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ABC News Breakfast -

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(generated from captions) Springs. Mullah Rahim Daad Sadiq Qa This Program is Captioned

Live. An asylum seeker boat

diverted to Singapore. The

asylum seeker debate in

Australia descends into a war

of words. Ethiopia appeals for

emergency food aid to feed more

than 6 million people. Violent

protests outside the BBC over

the appearance of a right-wing

politician. And Wallaby star

Matt Giteau wins Australian

rugby's highest individual

award. Good morning. It's

Friday, 23 October 2009. I'm

Joe O'Brien And I'm Virginia

Trioli. The top story - a group

of asylum seekers rescued by an

Australian Navy ship has been

diverted to Singapore.

Indonesian authorities changed

the boat's destination to

prevent the case overshadowing

the swaying swearing in of the

Indonesian Cabinet. Back home,

the row has ignited a fierce

political debate with the Coalition saying the

Government's border protection

policy has failed. But Kevin

Rudd maintains the policy is

humane and in line with

international humanitarian idea

lines. All of our processes

in Australia, on Christmas

Island and in Indonesian

archipelago and in Malaysia and

elsewhere are consistent with

UNHCR processes. That's why we

have our approach. The previous

government chose to flout that

and brought in, instead, the

Pacific Solution. They had kids

behind razor wire. They had a

range of different

interventions which is designed for a different political

audience, not in dealing with a

manner which got the hard-. The

hard and tough line on asylum

seekers on the one hand. For

more on this, Hayden Cooper

joins us from Canberra. Hayden,

we've both been around a little

while and this debate is

starting to sound very similar

to debates back in 2001. In

fact, when it come stos

scaremongering, I think even

some of the lines are the

same. Yes t took us straight

back there firstly didn't they,

firstly with David Johnston on

this program, talking about the

threat of disease entering

Australia with asylum seekers,

but then Wilson Tuckey went one

better not too long after that

in Kaying that terrorists could

be trying to get into Australia

as well. That's not necessarily

the fact that everyone would

disagree with what they have to

say - I'm sure there are many

who agree with them - but they

should have left it for someone

else to make these points,

because all they've succeeded

in doing is handing to Kevin

Rudd a big stick with which to

whack the Opposition. It is

turn noog that old-style

debate, but I guess what's new

is the sums of money being

Bandied around now in relation

to this deal that is in the

process of being struck between

the Indonesian and Australian

governments? Yes, we've been

waiting for the numbers to come

out about how much it would

cost Australia to have Indonesia deal with the problem

of asylum seekers. 'The

Australian' newspaper today is

suggesting that it will be

around about $50 million.

That's based on a quote from

the Director-General of

immigration in Indonesia who

says that the cost of

processing asylum claims and

also detaining the asylum

seekers would be around about

$50 million, and indeed that is

apparently the number that is

being talked about between the

two countries. Presumably that

would be an annual figure, but

we haven't, as yet, had any

numbers mentioned by the

Australian Government. It will

probably be some time before we

reach that point as well,

Virginia. But while the Prime

Minister Kevin Rudd keeps

staunchly trying to defend his

record and defend how he is

managing the asylum seeker

issue, there has been some

questioning of his claims when

it comes to the efficient

processing of asylum seekers.

Tough but humane is the phrase

he keeps using, but before he

came to power, Kevin Rudd

promised to make changes in

this area to the length of time

it takes for asylum claims to

be processed. Now, at the time

he said that Labor, if they got

into power, would make sure

that 90% of asylum claims are

dealt with, within 90 days.

That has not been the case. So

far it seems the Government has

failed in improving in this

area because the figure is

still around about 75%. So

three-quarters of claims take

longer than 90 days to process,

despite the Government's promises to make improvements

in this area. So, it proves

that making changes is easier

said than done, and the line of

being tough but fair and humane

to asylum seekers has its

limits, I think. Hayden Cooper,

good to talk to you this morning. Thanks so much. In

other news this morning, there

have been violent scenes

outside BBC television centre

in London. Protesters have

breached security around the

centre, voicing their

opposition to a far-right

leader's appearance on a

current affairs program. Nick

Griffin is schedule to be a

panelist on the BBC's 'Question

Time' this morning. Ethiopia

have appealed for aid for 6 million people facing

starvation. The UN says more

than $290 million is needed for

the next 6 months alone. Aid

agencies fear a repeat of the

19 84 Ethiopian famine that

claimed a million lives. Anal

88-year-old alleged war

criminal facing possible

extradition to Hungary has

spent his first night in a

Perth jail. Charles Zentai is

accused of murdering a Jewish

teenager in 19 44. He denies

the claims but handed himself

into police yesterday and was

taken to Perth's Hakea prison.

The Home Affairs Minister Mr

O'Connor will decide if Mr

Zentai is extradited. Thousands

of police have been deployed to

Thailand in preparation for

this weekend's ASEAN meeting in

Hua Hin. Australian Prime

Minister Kevin Rudd will attend

the meeting on Sunday. And a

private funeral will be held

today for Australian television

pioneer Don Lane. The American

entertainer, who starred in the

Australian hit, 'The Don Lane

Show', died in Sydney

yesterday. He was 75.

Australian TV stars, including

Bert Newton and Rove McManus

have paid tribute to Mr Lane,

calling him a great performer. Overseas, the White

House has branded Fox News a

wing of the Republican party

and the Obama Administration is

boycotting the network. It has

been described in some channels

as the bullying of Fox News.

