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>>Sh good morning and welcome

to ABC News Breakfast. Haiti

buries its dead - mass graves

have been dug for 75,000 Australians. Older Australians

are set to be the winners from

the Government's tax review.

And Greek court has jailed a

night club bouncer for causing

the death of an Australian

tourist and in sports - three

Australians are through to the third round of the Australian

Open. This is ABC News

Breakfast. Our top story today

- Haiti's Government says the

bodieses of at least 75,000

people have been buried in mass

graves since the earthquake

struck the island more than a

week ago. Workers are carving

out graves on a hillside north

of Haiti's capital and in

Port-au-Prince the sea port has

patiently reopened, helping the

supply of much-needed aid. The

ABC reports. Coming ashore

today, vital equipment to help

operate the port. A difficult

manoeuvre on a makeshifted

ramp. But US commanders say as

and from today the port can

start receiving the aid that is

so urge - urgently needed. We're preparing the

port to receive all the cargo

when it comes to hand it over

to the foeblings that will

distribute it. We're ready as

of today to begin receiving some cargo. There's obviously a

lot of work that needs to be

done bhi a lot of agencies and

a lot of other units. Just how

much work is very clear. The

sea port has been

shattered. Sections have

literally been torn apart.

Shipping container s pitched

into the water and cranes that

could be off-loading

life-saving supplies listing

and idle. This pier can only be

used for light traffic now.

Heavy equilt can't be brought

through because it's unstable.

If we come down here, you get a sense of the kind of damage

that was done by the

earthquake. This massive

concrete pillar was actually

ripped out of the ground. And

over here you can see how

sections of the tarmac were

priced apart, wide gaps have

opened up and huge chunks have

just fallen into the sea.

Securing the pier is scriet

al to divers have been at work,

checking the damage concealed

beneath the water. Losing this

pier we will lose the majority

of us being able to bring the

humanitarian needs in. If it

goes in the water we almost

shut down. Is this the Lifeline

for the aid effort? Right

now,em. More aid is now -

ma'am. More aid is now getting

through. Up to 140 flights can

land at the capital's damaged

airport but there's a waiting

list of 1400. And there are

still many questions about why

it's taking so long to help

those in need. And for more on

the situation, Phillip Williams

is in Port-au-Prince. Phil,

good morning I believe there's

been another aftershock in the

last couple of hours. Yes,

there was. About 1.5 hours ago

we had two shocks over four on

the Richter scale that had

everyone running out gen.

People quite upset. Some tears.

People scared. That it could be

something bigger coming. So

they keep rolling on and this -

as they do, people feel more

and more insecure. So it's a really deteriorating situation

in terms of people's confidence

about the threat of another

earthquake. Now, we're hearing

this morning that mass graves

continue to be dug and the

total number of people buried

now in those mass graves is

(PROBLEM WITH SOUND) around 75,000. I know -

It conjures images of

concentration camps from the

Second World War. What a

terrible and traumatic job to

have to do that, using

bulldozers and tipping trucks, tipping truck loads of humanity

into pits and covering them

over. There is no Germany -

ceremony, not even a priest

there. It's just a ghastly

scene and one that will

continue because the bodies are

continuing to be re treefed.

Anywhere you drive there are

of the road waiting for occasionally bodies by the side

collection. That's a system,

it's like a garbage collection

system. You leave the body by

the side of the road. The truck

comes along, it's picked up,

thrown in the truck, thrown in

the pit and covered over.

Unfortunately that is as much

respect as can be offered at

the moment. The main focus is

getting those bodies out and

away because they themselves

pose a serious disease risk to

those that have survived. And,

Phil, what parts of the city

have you visited today and what

have you seen there today in Port-au-Prince? Well, I've

been just in the local area

where I am at Petraeus at the

moment and - pettonville at the

moment and it's quiet. One aspect that has changed in the

last couple of days is we are

seeing emerging some small

markets selling a bit of - a

few vegetables here and there.

So there's a small amount of

low level commerce going on. To

buy those of course you have to

have money and a lot of people

have lost all their money or

their money is buried in their

houses or they spent it all by

now. So for some it's not an

option. But there is not a

semblance of normity that would

be taking it too strong, but

there is a hint of normality.

But it didn't normal and still

I can say that people just are

few hundred metres from here as

we speak have not received aid.

They've - on the 10th day they

haven't received water, food or

any sort of shelter. In fact,

there was survey by one NGO

just recent ly of 350 of these

make shift camps. They found

half of them didn't have proper

shelter at all. That means they

didn't even have a plastic

sheet. And 1% had potable

water. So that means people are

either drink ing dirty water

with all the disease risks

attach ed to them or they're

able to bowl it, but not

everyone is able to boil it. So

it's still a very desperate

situation. Still, the aid is

there. Just a few kilometres

from here there is a lot of aid

piling up at the #5ir79. It's

just not able - airport. It's

not just able to get out where

it's needed. Have you seen any

signs that people have just

decided enough is enough, we

may as well leave Port-au-Prince because the

situation here is just too bad? Yes, definitely. There is

a mini exodus out of this city,

particularly from the centre of

the city where there is no

little to stay. The Government

is encouraging people to do it

they're putling on free buses

to get them out of the city.

