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Australians see in the New

Year with spectacular fireworks

displays. The world rings in

2010 with celebrations across

the globe. A gunman kills five

people in a shooting rampage in

Finland. And the Central Coast

Mariners slip to eighth on the

A-League table. Good morning,

it's Friday, 1 January, I'm Joe

O'Brien. And I'm Paul Kennedy.

The top story on 'ABC News

Breakfast', revellers across

the country greet the new

decade with gusto, wild weather

threatened to derail plans for

fireworks in a number of

cities. Sydney hosted a

spectacular show, more than 1.5

million watching it from the

city's foreshore, attracting a

global audience of a billion

people. As Amy Bainbridge

reports. It was billed as the

biggest New Year's Eve show in

the world. Happy New Year. And

with a price tag of $650,000,

Sydney shimmered under a

fireworks extravaganza, three

months in the planning. Until

last night the program for the

Harbour Bridge event was a

closely guarded secret. It's

possibly the best fireworks I

have ever seen. It was really

good. Like a baby, it was

really exciting, like

children. Torrential rain

threatened to thwart

Melbourne's quarter of a million fireworks show and

nature put on a display of her

own. While crowds were down,

hundreds of thousands of people

headed out to celebrate, with police saying they were

generally well behaved.

ALL: Happy New Year. Hobart's

Constitution Dock is still

buzzing as the finish line of the Sydney-to-Hobart Yacht

Race. The massive Taste

Festival was one way to stay

dry. Wine, good food, good friends. And what happened

when the storm came. We ran

inside. The nation's capital

shrugged off its serious

demeanour to put on a

spectacular show as the city

centre made way for a massive

dance party. We love you

Canberra. A cool change ended

Adelaide's scorching week and

made way for a family affair at

Elder Park. Happy New Year. In

the top end the show went ahead

before the rain came, and the

pubs were packed with plenty of

New Year cheer. Not everyone

was well behaved during the

celebrations. In Sydney there

were 70 arrests overnight. In

Melbourne 50 people were

questioned about drugs. While

much of the world is waiting

for the clock to strike

midnight countries across Asia

and the Pacific have been

ringing in the New Year. Hong

Kong's famous fireworks display

lit up the harbour.

In Japan thousands of

balloons were released as

Tokyo's electric light board

flashed 2010. CHEERING

. And in South Korea

celebrations had a more

traditional feel. So New Year's

Eve, what did you do last

night. I was well and truly

thunderstorm moved across asleep. But watched the

Melbourne, which caused a bit

of a delay to the fireworks in

Melbourne, but entertained a

few people anyway. We'll hear

from Vanessa O'Hanlon later on,

there was something like 10mm

fell across Melbourne as the

sun went down, and I'll be

interested to see what happened

to the fireworks at 9:00, there

was plenty of lightning and

thunder around. Both the Prime

Minister and the Opposition Leader highlighted the

environment as a big issue

going into 2010. In his New

Year's Eve message Kevin Rudd

claimed the outcome of

Copenhagen as a victory for the

environment albeit a down sized

one. He did not mention his

defeated Emissions Trading

Scheme. Tony Abbott made it

clear the Opposition would

fight what he calls the

environment tax. We saw more

than 90% of world leaders

supporting the 'Copenhagen

Accord' on climate change, by

no means a perfect agreement.

Australia wanted much more. But

an agreement nonetheless. Where

the alternative was complete

collapse and total

inaction. Globally we have

agreed for the first time that

temperature increases must be kept within 2 degrees

centigrade. Globally we have

agreed for the first time that

both rich and poor countries

will act to bring down their

carbon emissions in order to

contain increases in global

temperatures. As one of the

hottest and driest continents

on earth Australia is

experiencing the impact of

climate change first and

hardest. And, of course, we

have Mr Rudd's great big tax on

everything. The Emissions

Trading Scheme is not an

environment policy, it's a tax

policy. Mr Rudd thinks that the

best way to improve the

environment is to raise the

cost of living. I think that

the best way to improve the

environment is actually to fix

it. I think that we can have a

better world, we have to be

intel gelent about it, and I

don't see - intelligent about

it, and I don't see the

commonsense of whacking up the

price on everything. Tony

Abbott speaking there and the

Prime Minister Kevin Rudd

before him. In other news this

morning a gunman has gone on a

shooting rampage in Finland

killing five at a shopping

mall. He shot himself. Finish

police say Ibrahim Shkupolli

killed his ex-girlfriend in a

nearby apartment before heading

to a mall in Helsinki. The Fair

Work System comes into effect

today, marking the official

death of Howard Government's WorkChoices. The changes include new laws about wages

and working hours and

businesses with fewer than 100

workers can no longer sack

someone without good reason.

The Opposition says the changes

will be bad for the

economy. There's been an angry

reaction to news that a fallen

powerline probably sparked the

Toodyay fire in Western

Australia. 38 homes were

destroyed in the blaze north of

Perth earlier this week.

Western Power has conceded now

that it's possible the

powerline was the source of the

fire. The electricity provider

says a detailed investigation

will be completed by the end of

January. There was a security

scare in Bali last night with

fears of a possible New Year's

Eve terrorist attack. The US

Embassy sent its citizens

emails quoting Bali's Governor

saying there could be an

incident. Australian and

Balinese authorities say the

warning did not appear to be

based on a specific threat. A police spokesman told the ABC

the warning was a generic

message to be cautious during

New Year's Eve celebrations.

Thousands of mourners lined

roads in Indonesia to say

farewell to late President

Abdurrahman Wahid, he was

elected in 1999 after three

decades of dictatorship.