The cable channel which is

owned by Rupert Murdoch's News

Corporation seems to be

relishing the spat. North American correspondent Kim

Landers reports. The oh The

Obama White House targets Fox News. Will the news strategy

work? The White House is on the

warpath with the Fox News network, owned by Rupert

Murdoch's News Corporation The

reality of it is, is that Fox

News often operates as almost

the research arm or the communication arm of the

Republican party. Attacking the

media is a time-honoured

political tactic and the

bickering between Fox and the

Obama Administration has been

going on for a while. Health

care scare as Obama's dream

plan inches closer, is your

worst nightmare becoming a

reality? With stories like

this, the White House says that

fos News is not news, but the

network is opinion journal lix,

masquerading as news I suppose

the way we look at it it's not

a news organisation so much it

has a perspective. But Fox says the White House is unfairly

lumping its reporters with the

network's commentators, just

like confusing the newspapers

with its editorial executives.

Welcome to the program.

Tonight, here are the questions

we are going to be asking because tonight we will talk

about freedom of the

press. Popular talk show host

Glenn Beck is at the centre of

the squabble, regularly targeting Obama admin officials Here is what White House communications director

had to say to the teenagers

there. Two of my favourite

political philosopher s, Tung

and Mother Teresa, not often

coupled with each other, but

the two people I turn to

most. I don't Mao should be

anybody's favourite anything,

or one that you turn to most,

given that his political

philosophies including shooting

political opponents in the

head. In the era of 24-hour

cable news channels, it's

difficult for anyone to get the

final say, but Fox was cut from

a round of presidential

interviews last month and the

administration isn't making its

officials available for net of

the network's talk shows. Some commentators are arguing that

it's foolish for the White

House spending so much time

slamming one network simply

because it dislikes much of its

programming They called it a

White House enemy. That is

over-the-top language. We heard

that before from Richard Nixon

and we have this White House

prone that to kind of helpful.

It's not helpful. It's

demeaning to the President. The President of United States

should not be picking out

enemies in the media and

personalising and allowing his administration to personalise

it as well. Rupert Murdoch

seems to be relishing the

controversy. There could soon

be a truce. The White House

says its officials will appear

on Fox programs soon. Kim

Landers with that story from

Washington. Now, in London,

several hundred protesters are

demonstrating outside the BBC

about the appearance of British

National Party leader Nick

Griffin on the current affairs

program 'Question Time'. Europe

correspondent Philip Williams

has been covering the protest

and he joins us now from our

London studios. Phil, what's

happened with this process

There are 5 or 600 protesters

trying to stop Nick Griffin

from getting into the BBC in

the first place. Some of them

rushed the gates, some of them

got nearly to the studios and

were literally dragged out. All

of them say he shouldn't be

given a platform because his

ideas, his platform from his

party is so odious that giving

him the legitimacy of being

seen on television and they

fear he may attract recruits

that don't understand just how

awful his party is. The police

are down there en masse. One

policeman has been injured, a couple of other people hurt in

a minor way and there have been

three arrests, but really their

main aim to stop this program

from going ahead has failed

because simply he came in

through the back door. Lots of

security men, a lot of his own

security, in fact. This program

is being taped as we speak and

will be broadcast in a couple

of hours, so their aim has

failed and he has - Le be presented to the nation in a

short time. So, the show is

'Question Time'. It's quite a

prominent show in the UK, is

it? Yes, very prominent show.

It has been going for many,

many years and it is a

discussion program where they

have politicians from all the

major parties and a studio audience that throws them

questions backwards and

forwards. It is very vibrant,

very entertaining and it helps

shake policy t really does.

People are saying, "Well, what

are you letting this man on

for, a man who comes from a

party that say it is doesn't

allow black people to join it?

A party which lost a court case

last week, a court case that

said you must remove that

clause from your party

membership or your party could

risk being dissolved." People

find the party very, very

offensive and don't believe he

should broadcast his views. On the other side of the fence,

there are peopling who are

saying, "Well, hang on. This is

a democracy. He has won two

seats in the recent election,

including himself. He is now an

MEP. As such, whether you like

it or not, you should hear his

views." So he really has

divided the nation very sharply

and those who are opposing it

are still staying outside

Television spb ter as we speak

and will no doubt give him a

rowdy reception should he

mistakenly go out the front

door. Those people are the

usually the type of people you

expect defending the freedom of

speech? Yes, that's the

paradox , isn't it? They come

from the left of the political

spectrum mostly, but the

argument there is - well, is he

devious, tricky, he will

present himself as a reasonable

face and behind it all there is

a very unreasonable set of

policies and goals, for

example; that is, a white

Britain kicking out people

other than white from the

country and that shouldn't be

allowed, he shouldn't be given that legitimacy. On the other

hand, of course, there is the

counter argument let the people

decide - are they so silly not

to be able to see through these

ideas, these policies, he sas

says, in deof himself, "I've

been misquoted. I'm a nice guy.

Don't take it out on me. Hear

me out." He also said in a

newspaper article this morning this is his greatest

opportunity, this is the

greatest leg-up his party has

ever had to be on this program,

so it is definitely seen as a

great thing for him to be seen politically on this

program. Phil, good for the

ratings for this program, no

doubt. Has it actually been

recorded yet? Well, it is

being recorded as we speak now.

It will be replayed in about

hour and a half. Undoubtedly,

I'm sure it will be the top

ratings the show has ever had.

