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ABC News Breakfast -

View in ParlView

(generated from captions) The Foreign Minister says

an Australian lawyer being held

in Libya could soon be

released. I really want this

Australian woman to be

reunited, to be admitted again

into the arms of her family,

they want her, and that's my

goal in coming here. This

Program is Captioned Live.

Political leaders in Greece

confident of forming a

coalition government coalition government today. First Fairfax, now News

Limited - big job losses

expected at the Murdoch stable

as both media groups deal with

the rise of the irnt net. And

the Melbourne Storm come from

behind to beat the Sea Eagles.

Good morning. It's Tuesday,

19th June. I'm Michael

Rowland. And I'm Karina

Carvalho. The top story on ABC

News Breakfast - the foreign

Faiers Minister Bob Carr says

he is confident an Australian

lawyer being held in Libya will

be released soon. Melinda

Taylor and three of her

colleagues have been accused of

smuggling documents to Saif

al-Islam, Moamar Gaddafi's

son. Mr Carr says he believes

an apology from the International Criminal Court

will secure Ms Taylor's release.

I really want Ms Taylor to be

reunited with her family. But I

now have a deeper understanding

of Libyan perspectives and

International Criminal Court concerns with the way the

has responded with them and

it's my goal to see if we can

bring the two sides together in

fruitful dialogue. The Prime

Minister and Foreign Minister

difficulties and complexities explained to me some of the

in this case and I've

undertaken facilities for

contact between Libya and the

International Criminal Court. I

will ring Judge song, the Chief

Judge, the chief chair of the

International Criminal Court,

to ask him to look at Libyan

concerns and Libyan

perspectives over the handling

of this case. Bob Carr there

and we will be speaking to the

Foreign Minister from Europe

later this hour, but first here

is the news with Karina Good

morning. Leaders of Greek

Greece's New Democracy party is

expected to form a collision

government today with the Pasok

which tame third. The Syriza

party which polled second said

it will remain in opposition.

Antonis Samaras Sam says Le

seek some changes to the

package of the bailout for

Greece. News Limited may

announce its own restructure as

soon as today. Yesterday

Fairfax announced 1900 job also

go over the next four years of

the 'The Age' and 'Sydney

Morning Herald' will downsize

to become tabloids and the

company hasn't ruled out going

completely online. The changes

at News Limited are expected to

include hundreds of

redundancies. The search has

resumed for a missing

Australian yacht. Ian Thompson

and his colleague rang a friend

to say the yacht had run

aground and was breaking up.

The Prime Minister says

Australia will contribute $20

million to help improve food

security in poorer countries.

The Julia Gillard has made the

announcement at the G20 summit

in Mexico. The Canadian

initiative aims to overcome

hunger in pup struggling countries. The presidential

candidate Ahmed Shafiq has

vowed to challenge the results

in ee just a minute. Egypt's

mill ri council gave itself

sweeping now powers but say it

is will hand over power to the

new President at the end of the

month. The leader of the New

Democracy party in Greece says

his country needs a new coalition Government

immediately. Philip Williams

joins us via broadband. The

whole world has been watching

on extremely anxiously? Yes t

has been a revolving door with

leaders of various parties

coming and going. What the

leader of New Democracy said,

Samaras said he wanted was a

unity government, ei everyone

joined into that government. He

knew that wasn't going to

happen because the left-wing

Syriza party certainly wasn't

going to be involved with that.

Here is how he expressed that disappointment shortly after

Syriza definitely wouldn't join

the government. That's what

we're trying to do. Mr Tsipras

is thot willing to participate

in such a government, such a

coalition. I believe that the

government should immediately

be formed. It is something that is required and necessitated by

the developments, by the

economic situation, by the

reality and by the vote of the

Greek people, so that's what

we're trying to do. Phil,

Syriza has dealt itself out.

