of her

political life to sell the new carbon tax but she's facing an

uphill battle. The latest

opinion poll suggest it's more

unpopular than ever. Two thirds

of voters surveyed by Neilsen

don't support the tax. Tony

Abbott has gone into campaign

mode promising to scrap the tax

as his first priority. But Julia Gillard says the

Opposition's fear campaign will

not succeed. Well for more on

this our political reporter

Winsome Denyer joins us from

Canberra. Take us through these latest opinion poll

the Government. We did see results. It's not good news for

yesterday thousands of people

rallying in opposition to the

carbon tax in Sydney and there

was also a rally happening in Melbourne and this Neilsen poll

that's out this morning shows

that opposition to the carbon

tax is up 3 points to 62% and

support has fallen by 4 points

which is to a record low of

33%. So it's not good news for

the Government. That poll was

taken at the end of last week

and there was 1,400 people

included in that and that was

after the Government had

promoted their payments to

households and tax cuts and

that sort of thing so despite

that still not good news for

the Government's carbon

tax. And yet both - And yet

both leaders were out doing the

hard sell yet? - yesterday. They were. Both

Julia Gillard and Tony Abbott

were in Melbourne and also

joined by several of their counterparts, there were

government ministers fanned out

across the country and they started their campaign there.

Let's take a listen to what

they had to say. People will

be able to reflect on the past

12 months all of the claims

that have been made and you

will be able to judge for

yourself and in the months

ahead, I think, as the dust

settles from this debate.

Australians will be able to see

that we've done the right thing

to tackle climate change and seize a clean energy future. The most positive

message that I can give to the Australian people right now is

that if they elect a Coalition

government there will be no

carbon tax on day one of a new

government the instructions

will go to the public service,

start preparing the

legislation. On day one of a

new Parliament the carbon tax repeal legislation will be introduced. Tony Abbott and Julia Gillard both in Melbourne

yesterday. Attention now turns to Darwin today,

Winsome? That's right, Karina.

The Indonesian President Susilo

Bambang Yudhoyono will arrive

in Darwin this afternoon at

around 2pm. The Prime Minister

Julia Gillard has already

arrived in Darwin ahead of that

visit and the Opposition Leader

Tony Abbott is expected to get

there some time this afternoon.

They're going to have a state

dinner this evening with the

President and both Julia

Gillard and Tony Abbott are

expected to speak at that event. And tomorrow Julia

Gillard will be meeting with

the Indonesian President and

they will be holding official

talks and they're expected to

talk about things like trade,

economic issues and of course

the very political asylum

seeker policy issue that's been

debated last week in

Australia's Parliament so it

will be interesting to see what

comes out of those talks tomorrow. Winsome Denyer in

Canberra, we'll leave it there

for now. And the Prime Minister

Julia Gillard will speak to

local radio in Darwin a little

later this morning. We'll bring

that to you live on ABC News

Breakfast. But first here's the

rest of the news with Andrew Geoghegan. Good morning.

Extradition proceedings will

begin today in Darwin for a man

wanted over a murder in NSW.

The Northern Territory police

have arrested Jonathan Stenberg

who has been on the run since

last week. He's accused of the

beheading of a 54-year-old man

on the NSW north coast in June.

Stenberg will face a Darwin

court later this morning. A

search will resume at first

light for a man believed to be

missing in waters off the Gold

Coast in Queensland's

south-east. Water police and a

helicopter scoured the surf

late yesterday after reports a

man was in dis tress at

Broadbeach. The search was

suspended overnight. Zbll Turk

- Turkey has scrambled 6

fighter jets to its border with

Syria. The jets were placed on

alert after Syrian helicopters

flew close to the border at the

weekend. Syria shot down a

Turkish jet a week ago. World

leaders call for a transitional

government. There are reports 4

traders from the Royal Bank of

Scotland were sacked last year

for their role in fixing

interbank interest rates. The

bank has confirmed it's being

investigated for manipulating

the rates at which banks lend

to each other. Reg lators have

fined bar delay bsh Barclays

for its role in the

practice. Japan has switcheded

on its first nuclear reactor in

nearly two months. All the

country's 50 nuclear plants

have been shut down for safety

checks after last yeack -

year's Fukushima disaster. The

move had divided public

opinion. The operators at

Fukushima have also managed to

restore the cooling system at

the crippled nuclear plant.