Tributes flowed for the

69-year-old, a long-time

champion of democracy. Prime Minister Kevin Rudd said

Abdurrahman Wahid was admired

and respected not only in

Indonesia, but around the

region. Going to Queensland

now, and rewind a little bit.

In 1979 it was perhaps the year

best remembered for the controversial demolition of Brisbane's iconic Bellevue

Hotel, the year also that Joh

Bjelke-Petersen tried to take

dramatic action against the

Union Movement. Kirrin

McKechnie reports on the revelation from Queensland

Cabinet papers released under

the 30-year rule. It was a

secret midnight strike. That's

left a lasting impact on Queensland.

ALL: Save the Bellevue

Hotel. Under cover of darkness

the infamous Dean brothers

demolished Bellevue Hotel in

April 1979. By order of the Joh

Bjelke-Petersen

Government. Well, it's a pretty

corny sort of place. Pretty

well what you could describe as

a heap of rubbish. Cabinet

papers released under the

30-year rule revealed the

National Trust classified the

iconic building as worthy of

renovation. But that would cost

more than $2 million. Demolition came in at

$40,000. There's no way in the

world you could do anything

with it, other than demolish

it. The Premier took an uncompromising attitude towards

the Union Movement. Regular

strikes disrupted a range of

industries in '79, department

the Government's authority. Guess which union

was involved, the ETU. The same

union bagging us out there

today. The Joh Bjelke-Petersen

Government hoped to solve

industrial problems by trying

to deregister disruptive

unions. That move failed.

Instead the Premier proposed

new emergency powers to invoke

when strike action threatened

an essential industry. You

know how we work, to maintain

law and order and the rights of the majority of

people. Education was a hot

topic around the Cabinet table

30 years ago. Literacy and

numeracy weren't the talking

points. The Joh Bjelke-Petersen

decided to get tough on teacher

dress standards, forcing

schools to display portraits of

the Queen.

# God save our gracious

Gene... The Premier forced

students to sing 'God Save the

Queen'. Fling the flag was a

must. Joh Bjelke-Petersen was

concerned about his own image,

training a PR team in poem

oceanal photography and

approved magazines publicising

Queensland. Times have changed,

but not much. And I was only 10

at the time in Far North

Queensland. I can remember how

devisive that issue was between

Joh Bjelke-Petersen, and the

unions. Really devisive issue,

and how times have changed. We

heard from Kirrin McKechnie

then that Joh Bjelke-Petersen

was trying to push the Queen in

schools, holding up photos and

things like that. But now, this

year, we have changes coming in

on 1 January, which we'll go

into in detail during the show

this morning. In Victoria all

references to the Queen or a

lot of the references to the

Queen in the courts are being

removed. I wondered when I was

looking at the kids playing the recorder, that they still play the recorder in

Queensland. They do, and play

it damn well. Five Canadians,

including a journalist and

eight Americans working for the

CIA have been killed in separate attacks in

Afghanistan. The first attack

at a military base was the

worst against intelligent

officials since 2001. Father

Pavel reports Parthena

Stavropoulos. This is the seen

of one of Taliban's killings,

claiming the attack in an army

base at Khost. A Taliban

spokesman said the suicide

bomber was an officer in the

African army, evading security

when he entered the gates and

detonated his explosives. There

were eight American victims,

all CIA agents.

TRANSLATION: I'm working at a

construction company, guarding

the same office at night. This

company is close to the

American airfield, I heard an

explosion, but it looked inside

the base. We do not know what

happened inside. Further south

in Kandahar city a roadside

bomb blast claimed the lives of

five Canadians, four soldiers,

one a journalist. It's the

worst loss of Canadian life in

Afghanistan in 2.5 years. The

soldiers were conducting a

community security patrol in

order to gather information on

the pattern of life and

maintain security in the

area. The journalist was

travelling with them, to tell

the story of what Canada's

soldiers are doing in Afghanistan. 34-year-old

Michelle Lang was a reporter

with the 'Calgary Herald', she

was on her first assignment with Afghanistan and had only

been there for 20 days. We feel

for her family, fiancee and friends, obviously whether they

are in the newsroom or

elsewhere. The killings took

place in what was considered to

be a safe part of Kandahar. Now

we'll go to the front pages of

the major newspapers around the

country, and predictably many

feature firework displays in

the country's major cities.

'The Australian' says the

Fraser Government feared the

arrival of refugee boats posing

continuing threats to national

unity according to declassified

Cabinet documents. 'The Age' -

Melbourne house prices soared

by 17% in the first 11 months

of 2009, outstripping growth in

other capital cities. 'The

Herald Sun' - photographs of

children beginning the second

decade of their lives in

2010. Students who dropped out

of an Australian-owned

university are investigated for

links to the Nigerian man

accused of trying to blow up an

aircraft in the US. Reports the

'Sydney Morning Herald'. 'The

Daily Telegraph' says

Australians have come through a

turbulent decade to lead the

world into the New Year. The

Adelaide 'Advertiser' -

prominent leaders say South

Australia must invest in infrastructure, fix water

problems and modernise its

capital city. Smokers give up

or get out of pubs in clubs and

pubs in Northern Territory, The

Northern Territory News

reports. Thousands of security

personnel patrolled Bali's

party districts after warnings

terrorists planned a New Year's

Eve attack says 'The Canberra Times'. 'The Mercury' -

Tasmania celebrated the New

Year with a short, wild rain

storm, thunder and lightning

after one of the hottest days

on record. Finally 'The Courier

Mail' says wealthy house

hunters will be banned from

accessing Queensland's first

home owners grant for

properties worth $750,000 or

more. If you'd like to send

feedback on any of the stories

we are covering today or maybe

rate your local fireworks

displays, send emails to:

