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This is Ten's Early News. Good morning. I'm Bill Woods. Top stories this Wednesday - the UN warns of a humanitarian crisis in the Middle East. as attacks escalate expected to be displaced. Half a million people arriving in Jordan Australians flee the war zone, from Lebanon. after a long and dangerous bus ride The tsunami death toll tops 300 admit they received warnings as Indonesian officials but did not announce them. And in sport - on the green jersey tightens Robbie McEwen's grip pulls out of the Tour. as his main rival Checking today's weather now - business and finance. Now with our first look at the day's of the session in positive territory Wall Street has spent much earnings from Coca Cola. thanks to better-than-expected a humanitarian catastrophe. Fears this morning Lebanon is facing The United Nations says displaced by the Israeli attacks. half a million people have been blackouts in much of the country A week of bombings has caused could lead to widespread illness. while poor sanitary conditions in Beirut overnight, Air-raids killed more than 30 people on northern Israel while a volley of Hezbollah attacks

killed at least one person.

There are those fortunate enough who

have not really being targeted thus

far. Although it is it very

frightening for them they are in

relative safety. And then there are

tens of thousands of people who tens of thousands of people who have

had to flee their homes. You can only

imagine the consequence. You will imagine the consequence.

have thousands of people displaced.

Anyone staying has a real risk

Anyone staying has a real risk have

been killed or injured. People are

out of their homes. are believed to be caught up 25,000 Australians in the Middle East hostilities. A ship is on its way from Turkey

stranded in Lebanon. to pick up hundreds of Australians to be chartered by the Government More vessels are expected in coming days. of our nationals Four buses carry more than 90 and to safety. through the Israeli blockade The trickle set to become a flood, to take part in a great exodus as the Australian Government prepares

from Turkey A charter vessel on its way by sea.

in Beirut. to rescue our citizens stranded onto that ship Planning to get about 300 people will go onto a Canadian ship. and a further 100 And there are more on the way. on a massive scale. The sea evacuation expected to be with children, to the elderly, Priority must be given to families or infirmed. and to people who might be sick there is little it can do And the Government admits for Australians trapped in the south of Lebanon near the Israeli border. PHONE: I don't think we can survive another day or two. I'm sure there's going to be casualties from Australian people. Israel refusing to call a ceasefire so Australians can get out. There are no grounds for saying we haven't tried, It is a war-like situation. It's possible that somebody who is Lebanese has been killed and that we will subsequently discover they also had dual Australian citizenship. Murray McCloskey, Ten News.

If you're worried about family and friends in Lebanon and haven't been able to contact them you can call the Department of Foreign Affairs hotline on 1800 002 214. Australians in Lebanon can contact the embassy in Beirut or call 61 1300 555 135. Indonesian authorities have confirmed they knew Monday's deadly tsunami was coming but were helpless to alert the villages in its path. 350 people are now confirmed dead and hundreds injured. Aid agencies say 54,000 people are displaced. Many are afraid to return to coastal areas for fear the seas will rise again. There are no reports of Australian casualties. Although one Melbourne family has described its narrow escape

from the wave. Australia's military presence in East Timor will be wound back.

On his first visit to the capital Dili since the violence, the Prime Minister conceded our troops can't maintain law and order indefinitely. Warm enough? Oh yeah, a little bit warm. Meeting and greeting some of the 2,500 soldiers who have been keeping the peace in East Timor for the past two months. Mr Howard conveying gratitude for a job well done in dangerous circumstances. We are all immensely proud of you. We are all greatly in your debt. Mr Howard's whirlwind visit intended as a thank-you to our troops but also as a vote of confidence in the reshaped government in Dili. The key question - how long will Australian soldiers and police be needed to hold apart the warring factions and rabble that cause such death and destruction only weeks ago? We don't want to go prematurely but I don't want to give the impression that we are here indefinitely. Mr Howard was greeted on arrival by the newly appointed Prime Minister, Jose Ramos Horta. He also met the popular President, Xanana Gusmao. Nice to be back in your country. The commanding officer of our military contingent briefed Mr Howard,

and he too declined to name a departure date for our troops. At home, the Greens say we pulled out of East Timor too early last time, and should not repeat the error. Greg Turnbull, Ten News. High drama in the skies of Brisbane yesterday with a military jet sparking an all out emergency. Shortly after take-off a wheel on this Air Force F1-11 fell off, the plane forced to circle the airport for four hours burning off fuel. The plane eventually managed to touch down with no landing gear, the novice pilot praised for guiding the stricken jet back to the ground.

