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(generated from captions) Tonight - valuable new information for police of the Bali bombings. hunting down the masterminds It's still a bit of a shock but just trying to get through it and concentrate on getting him home. to cope with the holiday tragedy. Victims and their families struggling

And - legitimately Because now the schools can operate from the terrorists and talent-spotters schools, can train them in hate. can look at the kids going through The Federal Opposition says schools, can train them in hate. can look at the kids going through

The Federal Opposition says terrorist group a ban on Indonesia's most sinister is one way to control it. Hello and welcome to Ten's Late News. I'm Sandra Sully. injured in Afghanistan. Also tonight - an Australian soldier Goodnight APPLAUSE tonight And Nicole, a surprise statement in the Bali bombing inquiry. But first tonight - progress

Investigators have been to a splinter group of JI. apparently with links

Nicole Strahan is in Bali. saying tonight Nicole, what are police about this latest line of inquiry? about that, Well, so far there are scant details some of the components used but it was revealed this afternoon 22 people. to make the bombs that killed raided several properties It's also emerged that police

Australian the Federal Police receipted

the scene using Federal Police receipted the scene Federal Police receipted

the scene using man kens. It's Federal Police receipted the scene using man kens. Federal Police receipted the scene using man Federal Police receipted

believed suicide bombers had the scene using man kens. It's believed suicide bombers

accomplices accomplices that accomplices that may have believed suicide bombers had accomplices that may believed suicide bombers had

accomplices that may have remotely believed suicide bombers had

detonated bombs using mobile Parts detonated bombs using mobile phones. detonated bombs using mobile phones. Parts of detonated bombs using mobile phones.

Parts of the bomb have detonated bombs using mobile phones. Parts of the bomb detonated bombs using mobile phones. Parts of the

Parts of the bomb have been detonated bombs using mobile phones. Parts of the bomb have been found, detonated bombs using mobile phones.

cables Tupperware, pieces of detjonator Parts of the bomb have been found,

cables and backpacks. Tupperware, pieces of detjonator cables and Tupperware, pieces of detjonator

cables and backpacks. Those being Tupperware, pieces of detjonator cables and backpacks. Those Tupperware, pieces of detjonator

questioned are questioned cables and backpacks. Those being despite arrests. questioned are not suspects, despite questioned are not suspects, cables and backpacks. Those being questioned are not

questioned are not suspects, despite arrests. There are questioned are not suspects, despite arrests. There

questioned are not suspects, despite arrests. There are a questioned are not suspects, despite arrests. There are a number

of witnesses. It is expected to despite arrests. There are a number

sharpen the police investigation in this this case. The sharpen the police investigation in this case.

sharpen the police investigation in sharpen the police investigation in this case. The general sharpen the police investigation in this case. The general refused to

confirm reports on early morning

raids on houses confirm reports on early morning raids on houses in

raids on houses in Denpasar. A confirm reports on early morning

community leader said they received

a tip-off about men living in community leader said they received

rental houses. After the bombs

exploded police were alerted.

Police searched the houses there's

tonight And Nicole, a surprise statement no sign of the men.

of JI, from the suspected spiritual leader

Abu Bakar Bashir from prison. Yes, that's correct, Sandra. And in part that statement says bombings in peaceful places, "I very much disagree with the

the lives of innocent people". "including Bali, which sacrifices Abu Bakar Bashir, So that statement coming from

where he's serving 30 months jail. from his prison cell

Thanks, Nicole.

from Bali. Nicole Strahan joining us there There were traditional religious ceremonies in Bali today

aimed at warding off evil spirits. The services were a stark contrast of the weekend's blasts. to the aftermath

lies on the beach at Jimbaran Bay, As unclaimed clothing cleansing the area the locals have begun that struck on Saturday. of the horror

to the Hindu Balinese The sacred ceremony is important

because, they believe, to the next life it releases the spirits of the dead

and expels evil from the region. in the practice. Westerners too finding comfort

a chance to openly grieve The simple service giving them

so suddenly and violently taken away. and remember their loved ones

Others turning elsewhere to mourn,

to the 2002 bombings. such as the memorial faiths of Bali -Hindu, Muslim, Representative of the four main