More now on the arrest of

Jonathan Stenberg. He was found

in bushland near Darwin an a

week on a run. It's alleged he

decapitated a man last

month. After 6 days of searching Territory police

finally captured Jonathan

Stenberg. At 3:08pm this

afternoon I can confirm the tactical response group

officers apprehended Jonathan

Stenberg in bushland following

a search in the designated

apprehended without search zone. Mr Stenberg was

incident. 10 tactical police

surrounded the 46-year-old

hiding inside a camouflaged camp. Police say he was armed

with handguns and a rifle. He'd

managed to conceal himself in a

reasonably elaborate camp set

up which was extremely

difficult to spot. The

bushland, the terrain there was

thick and heavy and it was a

good job by the tactical

team. Police say the former

Defence Force member had built

the camp which had items which

allowed him to survive in the

hot conditions of Darwin's

rural area. They believe he'd

been inside the hideout near

Berry Springs since he fled his

ute on Tuesday sparking one of

the largest manhunts the

Territory has ever seen. It's

alleged Stenberg murdered

54-year-old Edward Kelly who

was decapitated at his

Broadwater home on the northern

NSW coast in late June. He has

been arrested on the warrant in

existence for the offence of

murder in the NSW jurisdiction

and the investigators from NSW

will arrive in this jurisdiction in due

course. More than 100 officers

have been scouring 45 square

kilometres of bushland and tip

offs from nearby residents

allowed police to keep on his trail. Police say he's

undergoing a medical assessment

but is not injured. The

Queensland Premier has renewed

his attack on one of the

State's major electricity

suppliers. Cam bem Newman has

asked all government

departments to renew their

contracts with Origin Energy to

see if they can Phillip Island

a better deal. The Premier is

threatening to turn the lights

out on government contracts

with Origin Energy. We will not

be doing business with a

company that thinks it can

charge unaccept ybl electricity

prices to people in Queensland. Origin stands to

lose 2,500 government accounts

worth around $26.7 million. Campbell Newman says home

owners can follow the

Government's lead. He's reminding everyone they too can

change providers after Origin

announced price hikes. You may

not be aware but you don't have to buy your electricity from Origin. You can shop

around. The State cabinet is in

Townsville to sell its regional credentials at its first

community forum. But public

sector workers aren't

interested. Queensland yes,

Campbell no. Queensland yes,

Campbell no. They're worried

about the widespread effects of

cutting the number of staff on

temporary contracts. The Newman

Government ought to think of

the people, think of the people

first. It's a catch cry the Premier has acknowledged with

another apology. The Government

is very sorry about that, we know that's hurting

people. More than 200 residents

from across north Queensland

secured face time with members

of the cabinet. We've got a

range of delegations from the

Premier to the Deputy Premier

and a few ministers in terms of

a range of stuff. We don't

expect to get any answers.

We've been doing this for about

4 years and we've got no

answers off anybody but yooufr

got to try. The ministerial

team has one more day in north

Queensland to hear those

concerns with a cabinet meeting

on Monday. Let's check the newspaper front pages around

the country now and the first working day of the Government's

new tax on polluters. 'The Age'

says it's not going well for

Julia Gillard so far with

public support dropping to a

record low of 33% in the

Neilsen poll. A Newspoll in the

'Australian' suggest every

Queensland Labor MP including

Kevin Rudd would lose their

seat if an election were held now. The 'Daily Telegraph' in NSW reports many businesses

around the country have already

begun increasing prices. The

biggest cost will be in the communications, retail and

transport sectors, that story's

in the 'Canberra Times'. Meanwhile the 'Courier Mail' says Queenslanders could

end up paying dearly for the

State Government's war against

Origin Energy as we just heard. In other stories the

'Financial Review' looks back

on the world's financial year

and concludes there will be no

fast return to boom times. The

'Herald Sun' rr says Victorian

schools will try a new approach

to educating teenagers about

the dangers of alcohol and

drugs, dumping the Just Say No

policy. A number of parents

being prosecuted for unpaid

school fees has risen

dramatically according to the

'Advertiser'. Parent power is

on the rise in Tasmania. The

'Mercury' reports on a new school road safety action campaign. The 'West Australian'

reports on a new system to ease

pressure on hospital emergency

documents. And the capture of

murder suspect onthen Stenberg

at his bush hideout in Darwin

is the lead story in the 'Northern Territory News'. You

can see the front pages of the newspaper's dominated by talk

of the carbon tax which was

introduced yesterday. That

Neilsen poll quite significant,

33% of people strongly opposed

to the carbon tax. I guess

that's no real surprise,

particularly given the campaign

the Opposition is running and

everyone is talking about it

and there is that fear at the moment. The Government, of

course, is hoping that that

will dissipate and then they

will get traction. And that's what the Government of course

is hoping for, that in the

weeks and months ahead as

people see those compensation

payments flow into their bank

accounts they say pensioners

have already seen a rise in

their pensions , that they will

then see that there aren't any

negative effects on households to the carbon tax because

they're being adequately

compensated. So, do you think

the Government is likely to win

over voters over the carbon tax

issue? We'd love you to join the conversation on Breakfast

this morning. You can send emails to:

Abc Andrew G, feel free, I

need all the followers I can

get. A big welcome, you will be

here 2 weeks. This is the West Australian connection. Oh yes,

of course. We'll try not to be

too bias about that. Andrew a

good Perth boy

recently. Yes. You left a while

ago. You've been Africa

correspondent and now you

present Weekend brebling

fast. Yes, now I have to get up

extra early during the week.

Thanks for having me on the couch. Let's take a quick look

at the weather around the

country.

These are the top stories on

ABC News Breakfast. The Prime Minister Julia Gillard is

facing a tough job to sell the

carbon tax. The latest opinion

poll shows support for carbon

tax has hit a record low. The

Fairfax Neilsen poll shows two

thirds of voters don't support

the tax. A man accused of

murder in NSW will face an

extradition hearing in Darwin

today. Jonathan Stenberg has been arrested after about a

week on the run. He's wanted

for the murder of a man on the

NSW north coast in June. And

Turkey has sent six war planes

to its border with Syria.