The big project from the

Government's point of view is

this supertent cities for

400,000 people. That is not

going to be one gigantic tent

city, it's broken up into tent

cities of 10,000 each. There,

it's hoped, they will have all

the protection they need, the

food and the water and the

medical care. But it's a long

way off yet. These tent cities

haven't emerged yet. We know they're going to be built on

the outskirts of town but

they're not there yet. As

people leave the city, that is

all well and good, but where

are they going to if they

haven't got friends or

relatives? For so many people

here they have no option and

they are sitting tight. And,

Phil, we keep on raising this

subject about aid just not

getting through to people from

the airport. And you've

mentioned there that you've

seen a group of people here you that still haven't seen

anything. Is there any indication that it is improving

now? Well, there is, yes, definitely, over the last

couple of days the flow of aid

has improved. There is no doubt

about that. And I've seen

distribution of aid around here

but it's been fairly localised,

sometimes local charities and

happen ard youzous. But the

actual - happen had. But when

- But it's not organised.

No-one underestimates the scale

of this tavenlth you can't

blame everybody and say they

should have got it by now but

you can understand the enormous frustration of people sitting

in parks for days and days on

end being told the aid is

coming, the aid is coming and

it just doesn't. I think in

Australian if that was the

situation we would be extremely

frustrate and angry too by

now. Phillip Williams in

Port-au-Prince port, thanks

once again for that. In other

news this morning - older

Australians could be the

winners from a wide ranging tax

review. The Treasury Secretary

Ken Henry has signaled tax

break force older people could

be an incentive to try to keep them in the work force longer.

But low paid workers in

Australia could lose salary

perks of up to $30,000. The re structure would affect

church-based hospitals, nursing

homes and agencies which

provide top-up payments to

their workers. Jack Straw has

told the country's Iraq inquiry

he agonised over the decision

to go to war in Iraq Baw he

leave believes officials made

the best decision possible. Mr

Straw who was a key figure in

Tony Blair's administration

says the decision to go to war

was the most difficult he's

ever made. A Greek night club

bouncer has been jailed for 22

year force causing the death of

an Australian tourist. Marios

Antonopoulos escape add

conviction for murder but he

was found guilty of inflicting wounds that caused the Sydney

man's death. Two other men

involved in the attack were

also jailed for more than seven

years. 20-year-old Doujon

Zammit was killed while on

holiday in Mykonos in July

2008. A Western Australian

community is on red alert as the northern Kimberley

coastline braces for Tropical

Cyclone Magda. Residents of

Kuri Bay north-west of Broome

have been warned to seek

shelter immediately. And in far

North Queensland the tropical

low hovering off the coast

there has been downgraded from

a cyclone but the danger is not

over yet. It is expected to re

intensify and lash the

coastline over the weekend. And

Wall Street stocks have plunged

after US President Barack Obama

revealed plans to limit the

size of big Banks. His proposal

is a bid to try to prevent

future financial crises and it

limits the amount of risk banks

can take. As Virginia just mentioned,

the UK's foreign secretary,

Jack Straw, has said backing

the invasion of Iraq was THE

most difficult decision he has

ever taken. The BBC's Nicholas

Witchell reports from the Iraq

war inquiry. He had come to

talk about what he said was the

most difficult decision of his

life. Jack Straw was Britain's

foreign secretary from 2001 to

2006. As such, he was Tony

Blair's loyal lieutenant, yet

his evidence highlighted some

difference. Firstly on the

subject of regime change. This

was the declared US policy on

Iraq but it was never declared

as British policy. A foreign

policy objective of regime

change I regarded as improper

and also self-evidently

unlawful. Was that also the

Prime Minister's view? It took

several minutes but finally Mr

Straw came to an answer. The

Prime Minister was as well

aware as I was that, as I say,

military action for regime

change could not be an

objective of British foreign

policy. And nor could it be

disguised as an objective. So

how could it be the committee

wondered that in his recent

interview with Fern Briton that

he did support a regime of

policy change. Mr Straw was not

sure about that: The best way

is to ask him. We will. Then to

the private letters between Mr Blair and President Bush in

2002. The former foreign

secretary thought he had seen

them all, though he couldn't be

certain. He was asked in

particular from a letter from

Mr Blair at the end of July

2002. Were you entirely

confidentable with the way the

Prime Minister was -

comfortable with the way if

Prime Minister was expressing

himself to the President Well,

if... in some this will be

easier if it were private sessions. It would be much

easier if we had nem in front

of them. Mr Straw wanted prif

is. The committee wanted the

letters. My question is are

were you happy with what was on

the paper? Being happy with it,

main ly would I have written

the memorandum in the same way,

probably not because I am a

different person. On the Iraq

dossier in 2002, Mr Straw

accepted that Saddam Hussein could make weapons of mass

destruction ready at 45 minutes

notice was an error. Plainly,

that reference should have been

much more precise. That was an

error. And it's an error which

has haunted us ever since. But

Mr Straw insisted that the

Blair Government's purpose had

only ever been to disyarm

Saddam Hussein. The objective

was not military action. That

was a means we might have to

resort to but it was never ever

the objective of the British

Government, nor would I have

been willing to be party to

that. As Tony Blair's foreign

secretary Mr Straw said in a

written memorandum to the

inquiry he could have prevented

Britain's involvement in the

invasion if he had been against

it. He supported it, he said,

because he believed it was the

right thing to do. "We made the

best judgments we could in the circumstances," he said.

We will look now at the front pages of the major

newspapers turnaround country,

starting with the 'Australian'.