Christian and Buddhist are leading the way in helping heal the broken Island. Today's ceremonies are culminating in a massive gesture of unity - of all faiths Indonesians and visitors at Jimbaran Bay. marching to the bomb site

the mood is increasingly desperate. But on the streets of Kuta,

are strangely silent. The usually bustling streets footpaths vacant. Coffee shops are empty, outside restaurants. Security stand guard to surrender to the terrorists, Some businesses refuse

are standing beside them. and many tourists it was about 300m up the road. There was a bomb -

are beautiful and we feel 100% safe. But the Balinese people

boldly proclaimed. The defiant message I think everybody is just pissed off that they keep on having a go, you know? In Bali, Nick Way, Ten News. Tonight five Australians are still receiving treatment in Singapore for shrapnel wounds from the blasts. Australia's High Commissioner to Singapore Miles Kupa, is in contact with the victims and their families. The High Commission continues to be in close contact

with the medical staff at the hospitals and with patients and the patient's families. Richard Anicich is at the bedside of his brother Paul and sister-in-law Penny. Paul's condition remains serious and stable. Penny's condition is continuing to improve and she is certainly in good spirits. She clearly gained a sense that as Australian's, as a member of the Australian community, we care and we look after our own. Mr Anicich overwhelmed by the support his family has received. I must say that the Newcastle community has been widely affected by this tragdey and many other families are involved and many are suffering through this period. Pressure is mounting on the Federal Government to get tough with Indonesia over banning Jemaah Islamiah. The Opposition says JI's schools are breeding grounds for hate. As the people of Bali begin burying their dead, the finger of blame is pointing increasingly

at the sinister organisation Jemaah Islamiah. Labor says enough is enough. Nearly 100 Australian victims three years ago and now this outrage. Make no mistake. The Australian community want Indonesia to ban and to outlaw JI.

In the Opposition's sights, JI's schools - fertile breeding grounds for extremists. Because now the schools can operate legitimately and talent-spotters from the terrorists can look at the kids going through schools, can train them in hate. The ban would give prosecutors in Indonesia new criminal grounds to pursue the group. It would also make it harder for JI to fundraise and disseminate propaganda. But our Government isn't convinced. I don't think it would make a great deal of practical difference, no. Nevertheless, banning JI is on the agenda. We will be raising it with the Indonesian Government. The Indonesian Government has been reluctant to move on Jemaah Islamiah for fear of antagonising public opinion in what is the largest Muslim country on earth. But some terror experts say unless it get serious, the bombings will continue. The latest travel advice for Australians in Bali is urging extreme caution and reporting talk of fresh attacks in the popular Seminyak area. Paul Bongiorno, Ten News. Amid all the trauma of the Bali bombing, there emerges tonight a remarkable story of survival. A mother and daughter have told how they fled one of the blasts but ran towards a second explosion escaping serious harm both times. 21-year-old Aleta Lederwasch and her mother Julia from Newcastle were sitting down to dinner at Jimbaran Bay in Bali last Saturday night when the first bomb went off. It was just a huge explosion and orange, you know, orange colour.

Aleta says she just ran, her mother Julia followed. All I was thinking about was where to run next, what to do, and I couldn't really run on that leg. But then another explosion.

And then we went "Oh, my god, that's a second one, "are we running into a third one". Aleta was hit by bomb debris - a pellet lodged in her leg, but the pair managed to get to safety

eventually brought to Darwin hospital, and tomorrow they'll be on board a Hercules plane back to Newcastle, along with seven other bomb victims from the city. The extent of injuries from the blast shown in X-rays. This from a 50-year-old man. This is a fragment here just adjacent to the heart. The man has eight ball bearings lodged in his chest. Surgeons say the fragment near the heart may stay there for life. At this stage, if a fragment was in a dangerous area, or was too time-consuming to remove it, if it was safe to be left, it will be left. Incredibly enough, shrapnel to fill several shopping bags has been extracted from the victims, and taken by Federal officers for forensic testing. Doctors liken the operations to those performed on casualties of war. It is not dissimilar to the concept you may be familiar with in 'Mash', where you just do the basic that you have to, then get them out. The patients will be flown back to Newcastle for treatment, on board a C-130 Hercules - the same plane that brought them to Darwin for treatment two days ago. Many still face a long road to recovery, but doctors say at least they'll be near their friends and family. In Darwin, Gerda Jezuchowski for Ten News. An Australian soldier has been wounded in fighting in Afghanistan. He suffered minor shrapnel injuries. He was treated at the scene and then taken to a coalition medical facility. The Defence Department in Canberra says he'll return to duty when he's recovered. A 10-year-old girl has told how her father saved her from the jaws of a crocodile. The little girl is lucky to be alive after being dragged underwater by the croc in the far north of Western Australia. Still terrified and distressed by her narrow escape from the jaws of a hungry crocodile, 10-year-old Chantal Burnup was airlifted to Derby Hospital for treatment. She owes her life to her 14-year-old brother Simon who fought the large crocodile, while Chantal's father dragged her to safety. I turned around to call my dog and something grabbed me underwater

