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Live.

The Indonesian earthquake

operation shifts from res clue

to recovery. A Liberal frontbencher blames party

disunity for a slump in support

for the Coalition. The Reserve

Bank considers raising interest

rates for the first time in 18

months. And Australia making

hard work of a small tun chase

in the final of the Champions Trophy. Good morning, it's

Trophy. Good morning, it's

Tuesday 6 October. I'm Mary

Gearin. And I'm Joe O'Brien.

The top story on News Breakfast

- in Indonesian, officials in

in earthquake hit city of

Padang have called off the search for survivors. No-one

has been found alive in the

rubble since Friday. At least

1,000 people are still missing. Aid agencies say

they're dons traiting their

efforts on getting supplies to remote inland areas which have been hard to reach because

been hard to reach because of

landslides and digital to Roos. Dr Dave Jenkins, the CEO of

Surfaid International, said

local authorities were quick to

respond to the crisis. I think

most of us very were impressed

with the local people and their

- in the first hours and first

days, how they hoped with the

situation when they had

hospitals down, comms down, really challenging to

really challenging to be able

to respond that they did a

rarngable job. From those of us

who know the area and looking

in from the outside. There are

weaknesses that have been

exposed, the need for

keerndation, the need for a

chain of command and very good

communication in reserve,

there's still a lot we need to

coso prepare for the next one. Dr Dave Jenkins, the CEO of Surfaid International,. In

noer news this morning, support for the Federal Government

for the Federal Government has

surged according to the latest

Newspoll. It has Labor ahead

58% to 4 #% on a two-party

preferred basis. A fortnight

ago Labor had just a 10 point lead. Opposition frontbench

ever Steve Fitzsimmons says the

poll result is a reflection of

Coalition disunity. The Reserve

Bank of Australia could become

the first major economy in the

world to raise interest rates after the global financial

crisis. The board of the

crisis. The board of the RBA

will make the decision at its

monthly meeting today, the

increase would be the first in

18 months. The cash rate is at

what's been described as the

emergency level of 3% N Samoa

talks are under way about the

possibility of kuming the body

of an Australian woman who died

in the tutu. 30-year-old Anita

Nuualiitia was buried in a mass grave. Federal Government

spicials say they've been grave. Federal Government

talking with her family about

returning her body to Australia

to be buried. About 250 people

are dead after torrential rains

and flooding in southern India.

Almost 2.5 million people have

been left homeless after five

days after hef yy rain. Food

supplies are being dropped to

hundreds of thousands of people

stranded by the floods.

Officials have put the cost of

the recovery at billions of dollars. A suicide bomb

dollars. A suicide bomb ever

has killed five people at the

dwriens food agenciessy offices

in Pakistan. Police, speed

cameras and breathalysers are

investigating how the bomber

was able to here the high

security area and deadinate 8kg

of emplosives. Known has

claimed responsibility for the

attack. The UN

Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon

described the attack as a

Australian woman heinous crime. And an

Australian woman has with won a

share of this year's nobally

breeze for medz sin. - Nobel

prize for medicine. The Nobel

institute says the scientist's

work added a new dimension to

understanding the cell and its

connection with cancer and the

ageing process. As Indonesian

authorities struggle to deal

authorities struggle to deal

with the Padang earthquake many

survivors of last month's

disaster in Java still waiting

for help. The 7.3 magnitude

quake scroied more than 60,000

homes and killed 7 p people but

Government aid has been slow to

arrive. It's hot, dry and

dusty. But this tent city in a

place thousands west Java field is the only

place thousands of survivors of

last month's quake have call

home. Indonesia said it didn't

need international assistance

to rebuild after the disaster.

But five weeb on, the

Government is still assessing

the damage and rebuilding

hasn't started.

TRANSLATION: It's uncomfortable

and dirty. During the day it's

hot and at night we're

hot and at night we're cold.

There's water at the front of

the camp, but we have no

electricity. There's still no

plans to relocate the people

here to more permanent housing

but they can't stay here for

much longer. Once the wet

season rains start the threat

of disease means they'll have

to leave.

TRANSLATION: We want to help

the best we can so we can immediately leave these tents

as soon as possible, before the

as soon as possible, before the

rainy season comes. Because

when the rain comes many

problems will arise like

diseases. Across Westa Java

homes and piles of rubble mark

out the places that couldn't

withstand the earthquake. Tens

of thousand of homes and about

# 400 schools were damaged.

This man's home collapsed with

him and his pregnant wife

inside. The Indonesian him and his pregnant wife

Government is promised $140

million to rebuild this area

but he can't wait for the

official reconstruction to start.

TRANSLATION: I'm really hoping

for the Government to help with

the rebuilding because it's so

scary to mang that we'll have

to keep living in tents while

they're taking their time The

Government has promised to finish reconstruction by

February. But that seems even

more unlikely now that the

focus is on Padang. Returning

now to our story on the latest

Newspoll, support for the

Opposition Leader has slumped

as Malcolm Turnbull tries to

unite the party over the Emissions Trading Scheme. For

more Kirrin McKechnie joins us now from Canberra. What have those results actually shown,

can you guide us through the details? Well, it's an extraordinary result and what's

really interesting is the two

party preferred vote. It hasn't

budged for months. Yet today

what we're seeing is Labor

soaring ahead from 55% to 58

and the Coalition down from 45

to 42%. Now, these are really

dangerous levels for the

Opposition and would put it out

of the game if an election were

to be held this week but there is some good news for Malcolm

Turnbull. He's gone up in the

preferred PM stakes from 17 to

18% but Kevin Rudd's gone up

too. He's gone from 65 to 67%.