It's reporting the nation

facing tax hikes as a result of

the Henry tax review but older

workers could be offered lower

marginal tax rates to stay in their jobs. The 'Canberra

Times' says Ken Henry has

raised the prospect of higher taxes to cover the cost of

Australia's ageing population.

The 'Age' feet is saying that

Mr Henry has dashed hopes that

the review will pave the way

for the lowest tax. 'The Daily

Telegraph' says salary perks up

to $30,000 uld could go as part

of the overhaul. Australian

also have to pay more tax

overtime, says the 'West Australian'. The 'Financial

Review' is saying the hounceing

market has bounced back. The

'Herald Sun' has a royal

souvenir tabloid edition, says

Prince William was a smash hit

with the Victorians. The 'Sydney Morning Herald' reports

some of the world's top

engineers have warned Railcorp,

the construction of the CBD

metro could cause a serious

risk to train operations in the

centre of the city. The

'Courier Mail' says year 7

would be moved into high school

for the first time in Queensland undear new

proposal. The identify ity of a

man convicted of murder ing a

teenage girl he met on the

Internet cannot be revealed. The 'Northern

Territory News' says a man has

been singled in a single car

rollover in front of a

Territory school. And 'The

Mercury' says a long awaited

advertising targeting the

horrific road toll finally

aired last night. We always

like to hear from you through

the morning. If you would like

to send us your feedback on any

issues today, particularly the

Henry tax review, send emails

to us.

The top stories this morning

- workers in Haiti are digging

mass graves to bury 10,000

earthquake victims every day.

The Government says the bodies

of at least 75,000 people have

been buried since the

earthquake struck the island

more than a week ago. Older

Australians could be the

winners from a wide ranging tax

review. Ken Henry has signaled

tax breaks for older people

could be an incentive to keep

them in the workforce longer

but low paid workers could lose

their salary perks under the

plan. And a Greek night club

bouncer has been jailed for 22

years for his role in the death of Australian tourist

20-year-old Doujon Zammit.

Marios Antonopoulos escaped the

conviction for murder, but was

found guilty of inflicting

wounds that caused the Sydney

man's death in 2008.

Returning now to the wide

ranging tax review that may

introduce tax breaks for older

people, as an incentive for

them to work longer. For more

on this Melissa Clarke joins us

from Canberra. Ken Henry knows

how to keep a story rolling

during the quiet summer season,

doesn't he? He just makes

another speech. He's kept it

rolling for quite some time. He

spent last year giving speemps

with grab bags of ideas which

had us all in speculation about whether those ideas would make

it into the final review. Now

that the final review has been

handed to government every time

he s anything to do with tax

there is more speck it might be

in it. He's given a fairly

strong hint to the tax teachers

Association yesterday that

there could well be provisions

to encourage workers to stay in

the work force longer by giving

them lower marginal tax breaks.

That dove tails with what we've

heard from Kevin Rudd in the

last few days where he's been

giving speeches outlining the

challenges posed by the ageing

population and the need to keep

people in work and to get more people participating in the

labour market. So I think he

may well be looking to adopt

that sort of measure. The

Government's actually receiving

this report, hasn't it? The Government received the report

before the end of the year in

2009. There Wass no formal

response as yet. The Government

will be looking over it for the

next couple of weeks, maybe a

few months, before we get a

formal response from the

Treasurer, swaince. - Wayne

Swan. Wayne Swan has said that

there won't be a huge one-off

big reform to the system, that

it's likely to be a number of

mesh ursz introduced over time

- mer urs introduced overtime.

So don't expect the tax and

transfer system to be radically

altered overnight. It's likely

to be a series of small stechs

of changes. I was intrigued to

read a story yesterday

suggesting that there might be

leadership aspirations still in

the ruck sack of Malcolm

Turnbull. But just in a

slightly different place. Take

us through that. I am sure he

hasn't given up his ambitions

but what form they may take is

the cause of all the

speculation. Peter Debnam, the

former Liberal Party leader who

was replaced by Barry O'Farrell

last year has made it clear

that he doesn't in tend on

recontesting his seat of

Vaucluse in 2011. That seat

overlaps with some of Malcolm

Turnbull's Federal electorate

of Wentworth, which has tloed a

lot of people in the Liberal

Party circle suggesting that perhaps Malcolm Turnbull should

look at becoming the next State

Premier of NSW rather than

launching any tilt to regain

the leadership of the Federal

Opposition. So that set tongues

wagging again. He has just come

back from holidays over in

North and South America. While

he is not commentdzing officially on anything at this

stage, he is not weighing in on

any speculation about politic s

or even about policy at this

point. There has been reports

insiders are saying he's been

hitting the phones an making

sure he's still talking to

people and still has his

networks running. You wouldn't

rule anything out at this

stage. I can just imagine the

response of our businessman and

Malcolm Turnbull antagonist

Jeffy Cousins to that news. He

will be running a single man

campaign if Malcolm Turnbull

announce s that ambition. But

John Howard is back in the

news. What is this about? Questions about job

prospect s it's an interesting

one for John Howard. It was

only a short time ago there was

talk that he may well take up a

role with the National Rugby

League. Now it seems he might

be taking up a role with

perhaps his most favoured

sports child that of cricket. We understand there is some speculation around in the

newspapers today that he may be

cricket Australia's candidate

for the presidency of the International Cricket Council,

the governing body. You would think this would have to be

John Howard's dream job. She a

self- professed cricket et

tragic, has been quite willing

to jump in the commentary box or have a hand himself at some

of that famous footage of him

trying to bowl a couple of

ballings that inevitably gets

pulled out. So he probably

wouldn't mind the job. Whether

he is the candidate, though,

hasn't been confirmed. But it's

a great story. It would be

fantastic if he did take it up.