Tedgess - tensions between the

two countries have flared again

after Syrian helicopters flew

close to the border at the

weekend. Relations have been

strained since Syria shot down

a Turkish jet a week ago. Cattlemen in the Northern

Territory say the carbon tax

could tip the already strained

industry over the edge. The

cost of air travel and rail

freight is also causing concern

in the Top End. At Lakefield

500 kilometres south of Darwin,

the Rix family is bracing for

the carbon tax. I think people

are totally confused about it

and unsure. And they're not

alone. The northern cattle

industry has been a vocal

opponent, labelling it a

destructive blow at the worst

possible time. Most cattle

producers are already

struggling with high debt

levels due to the suspension of

live exports a year ago. Yes,

mustering in the Top End will

be hugely affected because the

gas will be more expensive. Aviation fuel is

expected to increase by about

10 cents a litre. For local

airline Air North it means an

additional $1.2 million to

their annual costs, that will

hit ticket prices for

Territorians dependent on air

travel. The carbon tax will

also affect rail transport with

the consumer bearing the impact

at the end of the line. That

$1.2 million will be passed on

to the customer eventually.

Some of the impacts, the cost

of beer, cornflakes, down to

dog food, that means things

will have to go up more in the Northern Territory than they

will in the east coast where most of the goods are delivered

by trucks. City residents will

also be affected with Darwin

Council raising rates by $29 a

year due to higher land fill

costs. Basically we are the

only tropical landfill and our

rubbish decays at a different

rate. The next few weeks will

determine if tir toirn -

Territorians think the carbon

tax is an environmental

necessity or a load of

rubbish. Now the Indonesian President Susilo Bambang

Yudhoyono will arrive in Darwin

later today. He and Julia

Gillard will hold formal talks with asylum seekers set to be

high on the agenda. The Prime

Minister Julia Gillard last met

with the Indonesian President

during the East Asia summit in

Bali late last year. Their

high-level meeting fulfils an

agreement between the two

countries to meet every year to

forge greater cooperation. I

talk frequently to the

President of Indonesia, we've

got a strong and robust relationship between our two

countries. It's another boost

for Darwin which hosted the US

President Barack Obama late

last year. Aussie, Aussie,

Aussie. Oi, oi, oi. Indonesia

are our nearest neighbours,

very good friends and it will

be great to welcome the

Indonesian President. With the

visit with my President to

Darwin so now people will see

what's happening in Darwin. But

it's not the President's first

visit to Australia's northern

capital. He made a flying

stopover in 2005 where he met

with a former chief minister

Eclair Martin. Australia's political impasse on asylum

seekers is tipped to dominate

discussions. President

Yudhoyono, I'm sure, will be

aware of events in Australia. I

will say to him that the

Government is still working and

working hard to get an outcome here. Among discussions to

boost trade relations, disaster

response is high on the

agenda. You have that hard ware

but we are more experienced and

we have the nach ral start

happening in Indonesia, that

way we can combine and how we could work together. The

President will arrive in the

afternoon and a state dinner

will be held at Parliament

House. The high-level talks

kick off on Tuesday. And we

will be going to Darwin later

in the program for some

analysis of that visit, so stay

with us. The European Union's

embargo of Iranian oil imports

has just come into effect. The

move was agreed as part of international sanctions and

curtailing Iran's nuclear ambitions. Iran's economy will

be hit hard by the ban. Last

year the EU accounted for

around 23% of Iran's oil

exports. France has lowered its

growth forecasts because of the

worsening economic climate. The

French Government has almost

halved its forecast for 2012 to

0.4% and slashed its outlook

for 2013 to between 1% and

1.3%. Spain has also revealed

its recession has deepeneded in

the second quarter of the year.

Output shrank by 0.3%. Well to

finance and the

finance and the overseas

markets had a strong finish to

the week. On Friday the Dow was

278 points up:

In Russia a social issue that

was barely ever talked about in

the Soviet era is finally

getting some attention. It's

the topic of un married teenage

mums. Experts estimate

one-third of all Russian

children are born to

teenagers. Just 7 months old

Yvonne has no idea how lucky he

is. Born to a young, single

mother, they live in a

government shelter where even

cutting edge play rooms are

provided. But everyone here

knows for most others like them

in Russia it's a very different

story. Katya is just 17. She

decided to give birth to

one-month-old Verinika against

the wishes of the baby's father

and much of her own family.

TRANSLATION: In the most cases

they kick the girls out and send them to get

abortions. When the Soviet

Union still existed it was as

if unwed mothers didn't. There

was almost no acknowledgment of mothers raising children on

their own. People didn't speak

about that at the end of the

Soviet period. There was the

tradition to keep silence. A

parliamentary deputy recently

estimated nearly one-third of

all Russian children are born

to teenage mothers. To give

you an idea of how little

recognition there is of this

issue, in Russia with a population of 140 million

people, there are just 2 State-supported shelters for

young single mothers. Efforts

to raise awareness are starting

to make an impact. These

mothers are enjoying a day on

the Moscow River courtesy of a

charity that helps them

complete their education, find

jobs and look after their

children. Many of these young

women, like 16-year-old arena

have been shunned by friends

and family.

TRANSLATION: They think we are

good for nothing, unable to

bring up a baby. Social workers

say support is vital because in

Russia there are many more

babies like these. Well let's

check sport now and Paul

Kennedy is on the couch. Paul,

what's happening? There's plenty happening in Europe.

We'll go straight to the soccer

because Spain is playing Italy

this morning in the Uoh euro

2012 final and Spain scored

twice in the first half. It

looks like Spain is the winner

from here. Let's take a look

now at those two goals.

Fab gas still going and it's

in from Silva!