You can probably have a rant

about some of the coverage last

night. There was a logo on the

9:00 fireworks, down in the

corner of the screen, which obscured the Opera

House. Really. It was a logo

with a squigle of the Opera

House. Drives me nuts, those

things. If you were similarly

outraged, let us know. Top

stories - celebrations across

Australia welcomed in the new

decade. Sydney hosted a

spectacular show, more than 1.5

million watched from the foreshore. Countries across

Asia and the Pacific have been

ringing in the New Year, Hong Kong's famous fireworks display

lit up the harbour, in Japan

thousands of balloons were

released as Tokyo's electric

board flashed 2010. A gunman in

Finland kills five people at a

suburban shopping mall. Finnish

police say Ibrahim Shkupolli

killed his ex-girlfriend in a

nearby apartment before heading

to a mall near Helsinki.

The American economy is

ending the year with just the

slightest glimmer of recovery.

The July to September quarter

saw growth of over 2%, and the

predctions are for stronger

growth in the final quarter of

the year. President Barack

Obama said he is cautiously

confident about the future, but

signs that the banks are

already becoming complacent is

worrying analysts. North

America correspondent Michael

Brissenden reports. (Bell.

If it proved anything, it's

that it's not a financial

crisis or economic crisis this,

is a social crisis. (Bells

ring). Everybody is

inextricably linked to their

financial standing. I put in

for probably - oh, probably

8-10 jobs a week. I get

interviewed for about four a week. I'm still

unemployed. There's no jobs

out there. There's nothing. We

were promised so much and we

didn't get anything. It may

seem like health care and

Afghanistan have soaked up most

of the news space in the US in

the last few months. There's

one other story that dominated

the politics of 2009. The

economy. After four quarters of

decline, tentative goeth has

returned in the growth has

returned in the last half of

the year. Home sales are up,

unemployment topped 10%, the

rate of job losses has slowed.

No-one feels confident enough

to call the crisis over.

There's been hard lessons for

everyone along the way. One

thing that we have learned for

sure is the financial system is

more fragile, and has the

potential to be unstable, in

ways that we hadn't understood

before. The question that's now

being asked is has that lesson

been learnt where it began. The

concern that it hasn't

stretches from here all the way to Pennsylvania Avenue in

Washington. After more than a

year of crisis and uncertainty,

there's positive signs that the

economy is picking up. It's

hard to find anyone that thinks

the system itself is out of

danger. According to the President Wall Street doesn't

get it, it's an easy political

shot, but there's plenty of

hours, I think he's right. From

his office at the top of New

York's university Stern School

of Business, Thomas Coley can't

quite see Wall Street, but he's

one that has grown concerned

about the return to business as

usual by the big invest. Firms.

Some of those that have paid

back the taxpayer bailout money

are preparing to once again to

doll out big

multimillion-dollar bonuses. If

we say we are going to come in,

Bill you out if you engage in

risky activities, you are

encouraged to take on more

risk, with more risk is higher

rewards, salaries, better

shareholder returns as long as

the system doesn't collapse. If

you get too far out over the

edge, the taxpayers will come

and rescue again. So they like

that system. Very well. It's

like being subsidised to build

your house out in the bush

where you might get burned out

by a bushfire, but if somebody

else is paying for the

insurance, why not. Why not? Because the President says

change is coming. I did not run

for office to be helping out a

bunch of, you know, fat cat

bankers on Wall Street. With

the health care bill out of the way the Obama Administration is

about to move through the list

of stalled legislative

business. The banks have been

lobbying hard against it. A

financial regulation bill is

expected to come to a final vote in the next few

months. Why is it that people

are mad at the Backs? Let's

see, you guys draw down 10-20

million bonuses after America went through the worst economic

year that it's gone through in

decades, and you guys caused

the problem. And we have 10%

unemployment, why do you think

people may be a little

frustrated. The bill is

described as the most sweeping

rewrite of financial regulation

since the great depression,

amongst other things it will

allow the Government to

dissolve huge globally

defective banks, give

shareholders is greater say on executive pay. Not everywhere believes Wall Street should

shoulder all the blame. Any

time you paint an industry with

a blame brush, you have to be

very careful. Todd Harrison was

a Wall Street trader for 20

years, these days he runs a

financial media company and

says the culpability for the

crash last year extends to

policymakers who were complicit. Systematic problem

of too much acouple rated debt

goes back to the Dotcom crisis

in 2000. He says the markets

need to be freed up to do what

they do best. Weeding out the

bad debt. It's Darwinism in its

purist form. There'll be punish

those who transgressed.

Unfortunately there has to be

that. Once you start opening

the can of worms of introducing

the bailouts and others, where

do you stop? Therein lies the

moral hazard. There's a big

difference between being a

policy maker and playing the

roll of god. Analysts warn that

there is still a big credit

risk in the market. The

mountain of debt associated

with the leverage buyout

activity that took place over

the past few years is yet to be

financed. We haven't seen how

the some deals with the private

debt. The public debt is

becoming an issue, make the US

economy being fragile Right now

the US is on an unsustainable

fiscal path. Sooner or later we

have to get on a sustainable

fiscal path or we'll loss the

confidence of the rest of the

world. That's a problem that

has to be addressed and it

hasn't been addressed. Mark

Twain says history doesn't always repeat but often rhymes,

we have to learn from the past

or we are destined to repeat

it. Michael Brissenden with

that report. We'll go to the

markets. British stock market

rose in light holiday shortened trade.