I think it would be a nice way

to round out about working

life. Good to talk to you, Melissa. Thank you very much.

Now the US has called on

China to investigate the recent

cyber attacks on Google. The

attacks on a number of gmail accounts prompted the search

giant to threaten to leave

China. The US Secretary of

State, Hillary Clinton, said

companies such as Google should

refuse to support politically

motivated censorship. The most

recent situation involving

Google has attracted a great

deal of interest. And we look

to the Chinese authorities to

conduct a thorough review of

the cyber intrusions that led

Google to make its

announcement. And we also look

for that investigation and its

results to be transparent. Hillary Clinton

there and China says the row

should not be lirnged to

relations with the US. An ohton

markets, the Wall Street stocks

have plunged overnight after

President Obama unveiled the

plans to limit the size and

scope of US Banks an finance

firms. The Dow has fallen 204

points.

In few minutes, Vanessa

O'Hanlon will be with us to

look at the wealther. And then

we will review Friday's papers

and today our re viewer is head

of PR agency Inside PR Mike

Smith. Now with sport, sheer

Luke waters. Thanks. Ten sis

first an three Australians - Lleyton Hewitt, Samantha Stosur

and Dell el Dell are all

through to the third round of

the Australian Open but it was

Roger Federer that sent annam

ominous message to his rivals.

After getting a run for his

money in his opening match,

Roger Federer wasn't in the

mood to muck around against

Victor Hanescu. Come on! That

is just ridiculous. The

Romanian was more competitive

in the second. But at the

business end of the set, the

Swiss ace stepped it up

further. During the third a

special fan joined the crowd,

and the world number one produced tennis fit for

royalty. But by the time Prince William had settled,

this contest was over.

Game. Your Royal Highness,

welcome to the world of tennis.

Thanks for coming. Two years

ago, Casey Dellacqua charmed the Rod Laver Arena crowd but

injury has struck since. Her

second round opponent, Karolina

Sprem, had the power but as the

first set went into a

tiebreaker, she didn't have the

touch. That's it. Dellacqua

broke the corrosion's serve

early in - Croatians serve

early in the second. But the

Australian nervously wasted

three breaks of serve and three

match points. Dellacqua finally

closed out the scrappy affair

in another tiebreaker, even the

deciding point was in decisive.

That's it. That's it. I was

so nervous and I tried to take

my time and get a first serve

in and so many things were

going through my head. Gosh I

was lucky that last ball went

out. Her next opponent is Venus

Williams. Lleyton Hewitt has

set up a round 3 block buster

against Marcos Baghdatis.

Hewitt was clinical in his

second round match, demolishing

Donald Young in straight sets.

Hewitt says he is ready for

Baghdatis, who beat him in the

Sydney international. Yesterday

the Cypriot overcame a 2-set

deficit, a temporary explosion

and crammed to win a thrilling

five setter. There goes the racquet. Little known

27-year-old Portuguese riderman

well car dosy has won a gruel

ing stage 3 in the Tour Down

Under. Stifling heat,

strengthening winds and a

series of climbs through the

Adelaide Hills promised to make

this leg by far the tough est

yet. But adversity produces

opportunity for including Cadel

Evans, Lance Armstrong and Val

Verdy. Men who thrive on

intlicting pain on themselves.

There was an early break

differing Spain a first sprint

win. Luke Roberts was the next

to go. To wrest the King of the mountain Australia from Tim

Row. There were top points on

the second point from Simon

Clarke and jack bob ridge. The

peloton wasn't letting anyway

get away under car dosa made

the move meeting evans to the

line. Cardoso says he can't

win overall but was delighted

with his first pro- tour victory. Andre Greipel held his

lead, despite struggling in the

oppressive conditions. I think

it was not healthy to ride the

bike today. Greg Henderson and

Gert Steegmans and verdict y ya

are 14 seconds behind with Vanilla Ice two seconds back.

To cricket and probting says

50-over cricket will survive

despite the growth explosion of

Twenty20. The Aussie s are well

prepared for the one dayer

against Pakistan, Younis Khan

returns for the visitors as

does veteran all-rounder freed

freed freed, who has been -

Afridi. The final is at the

Adelaide Oval. And Mohammad

says they are a much better

one-day team. ABC News

Breakfast can be watched live

on the web from anywhere. No

on a hot day for the south of Australia, here is van yaes

with the weather. It's

certainly feeling like tennis

weather. Catastrophic fire

danger warnings in NSW, for the

eastern, northern and Riverina

and for the south-western and extreme for the southern rif

Reen ya. For severe warms for

the low a er central west

plains and a total fire ban for

those areas as well. Let's look

at what's happening in

Victoria. Extreme fire danger

warnings for today for the

northern country and the mallee

district. North, central and

north-east, a severe warning

for the Wimmera, west and south Gippsland. And And a total fire

ban. We have catastrophic

levels for the mid-north

Riverina and Murraylands. A

severe fire danger for

north-west pastoral and

north-east pastoral and the

upper east in SA. The cloud is thick over the northern parts

of the country especially

around Cyclone Magda which is

intensifying. The one over in

the north-east is now an ex

tropical cyclone and it's still

causing rain flout the tropical

coast. We have heavy rainfalls particularly around the

Kimberley for today.