So it's not good news at all

for Malcolm Turnbull and

finally I think the Coalition

are starting to concede that

disunity within the party is

causing some trouble. Let's

have a listen to Opposition frontbencher Steve Fitzsimmons

on Lateline last night. We've

been scraby. The general public

is making the message heard

loud and clear. We need to of

course make sure that we are

articulating a clear coherent,

inciteful policy framework and

approach. We need to ensure

that we do that but at the same

time we don't quell internal

discuss, there's a lot of

strength that comes from having

an internal opinion. Some frank

admissions there and Malcolm

Turnbull is also going to get

some not any relief this weekend, apparently the West Australian Liberal Party in its

party conference is going to

also ramp up the issue on ETS? That's right. Malcolm

Turnbull has been facing

rebellion from within his

party. Now he's getting it from

the States as well. We've seen

the trouble that's been brewing

in Queensland over the debacle

to do with Peter Dutton's preselection. Now, Western

Australia is fighting back too

and planning revote this

and planning revote this

weekend. It's not good for

Malcolm Turnbull. Interestingly

too, you may remember last week

that he hit out at what he

called anonymous smart ars

within the party briefing the

immediatant about their

concerns . Finally another

Liberal Party member has come

out with his concerns out into

the open, much fifield

the open, much fifield has

raised concerns about Malcolm

Turnbull owes plans to negotiate with the Government

been Copenhagen an an ETS. This

is really significant because

of course you can dismiss the

likes of Wilson Tuckey, he's

known as a troublemaker, but

when someone like Mitch Fifield

starts raising concerns you do

know that Malcolm Turnbull has

got some trouble. That is from

within by also talking of

Wilson Tuckey apparently the

Government is believing that

there's now a push on to delay

the vote which of course would deny the Government any

possibility for a double

dissolution? Dwrae. Penny Wong

the Climate Change Minister is

fed one all of this toing and

froing from within the

Opposition ranks. She's

demanding Malcolm Turnbull get

his house in order and like you say,

say, she's concerned that the

Liberals are going to use next

month's - when the ETS is put

before the Senate, they're

going to use that debate to really string out debate so

there won't be a vote. Wilson

Tuckey is unrepentant about.

That he says an issue as big as

this needs lengthy debate but

he says that the Government

should not use no vote as

opposed to a no vote to try and

pull the double discollusion

trigger. H essays if they do

that they'll be seen as mean

and tricky from the Australian

public. There'll be a fair bit

to talk about at the shadow

Cabinet meeting tomorrow. Sit possible that Malcolm Turnbull

is able to get his troops into

line? Last week when he issued his ultimatum

his ultimatum to backbenchers,

the back me or sack me

ultimatum, he said that he was

confident that the Opposition

frontbench, shadow Cabinet, was

on board with his plans to

negotiate on the ETS, but as I

said, with Mitch Fifield

raising concerns you've got to

ask how sure he is that he has

got complete shadow Cabinet

support for his

support for his plans. Kirrin

McKechnie thank you. They're

crucial pieces of evidence but

Victoria's top bushfire firefighters can't find them.

The royal commission into the Black Saturday bushfires has

heard that maps showing which

towns might be hit may have

been destroyed or inproperly

removed. One map used by fire

chiefs to chart the course of

fires has turned up but the map

used which the State's fire

chief is still missing. The

maps were used by CFA chief

Russell Rees and his deputy. To

show where the fires were

burning and crucially for the commission where they may have

been headed. One man that has

missing since the fires has now

turned up, discovered in a

locked cupboard. It shows some

of the places it would be hit

hardest. Key townships

identified there are

Whittlesea, Hirstbridge and

Kinglake. The township on the

right hand frank in Is

Marysville. Was that an

anticipation of where the fire

had the potential to burn? At

that time I hospital put my

mind to any serious prediction

of where the fire would

of where the fire would go.

Certainly Marysville is within

the scich but I'd like to

stress that it was a very quick

notation at the time On the

day, some independent fire

experts correctly tipped where

where the fires would go but

with the fire chief's main map still missing the commission

has few records of of who knew

what and when. Counsel

assisting the commission raised

an unpleasent explanation about

what might have happened to the

missing map inside the intergrated emergency

keerndation St or IACC? That

the document was for some

reason, unknown, destroyed or

thoun away within the

IACC? It's a possibility of

that. Or taken out of the IACC

in some way other than in

accordance with these processes

we've been talking

about? Possibly. But at this

stage we don't know? Jo no we

don't The fire chief's maps

were annotated as the disaster

unfolded. The map still missing

could show where it was

expected the fires would reach.