Just how exactly has Antonis

Samaras been talking to? Well,

he has been talking to mainly

Pasok who are going to be no

doubt their partnerers and

between the two of them they

just make the 150-seat

threshold and they will

probably add a couple of smaller parties as well,

although one of the parties

they're talking to has some

reservations because they want

the bailout scrapped but

they're saying they're willing

to see it phase out over a long

period. We are just waiting to

see if they can be brought into

the fold. Whichever way you

look at it, it won't be the

most stable and most rock solid

government, but it is the old

firm back in town. People know

who he are, they formed the

nucleus of the last government

and so they are a and so they are a known

quantity, and I think in the

end, that was the problem,

there was too much of a sense

of risk attached to Syriza, to

Alexis Tsipras, the young Turk

that nearly unseated the old

school here, and people did go

back to the old, but basically

government, they want it what people want is a

quickly, they want to end the uncertainty and they just want

to get on with their lives and

hope that this government can

improve their lives because the

last five years, governments

have simply not done that. At

least that's the perception,

that their lives have gone from

bad to worse. And finally,

Philip Williams, Mr Samaras

wants a lightening of the very

strict conditions but again

overnight German Chancellor

Angela Merkel has said she is

prepared to go only so far down

know that road? Yes, and we don't

know exactly what he means by

that, we don't know how rad kal

a bailout campaign that is,

probably not that radical given

that he campaigned to keep it,

but the actual term that things

have to be paid back may be

stretched out a little, and

that will make it a little

easier, but as for radical

restructuring, re-negotiation

of the whole package, as far as

what the Germans are saying at

the moment, that's simply not a goer. Philip Williams, thank

you. Australia will contribute

to a new public-private partnership to improve food security. Julia Gillard has

joined Canadian, British and

World Bank leaders to announce

the new initiative at the G20

summit in Mexico. Goals such as

improving harvest management in

the developing world. Prime

Minister Gillard says Australia

will make a financial and

practical contribution to this

project. I'm delighted that Australia will have an

opportunity to play a role in

this important new initiative

and I'm very pleased to be able

to anuns that Australia will

provide a contribution of $20

million. We are a very

efficient agricultural

producer. We are in parts a

very arid country, so we've got

some relevant expertise and

we're very happy to

share. Lawyers for ASIO are

expected to tell the High expected to tell the High Court

today that a Sri Lankan refugee

being detained indefinitely

wasn't denied procedural

fairness in his security

assessment. Lawyers for the man

are trying to have an earlier

High Court ruling in favour of

indefinite detention

overturned. Elizabeth Byrne

reports. The man is one of 51

people in a similar position.

Australia has asked 1 is other

countries to take members of

the group without success.

Lawyers of the man have told the court the only legal

purpose of his detention is

removal, and since that has

been proved impossible, he

should be released. The court

has been urged to revisit the

decision on the basis there is

a new context where the case no

longer sits well with more

recent rulings by the court,

including that on the Malaysia

Solution. Today lawyers for

ASIO are expected to refute

allegations that the man was

denied procedural fairness in

his scurl assessment. mpl Let's

go to the front pages of the

major newspapers around the

country now and the 'Canberra

Times' says Fairfax Media will

axe 1900 jobs, close printing

presses and reform mat both

'The Age' and the 'Sydney Morning Herald'. 'The

Australian' reports that

Fairfax Media has foreshadowed

the end of its printed

mastheads. The radical changes

are designated to cut costs as

readers and advertising move

online says 'The Age'. The 'Courier-Mail' reports

Queensland's farmers are locked in

in an epic battle with miners

over access to the State's

prize grazing land. The 'Herald Sun' says the Victorian

Government has forced Melbourne

Water to cab sell a - to cancel

a planned fee hike. Friends

tell of their shock at the

death of a man who ag was

allegedly set on fire by his

neighbour, reports the 'Northern Territory News' The

'Sydney Morning Herald' reports

fears of an imminent collapse

of the European currency have

subsided. The 'Financial

Review' says European

governments signaled they may

relax the austerity measures

imposed on Greece The Port Adelaide Football Club will

seek to educate players'

families about venting their

feelings on social media. That

story is in the 'Advertiser'. The 'West

Australian' says the number of

WA motorists not wearing

seatbelts has increased

according to the Office of Road Safety. The 'Mercury' says

Tasmania's testing for learner

and P-plate drivers as been

labelled too difficult and costly. And more than 16,000

people have signed up to the

'Daily Telegraph''s people

power campaign. We would

like-to-hear from you this

morning as a newspaper consumer

how you're dealing with this,

for instance, do you get your

news primarily from a tab blet

or computer, newspapers less

important, certainly growing

Hywood was arguing from Fairfax

yesterday. And are you willing

to pay for your news online as

well? And that's the key

consideration for the Fairfax

press is whether in fact they

move to this paywall structure

whether Australians will pay

for their stories. 'The

Australian' say it is has been

very heartened by the fact what 'The

'The Australian' produces but

are you willing to chip in $2 a

week to get your news. The

newspaper shock waves continue

here in Australia. Contact us:

Let's take a quick look at

the weather around the country.

These are the top stories on ABC News Breakfast - the Foreign Affairs Minister says

he confident an Australian

lawyer being held in Libya will

be released soon. Bob Carr has

met Libya's Prime Minister and

deputy Foreign Minister. He

says an apology from the International Criminal Court

may secure Miss Taylor's

release. Leaders of Greece' New

Democracy party is likely to

form a coalition with the Pasok

party later today. Pasok came

third in Sunday's

election. News Limited may

announce its own restructure as

early as today. Its rival

Fairfax has announced 1900 jobs

will go over the next four

years of the changes at News

Limited are also expected to

include hundreds of

redundancies. There is indeed mounting speculation that News

Limited could announce its own

shake-up as early as today

after Fairfax' shock

announcement of yesterday of

the company is cutting 1900

jobs over three years and paut

putting paywalls up on its

online services. Watching from

the sideline is Gina Rinehart,

now the biggest single

shareholder in Fairfax. Hamish

Fitzsimmons has more. As

Fairfax slashed her workforce,

Gina Rinehart has cornered

almost 19% of the company's

shares and is expected to be

offered two board seats I think

Fairfax needs Gina a hell of a

lot more than Gina needs

Fairfax. A very dire judgment

on the performance of Fairfax.

Its share price is at 20-year

lows. As Fairfax shares moved

west, staff were shell-shocked

after the radical restructure

was announced. We've recently

seen a bananas decision to

outsource 60 subeditors from

Wollongong. It's just rubbish.