The Air Force has grounded the entire fleet of F1-11s until it works out what went wrong. Robbie McEwen's grip on the green jersey has tightened with his main sprinting rival pulling out of the Tour de France. Winding their way through the first of three days in the Alps, world champion Tom Boonen retired on the approach to the second big climb. The elements proved no trouble for a breakaway group. But it was Luxembourg's Frank Schleck who took line honours. American Floyd Landis reclaimed the race leader's yellow jersey. Australia's Cadel Evans slipped to seventh overall but is still under three minutes off the pace. Cursed St Kilda ruckman Justin Koschitzke's comeback from injury has again been put on hold. He's been suspended for one week by the VFL tribunal after pleading guilty to making contact with an umpire. Justin Koschitzke was again in the spotlight, the VFL Tribunal ruling he had a duty of care not to crash into umpire Josh Krull. The St Kilda ruckman had been hoping to continue his comeback this weekend, but will cop his suspension on the chin. Well, he's very disappointed about having to miss another game this weekend. You know, he's had a real interrupted season, as we know, but he got a very fair hearing in there. Obviously, it was a pretty forceful blow to the back of the umpire's head. The players definitely have a duty of care to know where the umpire is at all times. At the AFL Tribunal, Richmond defender Joel Bowden failed to have his striking charge downgraded and will also miss one match. And Nick Davis has apologised to the Sydney Swans for his recent public outbursts but it may not be enough to get him back in the side. We see it as serious and it goes against what we are as a team, so there is some of that loss of trust, I suppose, from the playing group, and it's just up to Nick now, how he's going to get that trust back from the playing group. The Australian women's cycling team has remembered friend Amy Gillett killed during training in Germany one year ago. Some good news for our miners with growth in resource hungry China showing no signs of slowing down. Over the second quarter the Chinese economy expanded at its fastest pace in more than a decade with growth coming in at 11.3%. But the result has prompted fears the Chinese Government may have to raise interest rates to take some steam out of the red hot economy. That news sent our resource companies lower yesterday amid concerns growth will slow if rates are raised. Embattled wheat exporter AWB has won a court battle that means it will not have to hand over secret documents to the Cole Inquiry. Yesterday the Federal Court said it did not accept the Commonwealth's push to have the papers scrutinized by the Cole inquiry. AWB is claiming legal professional privilege over the 1,300 pages that deal with kickbacks allegedly paid to Saddam Hussein's regime. National weather for the rest of the day - Now for a look at the newspaper headlines - Specially chartered ships on their way to evacuate Australians from Lebanon. This program is captioned live. Welcome back to Ten's Early News. This morning -

fleeing danger - Government-chartered vessels to pick up hundreds of Australians in stranded in Lebanon. A policeman returns fire on a gunman in Melbourne claiming he feared for his life. Rescuers search for tsunami survivors in Indonesia. The Government committing to emergency aid. And the Northern Hemisphere swelters. Near 40 degree temperatures driving the French to waterholes

and New Yorkers off the runway. Time for another check of the markets, here's Kath. Wall Street is trading in the red this moring. Traders somewhat sidelined ahead of the Fed chairman's testimony and CPI numbers out tomorrow. A warning from the United Nations that Lebanon is facing a humanitarian crisis. Israeli forces continued their aerial assault on Beirut overnight, killing at least 30 more people. Beirut's skyline. Plumes of smoke a telling tale of city under attack. On the ground twisted metal and piles of rubble where residential buildings once stood. Israel insists the aerial attacks are carried out with pinpoint precision to limit the number of innocent casualties. But hospital wards tell a different story. The young and old in beds beside each other. And now the United Nations is warning of a humanitarian catastrophe with half a million people displaced by the Israeli onslaught. The road out of Lebanon to the Syrian capital Damascus is at a standstill as thousands of people try and flee the violence. While foreign nationals escape the war-torn region by sea and air. It's a similar story in northern Israel. Rockets continue to rain down on Haifa and other towns, killing one person overnight. And as violence between the two countries continues to escalate so too does the anger across the Middle East. Tens of thousands of people in Iran taking to the streets

in protest over Israeli attacks on Lebanon and the Gaza Strip. Hugo Ward Ten News. 86 Australians arrived in Jordan overnight after fleeing Lebanon. The evacuees spent nine hours on a bus to get to the capital Amman. It was a frightening trip. They rounded the war zone north into Syria, before heading south to Jordan which borders Israel. We are lucky that we are out. But we really feel for the people who are still left in Lebanon. It's heartbreaking to see the country pulled apart. The Australians could be home within days. Hundreds of Australians are expected to join a mass exodus by sea from Lebanon. The Australian Government has chartered a vessel from Turkey to begin evacuating our citizens from the war zone.