It is a political program. It

is reasonably popular, not as

popular as 'Insiders', of

course, Or ABC 'News

Breakfast' But the ratings

will go through the roof. Now

we'll take a look at the front

pages of the major newspapers

around the country. The

'Australian' -- 'The

Australian' is reporting that

the processing of asylum seeker

also cost more than $50 million. Corporate

whistleblowers will get stronger protection under

Federal Government reforms says

the 'Financial Review' The

Victorian Government is

considering giving extra

compensation to high-polluting

power stations 'The Age'

says. Wayne Carey is pictured

with his daughter on the front

page of the 'Herald Sun' as his

new biography is set to be

released Lots more publicity

for him. In the 'Advertiser',

that's also reporting that the

AFL star often contemplated suicide. The 'Sydney Morning Herald' reports asylum seekers

aboard the 'Oceanic Viking'

will be at sea for other three

days after confusion about

where to house them. The New

South Wales Liberal Party has

tried to recruit retired league

star Hazem El Masri says the

'Daily Telegraph'. Less than

one in five of the Federal

Government's promised new

computers for schools has been

delivered, Rhetts 'The

Courier-Mail' The 'Mercury'

says a new planning report

recommends scrapping the $300

million plan to develop the

Ralphs Bay canal. Finally, the 'Northern Territory News'

reports a nearly 5m croc has

been caught in a trap in Berry Springs. Let's take a look at

the top stories on ABC 'News

Breakfast' now. A group of 78

asylum seekers rescued by an

Australian Customs ship has

been diverted to a detention centre near Singapore. The

Government's handling of the

issue has provoked a fierce

political debate. The

Australian Government says its

policy is humane and in line

with international

guidelines. Ethiopia has

appealed for aid to feed more

than 6 million people facing

starvation. They say $290

million is needed for the next

6 months alone. Protesters have

stormed the BBC's television

centre in London. Crowds

gathered outside the BBC to

voice opposition to a far-right leader's appearance on a current affairs program. Three

people have been arrested and

one police officer has been

injured. To finance nows now

and the outgoing chairman of

BHP Billiton has predicted

Australia is on the cusp of

another resources boom. At a

speech in Melbourne, Don Argus

said China and India would

drive unprecedented growth for

commodities But he warned it

would happen only if Australian

law-makers play their cards

right. Neal Woolrich has this

report. Don Argus has just a

few months to go before his

time as chairman of the world's

biggest miner comes to an end.

During his tenure, BHP's

profits have risen 15-fold and

Australia has been the

recipient of an unprecedented

iron ore boom. In a rare speech

to the mining faithful in

Melbourne, the 71-year-old

predicted the good times will

roll on well after he is

gone. If Australia can hold our

current share of Chinese and

Indian mineral demand constant,

then up to 2015, we will

benefit from an additional $18

billion in annual export

revenues. The China growth

story was propped up by fresh

economic data. Official figures

show China's GDP grew by 8.9%

in the year to September, with

strong growth in fixed asset investment, industrial

production and retail sales.

Analysts say it is an

impressive result, considering

the world has been in the grips

of a financial crisis. Everything that has

been forecast over the last 5

to 6 years is really starting

to play out in terms of their

demand for the base metals and

iron ore and coal as well.

We've seen that yesterday with

BHP's quarterly result as well.

The numbers have rebounded

quite incredibly to what people

would have been anticipated 6

to 9 months ago, even 12 months

ago. But the BHP chairman warns

the China bounty could be at

risk if the Australian

Government doesn't get key

policy settings right. He takes

issue with the proposed

emissions trading scheme,

arguing Australia must properly

compensate trade-exposed

industries and ensure there is

a global system in place before

committing to an ETS, otherwise

the Australian scheme may

suffer too much carbon price

volatility. If you can't

predict what the price of

carbon will be with confidence,

it becomes much harder to

determine where the large investments make economic

sense. Different treatment only

penalises our competitive

position and does not

necessarily result in reduced

CO2 emissions globally.

Traders give them the ability

to trade, so sceptics would say

that this whole carbon trading

scheme would be very good for

the agents dealing in these

products. In a wide-ranging

speech, Don Argus argued the

need to tap superannuation

savings and foreign and bond

sources. He says the Henry Tax

Review will be crucial in

shaping Australia's comp pet

tiff. On the industrial

relations front, Don Argus

fired a broadside at unions

saying individuals were better

off individual ral sli

negotiates for better wage and

conditions The fair work aktd -

it's impackeded by the

requirement that we nuft

negotiate collectively with bargaining representatives from

the unions on a wide range of

issues. Mr Argus will step down

from the chair of BHP Billiton

next year. He will be replaced

by the former CEO of Ford, Jac

Nasser. To a look at the

markets now and Thursday's

trading has seen stocking

rallied.

In a few minutes, Vanessa

O'Hanlon will be with us to

take a look at the national

weather And then a review of

the newspapers and this morning

our rue viewer is 'Crikey'

editor Jonathan Green. Paul,

rugby's night of nights last

night. Yes, Matt Giteau has

won the Australian rugby's

highest individual honour and

he is only the second back to

win it in its 8-year history.

Timely win ahead of the

Wallabies European tour. No

surprise for rookie of the

year, it was James O'Connor,

the fullback and he will be a

worthy recipient of that award.