In a few minutes the only

female on the show this

morning, Vanessa O'Hanlon, will

be hear here with us to look at

the weather. We'll have a

review of some newspapers this

morning, we'll be joined by

Australia Network journalist

Jeff Waters. But now with

sport, here is a new face.

Luke. Thanks, good morning,

Central Coast Mariners have

slipped to eighth on the

A-League table after suffering

their fifth consecutive lost. Wellington Phoenix Paul Iffil

did the damage for the winners,

netting two goals. Lock head

using Cas air us. Early ball.

Michael goes down. Penalty

given. So often they take a

couple of touches in that

position. It was a lunge in

from behind. Paul Iffil against

Andrew Red main. Paul Iffil,

too good from the spot. They've

come to play partypoopers,

Wellington Phoenix, 1-# up. Cas

air us, does he have a parting

gift for his former side. Sets

up Paul Iffil. Paul Iffil has

come and conquered two goals

for him. The points may be

saved. Adrian Cas air us,

former Mariner was

keen. Lleyton Hewitt says he's

fitter and stronger heading

into the Hopman Cup in Perth.

The Australian team of Lleyton

Hewitt and Samantha Stosur go

into the tournament starting Saturday as the No.1

seed. After a solid 2009,

Lleyton Hewitt hopes to

continue his rise up the

rankings with a strong

performance at the Australian

Open. His first mission in 2010

is to help Australia to victory

at the Hopman Cup, for the

first time in 10 years. I feel

as fit as I have ever been, as

strong as I have ever been.

Hitting the ball well at the

moment. It's a matter of going

out there. If the body holds up

I could give all the guys a run. Lleyton Hewitt hasn't

played with Samantha Stosur. We

have a chance. Former world

No.1, American Andy Roddick

will use the Brisbane International to prepare for the Australian Open. Andy

Roddick has been side lined

with a knee injury but says

that could work to his

advantage. On the flipside I'm

a little more mentally rested

than a lot of guys, maybe more

eager. There are plenty of big

names in the women's draw, Kim Clijsters joining Ana Ivanovic,

and Justine Henin. That's good.

We want to play tough matches

before a Grand Slam. The

tournament starts Sunday. The

cricket and team selections are

dominating discussions ahead of

a second Test against Pakistan

starting tomorrow. Visitors are

likely to add a second spinner

to their 11 as John Hayes Bell

reports. Recognised as capable

of bottling an end but not

taking bags of wickets. Nathan

Hauritz should retain fond

memories of his last bowling

performance of 2009. I hope

it's the start of something

good. It's been a pretty tough

road. There's been good and bad

moments this, is one I

remember. The 28-year-old off

spinner heeded Shane Warne's

approach on how to approach

fourth and fifth day Test pitches, maintaining patience

under attack. I guess the most

important thing is not to put

pressure on myself in those situations. Have the confidence and trust in himself to throw

up the ball, let the surface

work for him. Twice this

thumber Blue's team-mate Steve

Smith has been on stand-by for

an injured Nathan Hauritz.

Smith took four Tasmania scal

pz s. Steve will be an

exciting prospect for the

future. He's a leg

spinner. Despite a sizeable

defeat the Pakistanis don't

thing they are far from being

competitive, feeling the first

Test would have been tighter if

not for poor fielding and Mitchell Johnson's spell at the

start of day five. He kill us, first two or three balls take

two wickets. The call has gone

out for former batsman Akbar

Khan, to join the tour. The

current skipper says his

predecessor has been out of

form and may not come into the

line-up even if he arrives in

time 6 hour difference, time,

jet lag as well. I think it's

not good for him as well, and

not good for the team. Well

credentialed leg spinner Danish

Kaneria overcame a finger

injury and seems certain to

play. We'll talk about Danish

Kaneria later. He may be a

valuable acquisition for the

Pakistanis starting tomorrow. I

can't believe they are playing

soccer New Year's Eve. Yes.

It's been a bit of a tradition,

and always in the past two

years has been a 0-0 draw. This

year the Mariners were

done. Thanks for that. ABC News

can be watched on the Australia

networks, 46 countries across

the Asia Pacific, and live on

the web from anywhere in the

world. Now, here is Vanessa

O'Hanlon, with a look at the

weather, and it was a wet start

to the new year in two states

last night. Good morning, Happy

New Year. Most of the rain was

over Queensland. Cairns, you

got 106mm, Innisfail 94.6. Cape

flattery 53mm. Around Victoria

plenty of rain. Highest falls

over the north-east with a

severe thunderstorm warning for

the alpine region, Falls Creek,

nearly 131mm of rain. Mt Hotham

65.2. Melbourne had decent

rain, 9.2mm. The fireworks went

ahead, a little late but we got

them. Kilmore gap - 31.4. Let's

look at the satellite for

today. For the south-east, a

cloud band hopefully we'll get

the satellite system up in a

moment to see what's happening

for New Year's Day, but a cloud

band causes rain and storms,

possibly over the Alps and

Victoria. Another cloudy day

ahead for NSW and Queensland,

with more showers, mainly for

the inland areas and unstable

air over the tropics, cloudy

with thundery showers, further

to the top end, there's a

developing monsoon trough with

a weak tropical low. We'll

leave it there, and have a full

weather update at 7:00. Thanks

for that. A few New Year's

bugs. 10 years after the

Millennium. Now the top story

an 'ABC News Breakfast' - dazzling celebrations have been

held around the country to mark

the beginning of the new decade. Sydney's fireworks display was billed as the

biggest and best and vowed the

crowd and millions of viewers

around the world. Wild weather

threatened to derail fireworks

displace in a number of other capital cities, as Amy Bainbridge reports, the shows

went on with rain, thunder and

lightning adding to the mix. It

was billed as the biggest New Year's Eve show in the

world. Happy New Year. And

with a price tag of $650,000,

Sydney shimmered under a

fireworks extravaganza, three

months in the planning, until

last night the program for the

Harbour Bridge ech was a

closely guarded secret. It's

possibly the best fireworks I

have seen. It was really good.