Let's go to the Tour de

France and Peter Sagan was the

stage winner last night. This was an interesting finish

because it was slightly uphill

or a good little climb and then

flattened out right at the top.

So it was a sprint finish.

Fabian Cancellara kept the

yellow jersey, he made a real

tilt at winning the stage. But

Peter Sagan sat on his wheel

and came through. We'll tell

you what happened with Cadel

Evans. He was OK and moved up

into the top 10 as well being

among the group sprint finish

that just finished behind the

leaders. We'll explain his

position just after we look at

the finish of stage 2. The

sprint is open by Fabian

Cancellara as the attack comes

behind Gilbert and now it is

Sagan going for the victory.

This is the first Tour de

France for Peter Sagan and Sagan is coming clear to get

his first stage win. There it

is for you, Peter Sagan he's

22.5 years of age, the champion

of Slovakia gets his 14th win

of the season but his first in

his very first Tour de

France. And Peter Sagan

delivering on his promise to do

a body building pose if he won

a stage of the Tour de France.

Let's go to the cricket last

night. Australia is now 2-0

down against England in best of

5 one-day international series.

Shane Watson scored a

half-century, you can see him

there playing some nice shots

and also George Bailey scored

65 as Australia made a not very

good 252/7. Ian Bell continued

his great form and made a

half-century, 75, and then Ravi

Bopara made 82. As England

chased down its 251 with a

handful of wickets in hand and

5 overs in hand. Pat Cummins

repeating the news from last

night that Pat Cummins, the

young fast bowler who is

looking to get some time in the

middle in English conditions

ahead of the Ashes next year, he's broken down so he's going

to be coming home. He's got a

side strain. Just finishing off

the AFL news for the weekend,

the final match of the round

was the Kangaroos versus the

Saints, a fight for 8th

position. Watch Brent Harvey

go. It looks like he's still in

his 20s, not 34 years old. And

he's enjoying some good form.

The Kangaroos beat the Crows

last week in an upset and they

continue that good form last night. They

night. They had to come from

behind against the Saints.

Daniel Welsh is the star. You

can see him there kicking one

of his two goals. He had 34

possessions as well. And will Brendan Goddard face some sort of questioning from that

incident? We'll have to wait

and see. His opponent did go down, I'm not sure how much

contact there was there. How

long is left in the Euro

final? About 10 minutes when I

came on, 10 or 15 and because

Spain has got a 2-0 lead Italy

can't sit back so I would

expect one or two more

goals. Spain are pretty solid.

Zblt you, remember you were at

the World Cup in Andrew. Spain

has been pretty much the

dominant team for the past 2 or

3 years. They had an average

result against Portugal there

at one stage. People started

calling Spain boring. They were boring holes in the Italian

defence in that first half.

They are the world's best. No

vuvuzelas this time but some

more silverware maybe for Spain. No team has won

back-to-back Euro finals so

they will be the first team to

win two in a row. How do you

know about football? I love

sport. Well, let's look at the

Tour de France and I want to

keep you up to date with what

Cadel evns - Evans has been

doing. This is an example of

his team work as they move

through some dangerous turns.

This is one of his team-mates,

I think it's George Hincapie.

So he takes Cadel Evans from

the back of that bunch all the

way up to the front and one of

the roles the team has is to

protect Cadel Evans from any

sort of trouble. So what they

did there they thought well

it's better to be up the front

when we move through these different turns and there's

about 3 k to go and all of a

sudden he bobs up on the

right-hand of your screen there

right at the front. He actually

had a bit of a tilt at it too

with 1.9 kilometres to go. He

moved to the front, Cadel

Evans, but Fabian Cancellara

took the lead. That Then

Fabian Cancellara, he is in the

yellow jersey, he went for it

but you can see Sagan just

sitting in behind waiting for

the stage win. And Fernando

Torres has just scored so 3-0

is the score. That's pretty

much it then, you would have

thought. I'll show you more

highlights in the next 30

minutes. ABC News Breakfast can

be watched live on the

web. Just visit the main ABC

News website at

abc.net.au/news. And you will

find a link to News 24 which is

streamed live every

day. Vanessa O'Hanlon joins us

with the weather now. And it

has been a very cold time in

the south-east. I know that

because I just came from

Queensland down to

Melbourne. It certainly has

been. Brisbane has had their

fair share of rain last week

and also fairly cold but this

weekend has to have been one of the coldest and wettest weekends in a long time down in

the south-east. Since 9:00

yesterday over 13 mm of rain in

Melbourne, 38 mm in one of the

suburbs ferny Creek. 1.6 mm has

fallen in Adelaide and under

0.5 mm in Canberra. This

Antarctic blast over the south-east pushed sleet up to

the Tablelands of NSW. This

combination of a low and hike high pressure system is

creating a strong well of 3 to

4 metres and a south-westerly

flow and this is also causing showers along the south-east

coast. A dry day elsewhere

underneath this high pressure

system. A weak low will

maintain showers tomorrow

spreading a change along the NSW coast on Wednesday. The

high will reach the south-east

by the end of the week and rain

will redevelop along the east

coast. For Queensland today:

Thanks, Vanessa. You're

watching ABC News Breakfast.

Still to come - the carbon tax

may be deeply unpopular. What

do young people think about it?