We ask managers to learn from

past mistakes, learn to talk to

their workers. Management is

talking but it's not what

journalists and other Fairfax

staff want to hear. There will

be redundancies, including

those already announced in

Fairfax for the future and the

changes announced today. 1900

people will be leaving the

business over the next three

years. The 'Sydney Morning

Herald' and 'The Age' will go

to a tabloid size from next

March and Fairfax will close

its printing presses in Sydney

and Melbourne. The newspapers'

websites will move behind a metered paywall and the company

says its emphasis will be

digital. We will do our best to

make sure that 'The Age' is here

here for a long time to come

and on our digital platforms

we're market leaders. One of

the most successful websites in

the country. But turning that

popularity into profit is another thing Newspaper

economics are crashing. The

broadsheets are close to even

or even in loss, so they have

to make some hard, long overdue

desists. Fairfax CEO Greg

Hywood outlined the future in

this grainy video on websites We're also changing

the way we deliver our journalism with a significant

restructure of our metro

editorial teams to ensure a

greater integration across

print, digital and mobile

platforms and better sharing

across geographies. Whether or not Fairfax has made the

changes in time to adapt or be

crushed by the new media

environment is another matter.

Andrew Jaspan he had titted the

'The Age' from 2004-2008 and

now runs the online opinion

site The Conversation I salute

the country, but the problem is

it's five to 10 years too late

and the result of being too

late is that it's left the company in a very weak position. Gina Rinehart's raid

on Fairfax shares has prompted

speculation the mining magnate

wants the papers to reflect her

opinions. What that means is

she will take this group in a different trajectory in terms

of its editorial line and what

the impact of that will be we

don't quite know. But economist

Christopher Joyce says changes

will ultimately be commercially

driven If there needs to be a

change to editorial content,

that will be driven by revenue

and profitability

considerations, not by some ulterior, ideological

agenda. News Limited is

preparing for its own major restructuring effort and

resulting job cuts. Traditional

newspaper journalism is on the

way out and this is the biggest

moment, the most decisive down

downsize that we've seen, but

many more, hundreds of

newspaper journalists are going

to lose their jobs. These are

paper cuts that for many will

be painful, but arguably

fundamental for both Fairfax

and News Limited's

liability. We will be discussions this in detail

after 7, we will be joined by

Mr Grugt fri and Harold Mitchell, Australia's foremost

media buyer with very strong

views about the long-term

profitability of newspapers to.

Finance and Federal Treasury

secretary Martin Parkinson says

Australia simply can't relie on

rising minerals prices to

ensure growth over the next two

decades. Dr Parkinson says if

Australia's national income is

to improve at the rate seen in

the past 20 years, productivity

will have to more than double.

If we have to improve our

national income at the same

rate that we've seen over the

last two decade s, we'll have

to more than double our

productivity growth rate. If

not, the growth in our living

standards will inevitably slow.

So, we'll have to pursue

productivity improvement

innovation. We won't be able to

relie on the continued prices

in our minerals and energy

export s or fall to a rise in

imports do to a rising

Australian dollar. In other

words, we will s have to go

back to living standards the old-fashioned way, by working

for it. To To the markets: This program is not subtitled Let's see what's happening

in the world of sport now.

We're joined by Paul Kennedy.

Good morning Good morning. A

big win by the Storm last night Yes, industry concern as

well. Coming from behind in the

second half, having trailed at

half-time only marginally, but

Glenn Stewart has a real

problem with his leg, it

appears and is in doubt for

State of Origin 3. Let's take a

look at all the high lights,

including that one low light

with Glenn Stewart's injury.

COMMENTATOR: Got away from

Stewart. O'Neill still going.

Pass it back to Lowry. Smith to

the line. Going straight past Anthony Watmough. Back ons

inside. Cherry-Evans. Does he

get to him. Comanchero gets

there for Mann cherry-Evans

gets there for Manly.

Brett Stewart chasing through. This time No.

60. There is real concern about

this injury to Glenn Stewart.

Trying to pop the ball out.

Gidley flick passes if you like

and. That left knee. A round of

applause from the Manly fans,

you would expect. Manly will

have the lead going to

half-time.

Nielsen will put a kick in,

not a bad one either. Smith

coming through. Got a play at

it. Picked up. On the last

play, a chip out wide. Duffy is

out there. He can leap and he

brings it down. Foran,

Stewart, got away from Duffy.

He will score for Manly!

Looking to convert. He misses.

And that's an outstanding performance from the Melbourne

Storm. The final score there

26-22, and the Melbourne Storm

stays on top of the NRL competition. Let's briefly look

at Euro 2012 and there are a

couple of matches this morning.

One goal so far as those

matches keep going. Italy

versus Ireland and the Italians

have scored. COMMENTATOR: It's

1-0. Or is it. Off the cross

bar. Italy appealing and the

Turkish referee says goal. It's the captain endeavouring to

help it off the goal

line. We'll keep you up to date

with the scores in those two

matches. Let's stay in Europe

or go back to Europe, whatever

you like. Andrew Matheson is

the Rowing Australia national

high performance director. We

are hoping to speak to him via

web cam now. Just want to touch

base with you after that performance by the Australian

rowers. They're now back in

camp and gearing up the last

preparations for London. How

are they going? Yes, we had a

really good regatta. Last one

with six weeks to go to the

Games. Quite important regatta

for us to see where we were at

and we came away with one gold

and four silvers. Things are

looking pretty good for us.