A Duane bravo cyclone hit the

Champions Trophy. Let's take a

look at some highlights. COMMENTATOR: Dwayne Bravo

would have been very, very depressed at the half-way mark

of this game, but he has fired

on all cylinders now. What a

terrific victory. They will go

through now to play New South

Wales in the finals. We will

talk more in just a few moments

about the significance of that

Trinh da and Tobago team. To

racing news and trainer Mark

Kavanagh is hoping to make it

two in a row in come's Cox

Plate. He trains the

short-priced favourite Whobegotyou. Mark Kavanagh

trained for 20 years before he

had a horse good enough to even

compete in a Cox Plate. He won

last year's race with Maldivian

and now has the $2.70 favourite

Whobegotyou, but the trainer disputes he has got the race in

the bag and says those knocking

the class of the field are just

gel lows Everybody says, "Oh,

gee, it's a weak Cox Plate." I

bet they would like to own one

and train a horse that was

actually in it. There are no

weak Cox Plates. Jockey Damien

Oliver was on hand to personally oversea

Whobegotyou's final piece of

work before the big race If

you've got top riders riding

your horses, you don't need to

tie them down with

instructions. Bad jockeys can't

handle instructions and good

jockeys don't need them. No

instructions for Bart Cummings

either who turns 82 next month

and is in career-best form Age

has nothing to do with it. The horses don't know how old I

am. The veteran trainer is

taking the recent run of wins

in his pride. David Hayes might

be without a runner in the

Melbourne Cup after his expensive import, Changing of the Guard developed a hoof

abscess If it bursts in the

next few days t won't hold him

up much at all, he is a very

fit horse, but if it lingers on

for another three or four days,

it will probably be 2010 here

we come. Hayes will make a

decision by Monday. A hoof

abscess - that sounds

painful Not good at all. Look,

you often hear these lines from

the trainers when unexpected

injuries like this come oup,

"owe, look, just a couple of

days and she will alright ,"

the problem is the injury

itself might be absolutely

fine, but during the days

they've been fell fall lowed,

all their opponents have been

training and you would be a mug

to put money on them. In the

run up to the Yes, it's true.

If you miss a little bit of preparation because preparation

is everything That's right, and

all those other horses are

getting the preparation, so

this horse may not be getting

worse, but it's not improving

and the other horses are. Can

we talk about cricket for a

moment and that Twenty20

semifinal last night - it has

to be said the Cobras batted

really well and made 170-odd,

but the Trinidad team has just

been unstoppable in this

tournament so far and they're

playing with great team spirit. Dwayne Bravo hation

got to be a stage name. He is a

great player Dwayne Bravo and

turns it on I think he appears

in the. Chippendales. Another

player in dominant form is dumb

dumb dumb who has just made.

Dumbny. This team fr.

We know that the national

team hasn't been able to put

its best players in that team

because of an industrial

dispute and everyone is hoping

that that fixes itself soon,

and Darren Gang, the captain of

Trinidad and Tobago has said

recently if the problems aren't

fixed, then Trinidad and Tobago

will go ahead and play as a nation. With the performances

like that, you would have to

say that the authorities would

take it very seriously and

start to fix these problems

that West Indies cricket is

having, iron ore wise there

won't be a West Indies to move

forward. I think they will fix

it and Twenty20 is to the

invigorate the interests of the

crowd. They had a really poor

World Cup where the ticket

prices were too expensive and

that really dragged cricket

down in that country, in those

countries, but I think this

Twenty20 tournament has done a

lot for West indiscricket and

it's good for Australian

cricket, too, because the West

Indies are coming. New South

Wales will beat them in the

finals. Well, I wouldn't be so

sure about that Oh, something

so parochial. ABC 'News

Breakfast' can be watched from

anywhere. With the weather,

here is Vanessa O'Hanlon. It

has been a very dry week over

the coup tri-, but that's about to change for New South Wales

tomorrow. Good falls are

expected on Sunday, mainly over

the coast and into next week

for the whole State and that

also includes southern

Queensland and eastern

Victoria. Cloud right across

the south is drawing tropical

moisture ahead of a trough, but

not much rain in it. For the

east, patchy cloud in a trough

that is causing the odd shower

that will clear around New

South Wales. For today, a dry

day for most of the interior.

Easterly winds and the odd

shower for the Queensland

tropics. There are two troughs,

one over New South Wales and

the other over WA. That will

extend into the Bight before it moves into the south-east over

the weekend, bringing a cooler,

southerly flow. Frr Queensland

today - high cloud over the

interior. Isolated showers over

the far south-eastern parts.

High fire danger for most

districts. For New South Wales:

In Victoria, some early fog

near the ranges. That will

clear to a partly cloudy day. clear to a partly cloudy day.

For Tasmania - isolated

showers for the south-west.

They should clear from the far

south this morning. For South

Australia, you've got a mostly

fine day, 27 degrees in

Adelaide, a top of 22 expected

in Port Lincoln. They hot

around upper Coober Peedy. Western Australia - there is

the chance of showers and

storms over most of the south.

Drizzle this morning over the

south-west and again this

evening and up in the north,

afternoon storms for the

Kimberley and Top End. Thundery

showers about the Alice Springs

district and high fire danger

for the Northern Territory.

Looking ahead to the weekend.

More weather in half an hour.

The top story on ABC 'News

Breakfast' - 78 asylum seekers

rescued by an Australian

Customs ship are being diverted

to a detention centre near

Singapore now. It's reported

that Indonesian authorities

changed the boat's destination

to prevent the case

overshadowing the swearing-in

of the Indonesian

Cabinet Meanwhile, Australian

authorities have intercepted

another bood load of asylum

seekers to Christmas Island.