The commission it seems would

like to compare the missing map

with the fire warning publicly

given to the community. There

should be a culture in the

organisation and I would

imagine there is, that a

document of that kind must be

not destroyed. Because it's

part of the official record of

the organisation. The map that

has been found shows the fire

firefighting hierarchy were preoccupied with an earlier fire closer to Melbourne even

as the fires threatened

Marysville. Fire chiefs say

they had few details of the

threat. That represents my

uncertainty about how far the

fire had spread. I didn't have

a great deal of information in

relation to the fire at the

time. Certainly well aware of

it and aware of its potential

but not a lot of specific

detail about how far it had

progressed at that stage. The

Victorian Government admitted a

national mobile phone alert

system will not be ready for

this summer and no new fire ref

yoomgs will be built for this

fire season. Now to the front

pages of the major newspapers

around the country. Federal

officials may send home Sri

Lankan asylum seekers detained

on Christmas Island following

concerns they might be Tamil tiger fighters says the

'Australian'. In the 'Financial

Review', a Perth based Internet

provider faces court over

claims from Hollywood movie

studios that that they

encouraged copyright abuse.

Senior counsel for

Senior counsel for the

Bushfires Royal Commission has

said the Victorian Government

is lagging as it prepares for

the coming bushfire season

reporting the 'Age'. The

'Herald Sun' reports that

police have arrested a crazed

fan who broke into the home of

Collingwood footballer Alan

Didak yesterday. Today's

Reserve Bank meeting and the

prospect of an interest rate

rise is on the front page of

the 'Sydney Morning Herald'. Taxpayers are funding

a secret international

advertising campaign to

discourage illegal immigration

to Australia reports the 'Daily

Telegraph'. Port Moresby will

get State Government approval

to ex-party iron ore pafing the

by a for its first new mine in

more than a century. In the the

Reserve Bank board member

twarns Government stimulus

program will push up rates for several years. The

'Courier-Mail' has more on

illegal immigration with the

Australian Government's

Australian Government's advertising campaign targeting

potential unlawful asylum

seekers in Sri Lanka. Young

girls are being pressured to

wear bras, nail polish and

lipstick before they even get

to kindy reports the

'Mercury'. And in the 'Northern

Territory News', fears for a

crazy brave window cleaner spot

t working # 2 storeys up and

unsecured. If you'd like to end

us your feedback on any of the

stories we're cover dag -

Indonesian authorities are

calling off their search for

survivors in Indonesia. At

least 1,000 people are still

missing. Heavy rain and damaged

roads have hampered the aid

effort. Today's Newspoll is the

latest headache for the Opposition Leader Malcolm

Turnbull. Kevin Rudd leads the

Opposition Leader as preferred

PM 67% to 18%. Opposition

frontbencher Steve Fitzsimmons

says the poll result is a

refreks of Coalition disunity.

The Reserve Bank will make its

decision on whether to lift

interest rates today. A rise

would make Australia the first

major economy to raise rates

following the financial crisis.

The cash rate is at the

emergency level of 3%.

Australia's oldest listed

fund has criticised the Federal

fund has criticised the Federal Government saying the country's international business

reputation is being put at risk

by its proposal to split Telstra. The Australian Racing

Board AFIC, has written to Telstra shareholders urging hem

to pressure the Government to

change its mind. It's been flee

weeks since the Government

flagged the breakup of Telstra

and investors have been lining

up to criticise the proposal.

Now one of the nation's oldest

listed funds has joined the

chorus of concern. The

Australian Foundation

investment company or AFIC says

there's more at risk than just

investors money. It believes

splitting Telstra could damage

Australia's international

reputation as a good place to

do wiz. AFIC is calling on

Telstra's 1.4 million share

holders to sign a letter of

complaint to the Federal

Government. It's written

Government. It's written to

shareholders saying -?? The

potential breakup of Telstra

season the only worry weighing

on the boobs of the 80-year-old fund. I says the recent rally

in the Australian market is looking

looking too good fob true. To

be true. AFIC's managing

director Ross Barker says it's

becoming harder to find good

value investments.. During this

recovery we've tended to be in

the new share issues that have

come along that have been at quite discounted prices so

we've been spending our money there rather than directly in

the market and where the market

is now we think it's

forecasting a reasonable

recovery and if that doesn't come through then there could

be further setbacks And it's

not just Ross Barker who is

tipping a market dip. Fund

managers and analysts alike are

also predicting a correction..

In the last couple of months

we've seen the market raise 20%

so I think generally a

correction is probably a

likelihood and we're probably overdue for

overdue for one of around

5%. Particularly now we've reached the point where a lot

of stimulus panels for

economies and to support

financial markets, they're

starting to be wound back and

we'll probably face one to two

years of that. Mike Hawkins

from the stock broking firm

Evans and partners saying from

now on investors are

now on investors are keeping a

harnd across economic data and

its impact on companies' future

earnings growth Overseas you're

looking for expectations that

profits will bounce by 25% next

year and similar again in 2011.

To get those sortses of numbers

you won't git there on cutting

costs, you need sales to come

through and economies to

improve In the short-term the

Reserve Bank of Australia could

also stiefle the rally.

Economist are die vieded on

whether the RBA will put up

readed however the market is

putting in a 50% chance that

rate also rise. President

Obama's economic team says I

has no plans for a second

economic stimulus package

despite unemployment reaching 9.#%. A White House spokesman

has told reporters new job

creation initiatives are under consideration but there'll be

no formal package. And in the

market, -

In a few minutes vam will be

along with a look at the

national weather.. And a review

of some of the newspapers. This

morning we'll be joined by the Associate Editor of the 'Sunday Age', Seamus Bradley. Now with

all the sport here is Paul Kennedy. Thank you. Good

morning. Us's cricketers are

making steada break in their

run chase in the Champions

Trophy final in South Africa.