Priority much be given to families with children, to the elderly and to people who might be sick or infirmed. More ships are on the way, preparing to join a large international flotilla. The death toll from Monday's Javanese tsunami has topped 350 with scores more still missing. It's now emerged authorities knew the deadly wave was coming but couldn't alert those it was about to hit. The search for survivors goes on in the mud-caked villages of Java.

But more than two days after the deadly tsunami hope is fading. And the death toll rising. Hospitals struggle to cope. Stories of Monday's horror are everywhere. I thought I was dying. 18 months ago this stretch of coastline was spared by the sea as its northern counterparts took a hit. Now more than 350 are dead. 600 injured. 230 are missing. Threw us left, right.

Australians are among those who fled the 2m wall of water, triggered by a magnitude 7 earthquake.

A Melbourne man has told how he saved his family when the wave struck. It's now clear authorities were aware of the tsunami threat within minutes. But had no means of alerting those in its path.

A boost in the polls for Opposition Leader with Kim Beazley out-ranking the Prime Minister in the latest Newspoll. Meantime, the Prime Minister says the United State's new global policy on nuclear power influenced his decision to look at the possibility of uranium enrichment in Australia. Special operations group police surrounded the house in Melbourne's south-east at 5:00pm after ambulance officers reported a patient had armed and barricaded himself inside. The 26-year-old emerging with a handgun two hours into the siege to confront police. He was called on to drop his weapon. The SOG gentleman feared he was going to be fired upon and returned fire. Despite a chest wound, he tried to flee but was arrested, injuring an ambulance officer in the struggle. Both were taken to hospital. The stand-off stunning neighbours. The police came around and told us to stay indoors. We heard, "Stop or I'll shoot." There were two shots fired. Investigations are continuing, but the officer who wounded the gunman remains on duty. While we may be piling on extra blankets at night,

much of Europe is sweltering under record temperatures.

The mercury reached 36 degrees in Paris and London came close to breaking the record for its hottest ever day. Tourists in Paris did all they could to stay cool in the scorching heat, while others lapped up the welcome rays. Authorities are taking extra precautions to prevent a repeat of the heatwave in 2003 that killed many mainly older people. Heatwave conditions are also causing problems in America

with power grids beginning to fail. In New York blackouts have stranded hundreds of passengers at the La Guardia Airport. Without power, security screening at one of the main terminals was delayed and so were flights. Temperatures across the United States have been soaring all week with New York under an excessive heat warning. Power consumption in some states is now at a record high. In California, residents are being urged to conserve electricity Michael Gardiner's career at the West Coast Eagles appears over after another off-field indiscretion. The troubled ruckman will face drink-driving charges after crashing his V8 Commodore into two parked cars.

The Eagles have fined him $5,000 and suspended him indefinitely. Gardiner had only returned to the West Coast team three weeks ago after being banished last February for disciplinary reasons. NRL, and the Wests Tigers player who fears he's cost his team a finals berth has called for the controversial stripping rule to be abolished. Todd Payten says there's no point referees owning up to their mistakes

when the damage has already been done. Football Australia Chairman Frank Lowy has revealed an ambitious plan for Australia to host the World Cup in 2018. Speaking to the ABC, Lowy said the first major step in building on the Socceroos' success in Germany was to perform well in the Asian Confederation. Australia is a strong sporting country

and ought to be given a chance to move further internationally than where we were before. And Asia wanted us, FIFA accepted us and Oceania was ready to let us go, so here we are. That will make the biggest difference. Lowy wants Australia to be a regular top 10 nation in the football world.

Woolworths surprised on the upside yesterday posting better-than-expected annual sales. Revenue jumped 20% to nearly $38 billion

despite higher fuel costs and this year's interest rate rise putting the brakes on consumer spending. Those higher petrol prices helped the retailer's petrol stations division record a 32% rise in revenue with the company's Big W and Dick Smith stores also putting in a solid performance. And South Australian brewer Coopers says its takeover battle late last year with beverage giant Lion Nathan helped boost its yearly sales. The family-run brewery says

the ongoing stoush raised its profile in other states across Australia, prompting a 13.6% pick up in sales. Chairman Glenn Cooper says the huge media interest exposed the brand to previously untapped markets. In December shareholders successfully blocked Lion Nathan's $374-million takeover bid.