Elizabeth Byrne reports. There

is no doubt the flow of asylum

seekers to Australia is the

hottest of political

issues. That this House

censures the Prime Minister for

softening Australia's border

protection policies. And it is

a debate which raises some old

familiar themes. If you wanted

to get into Australia and you

have bad intentions, what do

you do? You insert yourself

into a crowd of 100, for which

there is great sympathy for the

other 99. I think these are

deep ly divisive, disgusting

remarks and they do not belong

in any mainstream Australian

political party. But the asylum

seeker issue isn't going away,

with debate ranging over plans

for an agreement with Indonesia

to detain those headed to

Australia, with questions about what it will cost and how payment will be

determined. There is no price

per head. We haven't actually

sat down with the Indonesians

yet to negotiate what this

framework will look like. As

foirs from both countries

thrash out the details, there

are questions about how Australia's internal debate

will be perceived. The

consultant employed to advise the Government on brand

Australia says an issue like

this can have an adverse

effect. If things go wrong, you may suffer some temporary

unpopularity, but it doesn't

affect the overall limit of the

country, unless the behaviour

is repeated over many, many

years and then it's very, very

hard to undo. As the new

arrivals settle in at Christmas

Island, the 78 Sri Lankan

asylum seekers aboard 'Oceanic

Viking' have been diverted to

Tanjung Pinang off Sumatra

instead of Merak Port in

Java. In other news, Ethiopia

has appealed for aid to help

feed more than 6 million people facing starvation. The question

was made at a meeting of

donors. The UN says more than

$290 million is needed for the

next 6 months alone. Aid

agencies fear a repeat of the

19 84 Ethiopian famine that

claimed 1 million lives. There

have been violent scenes

outside the front of the BBC's

Television Centre in London.

Protesters have voiced their

opposition to a far-right

leader's appearance on a

current affairs program. Three

people have been arrested and

one police officer has been

injured. British National Party

chief Nick Griffin is schedule

to be a panelist on 'Question

Time' later this morning. An

88-year-old alleged war criminal facing possible

extradition to Hungary has

spent his first night in a

Perth jail. Charles Zentai is

accused of murdering a Jewish

teenager in 19 44. He denies

the claims but handed himself

into police yesterday and was

take tone a Perth prison. The

Home Affairs Minister Brendon

O'Connor will decide whether Mr

Zentai will be extradited. Tens

of thousands of police and

soldiers have been deployed to

Thailand in preparation for

this weekend's ASEAN meeting in

Hua Hin. Violent

anti-government protesters

disrupted the event.

Australia's Prime Minister

Kevin Rudd will attend the

meeting on Sunday. And a

private funeral will be held

today for Australian television

pioneer Don Lane. The American

entertainer who starred in 'The

Don Lane Show' died in Sydney

yesterday. He was 75.

Australian TV stars including

Bert Newton and Rove McManus

have paid tribute to Mr Lane,

calling him a great performer The United Nations

drug and crime chief says

Islamic extremists are gaining

ground in central Asian

Republics thanks to money made

from Afghanistan's opium crop.

A new report says it has led to

an industry worth now $70

billion Australian a year. Jeff

Waters reports. It is the cash

crop of choice in much of

Afghanistan. Due to a collapse

of production in South-East

Asia, 92% of the world's opium,

which can be processed to make

heroin, now comes from Afghan

farms. A new report from the

UN's drugs and crime office

says the Taliban makes between

$90 and $160 million US a year

from opium taxes and it warns

that drug-funded Islamic

insurgencies emerging across

central Asia There is a large

number of insurgent groups in

Uzbekistan and generally

speaking and they are

benefitting from the trade. The

report calls the situation a

perfect storm. About a quarter

of the 1,300 tonnes of opium

and heroin coming from Afghanistan makes its way

through central Asia. 40%

travels through Pakistan. The

UN says the trade is

contributing to regional

instability, even in Western

China, so it's called for ramped-up security in

Afghanistan. We believe the greater attention should be

paid to enhancing security,

including police and law

enforcement ability. And a

troop surge is something being

considered by the United States

President. Senator John Kerry,

just back from Kabul, has

advised against making a

decision until Afghan's run-off

election next month. I think

you really want to know that

this has worked and you want to

know what kind of government is

coming out of it, so I think we

- that's again why this is a

very important period of time

and I would absolutely counsel

the President to wait until the

end of the run-off. And Senator

Kerry says Washington shouldn't

make a move without involving

its allies. Gunmen have shot

dead a Pakistani army Brigadier

and his driver in the capital

Islamabad. The shooting

happened as the Pakistani

military continues its

offensive against Taliban targets on the Afghan

border. Meanwhile, thousands of

civilians are continuing to

flee the area. Anna Walker

reports. Militants have struck

again in Pakistan, adding to

the 185 people who have already

been killed this month alone.

Security has been tightened

across the country amid fears

of retaliatory strikes by mill

assistants as the army attacks

their stronghold in South

Waziristan on the Afghan

border. Police say gunmen on a

motorcycle killed the Brigadier

and his driver. He is the

second senior officer to be

killed in less than two weeks

following a commando-style raid

on army headquarters in

Rawalpindi. And as the

offensive continues, the

Pakistani government is

struggling to control the

number of people who have been

forced to flee the area. At one

food distribution centre in

this town, police used sticks

to beat and disperse displaced

people who had arrived to

collect their food rations.