Like a baby, you know, it was

really exciting, like

children. Toren shall rain

threatened to thwart

Melbourne's quarter of a

million firework show, nature

put on a display of its own.

While crowds were down,

hundreds of thousands headed

out to celebrate, with police

saying they were generally well

behaved. Happy New Year. Hobart's Constitution

Dock sass buzzing as the finish

line of the Sydney to Hobart

yacht race. The massive Taste Festival festival a which to

stay dry. Wine, good food, friends. What happened when the

storm came. We ran inside. The

nation's capital shrugged off a

serious demeanour to put on a

spectacular show as the state

centre made way for a massive

dance party. We love you

Canberra. A cool change ended

Adelaide's scorching week and

made way for a family affair at

Elder Park. Happy New Year. In

the top end, the show went

ahead before the rain came, and

the pubs were packed with

plenty of New Year cheer. Not

everyone was well behaved

during the celebrations. In

Sydney there were 70 arrests

overnight. In Melbourne 50

people were questioned about

drugs. Never have I seen

someone so passionate about our

national capital, "We love you Canberra". Doesn't matter where

you are on New Year's Eve.

We'll hear more about several

of the city's biggest party,

particularly the one in

Melbourne where there were

people questioned overnight.

We'll speak to our reporters in

the field. Both the Prime Minister and Opposition Leader

highlighted the environment as

a big issue going into 2010. In his New Year's message Kevin

Rudd said the outcome of

Copenhagen was a victory for

the environment, albeit a down

sized one. He didn't mention the defeated Emissions Trading

Scheme. Tony Abbott did. The

Opposition Leader made it clear

in his New Year message that

the Coalition would continue to

fight what it calls the

environment tax. We saw more

than 90% of world leaders supporting the 'Copenhagen

Accord' on climate change. By

no means a perfect agreement,

Australia wanted much more. But

an agreement nonetheless, where

the alternative was complete

collapse, and total inaction.

Globally we have agreed for the

first time that temperature

increases must be kept within 2

degrees centigrade. Globally we

have agreed for the first time

that both rich and poor

countries will act to bring

down their carbon emissions in

order to contain increases in

global temperatures. As one of

the hottest and driest

continents on earth Australia

is experiencing the impact of

climate change first and

hardest. And, of course, we

have Mr Rudd's great big tax on

everything. The Emissions

Trading Scheme is not an

environment policy, it's a tax

policy. Mr Rudd thinks that the

best way to improve the

environment is to raise the

cost of living. I think that

the best way to improve the

environment is actually to fix

it. I think that we can have a

better world, we have to be

intelligent about it, and I

don't see the commonsense in

whacking up the price of

everything. So do you believe

Tony Abbott is on a winner when

he keeps hitting away at the

Government saying this Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme is a

big new tax the the email

address is:

In other news - a gunman has

gone an a shooting rampage in

Finland killing five at a

suburban shopping mall. He shot

himself later. Finnish police

say Ibrahim Shkupolli killed

his girlfriend in a nearby

apartment before heading to a

mall near Helsinki. Changes to

Australia's workplace relation

laws come into effect today,

the Fair Work System marks the

official death of the Howard

Government's WorkChoices,

changes include new laws about

wages, working hours and

businesses with fewer than 1

hupz workers can no longer sack

someone without good reason,

the Opposition says the changes

will be bad for the

economy. There's been an angry

reaction to news that a fallen

powerline preeble sparked the

Toodyay fire in - probably

sparked the Toodyay fire in

Western Australia, 38 homes

from destroyed. Western Power

conceded it's possible the

powerline was the source of the

fire. The electricity provider

says an investigation will be

completed by the end of

January. There was a security

scare in Bali last night with

fears of a possible New Year's

Eve terrorist attack, the US

Embassy sent citizens emails

quoting Bali's Governor saying

there could be an incident.

Australian and Balinese authorities say the warning

didn't appear to be based on a specific threat. The warning

was a generic message, to be

cautious during New Year's

celebrations. Thousands of

mourners lined roads in

Indonesia to say farewell to

late President Abdurrahman

Wahid. Abdurrahman Wahid was

elected in 1999 after three

decades of dictatorship. Tributes flowed for the

69-year-old who was a long-time

champion of democracy. Prime

Minister Kevin Rudd said

Abdurrahman Wahid was much

admired and respected not only

in Indonesia, but also in the

region. No if a week is a long

time in politics, then 30 years

is an eternity. But the release

of secret Cabinet papers from

1979 shows that many of the

biggest political issues have

hardly changed. The documents

from the National Archives shed

new light on the inner workings

of the Fraser Government as it

struggled with how to handle

the massive influx of refugees

from Vietnam. Dana Robertson

reports. It was the year

America's space dreams crashed

to earth. All that is left is

to let Skylab fall to a natural

death. Disco topped the charts

# Born to be alive But as a

film about the Vietnam war

generated critical and popular acclaim...

..the aftermath of that war

still rippled to Australia's

shores. The so-called boat

people dominated Australia's

reaction to the refugees. Only

2,000 Vietnamese refugees

arrived in Australia by 1979.