Indonesian authorities admit

they knew the deadly tsunami was on its way. More when Ten's Early News returns.

This program is captioned live. Top stories this Wednesday - the UN warns of a humanitarian crisis as attacks escalate in the Middle East. Half a million people expected to be displaced. Australians flee the war zone, arriving in Jordan after a long and dangerous bus ride from Lebanon. The tsunami death toll tops 300 as Indonesian officials admit they received warnings but did not announce them. And in sport - Robbie McEwen's grip on the green jersey tightens as his main rival pulls out of the Tour. Checking today's weather now - Now a look at the day's business and finance. Wall Street has spent much of the session in positive territory

Fears this morning Lebanon is facing a humanitarian catastrophe. The United Nations says half a million people have been displaced by the Israeli attacks. A week of bombings has caused blackouts in much of the country while poor sanitary conditions could lead to widespread illness. Air-raids killed more than 30 people in Beirut overnight, while a volley of Hezbollah attacks on northern Israel killed at least one person. And sigh of relief for 86 Australians who made their way out of Lebanon and into Jordan overnight. They spent at least eight dangerous hours on a bus to get to the capital Amman. The evacuees could be home within days.

25,000 Australians are believed to be caught up in the Middle East hostilities. If you're worried about family and friends in Lebanon and haven't been able to contact them you can call the Department of Foreign Affairs hotline on 1800 002 214.

Australians in Lebanon can contact the embassy in Beirut or call 61 1300 555 135.

The death toll from Monday's Javanese tsunami has topped 350 with scores more still missing. It's now emerged authorities knew the deadly wave was coming but couldn't alert those it was about to hit. The search for survivors goes on in the mud-caked villages of Java.

But more than two days after the deadly tsunami hope is fading. And the death toll rising. Hospitals struggle to cope. Stories of Monday's horror are everywhere. I thought I was dying. 18 months ago this stretch of coastline was spared by the sea

as its northern counterparts took a hit. Now more than 350 are dead. 600 injured. Hundreds are missing. Australians are among those who fled the 2m wall of water, triggered by a magnitude 7 earthquake.

It's now clear authorities were aware of the tsunami threat within minutes. But had no means of alerting those in its path. A man is under guard in a Melbourne hospital after being shot by police during a seige last night. Special Operations Group officers surrounded the home in the city's south-east, shooting the 26-year-old gunman in the chest after he allegedly emerged with a handgun. He was called to drop his weapon, the SOG gentleman feared he was going to be fire upon and returned fire. The two hour stand-off began after family called an ambulance, concerned for the man's welfare. High drama in the skies of Brisbane yesterday with a military jet sparking an all out emergency. Shortly after take-off a wheel on this Air Force F1-11 fell off, the plane forced to circle the airport for four hours burning off fuel. The plane eventually managed to touch down with no landing gear, the novice pilot praised for guiding the stricken jet back to the ground. The Air Force has grounded the entire fleet of F1-11s until it works out what went wrong. Robbie McEwen's grip on the green jersey has tightened with his main sprinting rival pulling out of the Tour de France. American Floyd Landis reclaimed the race leader's yellow jersey. Australia's Cadel Evans slipped to seventh overall Cursed St Kilda ruckman Justin Koschitzke's comeback from injury has again been put on hold. He's been suspended for one week by the VFL tribunal Justin Koschitzke was again in the spotlight,

the VFL Tribunal ruling he had a duty of care not to crash into umpire Josh Krull. The St Kilda ruckman had been hoping to continue his comeback this weekend, but will cop his suspension on the chin. Well, he's very disappointed about having to miss another game this weekend. You know, he's had a real interrupted season, as we know, but he got a very fair hearing in there. Obviously, it was a pretty forceful blow to the back of the umpire's head. The players definitely have a duty of care to know where the umpire is at all times. At the AFL Tribunal, Richmond defender Joel Bowden failed to have his striking charge downgraded and will also miss one match. And Nick Davis has apologised to the Sydney Swans for his recent public outbursts but it may not be enough to get him back in the side. We see it as serious and it goes against what we are as a team, so there is some of that loss of trust, I suppose, from the playing group,

and it's just up to Nick now, how he's going to get that trust back from the playing group. The Australian women's cycling team has remembered friend Amy Gillett killed during training in Germany one year ago. Kate Nicholls, one of the five cyclists injured when an out-of-control car hit the group, took part in the time trial of an annual race they were training for. Amy's parent's Denis and Mary Safe also there to support the team.