Thunderstorms, Gail force winds

and flooding possible in the

area. There is a trough in the

south-east that is starting to

make its way along the SA coast

t. It will move into NSW and

Victoria today and particularly

this morning and then it will

make its way across the eastern

parts throughout today and

tomorrow, which should cool

things do down, but we have the

high in the bight that is

continuing to make things hot.

The top story on ABC News

Breakfast - the main port in Haiti's capital,

Port-au-Prince, has reopened to

speed up the delivery of

emergency relief. Nine days

after a massive earthquake

shook the country, about half a

million people are estimated to

be homeless. Aid is continuing

to arrive but it's still not reaching those who need it

most. The BBC's Ben Brown

reports. Food is finally

getting to the people here who

need it. But while we were

filming this distribution of

German aid today, we saw it

quickly descend into chaos. It

was everyone for themselves.

Survival of the fittest. UN

troops and Haitian police

nearby seemed unwilling or

unable to restore any kind of

order. This is the new Haiti -

hundreds of thousands of the

homeless now living in vast

tented camps like this one.

Refugees in their own country,

their own city. While another

half a million Haitians are not

that lucky. They're living in

tents outside their homes. This

woman and her four children dig

amed the rubble of what was

their house. They're not

looking for survivors, they're

looking for their clothes and

shoes. They only have what they were wearing when the

earthquake struck and it's cold

at night. She showed me what

passes for her bed nowadays.

She sleeps on this patch of

stony ground. So far she hasn't

received any aid at all. She

tells me she has nothing.

Absolutely nothing. On a wall

in her street that is still

standing, a message to the

outside world - it is coming

but only to a fraction of the 3

million or so people here who

need it. There have been

difficult images to watch over

the last week, particularly

when you know aid has been

pielg up at the port and you

and many others around the

world have been generous but as

the time same it's easy to

criticise from this distance

because it's such a mess over

there and such a difficult

place to try to get aid to. We

would like to know what you

think about this issue. The critical issue of those who

have been trying to do their

best to get aid through but

clearly it's taken far too

long.

In other news - a Greek night

club bouncer has been jailed

for 22 years for causing the

death of an Australian tourist.

Marios Antonopoulos escape add

conviction for murder but he

was found guilty of inflicting

wounds that caused the Sydney

man's death. Two other men

involved in the attack were

also jailed for more than seven

years. 20-year-old Doujon

Zammit was killed while on

holiday in Mykonos in July

2008. Older Australians could

be the winners from a wide

ranging tax review. Ken Henry

has signaled tax breaks for

older people could be an

incentive to keep them in the

work force longer but low paid

workers in Australia could lose

salary perks up to $30,000. The

restructure will affect

church-based hospital, nursing

homes and welfare agencies

which provide top-up payments

to their workers. Jack Straw

has told Britain's Iraq inquiry

he agonised over decisions to

top lt shuetion with force. But

he says he believes officials made the best judgment possible

under the circumstances. Mr

Straw, who was a key figure in

the Tony Blair administration

says the decision to go to war

was the most difficult he had

ever made. A Western Australian

community son red alert as the northern Kimberley coastline braces for Tropical Cyclone

Magda. Residents of Kuri Bay,

north-west of Broome, has been

warned to seek shelter immediately and in Far North

Queensland a tropical low

hovering off the coast has been downgraded from a cyclone but

if danger is not over yet. It's

expected to re intensify and

lash the coastline over the

weekend. And Wall Street stocks

have plunged after the US

President Barack Obama revealed

plans to limit the size of big

Banks. His proposal is a bid to

try to prevent future financial

crises. I also includes limits

on the amount of risk banks can

take and banning retail banks

from using their own money in

risky financial transactions.

Prince William has wrapped up

his whirl wind visit to

Australia with an address to an

Australia Day function in

Melbourne. Earlier, the prince

visited tourns devastated by the Black Saturday bushfires

and he offered incouragement to

survivors there. Michael

Rowland reports. A burst of

pageantry marked the end of the prince's Australian

visit. Being in Australia is

the realisation of a dream. As

far a backback as I can

remember, I have heard from my

family about the wonders of

Australia and the hospitality and friendship of the

Australian people. The mutual

affection has stood the test of

time. My father had such a

great time here at school and

is still misty eyed about an

immortal moment on Bondi...

when an Australian beauty plant

add smacker on his cheek! It's

good to see this tradition is

still continuing. The young

prince was mobbed by

enthusiastic crowds from the

moment he embarked on an

unscheduled walkabout in

Whittlsea, north of Melbourne.

The prince was in town to

learn about the bushfire

recovery effort. This part of

the state was the hard est hit

by the Black Saturday fires,

more than 100 people die and thousands of homes were

destroyed. So this is the Area

that was burnt. The prince saw

for himself just how widespread

the inferno was. The Black

Saturday fires have had a

particularly touching effect on

the prince. He's followed the

recovery effort from afar and

has been very keen to hear

first hand from those affected

as to how they're re building

their lives. People like rich

and and Diane Fox whoa lost

their home and are now living

in a cabin as they rebuild. It

is an honour. It is not every

day that royalty comes to walk

on your wonderful block of

land. And it's not every day

royalty gets behind a barbecue,

but that's #w4r5 2 prince did

in Flowerdale. He had some

lettuce and Tom atto and all

the Australian barbecue things.