TRANSLATION: We were in the

queue here and suddenly the

police started beating us with

sticks. They were saying we

hadn't waited for our turn and

to come back one by one. TRANSLATION: The committee

people were just giving these

rations to the their friends

and relatives and not to the

affected people. As much of as

15 is,000 residents have left

Waziristan because of the offensive. Authorities say

hundreds more are likely to

join that list in the coming

weeks. When needle exchange

programs were first introduced

into Australia more than 20

years ago at the height of the

AIDS epidemic, the measure attracted considerable

controversy. Now more than 30

million clean syringeses are

handed out free across the

country each year. A major

study into the scheme has

concluded that for every dollar

spent, more than $4 has been

saved by preventing the spread

of diseases such as HIV and

hepatitis C. But anti-drug

campaigners remained

unconvinced. Matt Peacock

rorts. We were kids. We were

teenagers and they were

wonderful times. When I started

injecting drugs, needles were

extremely hard to come by, and

so if you were lucky enough to

get a clean needle, you shared

it with all of your friends. We

didn't know what the

consequences were, and we were

young and innocent. Decades

later, a clean Mason McDonald

found out the consequences of

his experiment with heroin. I

ended up at what they call

end-stage liver disease, which,

as I said to my doctor, "What

does that mean?" He said, "It

means you are going to die." I

think I was about 6 months or

so away from dying. A needle

shared by the young Mason

McDonald had infected him with

hepatitis CT would take a liver

transplant to save his life.

But dirty needles also spread

the AIDS virus. By the 19 80s

at Sydney's krintion Kings

Cross, doctor and alcohol

expert, found himself at the

centre of an exploding drugs

crisis I couldn't pretend this

wouldn't happen. It was

happening on my watch and

happening right now. Once hi.

IV got into the general

population, putting the genie

back into the bottle would be terrible. Australia these days

is a vastly different place.

Drug users across the country

are daily given fresh needles

by government-funded

programs. We have almost 1,000

site as cross Australia that

hand out needles and

syringeses. These range from

primary outlets and pharmacies,

vending machines and also

mobile clinics. They distribute

approximately 30 million

needles and syringeses every

single year. The catalyst came

in 19 86 when Dr Alex Wodak

took matters into his own

hands, breaking the law and

providing drug users with free,

fresh needles, an action that

galvanised anti-drug

campaigners. Once the movement

for safe use of drugs, which

needle exchange is part of,

started back in 19 92, we saw

massive increase s in drug use

in Australia. But according to

a long-term study released

today by the University of New

South Wales, there have been

huge benefits from needle and

syringe programs. Thanks very

much. Over the last 10 years,

we have saved over 3 2,000 HIV

infections in Australia and

we've saved almost 100,000

hepatitis C infections. What

does that mean in dollars and

cents terms? We've gained

back about $1.2 billion. We've

had incredible health care

savings. It is a huge difference, there is no other

way of looking at it. Huge

saving in lives, huge number of

HIC and hepatitis C infections

preventnd and of course a huge

savings . There is no science

that they are actually

depleting the HIV transmission

in Australia. Garry Christian

remain unconvinced that free

needles help. Is it condoning

drug use? Is it increasing drug use at the same time as

alleviating it? When it comes

to this report and trying to

cost all that have, where they haven't looked at the other

side, I think we would need to

say that the dollar figures

would be quite dune youse. ADVERTISEMENT: They

could have slept with someone

who had been doing drugs and

shared a needle with someone

who shared a needle with

someone who had the AIDS

virus. Anti-drug campaigners

claim that education about

sexually transmitted AIDS has

prevented its spread more than

clean needles which might, Sim

plu through their availability

would encourage drug users. But

the recent heroin user Elliott

marshal says a dirty needle

won't deter an addict in search

of a fix. Just saying no

doesn't work and we know it

doesn't work because there are

too many more factors involved

with it, there are too many

things that need to be dealt

with. They need to be dealt

with the underlying issue of

why somebody uses drugs in the

first place. I wish clean

needles existed when I was

using back in the '70s, because

the chances are I would never

have contracted hepatitis C in

the first place and wouldn't

have needed a liver transplant.

If needles were available by

the government, the Government

wouldn't have spent $400,000 on

my operation and thousands and

thousands of dollars each year

on my medication. When I

consider all of the programs

I've evaluated in the past,

this is by far the most

effective in terms of health

care outcomes and also in terms

of saving money. And with

hepatitis C infections on the

rise, especially in Australian

jails, even drug-free Australia

concedes that needle exchange

programs do make sense With

help C, the evidence is

there With HepC, the evidence

is there that needle exchanges

do lessen the incident and

prevalence as a result. The

Australian example, according

to Dr Wodak, is one that other countries should now

follow. It's time that the

politicians around the world in

other countries started getting

real, like the Australian

politicians did all those years

ago. Matt Peacock with that

report. You are watching ABC

'News Breakfast' and these are

our top stories today. A group

of 78 asylum seekers rescued by

an Australian custom ship has

now been diverted to a

detention centre near

Singapore. The Government's

handling of the issue has provoked a fierce debate but the Australian Government says

its policy is humane and in line with international

guidelines Ethiopia has

appealed for aid to feed more

than 6 million people facing

starvation. The UN says more

than $290 million is needed for

the next six months alone. Aid

agencies fear a repeat of the

19 84 Ethiopian famine that

claimed a million

lives. Protesters have stormed

the BBC's Television Centre in

London. Crowds gathered outside

to voice opposition to a

far-right leader's appearance

on a current affairs program.