We'll be speaking to the

director of the Youth Climate

Coalition. And we'll have a review of some of the

newspapers. This morning we'll

be joined by the presenter of

Drive Waleed Ali. Now here's

the news. The Prime Minister

has begun the fight of her

political life to sell the new

carbon tax but she's facing an

uphill battle. The latest

opinion poll suggests it's more

unpopular than ever. Two thirds

of voters surveyed by Neilsen

don't support the tax. Extradition proceedings will

begin today in Darwin for a man

wanted over a nurd - murder in NSW. Northern Territory police

have arrested Jonathan Stenberg

who has been on the run since

last week. He's accused of the

beheading of a 54-year-old man

on the NSW north coast in June

. A search will resume at first

light for a man believed to be

missing in waters off the Gold

Coast. Water police and a

helicopter scoured the surf

late yesterday after reports a

man was in distress at

Broadbeach. The search was

suspended overnight. A new

study has found indigenous

prisoners in Queensland have a higher rate of mental illness

than the general population.

The study has been published in

the 'Medical Journal of

Australia'. It's found 73% of

indigenous men and 86% of indigenous women in Queensland

prisons have a mental disorder.

Turkey has scrambled 6

fighter jets to its border with

Syria's - serious tensions

rise between the two nations.

Syrian helicopters flew close

to the border at the weekend.

Syria shot down a Turkish jet

about a week ago. Now on our

top story and you could be

forgiven for thinking we're in

the middle of a federal

election campaign with Julia

Gillard and Tony Abbott Chris

- criss-crossing the country

talking about the carbon tax.

Prime Minister Julia Gillard

says Australians now have the

chance to make their own

judgment. People will be able

to reflect on the past 12

months all of the claims that

have been made and you will be

able to judge for yourself. And

in the months ahead, I think,

as the dust settles from this

debate, Australians will be

able to see that we've done the

right thing to tackle climate

change and seize a clean energy future. The right thing to

protect our strong economy, to

have prosperity in the future

and to do the best we can for

our very precious environment. The Opposition Leader Tony Abbott says his

first act if elected will be to

dismantle carbon pricing. The

most positive message that I

can give to the Australian

people right now is that if they elect a Coalition

Government there will be no

carbon tax. On day one of a new government the instructions

will go to the public service,

start preparing the

legislation. On day one of a

new parliament the carbon tax

repeal legislation will be

introduced. That's my pledge to

the people of Australia. And

that was Tony Abbott speaking

in Melbourne yesterday. We've

been asking for your comments

will the Government be able to

win you over with the compensation package that it's offering as a result of the

carbon tax. Kimberly Jane on

Facebook says "It's a price,

not a tax and I support it." And Herman Simon on Facebook

says "My wife and I both work

and we don't have children. I

pay $850 a week in tax, this

privileged status means we will

not be seeing any relief from the Government while we

continue to pay for its shoddy

policies." And Joshua says

"Yep, do not want it." So you

can keep those comments coming

in to us. You can send emails

to: We're on Facebook and

Twitter.. It's ABC Andrew G.

There you go, it's on the

screen. Alright, let's go

overseas now and Turkey has

scrambled 6 fighter jets to its

border with Syria as tensions rise between the two nations.

The latest incident follows a

call by world leaders for a

transitional government which

would include members of the

Syrian regime and the Opposition. Opposition groups

say Syrians will not accept a

new government if Bashar

al-Assad is part of it.

(No audio) We obviously don't

have audio on that so we will

try to come back to it. Thousands of people have

flockeded from across the

country to see what it's like

in the cockpit of some of the

nation's most famous

aircraft. Josh Bavas was at

the Queensland air museum's

open day. If it wasn't for the

volunteers most of the former

World War II planes would have

ended up on the scrap heap. Of

such a vintage that as a small

boy during the war I had a

model spit fire and this is one

of those diseases caught in

youth which is incurable. I've

been involved one way or the

other with their aeroplanes

ever since. I did do my

national service in the RAAF. I

have flown but only light

aircraft and I've been involved

with aircraft operators, particularly missionary aviation fellowship in New

Guinea and Northern Territory

and with this museum for

something like 32 years

now. And the museum's come a

long way over those years. Tell

me about some of your humble beginnings? The first aircraft,

we said, was obtained when some

men put their hands in their

pockets and came up with enough

to make a bid for the aircraft

when it was being sold off. And

they had to move that aircraft

no less than 4 times before it

arrived up here because we were

forever looking for a site

until the local Landsborough

shire council offered us this

site and provided the building

that's over here. And so that's

one of those things. And now not enough room for all the

aircraft? Not enough room for

the aircraft. We've added a

very big hangar down here,

hangar number 2, but we need to

double that and build another

one of the same size immediately because we have

many aircraft that have to live

out in the open and there's

always the possibility of

corrosion and deteriorations

from sunlight that's happening

all the time. And why is it

important to keep some of these aircraft as historical

memorabilia? Well, if we don't

have the hardware here on the

ground, all people will be able

to see are paragraphs. For our

- photographs. For our children

coming along to see the development of airnautical

science over the years, the

development of aircraft and to

see how they could be put to

use for the benefit of people

all around, these are parts of

the education. We have schools coming through here very

regularly every year and it

opens many eyes to see what can

be done with an aeroplane once

you've got the right one. And I

guess this must be one of the biggest collections in the

country. It is in terms of numbers, certainly the biggest

in the country. We would like

to think that it's becoming the

most significant in the country

and also in the Southern

Hemisphere as far as that's

concerned. We are volunteer s

all the time and particularly

local volunteers that are

experienced in working with

their hands. That's helpful.