Earlier they visited the crash site, for the first time, where a plaque now stands in Amy's memory.

The market had been speculating a bid for Colorado was imminent. The $430-million hostile bid came from Affinity Equity Partners

There was a fair bit of takeover news for the market to digest yesterday, including a $109-million play in the banana industry. Timbercorp has teamed up with the Costa Group to bid for troubled banana grower Chiquita Brands - a company that had its crop destroyed by Cyclone Larry. Chiquita is currently recommending shareholders take no action but the market applauded the offer, pushing shares up 20% by the close of trade. Indonesian authorities admit Now for a look at the newspaper headlines - More when Ten's Early News returns.

THURSDAY. IN THE NATION'S CAPITAL, A COOL MORNING, WITH A MIX OF SUN AND CLOUD, WARMING TO A TOP OF 10. SHOWERS NORTH IN SYDNEY, SOUTH IN MELBOURNE. SHOWERS AND STRONG WINDS ALONG THIS COAST THIS AFTERNOON... HEADED FOR 14 IN WOLLONGONG, 13 IN BEGA. MODERATE SOUTH TO SOUTH EAST WINDS, IN ORANGE. COOL STILL IN BOWRAL THIS MORNING, A LITTLE WARMER IN GOULBURN. A DAMP DAY IN BATEMANS BAY, FINE IN BATHURST. MINUES ONE OVERNIGHT, WARMING TO 7 IN COOMA. 13 IN NOWRA. 14 IN BOTH COOMA AND PARKES. CHECKING THE OUTLOOK NOW, FOR CANBERRA AND SURROUNDS... AND A FINE DAY TOMORROW... RAIN TO END THE WEEK ON FRIDAY. SHOWERS RIGHT THROUGH TO WEDNESDAY, FINE AGAIN ON THURSDAY. (NO SCRIPT NEEDED HERE.) This program is captioned live. Welcome back to Ten's Early News. This morning - fleeing danger - Government-chartered vessels to pick up hundreds of Australians in stranded in Lebanon.

A policeman returns fire on a gunman in Melbourne claiming he feared for his life. Rescuers search for tsunami survivors in Indonesia. The Government committing to emergency aid. And the Northern Hemisphere swelters. Near 40 degree temperatures driving the French to waterholes and New Yorkers off the runway. A warning from the United Nations that Lebanon is facing a humanitarian crisis. Israeli forces continued their aerial assault on Beirut overnight, killing at least 30 more people. Beirut's skyline. Plumes of smoke a telling tale of a city under attack. On the ground

twisted metal and piles of rubble where residential buildings once stood. Israel insists the aerial attacks are carried out with pinpoint precision to limit the number of innocent casualties. But hospital wards tell a different story.

The young and old in beds beside each other. And now the United Nations is warning of a humanitarian catastrophe with half a million people displaced by the Israeli onslaught.

The road out of Lebanon to the Syrian capital Damascus is at a standstill as thousands of people try and flee the violence. While foreign nationals escape the war-torn region by sea and air. It's a similar story in northern Israel. Rockets continue to rain down on Haifa and other towns, killing one person overnight. And as violence between the two countries continues to escalate so too does the anger across the Middle East. Tens of thousands of people in Iran taking to the streets in protest over Israeli attacks on Lebanon and the Gaza Strip.

Hugo Ward Ten News. 86 Australians arrived in Jordan overnight after fleeing Lebanon. The evacuees spent nine hours on a bus to get to the capital Amman. It was a frightening trip. They rounded the war zone north into Syria, before heading south to Jordan which borders Israel. We are lucky that we are out. But we really feel for the people who are still left in Lebanon. It's heartbreaking to see the country pulled apart. The Australians could be home within days. A ship is on its way from Turkey

to pick up hundreds of Australians stranded in Lebanon.

More vessels are expected to be chartered by the Government in coming days. Four buses carry more than 90 of our nationals

through the Israeli blockade and to safety. The trickle set to become a flood, as the Australian Government prepares to take part in a great exodus by sea. A charter vessel on its way from Turkey to rescue our citizens stranded in Beirut.