Three people have been arrested

and one police officer has been

injured.

Let's take a look at the

Friday papers and we're joined

by 'Crikey' editor Jonathan Green. What a splendid

day. Yes, it is indeed. Not

even the death of Don Lane

could dissuade the tabloids

today from their plan. Well it

is an interesting plan that the

'Herald Sun' had Not just the

'Herald Sun'. All the tabloids

have clearly paid a fair bit of

money from Wayne Carey's

extract. And it is apparently a

tale about drugs and

infidelity. A good photographic

set-up to soften the blow, ease

the persona and every tabloid

paper in the country has a

picture of Wayne with his

daughter, Ella. Let's have a

look at one of them This is

perhaps one of the more rudimentary portraits of Wayne

and Ella. By the time they get

to the 'Advertiser', he is

looking more upbeat. Just

give us an idea of the extent

of coverage in the 'Herald

Sun'? Pages and pages and

pages. We haven't seen the

likes of - who was it - oh,

Wayne Carey had an affair with

his team-mate's wife. But it's

in the 'Advertiser', the 'Herald Sun' and 'Daily Telegraph' and Hobart 'Mercury'. From what you've

read of the stories, is there

much fresh in what we've seen

or have we heard it all

before? I think we are getting

it in considerable more detail

than we might have guessed was

possible, so every little

flexion. And this the day

after Don Lane died It is a

scandal and poor Don is

struggling to make an

impression this morning. He is

on page 3, I think, of the

'Herald Sun'. He cracks it for

the odd photo And makes page 1

of 'The Australian'. You're of

the same era as me, I think I

have to confess, Jonathan. We

remember Don lairn I recall

Don, fondly, I think. He was a

funny guy. He was a funny guy

and it was an interesting time

in television when appointment

television did exist, where

families would gather around

the television for a moment of

entertainment This is the guy

who made Bert Newton look like

a large round person. Because

he was so tall and lanky. I

wonder, if you could slip into

the mind of Don Lane at the

moment I'm there. Would Don and

Bert have had a problem with

the Black Face moment on 'Hey

Hey' I think they would have

gone with that. Don Lane

originally as an American,

would he have got that, do you

think? He probably would have

tweaked but I think he would

have had that sort of

vaudevillean streak that he

would have played it for the

laugh. I don't think they would have gone into saffron

territory. And it's got to be

said that there hasn't been

much of a backlash to the

Saffron program the other

night However, there was a

little editorial having a bit

of a poke at John and this is

part of the campaign against

the ABC, I think, and saying to

ABC boss Mark Scott, "Isn't

there something better for you

to do with our money than fund

this oik." #12k3w4r who should

pay for it and who gets paid

and if you receive public

funds, what you can re-coup

from it, so I wonder if that

feeds into it. Moving onto

the front page of 'The

Age' Extra story about how the

brumby Government and some of

its ministers have been more

active than the coal industry,

according to Canberra sources,

in lobbying Penny Wong and the

Rudd Government for extra

compensation for Victoria's

extraordinarily polluting

coal-power operations. Should

an emissions trading scheme put

in place? Indeed, and this

feeds into increasingly the

governments is seeing the emissions trading scheme as

sort of a way of compensating

polluters, rather than a way of

diminishing Australia's carbon

emissions and Victoria has a

particular problem in that

regard, so people could be

forgiven for perhaps doughing

the brumby's Government's green

credentials if it had them. If

this is its take on CPRS, to

get as much money as it likes

for the likes of the coal

plant. And the two major

parties meeting at the moment

and it seems they will be

looking for some common ground,

perhaps there will be It's

payday! Compensation is pretty

much at greed. Everybody will

get rich, especially those who

pollute. Don't you see that

also as a very interesting

contrast say with stories of

how the New South Wales

Government gets business done.

It's behind the scenes,

extraordinarily well organised,

all about protecting your own,

defeding your own economy and the brumby

# Bracks Government has been

exceptionally good at doing

that. You have to wonder with

all these entrenched states

whether the big issues like

climate, like water can really

be tackled in a coherent way with everybody fighting in

their corner. Perhaps not. On

the front page of 'The

Australian', Ken Henry has been

out and about in the last 24

hours. He is enjoying

himself He is having his time.

A var ritable Don Lane moment.

Population figures of Sydney to

grow to about 10 million,

Melbourne to grow to 7 million.

Don Argus talking about how we

will keep digging stuff up,

China is growing and Ken Henry

thinks all this adds up to a

golden age which will stretch

well into the century. I

don't know if you saw Kevin

Rudd on the 7:30 Report last

night, he was saying, "I

welcome this growth and I make

no apologies for that." He

loves that line. U- asylum

seekers finally seem to be

getting his message in order on

that issue, despite the fact

that the thing is rag and

falling apart and pretty

intractable as an issue, he is

getting his pitch right which

is we are compassionate but

hard. We at least have the

language in good frame. Hard

head, soft heart. I wonder if

comments like that from Ken

Henry, leaving aside the lovely future economic boom if that's

to be believed, I don't know if

it needs conversation about

exploding population right at

this time Well, exploding

population in this context is

seen as a huge economic plus

and that we've never imported

more people and we're doing

very well because testify. And

we have skilled labour shortages and apparently still

do The necessity continues for

us to import labour and not

necessarily by boat, but...