He was a nice fellow. After

lunch, the prince was the star

player at a local cricket

match. Displaying his prowess

with both bat and ball. The

professionals were impressed. A

little challenging. It came

down with more pace than I thought. The adulation wasn't

over with for the prince.

Hundreds welcomed him at He He arrived at Melbourne's

Government House. Officials

duties over, Prince William

heads back to Britain, his

charm offensive deemed an un

qualified success. I think it

helped that he went everywhere with rolled up sleeves. He didn't mind getting a few smackers on his cheek. Not like

that immortal one. If memory

serves me there's been speculation about that Bondi

Beach moment that that was

staged by the prince's people

in order to make him more

accessible and loose en him

up. There were too many on

this occasion to be

staged. There was quite

real. China is on target to

overtake Japan to become the

world's second largest economy.

The Chinese Government says the

nation's economy grew by 8.7%

last year, defying the global

economic downturn. There are

fears however the nation will

overheat as it steams out of

the global economic downturn. Tom Iggulden reports from

Beijing. Last year, China's

leaders were able to turn the

country's economy around in

dramatic fashion and they've

got the graph s to prove

it. The key, say the

Government's number cruncher,

was confidence in the economy

and the Government from Chinese

workers and consumers. It was

almost poetic.

TRANSLATION: Confidence is like

the rays of morning sunshine,

gathering together and becoming

colourful clouds in the sky.

Confidence has stoked the

little sparks of our economic

recovery into blazing fires

spreading all over. That fire

may now be burning a little too

well. The impressive GDP

numbers were accompanied by

year ending data showing

inflation returning to the

Chinese economy and

overproduction becoming a

serious problem in the

industrial sector. And that's

adding to pressure on the

Government to rein in the trillion dollar stimulus

package that most economists

say drove last year's

impressive growth. Analysts say

it's unlikely the Chinese

economy's battered export

sector will be able to pick up

the slack if the stimulus is

withdrawn. The high growth era

for China's exports is pretty

much over. China's market

issues are very large already.

It's not easy to increase

market share. And the overall

level of consumption in the

West is not going to rise but fall. There's been little

indication from the Chinese

Government so far on what ideas

it's toying with to maintain growth without overheating the

economy. The Government of

Indian of the Jammu and Kashmir

Indian State have offered

compensation to the people

displaced by the partition. And

100,000 families received

Church of Englands worth $3,000

each. Many say it's not

enough. It was one of the

deadliest exoduses in history.

In 1947, ancestors of these residents in Poonch district

were forced to flee the newly

created nation of Pakistan,

leaving behind their

possessions an acres of lands.

Relatives of those displaced

continue to liver in poverty.

But they've received some

reprieve after the Jammu and

Kashmir Government offered

compensation to families.

TRANSLATION: This is not the

first phase. In 2003, people

received $540 US. The people

who received those cheque also

now get an additional $2,700

for fr the Government. But many

argue the amount is not enough. TRANSLATION: This package we

are getting is very little for

a person who has ten mouths to

feed at home, who has 10

brothers and sisters. $3,000 US

is not enough. The refugees

should get a minimum of

$32,000. The move comes after a

series of feuds between the Federal Government and the

refugees who have long demanded citizenship rights in the

state. Under state legislation

the refugees are barred from

seeking employment, purchasing

property and voting in local

election. The Indian Prime Minister, Singh sic, however,

has promised to - Manmohan

Singh has prom itsed to help

improve their livelihood. You

are watching ABC News Breakfast. We will now look at

the top stories. Workers in

Haiti are digging mass graves

to bury 10,000 earthquake

victims in a single day. The

Government says the bodies of

at least 75,000 people have

been buried since the

earthquake struck the island

more than a week ago . A. A

Greek night club bouncer has

been jailed for 22 years for

his role in the death of

Australian tourist 20-year-old

Doujon Zammit. Marios

Antonopoulos escaped a

conviction for murder but was

found guilty of inflicting

wounds that caused the Sydney

man's death in 2008. And older

Australians could be the

winners from a wide ranging tax review. Treasury Secretary Ken

Henry has signaled tax break

force older people could be an

incentive to try to keep them

in the work force longer but

low paid workers could lose

some of their salary perks.

Now we will look at the

national papers. And we're

joined now from the former

editor of the the 'Age'

newspaper, Mike smi. Happy new

year. And the same to you. In

your suit, I thought you would

be in a summer y shirt. Today

is the end of the silly season. Official start on Monday which might explain a

few of the stories we've seen

coming through. It's been a

difficult silly season. There's

been some big story bus silly

ones too. I think my favourite

silly season story this year

has been all the journalists

queuing up to strip their

clothes off and pose nude after

the Jennifer Hawkins magazine

cover. There's been a couple of

blokes who have decided to do

that and none of us thank them

for that! They've received the

odd brick bat for doing that.

Did they make their point? I

think they're in love with look

at me journalism. What is the

'Herald Sun' got this morning? It's the Melbourne

paper's turn this morning to

gush over Prince William. The

'Herald Sun' has got a 7-page

souvenir edition. Excellent. An

editorial that says what a

stunning success he's been and

he has all the charm and

charisma of his mother. Which

probably captures the general

reaction to the prince's visit.

It has been a big success.

Fleet Street can't believe it.

They can't - Totally incident

free. Totally incident free,

well plan and probably most

clever ly out of all very

short. When you say Fleet

Street can't believe it, did

they suspect he would come over

here and be met by Republican

scorn? No, but I think just the

headline that it's drawn. The completely positive coverage

and the strength and poeldness

and prominence of the coverage.