They're 2 for 113678 earlier

the bowlers restricted New

Zealand to just 200. Let's look

at the highlights.

COMMENTATOR: He goes for it

gets the outside edge. Yes.

Gone! That is a major blow.

This is gone as well. Big

appeal and given. Oh my

goodness, that was a moon bawl.

Problem here. Big problem for

New Zealand. Knocked him over.

What a good yorker that was

146km/h. Yes, says Aleem Dar.

Goes for a tumble. That's almost has if something has

just pulled the rug under his

feet. There. Now, this is going

to be interesting here. The

fielders think they've got him.

He got a lot on that. What a

way to finish. 200 comes up.

Should go. What a catch? This

has got to be very clear.

Finger goes up. Ponting is

gone! That is the big scalp.

It's gone straight up. She

should take this. Unbelievable,

he came under the ball. That's

really what's important. A bit

of ruck there for Cameron White

who has sinced moved on to Mick

a half-century. Australia need

about # 5 runs to go. Sydney FC

has moved to the top of the A

league ladder following a 1

-nil victory over the Central

Coast Mariners and Adelaide and

Newcastle played a draw in the

other game yesterday which

included one of the goals of

the season. Let's look at both matches.

COMMENTATOR: That's a beautiful

header. An absolutely wonderful

header, Terry Mc-Flynn

celebrates his return with a

goal. The father, the new

father... Bridges gets it, Song

with a chance. What a start for

the Newcastle Jets. Casio,

that's brilliant from Casio.

One of the great A league

goals... It's a big break from

tradition and they just be a

glimpse of the future for

sports viewer. England's UK

qualifier will be shown to

subscribers on the Internet.

The BBC reports England will

play live on the Internet for

the first time when they take

on Ukraine... It's football but

not quite as we know it. On

Saturday, England's players

will make their full debut on

the Internet and end to more

than 50 years of telly

tradition. This Ma match is not

on TV. Some people aren't

pitch. Nor generations watching

England has meant watching the

TV. Through the good times. And

of course the not to good. But

they'll have to watch England's

next match on a computer. It's

being streamed ex-there'sively

on the Internet by this digital

company. A sign of the changing

times. Anyone and particularly

who has got young children or

teenagers knows that the way we

consume media is changing and I

think this is a classic example

of it. It's pioneering, it's

very exciting and anyone who

wants to come along on the

journey this week I that should

sign up The match is being

shown on most national

newspaper websites. It will

cost you 4 found # # if you

subkrieb now but more than that

if you do that on Saturday.

There's a limit on a million

users to ensure the site

doesn't crash. This is the soft

picture quality you can could

expect to see on Saturday. It's

not as good as traditional

television but on a computer

screen or a lap top it is

perfectly watchable. What will

the fans make of it? Certainly

not this thrill. They won't be

able to watch the game in pubs

just in certain cinemas and

many supporters will be less

than convinced. Sitting in

front of your computer screen

for 90 minute plus the

half-time seems a very, very

long time. A computer screen

normally about that pig. I'm

not sure many people would want

to watch a match like that for

90 minutes on a Saturday evening After the collapse of

se tapta television who has

been due - se tanta television

who has been due to show the match, there has been no

interest. Online advertisers

taken over on the Internet from

TV. The revenue stream. That

tells you something about where

it's going in terms of the

digital world so I'm sure it

will be the way forward in the

future and probably the reality

of what lit be like But if

online really is the future of

football those collective

moments in front of the telly

might soon be a thing of the

past. And of course se tanta

was that company in rirn

Ireland that started up from

nothing about to years ago but

then went bust earlier this

year so somebody has to pick up

those rights and if matches

like this which is not crucial

toing's World Cup chances,

they've already qualified, if

the major broadcasters don't

want to pick ut up, somebody

will jump in and fill that

void. That's hard to believe in

England? It is . But the amount

of money that they're talking

over there and broadcasters be

watching se tanta go bust are making sure that that doesn't

happen to them. Can you imagine

the outcry in Australia if that

was proposed here. We're used

to getting our sport on free to

air. There's a shift there. I

think if the chains come in to

allow networks to play live

sport on the digital channels,

I think the viewers will be the

winners there. I think it will

be good for those networks that

don't play sport in one city

but in another could double up

and play alternative matches on

those damage channels. We may

not see that in Australia. Very

interestingly, they're adopting

that technology in the UK.

They're turning back - turning

away from technology in sport

in America. The big sports over

there, the NHL, the hockey

league, the basketball, the

football, they're all putting

ban on Twitter and FaceBook for

all the players. They're

progressively trying to faze

that out because they dop want

important team information

leaked which has been the case

of on Twitter and remember

Phillip Hughes in the Ashes

announced that he was sacked

from the team on Twitter.

Interesting to see if that's

comes. It will be another

source that dries up. News

Breakfast can be watched live

on the web from anywhere. Just

visit - You don't have to pay. Here's Vanessa O'Hanlon with a

look at the weather and it's

been wet in Sydney in That's

right. A very, very wet wrong

weekend indeed. In Sydney in

the past 24 hours you've had

6.6mm of rain and power outages

as well and Nowra picked up p

33.8. Rain is moving over the

south of Victoria at the

moment. If if we look at the

satellite we are entering a

bitter cold snap over the

south-east. Cloudy over the

north-west of the country and a

little showery under the cloud over the south of Western

Australia. A fairly steady

water pattern ahead as a near

stationary high dominates most

of the hi. There's a cold

southerly air flow with showers

and now. A trough will also

cross Victoria. The trough over

WA will cause showers over the

tropics and the one over the

east has moved off shore taking

most of the showers with it. In

Queensland today -

The top stories on ABC News

Breakfast - the rescue effort

has all but been abandoned as

attention turns to caring for

those who survived last week's

cake. However, heavy rain has

hipderred efforts to reach

those most in need as the

threat of new landslides still

looms over survivors and the

people trying to help them. Indonesia correspondent Geoff

Thompson reports from Sumatra.