Another five weeks of solid

work here and the European

training centre and things are

looking really good. Andrew,

we've just got some problems

with the audio there. Forge on

with one more question. I

really wanted to ask you about

the men's foursome, the new

Oarsome Foursome. I notice the

English press are eight onto it

so there will be extra pressure

on the great British teams as

Australia tries to take the

medals. What do you think of

the new Oarsome Foursome. Great

young talent and a chance for

medals. Their British four is

the flagship boat and to go up

and beat them twice across the

weekend is certainly an

addition to their armoury, so

we are excited with what we've

got. We believe we can go

quicker. Andrew, we will leave

this there. We might speak to

you later on in the program and

run some pictures from the

World Cup. Talk to you later if

you can stay up. Brilliant. Andrew Matheson

that. I do want to talk about there. I do want to go back to

the rowing T will be a big part

of the Olympics and plenty of

different combinations there,

including on staying on top of

the women's fours, with minus

Pippa Savage and Amy Clay comes

in there, and the last dash at

the Olympics and we might talk

a little bit later about the

sledge, the on-field sledge

that seems to be getting a lot

of press in the AFL. It does.

Involving ruckman Will minutesome from the Western

Bulldogs. Pretty serious stuff.

I haven't read too deeply into

the story. Has he been forced

to ooh poll jies yet because

from all accounts what he said

was pretty disgraceful.

Not very nice. I can't pass

judgment. I stand poised to

pass judgment as soon as I hear

what was said, but it took me

back to one of the best sledges

I ever heard on a footy field

when I was lining up for goal

one day and someone mentioned

my girlfriend, but actually

said they thought she was

really hot, so I was really

confused by that. I missed the

goal after that because it was

actually a compliment.

Sometimes the reverse

psychology works. I think we

Mathesons because the audio can go back on our guest Andrew

might be fixed there. Andrew,

can you hear me I certainly

can. I want to ask you very

briefly about our Oarsome

Foursome again because I want

to run pictures of this. Drew

Ginn is going for his fourth

Olympic medal and it seems the

team-mates are rallying around

him. Tell us about the dynamics

of that crew? Just the real mix

of youth and experience is

something pretty special. They

have a great work ethic. You see from the footage they're

srm a pleasure to watch and

they're racing very well. We

really believe we can get really believe we can get more

speed out of them over the next

few weeks as awell, so it is a

really exciting time for us and

it's fantastic that the British

are shocked so early before the

Games. Tell us about the pair

who took out the women's pairs

and I know the broadcasters

were saying they believe the

Australian duo have a lot of

improvement as well and might

be a surprise gold in

Melbourne. They certainly are a

pretty talented boat. Kim Crowe

going from strength to

strength. And Brooke pradly was a World champion in this class

six years ago. Lots of

experience there. We've had a

Brooke over the last couple of bit of injury issues with

months. She is on her way back

and they're stepping up nicely.

I think they will be another

really good boat for us in

London. I want to run some

pictures now of the women's

foursome. We've heard so much

about Pippa Savage in this

country. The team forges on and

the women's eight as well which

we're all pleased to see have

made it into London. Can you

tell me about those two

boats? Both of them are pretty

gutsy boat and I think you will

see from the footage, if you

play it, they race really hard.

Still more speed to come out of

those boats, but gutsy

performances and that's all we

Probably a little bit tired can ask from our athletes.

comeg into the regatta and

obviously a little bit of

disruption in the squad, but

certainly a pleasure to have

around our team and they will

step up nicely across the next

five weeks as well. Terrific.

Andrew, I can tell you're

excited and there is a lot of

good feeling in the Australian

rowing camp at the moment, so

good luck with your final preparations Thanks for

that. That's Andrew Matheson in

Italy with the Australian

rowers. Good luck to them,

Paul. See you soon. Vanessa

O'Hanlon with the weather news

and a very wintry week in the

south, Vanessa. It certainly

is. The cold fronts are lining

up all with each other. Looking

like five. Heavier snow is expected from Thursday until

Sunday and over the course of a

week, around 50mm of rain in

Tasmania and also for parts of

the south coast. But the second

front, as we can see here, is crossing Western Australia this

morning, so far it's dumped

over 11mm of rain at bridge

town. It will then move across

the Bight, reaching the

south-east on Thursday, but

because of where the high

pressure system is situated, it

won't allow these fronts to

move any further north, but

that high is dominating

Queensland at the moment.

Another cold morning with

widespread frost. It's

minus-2.5 at Applethorpe.

You're watching ABC News

Breakfast. Shortly we will be

speaking to the Foreign Affairs

Minister Bob Carr who has

backpack to Libya to secure the

release of Australian lawyer

Melinda Taylor. He has been

meeting Libya's Prime Minister

and the deputy Foreign Minister

and later on, of course, we'll

review some of the day's

newspapers. This morning we

will be joined by Laurie die am

from Latrobe university. The

Foreign Minister Bob Carr says

he is confident an Australian

lawyer being held in Libya will

be released very soon. Mr Carr

says he believes an apology from the International Criminal

Court will secure Melinda

Taylor's release. Leaders of

Greek's New Democracy part are

confident they will form a new coalition government today with

the Socialist Pasok party which

came third in Sunday's

election. The left-wing Syriza

party which polled second says

it will stay in

opposition. The country's

biggest newspaper company News

Limited may announce its own

restructure as early as today.

Yesterday Fairfax announced 1900 jobs will go there over

the next three years. The

changes at News Limited are

also expected to include hundreds of redundancies. The

search has resumed for two

Australian yachtsmen missing in

Tonga for several days. The men

phoned a relative last Thursday

to say their yacht had run

aground and was breaking up.

Wreckage was later found on the

island. Egypt's Muslim

Brotherhood has claimed victory

in that election. Egypt's

military council gave itself

sweeping now powers but it will

hand over power to the new

President at the end of June As

we've just heard, the Foreign

Affairs Minister Bob Carr has

met Libya's Prime Minister and

the deputy Foreign Minister and

to tell us what came of the

discussions he joins us now

from Algeria. Good morning.