But we also have many

volunteers on the front counter

and on just doing things like

mowing the yard and keeping the

place tidy. In point of fact,

we sometimes like to say that

we're doing a special service

to the women of Caloundra by providing an opportunity for

their husbands to go away one

or two days a week and give

them a bit of peace. Alright,

we've got some breaking news

for you sports fans out there following the soccer and Spain

has taken it 4-0 in the Euro

final. We'll take you live now

to scenes in Madrid where I

guess the party would have

started maybe even at half time

because at half time Spain were

2 goals up thanks to a Silva

header and Jordy Alba putting

one in in the 41st minute pt.

And then in the second half

Fernando Torres came in and

scored the third goal and then

the fourth. The Spanish are

getting used to this, they

don't seem that excited

actually. They are used to it.

They won the World Cup and the

back-to-back Euro titles.

They're no doubt pleased, I

don't think we have a shot of

the Italians because they've

probably all gone home. We're

seeing live pictures from Rome ahead of the final and there

were equal numbers of Italian

fans on the streets of Rome

waiting for the start of the

match. So these obviously are

the celebrations, the

jubilation on the streets of

Madrid in Spain. The Spanish,

as you say, used to winning

now. Lots of criticism about

the Spanish style of game ahead

of this. Not even so much

criticism but that they change

their style of game from the

'80s and the '90s and that's

why they'd seen this cent - recent run of recent run of success. The

Italians are a very young

team. Well I mean I don't think

the fans are going to dispute

that. It may not be as exciting

but they are winning so I think

they would prefer to win

perhaps not playing such an

exciting game. I guess the question is we're two years out

from the World Cup, can they

maintain that momentum and win

back-to-back World Cups? Well

4-0, let's not forget Italy did

manage to beat Germany and

England on the way to the

final, so they will no doubt be

pleased with that and probably

not so pleased with a 4-0 drubbing

drubbing in the final though.

I'm sure the celebrations are

going to go long into the night

in Spain. Back home and in

South Australia a 2-hour time

limit on holding patients in

the emergency department is

being considered as a way of

addressing problems at the

Lyell McEwin Hospital. The plan

is part of a pilot project for

northern health agencies but

management insists it's only a

work in progress. An internal

document sent to staff at the

Lyell McEwin Hospital detailing

the changes suggests the

current system isn't working.

It states the system is carrying significant risk and

that the hospital cannot

continue to do the same things. Hospital management disputes

that's an admission of failure. We can always do

better. We have a growing

population in the north, we

have increasing demand. To deal

with that demand most emergency

department patients will be

moved into wards faster. Once

I've been assisted in triage,

two hours after that if they're

still in ED that we transfer

them to a ward with a

specialist to specialist

consultation occurring. There

will also be a focus on sending

patients home as soon as

possible or moving them to

Modbury Hospital or suitable

community care. Doctors won't

comment on the trial which will run for a week in August but

they have approached the Health Minister about the level of violence in hospitals. They

want tougher penalties which

already apply for assaults in

emergency departments to be extended to cover other departments and wards. I'm

happy to consider that given

that there's a greater rate of

assaults or code blacks outside the emergency department

compared to inside it and I'm

also prepared to look at an

advertising campaign which the

nurses union suggested. I would

warn the Government that such

legislation won't be effective against people with mental

health issues or who present

with drug and alcohol problems so on its own tougher

legislation won't be the

answer. The Opposition says

more security staff may be

needed to solve the problem.

You're watching ABC News

Breakfast. The top stories -

Prime Minister Julia Gillard is

facing a tough job to sell the

carbon tax. The latest opinion

poll shows public support has

hit a record low. The Fairfax

Neilsen poll shows two thirds

of voters don't support the

tax. A man accused of murder in

NSW will face an extradition

hearing in Darwin today.

Jonathan Stenberg has been

arrested after about a week on

the run. He's wanted for the

murder of a man on the NSW

north coast in June. And

Turkey has sent 6 war planes to

its border with Syria. Tensions

between the two countries have

flared again after Syrian

helicopters flew close to the

border at the weekend.

Relations have been strained

since Syria shot down a Turkish

jet a week ago. Well for a look

at the national newspapers this

morning we're joineded by the

presenter of RN Drive, Waleed

ally, good to have you on the

couch. Before I begin, how good

are Spain, I'm very excited

about this. You were barracking

for Spain? Yeah, yeah, right

from the start because it's not long ago Spain were the

whipping boys because they couldn't win a

tournament. We're just seeing

live pictures of Spain, the

celebrations ongoing. It's good

that the Spanish have something

to cheer about frankly. They're

not in the most

advantageous. Economically

nothing to cheer about but

maybe they spent too much time

playing sport and watching it

rather than doing work. That

was an offhand comment. But

this is one thing analysts were

saying either Spain or Italy

would probably have a boost on

its share markets today

whichever team one. And then it

will be wipe out the next day,

that's the way things generally

work. Congratulations to

Spain. Were you up early this

morning watching the final not

preparing for the papers? No, I was preparing for the newspapers because I have to

give you the best, anyway,

let's give go to the papers.