Food, some family or friends

and shelter from the rain. This

is now as good as life gets for

thousands of displaced people

in West Sumatra. Perhaps 600

people died in the Padang hotel

but the missing remain

unaccounted for. There are

40,000 houses like this one or

worse. This is south of Padang.

Thmplt is people who just don't

have access to what the big

city has. Rudemental living

kits are being handed out but

there are still areas that can

only be reached by air. The

heavy rain is hatchering relief

evidents and making more

landslides likely. This is our

great fear. There have been

land sladz - landslides

since. In these pictures you

can see why. The moment a

landslide vuk north of Padang.

One of many which killed 76

people and wrecked 16,000

houses here. In the hills

above, also to the north, you

can see the wastelands such

multiple landslides leave

behind. The destruction

continue as far as the eye can

see so deeper down the valley

we go. A little further on

another village has vanished. TRANSLATION: All around here

were hills, also on the right

there when the quake struck.

Along here were houses with

about 500 people, now there are

only 25 left Another rise in

the road and another similarly

shocking scene. The village is

gone. You can contribute to

News Breakfast. Send emails to

-

In other news, support for

the Federal Government has surged according to the latest

this Newspoll. It has Labor

ahead 58% to 42% on a two-party

preferred basis. A fortnight

ago Labor had just a 10 point

lead. Opposition frontbencher Steve Ciobo says the poll

result is a reflection of Coalition disunity. Australia

could become the first major

economy in the world to raise

interest rates after the global

financial crisis. The board of

the Reserve Bank will make the

decision at its monthly meeting today. The increase would be

the first in 18 months. The

cash rate is at 3% describeded

a the emergency level. In Samoa

talkings are under way about

the possible of exhuming the

body of an Australian woman. 30-year-old Anita Nuualiitia

was buried in a mass grave.

Federal Government officials

say they've been talking with

her family about returning her

botdy to Australia to be

buried. About 250 people are

dead after torrential rain and

flooding in southern India.

Almost 2.5 million people have

been left homeless after five

days of heavy rain. Food

supplies are being dropped to

hundred of thousands of people

strappeded by the fliedz.

Officials have put the cost of

the recovery at billions of

dollars and an Australian woman

has won a share of this year's

nobally prize for medicine.

Elizabeth Blackburn was one of

three US-based researchers who

discovered how the body

protecting chromosomes, the

Nobel institute says the

scientist's work added a new

Didak mention to understanding

the cell. The United States

defence secretary Robert

dwautss says more time is

needed to decide whether to

increase troop levels in

Afghanistan. The top US

commander there, General

Stanley McChrystal, has

complained that the Coalition

operation is in need a of a different strategy. According

to US officials he seeking

another 40,000 solders from

President Obama. Moorabbin

we're joined by the vice

President for foreign and

defence policy studies at the

American enterprise institute.

Good morning. Give us an idea

what the reaction has been in

the United States to this

latest incident where 8 US

soldiers were killed? Good

morning everybody. I think that

the reaction is understandably

one of shock and horror. We're

seeing a real ramp up in

casualties in Afghanistan right

now. Part of the reason that

we're seeing it is because

frankly we don't have enough

troops on the ground. We

haven't been able to atter strategy as General Stanley

McChrystal has requested and

we're going to be seeing more

and more casualties of this

kind until we make the

necessary changes on the ground. While President Obama

has got this top commanderer in

Afghanistan calling for 40,000

extra troops, how can he

possibly reject that request

and say that he's doing the

right thing by the troops

there? I think that the

President is the one who decided to place General

Stanley McChrystal on the

ground in Afghanistan. He

replaced the previous

commander, he said that he

wanted to see a change in

strategy. He brought in

somebody who is a known expert

in counterinsurgents. It's

going to be very difficult nor

the President to decide that

the command her chose is the

wrong one but what President

Obama has to just - has said is that he believes that the

situation on the ground has I

think changed sufficiently since the elections in Afghanistan and therefore we

need to do a reassessment. It's

a very difficult argument to

make and he's gotten hit quite

hard politicalate because he's

doing so With those weekend

comments by James Jones it

really does appear the Obama

straks is laying the ground

work for a decision which would

see no or very little increase

in troop numbers? I think that

that's really a guess right

now. We are hearing some

rumours that there maybe a

decision tomorrow, that's

tomorrow for us in the United

States, Tuesday, on this and

that there may be some sort of

announcement. I don't think we

have a good sense of where the

President is going to go and I

think this will be very much

the President's decision. Do

you think the American public

has the appetite for a decision

which would see tens of

thousands of more troops sent

to Afghanistan? I think that

the American public has very

little appetite for losing wars

and as with anything, the

President of the United States,

whether he's a Republicaner a

Democrat, broom, George Bush or

frankly anyone else, need to show the necessary leader. When

the President, this President,

decided to send an sticial

19,000 troops to Afghanistan,

he did so in a press release.