And Nicole Kidman has taken to

the political stage I love it

when a celebrity gets serious.

Nobody does serious like our

Nicole. What a picture. Take

this woman seriously and this

is appearing before a committee

of the US Congress. Clearly you

don't take it seriously No, I

do! Go on I've stood next to

Nicole Kidman at something and

she has skin. She has glorious

skin But she was here arguing

against the evil of domestic

violence, not that she has any

experience of it herself

despite - not despite

anything. That's right. But

nonetheless, she feels equipped

to stand before the US Congress

and make the case. I'm not sure

what else she has to offer

apart from that. The Yanks

love the star power. Goodwill

ambassador You need to bring in

someone with celeb. That works

in the United States. Shane

Warne? Yes, picture ed in the

back of the 'Herald Sun'. Get

what Shane carries with him? A

packet of fags and two mobile

phones, one for the missus, not

so much. Stop it - the mobile

phone. Don't you wish you would

put it away. Jonathan Green,

thank you. You can watch 'News

Breakfast' live every

morning. Here with sport,

here is Paul Kennedy. The John

Eels medal last night and Matt

Giteau won the 8th John Eales

medal. Chris Latham won it in

2006 and Giteau is Australia's

most important play-maker, so a

real boost for him ahead of the

trip overseas. Playing in Asia

and onto the European tour.

James O'Connor, the young star

won Rookie of the Year. To

cricket and the other semifinal in the Champions League was

played just a few hours ago and

the Cape Cobras made a very

good 170-odd with JPDuminy

making 40 of those. But

Trinidad and Tobago will not be

kept down. Dwayne Bravo made a

herioic half-century in little

time. In basketball, the New

Zealand Breakers won a game

last night against the

Townsville Crocs and it was

their import RV Story all the

way from Chicago, former

Milwaukee Bucks, he shot five

3-pointers. Now here is Vanessa

with the weather. Much rain

about today? No, Joe, there is

not, but we do have some on Sunday for New South Wales. If

we take a look at today's

satellite image, the cloud

right across the south is

drawing tropical moisture ahead

of a trough. Not much in it.

For the east, patchy cloud in

the trough is Australiaing odd

shorm for New South Wales. The

high will continue to create a

ridge over the east so it will

be a dry day for most of the

interior. Two troughs - one

over New South Wales and the

other over WA, that is

extending into the Bight before it move noose the south-east

over the weekend, bringing a

cooler, southerly flow. Around

the states for today and Queensland - high cloud over

the southern interior, isolated

afternoon and evening showers

over the far south-eastern

parts and a high fire danger

for most for most districts.

In New South Wales, isolated

showers and storms for the

central and northern ranges. In

Victoria - early fog near the

ranges, clearing to a partly

cloudy day with light to

moderate winds. Tasmania -

isolated showers for the

south-west. They should clear

this morning. For South

Australia - thundery showers

for the far west. Hot day for

the north. For the south,

between the high 20s and low

30s. Western Australia - you

have the chance of showers and

storms over most of the south.

Drizzle this morning over the south-west and again this

evening. Thundery showers about

the Alice Springs district and

a high fire danger for most of

the Northern Territory. Looking

ahead:

Vanessa, thanks so much. Much

more ahead on ABC 'News

Breakfast'. Former ambassador

and author Tony Ken man will

join us on the program. That's

coming up after this short

break on ABC 'News Breakfast'.

Stay with us.

This Program is

Captioned Live. A change of

plans - asylum seekers on an

Australian Customs ship now

diverted to a detention centre

near Singapore. Ethiopia

appeals for emergency food aid

to feed more than 6 million people. Violent protests

outside the BBC over the

appearance of a right-wing

politician. And Wallabies star

Matt Giteau wins Australian

rugby's highest individual

award. Good morning. It's

Friday, 23 October, I'm Joe O'Brien And I'm Virginia

Trioli. The top story on 'ABC

News Breakfast' - a group of 78

asylum seekers diverted by an

Australian Navy ship has been

diverted to a detention centre

near Singapore. Indonesia had

agreed to take the asylum

seekers after a deal was struck between Jakarta and the Federal

Government. Back home, the row

has ignited a fierce political debate, but Kevin Rudd

maintains the policy is humane

and in line with international

humanitarian guidelines. All

of our processes in Australia,

on Christmas Island and in the

Indonesian archipelago and

Malaysia and elsewhere are

consistent with UNHCR

processes. That's why we have

our approach. The previous

government chose to flout that

and brought in, instead, the

Pacific Solution. They had kids

behind razor wire. They had a

range of different

interventions which is designed

for a different political

audience, not to get the

balance right between tough and

hard line on people smugglers

on the one hand and being

balanced and humane in dealing

with asylum seekers on the

other. For more, Hayden Cooper

joins us now from Canberra.

Hayden, good morning. So the

mantra from the Prime Minister

is hard head and soft heart,

but the Opposition is throwing

very different lines at him.

Yes, they are. It took us all

the way back to 2001 yesterday

when we had a couple of

different statements from

Opposition members. The first

from David Johnston was to

suggest that disease could be entering Australia through asylum seeker boats, and the

second from Wilson Tuckey was

to suggest that terrorists

could be coming as well, and I

think Malcolm Turnbull would be

seething at Wilson Tuckey for

making that comment because it

succeeded in giving Kevin Rudd

the opportunity not only to

take the high moral ground,

which he did, but also the