and I tried to get it off me and my dad pulled me up out of the water. Dad, pulled her up out of the water and was swimming with her to shore with the crocodile still on. The teenagers were holidaying on their father's yacht when Chantal decided to go for a swim in open water in Doubtful Bay, about 240 kilometres North East of Derby when she was attacked yesterday afternoon. Come on, come on. A 2.5 metre saltwater crocodile, about the same size as this one, grabbed Chantal by the chest and dragged her under water, but she was pulled to safety suffering only cuts to her arms and upper body.

She's not gonna die and she's not gonna lose a limb so we''ll just take it from there. Gabrielle Burnup flew to Broome today, and then headed by road to Derby Hospital to be with her daughter. I'm relieved she's alive. She's a very lucky girl to be alive. You hear so many horrible stories about this and she's such a little person I can't imagine that she's not more hurt. Malcolm Douglas says crocodiles are always dangerous, but they're much more aggressive at this time of the year. The water temperature's going up, the humidity's going up, crocodiles are starting to mate, they've had a hormonal change and they're becoming incredibly hungry and very territorial. Malcolm Douglas says he's been expecting a crocodile attack for some time because more people are visiting the area. Rex Haw, Ten News. Stay with Ten's Late News. After the break - Well, then I'm going to have a very interesting time, and plenty of time to write my biography. A courtroom battle for a TV actor accused of fraud. And a sad farewell to a comic genius. And that is goodnight from him.

Goodnight APPLAUSE New Leave-In from Pantene. Nothing! A lot of people wonder about the chicken used at KFC. Well, I can tell you, it's delivered fresh, not frozen.

How would I know? SONG: # Can't beat it... # # Can't beat that taste Doo-doo... #

There's a shake-up coming for our electoral system - the Federal Government planning a range of changes including making it easier for people to make political donations in secret. At the moment all donations to political parties over $1,500 have to be disclosed, but the Government wants to lift the threshold to $10,000 Special Minister of State Eric Abetz making the case tonight. The low disclosure threshold adds nothing to the transparency of our democracy, other than to increase the administrative burden on those parties involved in it, and unnecessarily invades privacy.

Technical changes to the Senate voting system are also proposed, but the Prime Minister has ruled out any attempt to abolish compulsory voting. NSW police are investigating the sexual assault of a young woman believed to be an army recruit in Wagga Wagga over the weekend. Police say the 18-year-old was allegedly sexually assaulted by at least three men on Saturday night. The Defence department says it is now a police matter, ubut hasn't denied Defence personnel from the Kapooka Army Base have been questioned about the incident. The actress best known as 'Pat the Rat' has appeared in court, charged with defrauding the Commonwealth. Rowena Wallace is accused of claiming a pension while earning an income on TV. How times have changed for one of Australia's best-loved actresses. Arriving at court in a cab to face fraud charges and the possibility of jail. If he does that, well, then I'm going to have a very interesting time, and plenty of time to write my biography. It's a far cry from the days of old when Rowena Wallace was the queen of the small screen, picking up a Gold Logie for her portrayal of Pat the Rat on 'Sons and Daughters'. Well, you did your fair share of spying, didn't you? Does Gordon know you lied to him? Thought so. She specialised in scheming characters, but is now accused of a financial scheme of her own - claiming a disability support pension while working. According to court papers, the actress considered the benefit a life-saver between TV jobs. But she allegedly said: Ms Wallace has suffered from a number of health conditions, including depression, over the years, and claims not to know why she accepted the illegal pension payments. One excuse outlined in court papers suggests her failure to report an income stemmed from her fear of what authorities might do. The actress has previously publicised the difficulties of maintaining work in the industry, but has expressed regret at her solution. She also repaid the Government $26,000. The case will be back before the courts on Tuesday. Amber Muir, Ten News. Celebrations today for two Australian doctors who won a Nobel prize for proving that bacteria causes stomach ulcers. The pair revolutionised the way the painful condition is treated after experimenting on themselves. It was a common interest in bacteria that brought Professor Barry Marshall and Dr Robin Warren together more than 20 years ago. And it didn't take long before they dispelled the myth that stress was the main cause of stomach ulcers,

helped along by an unorthodox experiment where Professor Marshall drank bacteria. Of course I said to my wife, "Oh, we were right!" And she said, "What?" I said "I took the bacteria, I've got the illness!" And she said, "You did what?" But it took some time for the medical world to accept the revolutionary theory that a bug was the real cause of the painful condition. Barry actually held this back because he was scared to publish it straight away because he thought, "If someone finds out "I've been actually drinking this bacteria, "they'll never believe anything we do." We said, "Let's get back a bit and look down the ordinary microscope" and we can see these bugs everywhere. And they said, "No, you can't. It's just in WA. "There's something wrong with that place."