Thank you very much for your

time, Senator Carr. How close

is Melinda Taylor being

released? I couldn't put time

on it. I'm hopeful, after what

I heard earlier today in Libya

that the government is wrapping

up the investigation by its

prosecutor. I'm confident that

the Libyan Government and even

the authorities in Zintan are

keen that the four detainees be

released and I'm quietly

confident that with an appropriate form of words from

the International Criminal

Court, that they will respond

sooner rather than later. So,

it's still a fragile position,

but I feel reasonably hopeful

that as the Libyans see it, it

would be a good to wrap this

affair up with the release of

the detainees. So just hell us

about this apology and the wording of it and whether in

fact the ICC has agreed to

issue the statement? Yes, I

can't wade through the whole

territory of what was said when

Melinda Taylor and colleagues

were interviews Mr Gaddafi in a

cell in Zintan. Argument about

papers being handed over and

all the rest. But it's

certainly true that the Libyan

authorities are not just the

people in Zintan formed the

view that something wrong was

done, that there had been a

breach of trust. I believe the

ICC would have been protecting

its employees, Melinda Taylor,

included, better if they had negotiated protocols and

before they allowed their procedures with the Libyans

they acknowledge that in a people to go n and I think if

brisk way, a work man-like way

in a statement, they will clear

the air and make it possible

not only for the central

government in Libya, but for

those in Zintan enforcing its

authority to move as well. One

until now, what's been said is

that the ICC, as a UN body,

operates under diplomatic

immunity in these countries.

You're now saying that the ICC may be has made mistakes. Does

the ICC acknowledge that? I

spoke to Judge song of the ICC

on the way from Tripoli to the

airport and I put to him very

strongly that given the widely

and firmly held view in Libya

about this, given the confusion

about procedures and protocols,

it would do no harm to the

authority of the ICC to

apologise to the Libyan

authorities, and to concede

that things might have been

prepared for in a more

thorough-going way. If that's

said, I think that the Libyans

- the Libyans are deeply

concerned about continuing

threats to their security. The

Prime Minister and the deputy

Foreign Minister made reference

when they were talking to me to

Gaddafi forces just beyond the

borders, Gaddafi forces with

the capacity to move anywhere

along 4,000km of land border

that Libya shares with other

countries - they see this as a

real threat. There is a lot of

focus on the wreckage of the

country after the years of the

Gaddafi dictatorship, so there

is a lot of swirling resentment

and hatred focused on the

Gaddafi in prison. As a result,

extreme sensitivities in this affair, and I think they've got

to be dealt with. I think

they've got to be dealt with. We're prepared and I offered

this to the ICC and I offered

it to the Prime Minister and to

the deputy Foreign Minister, we're prepared to be the

International Criminal Court brokers between the

and the Libyans. They recognise

they've got to have a dialogue

when this affair is settled,

and I think Australia could

play a role as good global

citizen in facilitating it, and

both of them are open to that

suggestion. You said that it

could do no harm for the ICC to

issue this apology. The ICC has

come under huge criticism

because it hasn't successfully

prosecuted cases and it's seen

somewhat of a toothless tiger,

so surely another diplomatic

mistake on the part of the ICC

will do the organisation

harm? I've got a different

view. I think the ICC has

demonstrated a pretty good

record in recent cases and I

think - bear in mind, the ICC

was set up to bring

prosecutions in cases where a

country was disinclined to do

it or couldn't do it. This is

very different. In Libya you've

got a government very keen to

get on with the task of prosecuting someone for war

crimes or crimes against

humanity or genocide. One of

the categories of serious crime

on a mass scale. But the Libya

- but the rebels in Libya won't

even hand over Saif

al-Islam? No, but that's bus

they want to prosecute him

themselves. They want to carry

out the prosecution. That's the

difference. It's not a case

that the ICC, such as the ICC

has been involved with in the

past where the government

holding the alleged war

criminal has been reluctant or

unable to carry out the

prosecution. Here you've got

the government that holds the

algd war criminal itching to

get on with the prosecution and

that makes it different, and I

think that means there can be

fruitful cooperation. I don't

see why, for example, the

Libyans shouldn't be allowed to

carry out this prosecution

themselves in some sort of

premiership with - some the

sort of partnership with the

ICC. It wouldn't be too hard to

negotiate the terms and

conditions by which the ICC

many involves whilst carrying

it. I'm not prescribing this,

but I'm saying there is plenty

of ground for a fruitful

dialogue between the two

organisations. Fog the release

of the four detainees,

Australia is prepared to set

that up. Senator Carr, you said

ahead of this meeting that you

had modest expectation s of

what would come of it, given

that Libya had previously said

it would need 45 days to

complete this investigation.

Your personal intervention made

a significant difference.