He didn't give any speeches

about it. He didn't make any

announcements and he didn't

really justify the choice publicly. I don't think that's

the right thing for any

President to do. So, if the

President does mange the right

decision and go with the

recommend ace of his commander

he's also going to have to get

out there and make the sale to

the American public, explain

why he's doing it, why he's

putting lives at risk and

what's at stake If those troops

do not goo, what do you see

happening in Afghanistan? I

think that we'll be in the

worse of all words in which

we'll be putting at risk the

troops we have there. It's not

just Americans. We have many

NATO Coalition partners who are

represented there whose troops

will also be at risk. We won't

be able to achieve the

necessary control on the

ground. It means that the

Taliban and those they work w

extremist Islamist groups will

have the operational latitude.

In the past we've seen where

that led disglft whoa do you

think is getting to Barack

Obama monow and we're getting

these hints of reservations

about this? Well I don't much

subscribe to the

Kremlinologyist school of

analysis. I don't know who's

get to the President but I know

that the President is the boss.

The people in the

Administration work for him. If

there's any hesitation, I won't

hesitate to ascribe it to the

man himself. I think that he is

hesitating. I think that he is

shown himself very reluctant to

make these decisions as to why

my honest answer is, I don't

understand. Having laid the

ground work for a change in

strategy, having brought in a

new commander, I cannot see why

this President would want to

turn around and repudiate that. There were a lot of

people who had a lot of hopes

riding on Barack Obama and

thought a lot of the man before

his election, were you one of

those people and are you now

having second thoughts about

his ability as a leader? Well,

I don't want to present myself

as somebody who has had second

thoughts. I didn't vote for

Barack Obama and had a lot of doubts about him when he ran

for President. He is the

President of the eyes and he

has lot of responsibilities

that go with the job, whether

one likes him or not. Is the

world having second thoughts?

Are people of the United States

having second thoughts? There's no question that that's the

case. He had a bad week last

week which was capped by a

rather embarrassing episode in

which he promoted personally

Chicago as the choice for the

Olympics and got rather smacked

around by the IOC. The

President has great confidence

in his rhetorical ables. He has

great confidence in his able to

reach out to rogue nations and

persuade them to do the right

thing. I think what we're all

looking for, on

looking for, on domestic or

international policy, is

results and that's how the

President will be judged. So

far he's not doing that well

but this is only his first

year. The danger in foreign

policy is we have a lot to

lose. Thank you so much for

talking to us this

morning. Thank you. A suicide

womaner has killed five people

at the United Nations food

agency offices in Pakistani

capital. An investigation is

under way to find out how the

bomber evaded tight security at

the heavily fortified building.

The UN has temporarily closed

all its building in

Pakistan. Smoke rises above the

building and shattered windows

were the most visible signs of

the suicide attack. The bomber

managed to eivate scanner,

cameras and strict security to

gain access to the office in an

elite Islamabad suburb.

Minister pbt Ms Later he blew

himself up in the building's

lobby. Among the dead were two

Pakistani women and an Iraq

write man. Two of the dead were

urp employees. This doctor from

the Pakistan institute of

medical sciences hospital says

they are treating four critically injured people from

the blast. A number of others

are also being treated for

various injuries. Police

believe the attacker was

between 22 and 25 years of age.

In the last 2.5 years militants

have carried out scores of

attacking,s, - scores of attacking,s, - scores of

attacks. It was provided in

providing relief to about 2

million people displayed by an

army offensive. A Canberra

public servant has made history

as the first Australian to

climb all 14 of the world's

8,000m peaks. Andrew Lock

achieved the feat when he

climbed a mountain in Tibet. He

only just made it out to safety

after being caught out in a

severe storm It's been a 16

year odyssey that's taken

Andrew Lock to the top of the world. He's now first

Australian in a very elite

group of world

mountaineers. I'm absolutely

exhausted. And very dehydrated

and the like, but I'm just

still reveling in the success

of the climb. I really don't

think any other Australian will

ever do what he will do The

world's 14 lightest peaks

include the heavyweights,

Everest K 2 and another. All of

them in the greatest Himalayas

and all of them over 8,000m.

After reachling the top of one

in Tibet, Andrew Lock has

licked them all. A number of

the peaks he's done solo so

pretty gutsy with verilile

external support. This was the

lowest mountain on Andrew Locks

hit-list but it's so

technically tough it's taken

him five attempts to reach the

true summit. The Canberra

public servant reached the top

dangerously late on Friday, but

on desent was trapped in a

deadly storm. No tent, no

sleeping bags, no stoves, we

just had our back packs so we

sat on the ledge. It was a

very, very cold night. I'm

guessing between minus 20 and

minus 30 Not content with

baing at all world's 8,000m

peak, he's again got Everest in

his sighs. He's made all tore

summits without supplementary oxygen and he wants to do

Everest the same way. We'll be

talking to him later in the

program which I'm really

looking forward to. You're

watching News Breakfast. The top stories on ABC News

Breakfast - Indonesian

authorities are calling off

their search for survivors in

Sumatra. At least 1,000 people

will still missing after last

week's earthquake. Heavy rain

and damaged roads have hampered

the aid effort. Today's

Newspoll is the latest headache

for the Coalition leader

Malcolm Turnbull. Kevin Rudd

leads the Opposition Leader as

preferred PM 67% to 18%. Opposition frontbencher Steve

Ciobo says the poll results is

a reflection of Coalition

disunity. And Australia could

become the first major western

economy to raise interest rates

followling the global financial

crisis when the Reserve Bank

meets today. The RBA will

decide this morning whether to

hike rates from the current

emergency level of

emergency level of 3%. Now for

a look at the national papers

today we're joined by Jayne Dullard from CPR Communications. Thank you for

join us. It's all good news

this morning with another

Australian on top of the global

press? It's a fabulous story.