The discovery has transformed stomach ulcers from a chronic condition to one that can now be cured by a short course of antibiotics. Professor Marshall was highly commended in the Australian of the Year awards in 1998. And last night, the final stamp of approval - a phone call telling the pair they'd won a Nobel prize for medicine along with $1.7 million. When they rang me from Stockholm, suddenly the blood from my head went down to my feet, I could feel it. You didn't look well, Robin. The extraordinary relief that that research and the benefits of it has brought to potentially millions of people is a great achievement. Jacinda Birch, Ten News. And one of those Nobel Prize winning doctors received a standing ovation from the cream of Australia's scientific profession in Canberra tonight. Professor Barry Marshall was flown in from Perth to attend the Prime Minister's Science Prize dinner at Parliament House, Mr Howard declaring his achievement up there with the Sydney Swans. Whatever the scientific equivalent is of the ticker tape reception

that was given to the Sydeny Swans should be extended in their home cities to Professor Baryy Marshall and Doctor Robin Warren.

The PM's prize went to Professor David Boger, from Melbourne University whose work on the physical behaviour of fluids has reduced the environmental impact of mining. The sad passing tonight of a television comedy legend. Ronnie Barker,the larger half of the 'Two Ronnies' has died surrounded by his wife and three children

after a long battle with heart disease. He was 76. Think British television comedy, think Ronnie Barker. Good evening. I'm from the Ministry of Sex Equality. When two pairs of spectacles and two comedians with the same name appeared on the box, you just knew you were in for a good time. Music, and the team of researchers in Salzburg have uncovered an early Mozart score. He was only 16 and lived over the bakery opposite. Ronald Barker was born in 1929 and had lofty ambitions to become a bank manager. But something drew him to the theatre, then radio, and eventually TV. Hello, He first teamed up with Ronny Corbett in 'The Frost Report'. But it was as 'The Two Ronnies' that they would make television history, starting in 1971.

I can read women like a book. What system do you use? Brail. At its peak they had 17 million viewers tuning in across Britain. 75 per cent of the show was written by Barker, but for years he sent his scripts in under the alias Gerald Wiley so they'd be selected on their quality, and not because he was one of the shows stars. For a time Barker went inside starring as Fletcher in the prison comedy 'Porridge'. I've got something very serious to tell you. I don't know quite how to put this gentlemen, but there is a thief among us. He considered it his best work. But many fans also loved him as Arkwright the stuttering sex-crazed shopkeeper in 'Open All Hours'. Some guys pronounced have a gardener.

We used to say if you're going to Ava Gardener, she's the one to have. He officially retired after that to open an antique shop, but was lured back for a number of reunions with Corbett.

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grim news of the day, and the grim Nuss we'll ever never here the famous famous sign-off. Nuss we'll ever never here the famous sign-off. So Nuss we'll ever never here the famous sign-off. So it's Nuss we'll ever never here the famous sign-off. So it's goodnight from from me famous sign-off. So it's goodnight from me And famous sign-off. So it's goodnight from me And goodnight famous sign-off. So it's goodnight from me And goodnight from famous sign-off. So it's goodnight from me And goodnight from him. When tonight's Late News continues. In fact the inspector had a situation where he couldn't even drive the car for fear of it breaking. The tell-tale signs you're buying a death trap when shopping for a used car. And in Sports Tonight - St Kilda fire the first shot in AFL's trade week.

the footage you are watching of former soap star and high-profile customer Jason Donovan being pranked. Please do not call or text the number currently onscreen. Enjoy our excessively low rates responsibly.

There are millions of super fund and union members out there. There's a low-cost bank that's been created for super fund members and union members. So for simple, secure, low-cost banking, And switch to Members Equity Bank - the Super Funds Bank.