Should that have come sooner? I

might be mistaken about my

reading of the situation and I

might be overlooking the

difficulties the Libyan

administration could face administration could face in

implementing this. This has

been gathering pace for about a

week now, and no intervention

by me would have been possible

earlier. We needed the air to

clear. We needed to know where

the authorities stood. But

certainly without raising the

hopes of Jeff, Melinda's

husband or Janelle and John,

her parents in Brisbane, I was

reassured by the Prime Minister

and his Deputy Foreign Minister

talking about wrapping up the

investigation soon, and if

that's done, with appropriate

wording from the ICC, I think

the goodwill being offered by

the Libyans should be tested,

and again without raising

hopes, on too little evidence,

too little information, too little encouragement, I would

like to think that goodwill

might be flowing in the right

direction. Senator Carr, what

contact have you had with

Melinda Taylor's family, since

this meeting took place? I

spoke to - yes, since the

meeting took place, it was too

late at night to bother John

and Janelle in Brisbane. Hi

spoken to them before I went to

Libya, but I spoke to Jeff. I

woke him up early. He lives in

The Hague. I told him what I

was going to be proposing after

what I thought were very

fruitful meetings with the

Prime Minister and the deputy,

very promising meetings, with the Prime Minister and the

Deputy Foreign Minister. I told

him the nature of the

settlement that I was

suggesting to both sides and I

think he was quietly encouraged. And in interprets

of Australia's relationship

with Libya, how much aid is

Australia providing Libya and

are you happy that Libya is

doing all it can in order to

allow not just Melinda Taylor

but the other ICC lawyers to

leave as soon as possible? Something in this

affair has deeply stirred the

Libyans, not just a militia

group in Zintan, but serious people committed to democracy

in the senior levels of the

transitional council. We've got

to acknowledge that. We've got

to work with them. People I met

today are seriously committeded

to leading their country to a

democratic future. The problems

they face are huge. Here is a

country that was debauched,

devowed, divided, destroyed by

decades of the worst kind of

dictatorship, and then on top

of that, they had their

institutions and infrastructure

blown apart by months of

revolutionary war. They've

still got an armed militia. The

Prime Minister I spoke to has

got to deal with armed militia

across his country and I feel

immensely sorry for them. We discussed whether Australia

could help in a very specific

form of aid and that is giving

them some capacity-building

assistance in putting together

a judicial system. They've

still got the old statutes of

the Gaddafi regime. They've

still got judicial figures from

the Gaddafi regime. Here is a

country that needs to rebuild

its civil society and rebuild a judicial system and that's

something where I think we can help. Bob

help. Bob Carr, we thank you

very much for your time My

pleasure, thank you. Let's

take you to Egypt now where the

Muslim Brotherhood candidate

Mohammed Mercy has claimed

victory in that country's

presidential elections but it's

still unclear how much power he

will have, as Jon Stewart

reports. News that the Muslim

Brotherhood's Mohammed Mercy

was leading the presidential

race sparked scenes of

jubilation in Tahrir Square.

Counting at polling stations

across the country was closely

watched by Muslim Brotherhood

supporters of the group claims

to have won the election with

52% of the vote.

TRANSLATION: I salute all

Egyptians. I promise to act

like a brother to them, lick a

father to them and like one of

them who bears the same

problems and worries and work

Tosser of them. In his victory

speech, Mohammed Morsi worked

to allay fairs that the Muslim

Brotherhood would try to impose

strict Islamic law

TRANSLATION: We are not about

taking revenge or settling

scores. We are all brothers of

this nation. We own it together

and we are equal in rights and

duties. However, official

results are not due until

Thursday and it's still unclear

what the victory actually

means. Supporters of the ousted Mubarak regime Prime Minister,

Ahmed Shafiq, have refused to

accept the result. We are not

in a hurry to announce any resonance, because the only

authority to is announce this

is the elections. Three days

ago the Muslim Brotherhood

suffered a major setback when

Egypt's Supreme Court ruled

that last year's parliamentary

election was unconstitutional.

The Islamist group won almost

half of the parliamentary seats

in that poll. The supreme

council of armed forces is

closely linked to figures from

the former Mubarak regime of

the military council has ruled

that a new parliament cannot be

formed until a new constitution

is written. Supporters of the

Muslim Brotherhood fear the new constitution will boost the

role of the military. Despite

the uncertainty, some Egyptians

are still hopeful.

TRANSLATION: I am not a Muslim

Brotherhood supporter but I am

happy that Morsi is leading

because he is from the revolution and will continue

the goals of the

revolution. The military

Council says it will take three

months to write the now constitution. You're watching

ABC News Breakfast. These are

our top story this morning -

the Foreign Minister says he is confident an Australian lawyer

being held in Libya will be

released soon. Bob Carr has met

Libya's Prime Minister and

Deputy Foreign Minister. He

says an apology from the ICC

may secure Melinda Taylor's release. The New Democracy

party is likely to form a

coalition with the Socialist

Pasok party which came third in

Sunday's election. And the country's biggest newspaper

company News Limited may

announce its own restructure as

early as today. Its rival

Fairfax has announced 1900 jobs

will go over the next three

years. The changes at News are

also expected to include

hundreds of redundancies. For a

look at the national papers

we're joined by Dr Laurie, an

associate professor of journalism at La Trobe

University. Good morning. Good

morning. It's the story that

broke yesterday morning and

dominated the news yesterday

and is dominating the papers

today.