It's so great when someone wins

a science prize but a it's

impossibly hard to get on the

front page. We can pat

ourselves on the back for

intellectual capacity but I was

taken by something imbedded in

the dying paragraphs of the the

'Australian's coverage of this

story. The 'Age' has it on the

front page - she's been living

in the States since 19 #

# She's still Australian? Is

she. We have to claim hor. She's won something. We have to

claim her. I think pa rokallism

is one of the most intriguing

things about media and

newspapers in general. I'm not

sure it's just either, I'm sure

other country do it do. She

holds joint US Australian

citizenship. He's done all her

work in America. The people

she's mentored, one of whom has

won the award with her are

American scientist, born and

bred. She was apparently inspired by her Launceston

science teacher? That's

right. There you go. That's the

story? That was such an

inspiring story for everybody,

for girls, for scientists for Australians in

general. Ultimately, it is a an

inspiring story and it's great

to get a woman in science story

on the front page. With some of

those stories where people are

- we claim them as Australians

it's really questionable. But I

think with this example it's

probably... You're looking at

the 'Australian' this morning

as well? I was a bit interested

by the booner under the

headline, of the front page of

the the 'Australian' because

you can see it just there - the

battle of the bikini. And then

next to that, I'm an

anti-semetic racist

homophobe. Who is Peter Rourke.

Very gainingly so. It's

completely ironic. Does irony

sort of stand up in a headline

out of context because you

could look at eand think

"What?" You can take Rupert

murdiccor put him on a brortd -

Murdoch and put him on a broad

sheet. A man who has

established a retro swimwear

line has named his company a

different spelling but it

sounds like the name of

Jennifer Hawkins swimwear range

for Myer so there's now legal

proceedings b der way. It's an

intellectual story - the battle

of the bikini. I expect the

men's swimwear range doesn't

include a single bikini by the

way.

This all comes in the context

of the Australian supposedly

going up market and going for

the thinker? Supposedly. Maybe

it was a difficult day to get

these little pics to pop up

there. The really meaty

business of the day is interest

rates and so obviously that's

pretty much everywhere as

well? And hasn't that turned

around quickly? The sort of

weight of economists lending

their rate of support.

Definitely next time if not do.

Two papers went with it on

their front page. Must be a

ziflt decision for print

editors to decide whether to

run that story because by 2:30

in the afternoon it's redundant

either way. And the 'Sydney

Morning Herald' went ahead with

that today and put it on the front page. 'Sydney Morning

Herald' played it quite

straight, you know, reserve

ways up early rate rise. It

take talked a bit about the political background and the

fact that the Opposition will

use this to accuse the

Government of having inflated

the economy through its still

lution package but playing a

pretty straight bat. That

really does reflect the fact

that people may have a lot

riding on that. We've come to

the stage with those major

stories from Indonesia, they've

been on the front page for

quite is some time and there's

not anything significantly

different happening with those

stories today. So it is

possible for them for those

papers to lead with a yarn like

that this That's right and all

that coverage is moved to the

side and still a lot of pies

being given to it but off the

front page now as we go back to

the hip pocket nerve The 'Courier-Mail', you've cast

your eye north there as

well? Stay away is the - I

think we have that headline as

well. This has run on a couple

of papers. On the 'Courier-Mail' and the 'Daily

Telegraph', taxpayers funding a

war against illegal

immigration. I love this story

because it sound quite, like sh

but an advertising company has

obviously picked up some kind

of quiet Government contract to

run some campaigns in the

homeland of suspected terrorism

through street theatre to

encourage people not to catch

boats to Australia. It's a

different way of doing it? It

must'nt have been very much

money in this contract because

the figure isn't mentioned

anywhere. It wasn't perhaps

terribly lucrative. I like how

they've gone with the ang ing -

angle of the taxpayers paying for for it. Much like or other

friends in the 'Northern

Territory News'. As always a

headline there. What was it?

The window cleaner who was... I

thought about taking a crack at the 'Northern Territory News'

today and I thought, no. The

problems continue for Malcolm

Turnbull. There's bits and

pieces of coverage of that

Today a the odd batcher having

their said as well Both the

decline in the Opposition

standing among voters and the

Peter Dutton story continues to

unfold. We get those polls so

frequently, do you think

they've lost their impact

because they're coming out so

frequently? I think polls come

out so frequently that I have

no idea what they mean or what to make of

to make of them. Except for

journalist s to write

stories. Thank you for coming

in today You can watch all of

News Breakfast streamed live

every morning. The address is

- Now with the sport headlines

here is Paul Kennedy? Thank

you. An update on that Champions Trophy final in South Africa being played at the