A disturbing report tonight on hidden problems in used cars being sold privately. A major motoring group says almost every one has a significant and costly defect. It's the cheapest way to buy a used car, but it's also the most dangerous. 9 out of every 10 sold privately have a mechanical defect. About half of 400,000 that changed hands in the past year including one which had the front and rear of two different cars welded together. When you get underneath the car, you start to see some tell-tale signs, like cracks in the welds, certainly cracks across the bottom of the chassis. In fact, the inspector had a situation where he couldn't even drive the car for fear of it breaking. The biggest faults are: The average repair bill within the first few months is almost $1,000. It becomes an expensive game. Really the message for motorists is simple - if you are buying a car privately, make sure you get an inspection, otherwise you're going to end up with some pretty costly repairs. While the Fair Trading Tribunal provides an avenue for those who get a new car that's a lemon, there's virtually no chance of getting your money back if you buy someone else's old bomb. While purchasing a privately owned second-hand vehicle is very much a case of buyer beware, buying one from a used car lot does offer some protection. Tony Bakhos has been in the business for more than 20 years. There's not many bad dealers around, you know.

The whole industry seems to have cleaned up. He says a government-enforced 3-month, 5,000km warranty is your peace of mind. Frank Coletta, Ten News.

At Commonwealth Securities, Tom Piotrowski. And the oil price moving in the right direction for motorists?

Sandra, that's right. Any move south

Sandra, that's right. Any move south ward Sandra, that's right. Any move south ward in Sandra, that's right. Any move south ward in the Sandra, that's right. Any move south ward in the price

Sandra, that's right. Any move south ward in the price of Sandra, that's right. Any move south ward in the price of oil Sandra, that's right. Any move south ward in the price of oil is

south ward in the price of oil is worth celebrating. Over the

previous two days it's fallen by 2

per cent. It's at its lowest levels

in about a week. Reports talk of a

new hurricane brewing in the Gulf

new hurricane brewing in the Gulf of Mexico. It's a category one

hurricane at this stage, but could

put support back into the oil price.

As far as today was concerned the

energy sector was the worst

performer, Santos moved ahead, up

1.5 per cent on the back of

positive news as to gas exploration. positive news as to gas exploration. Telstra

positive news as to gas exploration. Telstra recovered positive news as to gas exploration. Telstra recovered some

exploration. Telstra recovered some ground. The stock was up by about 2 per cent. Not per cent. Not much ground. The stock was up by about 2 per cent. Not much science ground. The stock was up by about 2 ground. The stock was up by about 2 per cent. Not much science about it.

That stog has fallen about 20 per

cent over the last month. cent over the last month. The selling cent over the last month. The

cent over the last month. The selling dried up and the buyers

came selling dried up and the buyers came into selling dried up and the buyers came into the selling dried up and the buyers came into the frame. The benchmark All-Ordinaries Index off 2 points. Macquarie Bank eased 1 cent. Fairfax gained almost 3%. News Corp lost 41 cents. Flu drug manufacturer Biota lost almost 20%. David Jones down 12 cents. Thanks Tom. CommSec's Tom Piotrowski. Three sailors have been rescued from a stricken yacht in Bass Strait. A medical helicopter catching the dramatic operation on camera as the men were winched to safety. A French national was treated for head injuries in the chopper on the way to hospital. The other two men were uninjured and flown to Flinders Island. The crew raised the alarm yesterday when a fire broke out in the engine. Overnight rescue attempts were called off because of the wild seas. The national weather's next and then it's 'Sports Tonight' with Ryan Phelan.

Ryan, big surprises, with the NRL premiers not afforded the same honour as Sydney's AFL stars, the Swans? That's right, Sandra. There will be no George Street ticker-tape parade

for the Wests Tigers but who are the councils lining up to throw them a party? That's not the only battle for the new premiers now to keep its two biggest stars from the clutches of rival clubs. They've got no morals whatsoever when it comes to signing the best players possible on the market. Cameron White set to make his big-time cricket debut in tomorrow's one-dayer in Melbourne. And why Bathurst champion Rick Kelly is desperate for another win

at Mount Panorama this weekend. The day's sport is next.

and the satellite shows low cloud hanging over the southwest corner. There's more in Queensland along a trough. Hot dry winds will sweep the east coast generated by a high in the Tasman. And a front will bring a cool change to the southeast corner. It will be mostly sunny in Cairns, Brisbane, Canberra, Darwin and Alice Springs. Sydney will be sunny. Melbourne and Hobart will be windy and wet. Showers for Perth. Adelaide will be cloudy. And that's the latest from Ten News desk for this Tuesday, October 4. Sports Tonight with Ryan Phelan is next. I'm Sandra Sully. From the Late News team, goodnight. by the Australian Caption Centre. Supertext Captions by the Australian Caption Centre. www.auscap.com.au