The 'Times' man in London says

they were headlines that the

palace could only dream of. We

will look at those. We have the

times of London that we can

look at. 'The Sun' - 'The Sun'

is the red top tabloid over

there, they got an Australian

showbiz celeb to give his take

on a royal celeb's visit to

Australia. Jason Donovan - He's

half English these days. He is

almost an ex-pat. But he's

written in the London 'Sun'

that Prince William has been a

has kbrif hit and will restore

faith in the royal family here.

But I think what sums it up

best is after this visit

Australians on sports bet have

made him a $1.80 favourite to

become the next king. He knows

how to turn on the charm,

doesn't he. Last night he was

say Australia is the country of

the 21st century, Melbourne's

proud culture of sport and the

arts and culture. Straight out

of the Victorian Government's

handbook. Is it that hard to do

that? , no it's very easy. You

just read it from your speech

notes. But I think one of the secret notes to the success is

there's the shortness of it.

Royal tours have gone Twenty20 cricket. If he had hung around

for a couple of weeks we would

have got bored with him. You

can't deny it has been a big

success. Before we go, let's

look at the 'Age' front page

because the eagle eyed and ever

asserted Mike Smith has done

his job there. We will try to

get that up quickly. There's

the can't cook, can't bat but a

dab hand at glad handing. Very

nice line. You have a story you

want to look at in the

'Australian' and this is sports? If Prince William was

the media hero today, then Bern

add Tommic is the media

villain. After his out burst

about 2:30 yesterday morning

after his terrific match with - John Alexanderer I heard him say before the end of the

match, whatever the result was

Bernard Tommic has arrived and

hilt the big time. But he

spoiled it all in his

aftermatch press

conference. Tire and emotional

17-year-old at 2 o'clock in the morning. Patrick Smith in the

'Australian' who sometimes

writes with a pen dipped in

acid has compared it to some of

the great sporting

embarrassment s of some time

and accused him of un sportsman

like and surly behaviour. I

think it is un sportsman like

behaviour when you've lost a

match like. That you may

believe that to your very

bones. You don't say nit your

post match conference. Maybe

that is maturity too. Remember

there's been a lot of

17-year-olds both male and

female who have won grand slam,

not just made to it the first

or second round. They're much

more courteous and graceful in

defeat than Bern add Tommic has

been. Greg Bowman in the 'Age'

is saying grow up. And he needs

to grow up and get an alarm

clock. Apparently officials are

sake taking him to task on this

as well. He will be reprimanded. It's a problem

that he's created for

himself. Quite rightly. He

needs to learn the lesson. And the officials have made that

clear and so they should. You'd

be a tough dad. He is. The

kids when they used to come

into the 'Age' newspaper would

tell us that. My point before

about the silly season being

over I think to me syndicated

by the fact we're now hearing

Ken Henry talking abthis tax

review. Is he constantly making

these speeches because he want

s the Government to release it

and get it out there? I think

it's all part of priming. This

will be one of the big stories

of the year and we will see a

lot of tax speculation and tax

reviews. If it follows the

familiar pattern, the decisions

won't be quite as harsh as the

pre dictions are. But there

will be Prime Minister is

joined the softening up of the

public for some tough decisions

that there will need to be

generally higher taxes. There

will be winners and losers but

it's not going to be a friendly

review. They need to raise more

money to pay for a growing

older generation. And dangerous

for the Government in an

election year. Absolutely: They

will have to play it very

well. I don't think you will

see any of the really unpopular

decisions this year but they

may be spread over two or three

years with a lot of the bad

news coming after the election. And 'The Daily Telegraph' has managed to nail

down the really bad news with

its coverage? Probably the best

scoop of the day - Steve lieu

nis 'The Daily Telegraph' and

other News Limited tabloids,

it's a leak from the review if

it's correct of course that

they're going to axe the tax

free benefits that thousand of welfare organisations are able

to pay their staff. That's a big story because there's about

a quarter of a million staff

here who the charities can only

attract these people and match

private sector salaries if they

can often these tax free

elements. It will make it very

hard for charities to recruit

good staff competing in the

private sect of. Were you

surprised that more papers

didn't run with that amazing

photo on their front pages this

morning? From Haiti? Yeah. But

that is the power of Prince

William. Prince William knocked

that great story from Haiti off

the front page. Priorities are

skewive. And I have having much

trouble in the Murdoch papers

about the decision to go 24

hours new. There was one story.

Good to see you, thank

you. Thank you. Now here is

Luke Waters. Lleyton Hewitt

has set up a match with Marcos

Baghdatis. He demolished

American Donald Young in

straight sets. Hewitt says he

is ready for Baghdatis, who

beat him less than a fortnight

ago in the Sydney

International. Yesterday, the

Cypriot Baghdatis headed had an

up and down sort of day. He

overcame a 2-set deficit and

also a temporary explosion.

There goes the qua ra quet and

he suffered a bit of cramp.

This is him le covering from

cramp. An interesting method

from Baghdatis. Now, we are

going to be joined now by Haley

ka Noel, who is in the Adelaide

suburb of Norwood. She's been

following the events of the

Tour Down Under in SA. Good

morning, Haley. How are you?

Good morning. I am very

well. I am here just as 5,000

riders are going past me on

their way this morning. These

are amateur riders. It's very

loud down here at the moment. I

hope you can hear me OK.