moment. New Zealand made 200 in their innings. Australia bowled

really well and the Aussies

lost two quick wickets

including Ricky Ponting but a

128 run parter National Party

between Watson and Cameron

White seems to have saved the

day, Australia's now 3 for 151

with 13 overs to spare. They

are one batsmen short because

Callum Ferguson twisted his

knee in the field so they'll be

having Watson stays in for

that. To the A league now, two

games yesterday that was Sydney

FC's one goal against Central

Coast, Terry Mc-Flynn the story

there and Song scored for

Newcastle away against Adelaide

which looked like it might be

embarrassed until Casio, the

Brazilian star, scored that

goal, probably one of the goals

of the year and the Melbourne

Storm came home yesterday to a

mild reception, but a decent

crowd down there at their home

base and they celebrated that grand final win. Craig Bellamy

is now talking up his players

ahead of the Kangaroos tour,

the four nations tour, which

will be played in late October,

early November. And he said

that Cooper Cronk houb the halfback for the Kangaroos tame

and he has got a case there, although Jonathan Thurston is

the number one half weak in the

country and has been for a

couple of years so I guess

Craig Bellamy is saying that

Cronk may have gone past him

and Scott prps is tore person

contending for that halfback

spot but Australia going OK in

the cricket and Callum

Ferguson, let's hope his knee

suspect too bad because he has

been one of the best players

for Australia in the last 18

months. They haven't said what

the injury is. They're wanting

to win the game first but

looked like maybe a medial

injury in the knee, so it was a

really bad twist. Let's hope

that he will be OK for the Australian summer. How would

you rate that A league

goal? One of the best. We keep

saying that every few cays.

They've had a great strike but

Casio saved his team. They

would have been very

embarrassed if Newcastle had of

knocked them off at home, the

Reds Thank you for. That here

is Vanessa O'Hanlon with a look

at the weather? Thank you.

Anisy blast across the

south-east this week. Back to

the winter Woolieses a the cold

air crossed Tasmania overnight.

This morning it's headed north

over Victoria. Cloud is forming

under this cold air in'The

Australian' and Victoria.

Bringing snow to the mountains.

Also a little showery and

cloudy over the south of

Western Australia. Thissisy

blast will stick around for

most of the week as a near

stationary high dominate tsz

most of the country. A trough

will cross Victoria, that will

form a low pressure system over

NSW tomorrow, the trough over

WA will cause a few tropical

showers and the one over the

east has moved off shore. That's taking most of the showers with it. Around the

States -? N

Still ahead on News Breakfast

- we'll speak to beyond blue

director Jeff Kennett about why

youth are the focus of this

year's mental health week. He's

talking about some

internationally ground breaking work. That will be coming up

after this short break. Stay

with us.

Open This Program is

Captioned Live.

The Indonesian earthquake

operation shifts from rescue do recovery. The Liberal

frontbencher blames party disunity for a slump in support for the Coalition. The Reserve Bank considers raising interest rate for the first time in 18

months. And Australia recovers from a shaky start in the final of the Champions Trophy. Good morning. It's Tuesday 6 October. I'm Mary Gearin. And I'm Jakarta - Joe O'Brien. Supplying aid to victims of the Indonesian earthquake has become the focus over norption Sumatra. Indonesian thornts say the search for survivors in the earth yak hit city of Padang has been called off. The mission to help those in remote inland consider areas has been hampered pauft landslides and damage to roads. No-one has been found alive in the rubble

since Friday and at least 1,000

people are still missing. Dr Dave Jenkins, the CEO of

Surfaid International, said

local authorities were quick to

respond to the crisis. I think

most of us were very impressed

with the local people and

their, you know in the first

hours and first days, how they

coped with the situation when

they had hospitals down,

they had hospitals down, comms

down, really challenging to be

able to respond and they did a

remarkable job, from those of

us who know the area and

looking from the inside. I

think there are weaknesses that

have been be inpox ez. The need

nor coordination, the need for

a chain of command and very

good communication in reserve,

there's still a lot we need to

coto prepare for the next

coto prepare for the next one. In other news this

morning - support for the

Federal Government has surged

according to to - the latest

Newspoll. A fortnight ago Labor

had just a 10 point lead. Opposition frontbencher Steve

Ciobo says the poll result is a

reflection of Coalition

disunity. Australia could

become the first major economy in the world

in the world to raise interest rates after the global

financial crisis. The board of

the Reserve Bank will make the

decision at its monthly meeting

today an increase would be the

first in 18 months. The cash

rate is at 3% described as the

emergency level. In Samoa talks

are under way about the

possibility of exhuming the bid

you of Anita Nuualiitia, a 30-year-old,

30-year-old, who was buried in

a Maz grave. Federal Government

officials say they've been

talking with her family about

rump - returning her body to

Australia. About 250 people are

dead after rains and flooding

in southern India. Almost 2.5

million people have been left

homeless after five days of

heavy rain. Food supplies are being dropped to hundred of thousand of people stranded by the floods. Officials have put

the cost of the recovery

the cost of the recovery at

billions of dollars. A suicide

bomber has killed five people

at the United Nations food

agencies offices in Pakistan.

Islamabad police are

investigating how the bomber

was able to enter the high

security area and deadinate

about 8kg of explosives. No-one

has claim claimed

responsibility for the attack.

UN Secretary-General Ban

Ki-Moon described the attack has

has a heinous crime. And an

Australian woman has won a

share of this year's Nobel

prize for medicine. Tasmanian

born his Elizabeth Blackburn

was one of three USes bied - US based scientist