Yes, the news is the news. It

doesn't really happen this

often that you get a story that

really, I suppose, puts us

right into the centre of what's

actually happening with the

decline of newspapers globally

and in our own backyard. The really interesting thing about

this story is that it has been

a long time coming but it's

only this week that we'll end

up not just with the details of

the Fairfax job cuts but also I think from News Limited and

it's really interesting looking

at how the two papers, 'The

Australian' and say 'The Age'

and 'Sydney Morning Herald' are

covering it. 'The Age'

obviously part of Fairfax has

done a number of stories this morning crossing from

everything from the workers who

are going to lose their jobs at

the printing presses to a range

of different explainers on

what's going on. 'The

Australian' I think is

particularly interesting

because its editorial ven nabl pubably cases face a new

business model, is actually

very sympathetic to the

journalists at Fairfax, and I

guess everyone realises that

this is a huge moment in the

change, the downsizing of

print, and an interesting

commentary piece from Mark Day

said this is the tipping point

in the newspaper industry. As

you mentioned before, he said,

"We can expect later this week,

version of high-order maybe today, News Limited's

restructuring. It's unlikely to take a significantly different

direction." So I think what

we're getting from everyone who

writes for newspapers now is

eyes wide open. We're actually

seeing, that, yes, this is

possibly just the start. How

long will newspapers last for?

Is this a crisis in the media

or just a paper for newspaper

journalism? All those sorts of

questions are hitting both the

- are being covered in both

News Limited and Fairfax today.

There is a great cartoon from

Cadel ka. Have we got it up. Is

will come up. There it is. You

can see the guy there - all the people walking past on their mobile devices with the

headline "Internet no threat to

papers - final issue" I bit of

black humour there. This story

is not just big in Australia -

it's getting coverage all

around the world. 'The

Guardian' begins its article.

Fairfaxes 1900 job cut with the

words "landmark, historical,

unprecedented. No add jektive

seems too much to the massive

change to Australia's oldest newspaper group in a single

day." It goes on it look at

some of the issues, the vanilla

content reference is a quote

from Paul Murphy from the MEAA,

the fear that two newspapers

will just become one and lose

the capacity to cover things

editorially. And be different Yes, and be different from each

other. Across the Tasman, the

New Zealand 'Herald' late

yesterday put up an article

saying, "Fairfax says job cuts

won't affect New Zealand jobs."

This may seem a side story, but

it's interesting that Fairfax

owns over 300 papers, 50

websites and stations in

Australia and New Zealand and

several of these newspapers are

actually in New Zealand and

their CEO says there is no plan

to shift New Zealand's

broadsheet newspapers to

tabloid papers and he says

Fairfax New Zealand has been

ahead of the curve in...

rationalisation." What he

doesn't say is that a copy

editing will now include that

in Australia. New Zealand

'Herald', for instance. Two

challenges here. - 'Newcastle

Herald'. 'The Australian' is

encouraging readers who have

their online content free to

stump up $2, $2.50 a week for

the privilege and encouraging

advertisers to stump up a

similar amount of money for

tabloids which they're saying

they won't do. Still lots of

challenges to be broached. I

think everyone knows you will

still need to got a lot of

subscribers, and the value of

an online subscriber, even if

they're paying for content,

doesn't come anywhere near what

the print value is. The value

of online advertising is

minuscule. Even though it will

overtake, it's worth so cents

in the dollar to print

advertiser. No-one pretend s

that it is a great solution. If

anyone can think of a great

business model on how digital

mastheads can survive and

thrive, I think they would be

making a fortune by now.

How concerned are you given that you lecture journalism

students, and how concerned are

they for their few fewers? A

good question. My feeling about

that, like a lot of journalism

programs around the world have

long abandoned the idea that

print is actually the main game

with newspapers now, and I

think journalism is changing

and in fact our challenge is

actually to equip students to

go into different areas of the

media, as well as the

newspapers. We love it when our

students get newspaper jobs,

but as a new adventure, a completely different time, and

one of the things that has

become clear over the last

couple of years is that more

jobs require journalistic

schools, so journalism as a

practice will increase over

different times... The platform has changed essentially? Yes,

and no-one knows what will

happen and we factor in how you

deal with uncertainty when

teaching our students. The 'Daily Telegraph' has the news that really counts this

morning? Look, I don't watch

The Voice. Do you guys watch

The Voice? 2.5 million others

do I think we're the three

people who don't watch The

Voice. I can see how it is

very, very successful. The bit

I've seen, it's not a nasty

program, a talent show that is

quite inclusive. Ka Rees Eden

the winner and she appears on

quite a number of front pages

today. That's the 'Daily

Telegraph' which is also

running its own campaign to cut

electricity bills in New South

Wales. A couple of days now. It

has been a very concerted

campaign as that goes Yes, and

this is where they can add

traction to an issue and build

it up. The 'Daily Telegraph'

I'm sure will keep with that

people power icon that they've

got on the front page will keep

pressing on with this. Who

knows what circumstance clation

boost will be had by the free

Voice-winning poster. Exactly.

Finally today, the NT News have

an interesting front page

saying that the Dalai Lama will

visit Darwin. That, however, we have

have to say is not the Dalai Lama above. That's unfortunately someone who lost

his life when he was allegedly

set on fire by his neighbour. They've done pretty

well, Darwin, had President

Obama there. Dalai Lama -

pulling all these international

figures It just needs to set up

an international diplomats and

world leaders resort with a

pool of crocodiles, and

limitless stories for months

and years to come.

Maybe Darwin will end up

being the city that hosts the

G20 in 2014 . No-one is ruling

that out yet. That will be

great. And the Olympic Games in

the middle of summer in the

monsoon season. All going on in

the Top End. Thanks very much,

Lawrie Zion Thank you. Good

morning again to Paul Kennedy. The Melbourne Storm did very

well last night Yes, won some

poise. Manly was actually

leading in the first half. At

half-time, anyway. They came

from behind after Storm scored

two tries. Brett Stewart's try

helped them lead. His brother

went down for with a knee

injury is in doubt for the

State of Origin at the very

least. We will see how his

injury stacks up today. The

Storm showed some precision in

the second half and took

advantage of its opportunities.