But as 50,000 people a month

fled the new Communist regime,

the Government was preparing

for an influx of 100,000 or

more, and that was after

Cabinet's grim prediction that

half of those seeking refuge

would die at sea. The prospects

for whatever happens in Vietnam

escalating as a result of the

support of the two great

powers, China and Russia, for

the conflict, different sides

of the conflict in South-East

Asia are of serious concern. The situation had all

the the ingredients for one of

the most controversial and

devisive issues in Australia's

history. I think we have a

responsibility to do something

for them as soon as we got

involved in the war. I guess it

depends on whether you want an Australian country as it is

now, or a totally different

country. My own feeling is I

rather like it the way it

is. Cabinet tackled the issue

in ways all too familiar 30

years later. Temporary visas

considered, people smuggling

was made a crime, and Australia

helped fund a UN Detention

Centre in Indonesia You read

that and you think it almost

could have been written today,

but change the words of Vietnam

to Afghanistan, Iraq, Sri

Lanka. Still there were stark

differences with today. Despite

the public Opposition, it never

became the course celeb that

those it things have become since. Vietnam's invasion of

Cam poo chia made the refugee

crisis worst. Thai military

intelligence expect 3,000 Cam

poo chians. Cabinet battled

with the Pol regime. As we know

China tends to store Cam poo

chia. And Soviet Union supports Vietnam. I don't think they

recognised the full horror of

what happened in Cam poo

chia. War and refugees are not

the only familiar themes

echoing through the decades.

Before global warming, Cabinet

considered providing five new

coal-fired power stations,

using them to lure emissions intensive industries to

Australia, looking the at ways

to stop the exodus of young and healthy from private health

injushes, as the Moscow

Olympics drew close are the

Government agreed do $800,000

in team funding. When they say

$100 million 30 years later is

not adequate, I think this is a

bit above CPI. For the frazzled

public servants filling this

year's ar active there's

another link with the past.

Three decades before Kevin 24/7

Malcolm Fraser set a cracking

pace for bureaucrats 2:00 in

the morning at the lodge was

not rare. Some things are not

so secret. What is interesting

about looking back at how the

Government dealt with the

so-called boat people is that

there is no easy F, and it's an

ong issue. , easy F, it's an

ongoing issue, sometimes you

wonder when the politicians

will come up with a brilliant

idea to fix the problem. There

probably is none It's true, and

the fact that during the Fraser

years 200,000 refugees were

apparently accepted during that

period. It will continue to be

a challenge. Now back home and

revellers marked the new year

at a Melbourne dance party at

the Docklands. Emma O'Sullivan

joins us from Melbourne. What's been happening there this

morning. The dance party

finished at 6:00 this morning,

and until a short time ago

there were crowds streaming out

of the stadium jostling for

cabs behind me. Two days ago

organisers said they sold

30,000 tickets, half to people interstate. And said they

expected a lot more people to

turn up at the door. You could

get in as long as you were

dressed head to toe in white.

Another way you could get in to

the stadium was in the blue

police uniform. Victoria Police

said they'd have a large

presence at the dance party.

From 7:00 they patrolled the

stadium with sniffer dogs. You

are probably lucky it finished

a few hours ago, you are not

being hassled by anyone there

now, fortunately. Were there

many arrests at the

party. There were actually no

formal arrests. Police spoke to

50 people that the sniffer dogs

took an interest in. What will

happen to those people, police

will keep in touch with them,

issuing them with a caution or

rather than going to court

they'll be dealt with via a

diversion program, disciplined

but able to avoid a criminal conviction. There were happy

people this morning, here is

some of what the revellers said

to us. I had a good time.

After a few hours we had a

little less good time. Are you

still having a good time. It

was pretty intense, you know,

you get a lot of crowds of people coming in later in the

night. There's a lot of things

going on. Too much to see to

take anything in, they had a

great time. There's a lot of

support. They had St John's

around, if people were in trouble, there was a lot of

people to support you, support

services are important for a

lot of these events when these

things happened. Did you see police and security staff

around in there. Yes,

absolutely. They were $like a

shot. Whenever there was

someone that needed aid or

struggling, they were more for

support. It was really good.

Like after the New Year's Eve,

the time clock went the best

thing was they put Kings of

Leon on, different to dance and

trance music. That was the best mark. There were lots of people

dancing in the middle. Some of

the revellers with hands in the

air. You said there were no

arrests at the party there,

what about the Melbourne crowd

behaviour generally? Well, Victoria Police are still

number crunching as we speak,

but overall they are saying

this morning across the State

they are happy with the

behaviour, there was only a

handful of arrests, no major

brawls in the city and no major

incidents. Perhaps the wet and

windy weather encouraged people

to stay out of trouble last

night. Emma O'Sullivan in

Melbourne. You are watching

'ABC News Breakfast'. The top

stories - the new decade has

been marked with celebrations

across Australia. Sydney hosted

a spectacular show watched by

more than 1.5 million people.

In Asia Hong Kong's famous

fireworks display lit up the

harbour. In Japan thousands of

balloons were released as

Tokyo's electric Light board flashed 2010. The Federal

Government's changes to Australia's workplace relation

laws come in effect today.

Including laws dealing with

wages, working hours and marked official death of the Howard

Government's WorkChoices. And a

gunman in Finland killed five

people at a suburban shopping

mall and later shot himself,

Finnish police say Ibrahim

Shkupolli killed his

ex-girlfriend in a nearby

apartment before heading to a

mall near Helsinki.

For a look at the National

paper, today we are joined by

senior ABC journalist Jeff

Waters. Good morning Jeff. Good

morning. Happy New Year Where

were you last night? In bed

early, didn't see 12:00.