There's a thing called the

carbon tax apparently came in

yesterday, I'm not sure if you

caught up with that but - I've

heard about it. And the Government have made a point saying the sky did not fall

in. That's true. Although don't

think anyone was suggesting it

would fall in on day one. It's

a gradual fall, is it? Yeah,

yeah, a slow desent. It's

coming closer. That's probably

right. It's interesting the way

the different papers have

covered it. 'The Age', for

example, and the 'Sydney

Morning Herald' running with a

poll about it and some interesting features of that

poll that I think are really

concerning for the Government,

not just that there's only 33%

support for the carbon tax in

the polling but look at some of

the finer details. Only 5% of

people think they will be

better off with the carbon

price, 37% say it will make no

difference. The Government's

modelling runs counter to all

that. It actually says the

majority of people will be

better off or unaffected.

One-third of Labor voters

oppose the carbon price. I suppose that's not terribly

unexpected. 11% of Coalition

supporters are in favour,

probably higher than I thought,

but this is the one that I find

interesting. Two thirds of

Greens voters, two thirds of

Greens voters back the carbon

price. What happened to the

other third? If you don't have

a third of the Greens voters

- Maybe they feel it doesn't go

far enough. I suppose that's

probably true. Even so the

Greens were party to this and

spruiking to this, you'd think

you could at the very least

carry them with you and if

you're not carrying them it

shows how significant and steep

this mountain is that the

Government has to climb. But of

course the Government is hoping

that once this sort of filters

through in the next few weeks

or months that people will feel

perhaps they are better off,

those on lower incomes because

of the tax cuts and handouts

and that the effect of the

carbon tax will not be so

obvious to them. Frankly not

going to work, I reckon, and

the reason I say that is

because people have already

been receiving the benefits.

The tax cuts, no, but they're

not going to hear about that really for another year until

they do their taxes anyway.

They've been getting those

benefits without any increased

costs and they're still upset

about it. And about it. And any increased

cost that arrives now just that

would naturally arrive and electricity is a good example

of this, just becomes, it just

feeds into this narrative of the carbon tax. Whether or not

it has anything to do with it.

I think the Government - these figures are terrible for the

Government, I think, and they would have been expecting them

to be a lot better than now

because they've launched this

campaign over a long period of

time. They gave themselves time

to explain it and by the time

anyone actually decides this is

not as bad as they think we'll

be well past the next

election. Have you had a chance

to look at any of their - I was

going to say election ads, they

feel like election ads. The ads

they bought out in the last day

or two, certainly the Opposition countering the

carbon tax and calling Julia

Gillard a liar and everything,

do you think that's going to

bite? The Opposition ads

definitely will. They've got a

very strong narrative, it's a

very simple narrative, it's

very clear and people are

already sympathetic to it.

That's an incredible recipe to

the success of an ad campaign.

Just looking at the way some of

the other papers covered it.

The 'Herald Sun' took ran a

double page spread showing what

the cost will be. Here they're

talking about the way you would

prepare a lamb roast, I should

have checked my meats before I

confirmed that. The total is

that whole feast will go up 27

cents. I'm not sure if that's

meant to be saying it's not so

bad or if the tone of that

really is meant to be that this

is a slug that you can't afford

but nonetheless there you have

it, 27 cents. Zb not Not as bad

as the GST when John Hewson was

spruiking it, the infamous

cake, of course. The 27 cents,

I don't know, people are doing it tough, every cent

counts. But you had Wayne Swan

yesterday outside a supermarket

holding up a lamb that you can roast saying that it's the same

price. This is a full meal,

this includes things like pump

kins and various other things.

My favourite though is the top

banner of the Australian 'Financial Review' which again

talks about the polling

associated with the carbon tax

and there it is, revealed,

carbon tax poll, voters still

reject it. I like how it's

revealed as though there was

any great secret. I don't know,

I suppose that's what happens

when you have to do news about

something that was a long time coming and people's attitudes were set a long time in advance. Yesterday was definitely carbon tax Sunday and we'll hofbly hear a lot more about that. The other issue that is still out there for the Government is of course the asylum seeker impasse. That's right and the Opposition, even though they weren't able to be party to a deal that wasn't brokered you will not, if you hop on a boat get to the Australian mainland. The Government disputes that logic and says it's now known whether you go via Nauru or Christmas Island or somewhere on the mainland you ultimately get process and you ultimately can make it to Australia anyway so it's not a deterrent. That's very much the Government's line, that's the Immigration Department's advice. If you believe offshore processing works this makes some sort of sense. I can see a lot of satirists having a gooted - good time with this if it were to be implemented. Let's go on, we all love a love story. And a sports story. And combining the two. And we love stories of Olympians with gun, don't we? Speak for yourself. The AOC don't but apparently this one is OK because she's actually a shooter. The human interest story though here is interesting. This is Aletha Sedgman. She as a boyfriend Chris, they were both shooters trying to get a spot on the

Olympic team. It came down to

one final spot and Aletha got

it at the expense of Chris. You

now have a girlfriend going to

London leaving her boyfriend in

her dust as she takes that

final spot. No hard feelings,

it's not as if it's guns at 10

paces. Very good. No, this is

what they say that apparently

it's all fine, he's very

supportive of her. I wait to supportive of her. I wait to

see whether or not there will

be some kind of scoop telling

the real secret story in glossy

magazines in months to come. At

this point they're happy and

she looks happy with that

gun. You love your love

stories. I do and it's a moving

one, I think. Thanks for being

here. Thanks for having

me. Time to check sport and

Paul's back with us and it's

all Euro at the moment and the Spanish rightfully celebrating. They celebrating. They are

celebrating and I think we've

got live pictures from Madrid

now to show what it means to be

European champion and those are

the celebrations because Spain

has now won the European

championship and then the World

Cup and now another European

championship so they really

have dominated world football

and this morning they beat up

Italy 4-0. Two of those goals

were scored in the first half and then and then Italy went down to 10

men after that in the second

half. So Spain piled on another

2 goals. And they're about to be handed the silverware but

let's go back and look at those

four goals now.