The final score was 26-22 and

Melbourne coach Craig Bellamy

said he couldn't have been

happier with his side's

resilience. Let's go to the

only goal that has been scored

so far in Euro 2012. It is

Italy versus Ireland and the

Italians are

one-up. COMMENTATOR: It's 1-0,

or is it, it's off the cross

bar. Italy appearing and the

Turkish referee says goal. It's

the captain , Damien duff

endeavouring to help it off the

goal line. I will keep you

updated on those scores, but

just an update on the NBA, the

Miami Heat has beaten Oklahoma

so now leads 2-1 in the

championship. Let's hear from a

couple of the finely dressed

stars at the press conference

and American is warming to the

Miami Heat I told you guys last

year I didn't make enough

game-changing plays and that's

what I kind of pride myself on. I didn't do that last year in

the finals, so I'm just trying to

to make game-changing plays, and whatever it takes for a

team to win, just stepping up

in the key moments and be there

for my team-mates.

Last year I don't know if we

was experienced enough as a

unit to deal wa with what came

at us and it showed. This year,

no matter what happens, I feel

like we're a more experienced

team. It's not saying we wanted

more, I just feel like we under

the situations more and we can

deal with it better. Miami Heat

sounding like winners at the

moment. 2-1 up over Oklahoma. I

will attach a story to my

Twitter accounts. 'New York

Times' saying humility looks

good on the Heat, so starting

to warm to their personalities

as well as their

basketball. Right, but will the

humility be proven? Yes, I

think they may have learned

from last year. They might be

top winners this year Thanks,

Paul. Vanessa O'Hanlon with the

weather now. A cold front

across southern Victoria and

Tasmania overnight. Another is passing over Western Australia's south-west T will reach the south-east on

Thursday and will be followed

by a series of fronts into the

weekend, but because of where

the high pressure system is

situated it won't allow these

fronts to move any further

north. To Queensland:

Coming up after the break,

more on the rise of digital

news publications. We will The Foreign Minister says

an Australian lawyer being held

in Libya could soon be

released. It's still a fragile

position, but I feel reasonably

hopeful. This Program is Captioned

Live. Political leaders in

Greece confident of forming a

coalition government

today. First Fairfax, now News

Limited - big job losses expected at the Murdoch stable

as both media groups deal with

the rise of the Internet. And the Melbourne Storm come from

behind to beat the Sea Eagles. bloke Good morning, you're watching ABC News Breakfast on

Tuesday, 19th June. I'm Karina

Carvalho. Coming up on the

program this hour, we'll speak

to media buyer Harold Mitchell

and former 'The Age' and News

Limited editor Bruce gather ri

about the future of Fairfax

Media, and also coming up, time

for some '90s nostalgia. (Bruce

gugt ri) Set against the back

Dron of the end of the Cold War

early 1990s alternative rock

spawned a musical revolution.

We'll speak to Craig Schuftan,

the authority of a new book

Entertain Us later in the

program. Always good to have a

bit of Nirvana at 7 o'clock in

the morning, but first here is Michael with the news. Australia's Foreign

Minister Bob Carr is hopeful

Melinda Taylor will be released

soon. Senator Carr has met Libya's Prime Minister and

Deputy Foreign Minister. He has

told us here on ABC News

Breakfast that he believes an

apology from the International

Criminal Court will secure Miss

Taylor's release. Leader of

Greece's New Democracy party is

likely to form a collision with

the Socialist Pasok party which

came in third in Sunday's

election. The left-wing Syriza

party which polled second says

it plans to stay in opposition.

The New Democracy leader

Antonis Samaras has said he

will seek some changes to the

bailout package for Greece. Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood has

claimed victory in that

country's election. Official

results aren't expected to

Thursday. Ahmed Shafiq has

vowed to challenge the results.

Egypt's military council gave

itself sweeping now powers, but

it say it is will hand over

power to the new President by

the end of June. Let's come

back home and the country's biggest newspaper company News

Limited may announce its own

restructure as early as this

morning. Yesterday Fairfax

announced 1900 jobs will go

over the next three years there. 'The Age' and 'Sydney Morning Herald' will downsize

to become tabloids and the

country isn't ruling out

completely going online. The

changes are expected to include

hundreds of redundancies. The

search has resumed for two Australian yachtsmen missing

off Tonga for several days.

Adelaide man Ian Thompson and

his companion phoned a relative

last Thursday to say their

yacht had run aground and was

bragging up. Wreckage was later

found. Several days of

searching has so far failed to

find any trace of the men. To the markets:

A quick look at the national weather now:

Now, as Michael just

mentioned, the Foreign Affairs

Minister Bob Carr is hopeful an

Australian lawyer being held in

Libya will be released soon of

the a short time ago he told

ABC News Breakfast an apology

from the International Criminal Court could secure Miss

Taylor's release I really want

this Australian woman to be

reunited, to be admitted again

into the arms of her family.

They want her, and that's my

goal in coming here. But I now

have a deeper understanding of

Libyan perspectives and

concerns with the way the

International Criminal Court

has responded with them, and

it's my goal to see if we can

bring the two sides together in

fruitful dialogue. The Prime

Minister and the Deputy Foreign

Minister explained to me some

of the difficulties and

complexities in this case, and

I've undertaken to facilitate

contact between Libya and the

International Criminal Court. I

w