Planning to get about 300 people onto that ship and a further 100 will go onto a Canadian ship. And there are more on the way. The sea evacuation expected to be on a massive scale. Priority must be given to families with children, to the elderly, and to people who might be sick or infirmed. And the Government admits there is little it can do for Australians trapped in the south of Lebanon near the Israeli border. PHONE: I don't think we can survive another day or two. I'm sure there's going to be casualties from Australian people. Israel refusing to call a ceasefire so Australians can get out. There are no grounds for saying we haven't tried, It is a war-like situation. It's possible that somebody who is Lebanese has been killed

and that we will subsequently discover they also had dual Australian citizenship. Murray McCloskey, Ten News. If you're worried about family and friends in Lebanon and haven't been able to contact them you can call the Department of Foreign Affairs hotline on 1800 002 214. Australians in Lebanon can contact the embassy in Beirut or call 61 1300 555 135. Indonesian authorities have confirmed they knew Monday's deadly tsunami was coming but were helpless to alert the villages in its path. 350 people are now confirmed dead and hundreds injured. Aid agencies say 54,000 people are displaced. Many are afraid to return to coastal areas for fear the seas will rise again. There are no reports of Australian casualties. Although one Melbourne family has described its narrow escape from the wave. Police are trying to track down a group of people which terrorised motorists on a major motorway in Sydney. Rocks were thrown at oncoming traffic on the M7 in the city's west. This truck driver's face showered with glass after a one smashed his front window. It comes just days after a Sydney train driver was pelted with rocks by a group of youths. A sweet incentive for triple O operators is reportedly jeopardising people's safety. Sydney's 'Daily Telegraph' says workers at a call centre west of the city are being offered chocolate and movie tickets if they get callers off the phone within three minutes. It's raised concerns about the amount of attention given to calls. The paper reports one man was wound up in less than two minutes, despite an axe-weilding attacker smashing his Sydney service station. A man is under guard in a Melbourne hospital after being shot by police during a siege. The officer claims he feared for his life and was acting in self defence. Special operations group police surrounded the house in Melbourne's south-east at 5:00pm after ambulance officers reported a patient had armed and barricaded himself inside.

The 26-year-old emerging with a handgun two hours into the siege to confront police. He was called on to drop his weapon. The SOG gentleman feared he was going to be fired upon and returned fire. Despite a chest wound, he tried to flee but was arrested, injuring an ambulance officer in the struggle. Both were taken to hospital. The stand-off stunning neighbours.

The police came around and told us to stay indoors. We heard, "Stop or I'll shoot." There were two shots fired. Investigations are continuing, but the officer who wounded the gunman remains on duty. A pre-schooler has gone on a dangerous joy ride in the US. Five-year-old Larry Hopkins had a lot of explaining to do when police finally caught up with him. He was being supervised by his grandmother when he grabbed her car keys and set off on an adventure. Larry made it almost a kilometre before authorities finally caught up with him. Michael Gardiner's career at the West Coast Eagles appears over after another off-field indiscretion. The troubled ruckman will face drink-driving charges after crashing his V8 Commodore into two parked cars. The Eagles have fined him $5,000 and suspended him indefinitely. Gardiner had only returned to the West Coast team three weeks ago

after being banished last February for disciplinary reasons. There is too much margin for different interpretations, so if we wiped it out altogether,

then there wouldn't be a problem with it. Football Australia chairman Frank Lowy has revealed an ambitious plan Leanne West, Ten News. Frank Lowy has revealed an ambitious plan for Australia to host the World Cup in 2018. Lowy said the first major step in building on the Socceroos' success in Germany was to perform well in the Asian Confederation. Australia is a strong sporting country and ought to be given a chance to move further internationally than where we were before. And Asia wanted us, FIFA accepted us and Oceania was ready to let us go, so here we are. That will make the biggest difference. Lowy wants Australia to be a regular top 10 nation in the football world. Embattled wheat exporter AWB has won a court battle

National weather for the rest of the day - While we may be piling on extra blankets at night, much of Europe is sweltering under record temperatures. The mercury reached 36 degrees in Paris and London came close to breaking the record for its hottest ever day. Tourists in Paris did all they could to stay cool in the scorching heat,

while others lapped up the welcome rays. Authorities are taking extra precautions to prevent a repeat of the heatwave in 2003 that killed many mainly older people. Heatwave conditions are also causing problems in America with power grids beginning to fail.

In New York blackouts have stranded hundreds of passengers at the La Guardia Airport. Without power, security screening at one of the main terminals was delayed and so were flights. Temperatures across the United States have been soaring all week with New York under an excessive heat warning.

Power consumption in some states is now at a record high.

And that's it for this edition of Ten's Early News. I'm Bill Woods, thanks for your company. And I'm Kath Robinson, see you tomorrow. Supertext Captions by the Australian Caption Centre. www.auscap.com.au