They're heading down on the

same route that the

professional riders will take

later on today. This number

will swell to about 8 or 9,000

by the time they get to the end

because there's a few people

joining them along the way to

take a shorter route. So

they're very excited. I'm

spoken to a few this morning

and they're pumped. It's 160km

so it's a lot longer tha than I

would be taking. Yesterday we

heard the mercury got to over

40 and there was quite a steep

and windy stage of the tour.

What are the conditions and

also the route today? Yeah,

yesterday was a scorcher. The

riders really struggled. It was

very windy as well which made

it a lot worse. Today thankfully for the longest

stage of the tour it will only

get to about 32. It is quite

warm this morning, very barmy

but it's not expected to get

too much hotter. They're going

from here at Norwood through

the hills and down the the

South Coast, so there will be

some hills, some flats an they

will be riding along the coast

to finish. A bit of a reprieve,

32 down from 40. That is

probably a good thing for the riders. What about Lance

Armstrong mania? Obviously last

year the whole State of SA was

rapt in the fact he was there.

Has he taken on a lesser

profile this year? Very much

so. Lance is definite listen on everyone's lips and he is not

too far away from the lead. He

is only about 20 setioned off

the pace. Tomorrow's stage is

really where it will be won and

lost and I think we will see a

lot from Lance tomorrow. In

terms of the community of SA

we're still very excited to

have Lance here. Last weekend,

about 5,000 almost 8,000 people

joined him on a community ride.

He put out a Twitter post on

Thursday last week and all

these people came out to ride

with him up and down one of our

suburban streets. So it was

really exciting and people are

excited to have him here

still. What can you tell us

about Manuels Cardoso? It's a

little-known Portuguese geez

ride they're took the honours

yesterday? Not a lot. He's been

relatively little-known up

until now. He surprised

everyone yesterday. He beat

Alejandro Valverde, who as the

champion of the Tour of Spain

and our own Cadel Evans, and he

beat everyone. So it was an

amazing feat yesterday. All

eyes will be on him today to

see what else he can do. Thanks

for your time, Haley. It looks

like you're enjoying the lycra

and the bike riding there in

Norwood. So have a great

day. Thank you. Yes, so

interesting stage today down to

the fluoro peninsula. It looks

like SA now has more cyclists

per head of population than

anywhere else. Now here is

Vanessa O'Hanlon with the

weather. Tropical Cyclone Magda

is a category 2 and. Rainfalls

up of up to 100mm are forecast

for the Kimberley coast an over

the other side in Queensland

Cyclone Neville has been down

graded to a tropical low. It is

still causing a lot of rain

between Cooktown and Tully. NSW

very hot conditions with

north-west winds and fresh

afternoon coastal sea breezes,

the hottest being around Bourke

and in Griffith. For Victoria

hot in the north.

A mild southerly change is

due over the south-west this

morning. I will extend east

late in the day and into

tomorrow. Tasmania - isolated

light showers about the west

and north-east, mainly through

this morning. Moderate west to

north-west winds. A milder

southly change is moving over

the south. It should reach

there late this afternoon. A

severe fire warning for the

central west coastal district.

In the north, hefry main and

storms about the north-west

Kimberley. For the Northern

Territory, very hotdon

conditions in the south with a

top of 40 degrees for Tennant

Creek and the apolice.

Now still ahead on ABC News

Breakfast - we will have more

on the situation in Haiti with

Paul Shanahan from Care

Australia. And we will talk

about the decision that Barack

Obama has made to limit the

scale and the scope of banks.

The markets over have not liked

that news. So that is all comes

up after this very short break

on ABC News Breakfast. Do stay

with us.

Three Australians through

to the third round of the

Australian Open.

The top story on ABC News

breakfast - Haiti's Government

says the bodies of at least 75,000 people have been buried in mass graves since the earthquake struck the island more than a week ago. Workers are carving it graves on a hillside north of Haiti's capital and in Port-au-Prince the sea port has partially reopened, helping the supply of much-needed aid. The BBC reports. Come Coming ashore today, vital equipment to help operate the port. A difficult manoeuvre on a make shift ramp. But US commanders say as and from today the port can start receiving the aid that is so urgently needed. We're preparing the port to receive all the cargo and when it comes to hand it over to the folks that will distribute it. And we're ready as of today to begin receiving some cargo. There is a lot of work that needs to be done by a lot of people and agencies and units. Just how much work is very clear. The sea port has been shattered. Sections have literally been torn apart. Shipping containers pitched into the water. And cranes that could be overloading safe living supplies lition and

idle. This pier can only be

used for light traffic now.

Heavy equipment can't be

brought through because it's

unstable. And if we come down

here you get a sense of the

kind of damage that was done by

the earthquake. This massive

concrete pillar was actually

ripped oud of the ground. Over

here you can see how section of

the tarmac were priced apart, wide gaps have wide gaps have opened up and huge chunks have fallen into

the sea. Securing the pier is

vital, so divers have been at

work checking the damage

concealed beneath the

water. Losing this pier we

will lose the majority of us

being able to bring the

humanitarian needs in. If it humanitarian needs in. Ioes underwat goes underwater we almost shut

down. Is this the Lifeline for the aid the aid effort? Right now, yes,

ma'am. More aid is now get

getting through by air. Up to

140 flights a day can land at

the capital's damaged airport.

But there's a waiting list of

1400 and there are still many

questions about why it's taking

so long to help those in need.

so long to help those in need. A night club bouncer has