Let's stay in Europe, our man

James Bennett is in Belgium.

He's just watched the stage of the Tour de France that Peter

Sabon won and let's hear from

James Bennett's report. Each

town that hosts the start of

finish of the Tour de France pays handsomely for the

privilege. Liage and surrounds

hosted the opening too so they

wanted a bit of local glory for

their money. They tailor made

this finish for local hero

Philippe Gilbert. Unfortunately

though the best he could do was

4th. Three highly fancied

rider, the yellow jersey holder, Fabian Cancellara, Peter

Peter Sagan and Boasson Hagen

jumped to the finish. It was

Peter Sagan who got the win. A

solid day for Cadel Evans. His

20th place moved him up to 8th

overall 17 jersey - seconds

from the yellow jersey. The from the yellow jersey. The

team's working and functioning

well. Still early days yet. As

far as the other Australians in the race went, the GreenEDGE

team, they were hoping to set

up their Swiss rider Michael

Albasini. Things didn't quite

go to plan for him but Simon

Gerrens said there were good

signs for the team. I was happy with now

with now - how I went today. I

wasn't too far off the mark

today so it's a good sign for

things to come. Matt Goss did

have some success today. In the

intermediate sprint stage he

bested his rivals Mark

Cavendish and Andre Greipel to

pick up the points left behind

by the breakaway. Matt Goss is

excited about the stages to

come after that

confidence-winning boost. It's

a good start. It's a good start. It's not like

winning a finish sprint but I

feel good. It was a solid

little sprintup hill and

tomorrow will be when we have a

big crack. There will be a lot

more guys contesting the more guys contesting the sprint tomorrow and I'm really looking

forward to it. We've put forward to it. We've put our

team together deliberately for this. So later tonight

Australian time the last stage

of Belgian soil, 207.5 kilometres and the first real

stage for the sprinters. And that's it

that's it for sport for

now. Thanks very much. Vanessa O'Hanlon joins us with the

weather. To the satellite image

and patchy cloud over the

south-east in a pool of cold

air is generating showers and

snow on the Alps. Despite cloud

in the far south-west there's

only a few showers in that but

for the rest of the country a

cold morning but mostly fine day with a high situated near

the Bight. This will remain a

dominant feature crossing into the south-east the south-east by Friday.

Around the States Queensland:

Thanks very much. Let's leave

you with pictures from Kiev in

the Ukraine where Spain has won

the Euro 2012 final 4-0.

This Program is Captioned Live. Public support for the

carbon tax falls to a record low as the low as the political battle

heats up. It will hit every

Australian family's cost of

living. Australians will be

able to judge for themselves

rather than listening...

A man wanted over a NSW

murder to face extradition from

murder to face extradition from Darwin. Turkish war planes on

high alert as tensions with

Syria flare again. And Spain

thrashes Italy 4-0 to claim the

euro final in Kiev. Good

morning, you're watching ABC News Breakfast on Monday, 2

July, I'm Karina Carvalho.

Coming up - is the carbon tax

enough to tackle climate

change? The Youth Climate

Coalition says no. We'll find

out what more they want done

shortly. And the addiction that

gives a real high. As a small

boy during the war I had a

model spitfire of course and

that this is one of those

diseases when caught in youth

is totally incurable. Thousands

of people indulge their

obsession with planes at the Queensland

Queensland Air Museum but first

here's the news with Andrew. Thank you very much. The Prime Minister has begun

the fight of her political life

to sell the new carbon tax. But

she's facing an uphill battle.

The latest opinion poll suggest

it's more unpopular than ever.

Two thirds of voters surveyed by Neilsen don't support the

tax. Tony Abbott has gone into

campaign mode promising to

scrap the tax as his first priority but Julia Gillard says the Opposition's fear the Opposition's fear campaign

will not succeed. Extradition proceedings will begin today in

Darwin for a man wanted over a murder in NSW. Northern

Territory police have arrested

Jonathan Stenberg who has been

on the run since last week.

He's accused of the beheading

of a 54-year-old man on the NSW

north coast in June. Stenberg

will face a Darwin court later

this morning. A search will

resume at first light for a man believed

believed to be missing in

waters off the Gold Coast in Queensland's south-east. Water

police and a helicopter scoured

the surf late yesterday after

reports a man was distress - in

distress at Broadbeach. The

search was suspended overnight.

Police say no-one has been

reported missing in the area. A

new study has found indigenous prisoners in Queensland have a

higher rate of mental illness

than the general population.

The study has been published in The study has been published in the 'Medical Journal of

Australia'. It's found 73% of

indigenous men and 86% of

indigenous women in Queensland

prisons have a mental disorder.

Turkey has scrambled 6 fighter

jets to its border with Syria

as tensions rise between the

two nations. The fighter jets

were placed on alert after the Syrian helicopters flew close

to the border at the weekend.

Syria shot down a Turkish jet

about a week ago. This latest about a week ago. This latest

inci