Needless to say If you look at

the front pages, of course of

today's papers, you hardly

needed to go to the fireworks,

obviously the front page spread

for everybody. Also, on a large

number of the front pages this

morning is the story of the

Malcolm Fraser's attitudes to

refugees. I'll start by

talking about the 'Sydney

Morning Herald', and there's a

story on the front page which

is unique to the papers, that a

number of universities are being investigated to links to

the underpants bomber of

Christmas Day. There's not much

in the way of de pail This

comes in the wake of the

Nigerian man that boarded the

plane, it was in Amsterdam,

flew into Detroit, and he spent

a bit of time at a university

of Wollongong campus in

Dubai. Apparently, on arrest he

told authorities that there are

other people who had links to -

who are preparing to do the

same thing, as a result they've

gone back to the university to

see who he was hanging out with

I suppose, a number of people

are being questioned. We are

yet to see what comes out of

that. Is there any suggestion

as to what nationality those

other people are. Not at the

moment. As I said details are

scantly. The 'Sydney Morning

Herald' has gone with the fact

that there are more people

being interviewed and it is

linked to a NSW university. There's another

story on the Sydney paper. Just

a seg way nicely on the same

front page, there's talk about

how the 30 - Cabinet papers

from 30 years ago have been

released and talks of how Malcolm Fraser considers the

policy put up by Tony Abbott

and Kevin Rudd before the

election, that we should turn

away refugee boats at sea that

are seaworthy. Fraser's Cabinet

considered this but rejected it

as an idea. Of course, led in

many times more Vietnamese

refugees than we are

considering letting in from Sri

Lanka. There's a quote here

from Malcolm Fraser, a pointed

one. It was Pauline Hanson who

said turn the boats back from

Asia and everyone condemned her

and her narrow bigoted view. If

Tony Abbott is annunciating

Pauline Hanson's policies,

she'll be thrilled it's Liberal

Party policy. Very pointed

criticism. With Cabinet papers

being released. We have to wait

30 years to see the documents

Absolutely, it's something

that's down in other countries.

Documents that can be released

are released. Obviously there's

documents on national security

issues, not many. You mention

in that article you talk about

numbers of Vietnamese refugees

who came to the country, they

were in the hundreds of

thousands. I think it's 20,000

is the figure. Go to Australian

for that. They have on the

same We accepted 20,000

refugees in '78/'79 mainly from Vietnam compared to 12,000-13,000 in recent years.

2,000 in the last year. In

order of magnitude, different. Obviously there's

now debate in Australia as to

whether or not we turn them

away at sea. Of course, many

implications are there as to where they may be required to

go after that. The other

interesting thing about the - I

guess you call it a flood of

Vietnamese refugees is the

impact they've had on

Australian society in the last

30 years, there's, you know,

many Vietnamese people in

parliament, and, you know, they

are making - basically they've

been a great addition to the

Australian community That is

what Malcolm Fraser is saying

in his quotes in the paper this

morning. It's interesting how

in 30 years we can change so

markedly in our policies.

Interesting. Anyway, moving on

- 'The Age' has a great story

in it today on... About the

Tassie defle. Yes, it's

fantastic. Scientist discovered

the fingerprint of the deadly

facial tumour that's

devastating the Tasmanian devil

population. All the Tassie

Devils, they are not sure

whether they should be

isolated, not sure whether they

can be the bred with other

Tassie Devils, there's

obviously concerns about their

numbers, now they can test them

to see if they have this

disease. We'll beable to

isolate healthy populations for

the first time. There's a

concern they could be wiped out

altogether. They are not listed

as - I forget what the listing

is. They are threatened at the

moment. Yeah, it's a real

problem in Tasmania at the

moment. There's captive

breeding programs in all the

zoos, to try to... What's the

details of what they have

done. They isolated the genetic

fingerprint of the tumour, the

cancer itself, which apparently

attacks cells that nourish the

animal's nerve

animal's nerve fibres. We've

seen awful pictures of the

Tassie Devils, isn't it amazing

how the scientists work to

uncover these things, they've

been going for a couple of across. This is an

international effort. It's

published in the 'Journal of

Science' an international

journal, and it's not just the

Australians who have been

working on this, which is great

news that everyone is pitching

in. There's hope for the Devil

yet. Yes. Finally NT news. Priority in the Northern Territory is the fact that

smoking bans come in in pubs

and clubs for the first time.

As you can see, from the

enlightened NT news, why bother

having the bikini girl on page

3, you know, when you can have

it on the front page. It's hot,

people are going to the beach I

guess, that's the point. That's

the excuse. We saw celebrations

from Darwin, and I was looking

closely to see whether they had

cigarettes if their hands. They

know how to celebrate in

Darwin, I can tell you

that. They - certainly it will

be a changed scene in some

pubs. Could you expect the

smokers of a place like the

Northern Territory necessarily

abiding by a law

which... That'll be the

interesting thing. I think

there'll be heated

confrontations. In some of

those isolated places policing

issues come up. For goodness

ache what will you do if

someone says, "No, I'm going to

smoke". You spent time working

as a reporter, in the Northern

Territory, do you think it will

make a big difference of the

same argument will happen there

that happened in other parts of

the country, that hotels will

say business will suffer. I

can't help but think there'll

be a level of stubbornness in

the Northern Territory with

smokers that doesn't exist in

the rest of the country.

They'll take it in their

stride. They'll say, "Give me a

break". Thanks very much. Enjoy

the Happy New Year, Jeff

Waters. A reminder that you can

watch all of 'ABC News

Breakfast' streamed live every

morning.

With sport here is Luke Waters. Central Coast Mariners

season is on the line,

suffering a fifth consecutive

loss, the mariners sit eighth

on the A-League table, after

Wellington dealt them a 2-0

defeat, Paul Iffil did the

damage bagging two goals, he

has eight goals in his first

A-League season. A nervous wait

for yacht 'Two True', the South Australian yacht survived the

protest to take

Sydney-to-Hobart Yacht Race

handicap honours, Andrew Saies,

skipper was elated. 'Two True'

was involved in an accident

with a yacht in Sydney Harbour,

but Andrew Saies insisted his

crew did everything in its

power to avoid the

contact. Australia is likely to

go into the second Test with

Pakistan with an unchanged

line-up. Nathan Hauritz's form

has brought praise: the the

visitors will probably include

their own leg spinner, damaging

Danish Kaneria. He is likely

to be a bit of a weapon for the

Pakistanis, he's played about

50 tests, taken over 200

wickets, he'll be definitely a

bit of a weapon for them. They

need something. They do

indeed. Pakistan made the point

that their fielding cost them.

I want to give a tick to Mark

Taylor who said before the

match Fielding will be the dins

between the two teams, I think

they are right It's the old

adage, catches win matches,

they grasped a few. Here is

Vanessa O'Hanlon with a look at

the weather. I think we have

overcome the Millennium plus 10

bugs, Vanessa will look at the

rain falls in two of the States

in Australia. Yes, it's been a

wet New Year's for parts of

Queensland. A monsoon trough

drummed up storm activity over

the tropics. Heavy rain

overnight was over the north

tropical coast. Cairns is

raping. 106mm, 13 - Cairns is

raining. 160.

Victoria had a lot of rain.

Highest falls over the

north-east. Severe thunderstorm

warnings is current for the alpine region.

Melbourne's rainfall didn't

seem to dampen the fire

activity. Let's look at the

satellite. We have a cloud band

for the south-east, causing rain and storms, possibly

severe over the Alps in the

south-east. Cloudy for NSW and

Queensland. Showers mainly for

inland areas, and with the

unstable air over the tropics,

cloudy with thundery showers.

Further to the top end. A

developing trough with a weak

tropical low, slowly developing

over the next few days, a flood

advice issued for the top end

and Roper-McArthur districts in

the Territory. Two troughs

generating widespread showers

in the east. Heavy rain over

Queensland, spags the coastal

ors and north - especially over

the coastal areas. A high

keeping the south dry, and

causing dry gusty winds over WA. Widespread showers and

storms over the western and

Central Districts, humid

north-easterly winds. NSW -

widespread rain and storms,

heavy over the north, isolated

over the west. Victoria -

scattered showers, storms

mainly developing over inland

areas this afternoon. Heavy

falls expected over the

north-east ranges. 32 in

Bendigo. Tasmania cool

southerly winds easing, fine

apart from drizzle in the

south, a top of 23 in Hobart.

South Australia - dry, hot conditions over the Northern

Interior. Windy to the south.

Over to the west, severe fire warning for the Central West

district. Hot with gusty winds

over the interior. Mostly fine

conditions up in the north of

WA. Northern Territory - you

have showers and storms hot and

dry about the south. Very hot

in Alice Springs. Ahead to

tomorrow, sunny in Adelaide, 25

and storms along the East

Coast. Thanks Vanessa. Still

ahead - today we'll speak to

this Steve Irwin captain Paul

Watson as the anti-whaling

vessel makes its way to the

Southern Ocean for a

showdown. That's coming up on

'ABC News Breakfast', stay with

us.

This Program is Live

Captioned.

Australians see in the new

year with spectacular fireworks

displays. The world rings in

2010 with celebrations across

the globe. A gunman kills five

people in a shooting rampage in

Finland. And the Central Coast

Mariners slip to eighth on the

A-League stable. Good morning,

happy New Year's, it's Friday,

1 January, I'm Joe O'Brien. I'm

Paul Kennedy. Top story -

revellers across the country

greet the decade with gusto,

wild weather threatened to

derail plans for fireworks in a number of capital

cities. Sydney hosted a

spectacular show, 1.5 watched

from the foreshore. It

attracted a global audience of a billion people as Amy

Bainbridge reports. It was

billed as the biggest New

Year's Eve show in the world.

ALL: Happy New Year. CHEERING

And with a price tag of

650,000, Sydney shimmered under

a fireworks extravaganza three

months in the planning, until

last night the program for the

Harbour Bridge event was a

closely guarded secret. It's

possibly the best fireworks

I've ever seen. It was really

good, really good. Like a baby,

you know, it was really

exciting like

children. Torrential rain threatened to thwart

Melbourne's quarter of a million fireworks show and

nature put on a display of its

own. While crowds were down.

Hundreds of thousands headed

out to celebrate. Police said

they were generally well behaved.

ALL: Happy New Year. Hobart's

Constitution Dock is still buzzing as the finish line of the Sydney-to-Hobart Yacht Race. The massive Taste Festival was one way to stay dry. Wine, good food, good friends. And what happened when the storm came. We ran inside. The nation's capital shrugged off its serious demeanour to put on a spectacular show as the city centre made way for a massive dance party. CHEERING celebrations. In Sydney there was 70 arrests overnight. In Melbourne 50 were questioned about drugs. Isn't it great to be sitting here now not talking about violence breaking out in major cities. Maybe the heat in a couple of those cities played a part. It appears there weren't many arrests at all overnight, particularly in Melbourne. It was quiet in Melbourne. Gee, some people are hard to please, one of the girls sitting watching the Sydney fireworks said possibly one of the best I have seen. You'd th