Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Disclaimer: The Parliamentary Library does not warrant the accuracy of closed captions. These are derived automatically from the broadcaster's signal.
ABC News Breakfast -

View in ParlView

(generated from captions) This Program is

Captioned Live. The Philippines

calls for international aid.

Severe floods leave more than a

quarter of a million people

homeless. Signs of an economic rebound - the Federal

Government to show a $10

billion improvement in the

Budget bottom line. Roman

Polanski detained in

Switzerland. And Cadel Evans

bounces back to win the road

race at the World Championships

in Switzerland. Good morning.

It's Monday 28 September. I'm

Joe O'Brien And I'm Virginia

Trioli. The top stories on ABC

News Breakfast - the

Philippines has appealed for

international aid to help deal

with floods that have killed at

least 80 people. The country's

biggest deluge in nearly 40

years turned roads into raging

rivers and buried homes. At

least a quarter of a million

people are now homeless. Even

here, where people are used to

typhoons, they rarely see

anything like this. Nothing but

debris keeping them afloat. It

was one of many dramatic rescue

attempts across the Northern

Philippines as the rain fell

and just kept falling. Roads

turned to rivers. People took

refuge where they could, even

on power cables, as the water

level rose and most of Manila

was left under water. TRANSLATION: It happened if

he fast. All of a sudden

everything is under water. I

was not able to save anything

except the shirt I am now

wearing. The Government called

it 100-year flood. This year

has already been a deadly

typhoon in South-East Asia. The

national TV weatherman blamed

glarms. Others blamed the

Government for not moving

quickly enough. As the rain

stopped and the floodwaters

receded, the extent of the

damage across the capital city

and 25 provinces became

obvious. The number of dead and missing increased throughout

the day and is expected to

continue going up. And as a

thick layer of mud covered

everything, the survivors began

the clean-up, short of food,

water and shelter. Millions

then their homes and hundreds

are thought to be left stranded. In other news,

Australia is thought to be

about $10 billion better off

than expected. 'The Australian'

newspaper said the forecast of

a $3 2 billion Budget deficit

for last financial year has been slashed. The Federal Government is expected to

reveal the revised figure

tomorrow. The turnaround could

bring the Budget surplus back a

year earlier than expected. Film director Roman

Polanski hasdon detained in

Switzerland and faces

extradition to the US for a

30--year-old sex crime.

Polanski fled the US in 19 78

before he was sentenced for

having sex with a 13-year-old

girl. Swiss authorities say

Polanski is being held under an

international alert issued by

the US Government. The director

was to receive an award at the

Zurich Film Festival. The

German Chancellor Angela Merkel

has won another term in office.

She won 33% of the vote. She

may be able to form a

centre-right alliance. Mrs

Merkel says the new alliance

will get Europe out of its

biggest financial crisis in 60

continuing in Queensland. About years. The fire alert is

30 fires are burning and

they're spread across much of

the State. A large bushfire is

threatening homes north of

Rockhampton. A fire west of

Brisbane was contained

overnight. And Tasmania is

still cleaning up after shaef I

have rain and strong winds hit

the State on the weekend. Wild

weather caused power outages to

more than 36,000 homes across

the State. Gale force winds

swept through overnight. Sydney

and Illawarra south coast

region were the worst-affected.

At least 500 calls were made to

the State's emergency

services Iran claims to have

test-fired short-range missiles

just two days after being

condemned by the West for

secretly developing a new

underground facility. The test

tomorrow could reach Israel or

American bases in the Gulf. The

BBC's John Lyon reports. Iran

may have had its nuke cover

blown, but today is signaled it

was in no mood to apologise. Somewhere deep in

the Iranian desert, the

Revolutionary Guards began a

series of missile tests,

pre-planned, maybe. But the

West will see this as a new

provocation. And the general in

charge of the exercise promised

another test tomorrow of the

Shahab-3, the long-range

missile that experts believe

could reach Israel. The West

believe the newly revealed

nuclear plant was part of a

secret nuclear bomb program.

According to an American think

tank these may be the first

images. The Iranians only

admitted its existence after Western intelligence had

discovered it . As he arrived

back from the UN in New York,

President Ahamdinejad was

taking the development in his

stride. From the guard of

honour, you would think he was

returning in triumph, and with

a straight face, Mr Ahamdinejad

insisted that the latest

development was a blow to the West.

TRANSLATION: There was a

massive propaganda effort

against Iran's nuclear plant.

They made a lot of fuss, but

their efforts were in vain and

we think they now regret

it. This is just what the world

has come to expect of President

Ahamdinejad. When he is corner,

he comes out fighting. The real

test will be whether Iran will

be prepared to give any ground

when negotiations resume on its

nuclear program in a few days'

time. In the meantime, Mr

Ahamdinejad and his allies and

the Revolutionary Guards are

trying to tough it out in the

face of opposition at home and

abroad. We'll return now to our

story on those signs of

economic recovery. For more,

Melissa Clarke joins us from

Canberra. Good morning. We're

expecting a little more money

to flow into the Budget, are

we? With the '80/09 financial

figures about to be sienlised

by the Government, estimates

are saying 5 to 10 billion

better off than accept

accepted. You might remember

when the Budget came out, the

Government said about $210

billion have been wiped out of

the Budget. It seems now it

might only be $200 billion or

$205 billion wiped out. With

the economy sinking not quite

to the depths that were

anticipated and with growth in

China remaining strong and

still leading to some demand of Australian commodities, that

there will be a little more

coming in, in tax receipts than

had been anticipated. Indeed,

if we do see this order after announcement from the Government in the next few

days, we can expect the

Opposition to leap on this and

to continue with the attack,

saying things aren't as bad as

anticipated and that's the

reason why the Government

should be winding back its

stimulus spending which it has been steadfast in opposing and

we can expect to hear a lot

more from Joe Hockey, as he

said from inside ders, we can

be hearing this critique a

little more often, I think.

We have said the Government is

spending too much money, given

all the other factors as play,

and what's more, the money it

is spending is not being spent

well, it is being spent

recklessly. Well, still on the

matter of economics, finally

the Senate committee is going

to get its chance to grill to

key witnesses not necessarily

for the prosecution, perhaps

for the defence? Well, we will have Glenn Stevens, the Reserve

Bank Governor face the Senate

Economics Committee today and

they're arguing that the

Government's continued economic

stimulus spending will force up

interest rates which will see

fiscal and monetary policy

pulling in opposite directions,

so they will be wanting to quiz

the Reserve Bank Governor Glenn

Stevens about that and about

what circumstances would lead

him and the Reserve Bank

Council to raise interest

rates. I'm sure he will be very

cagey about that, as he

normally is, but the griing of

the Treasury Secretary Ken

Henry will have to wait another

week or so because the senators

on the committee want a bit

more time to look at his

written submission before they

grill him about the details T

will be an interesting two

weeks and I think Glenn Stevens

will be wanting to give away as

little as possible and the

Opposition will be trying to

make as much as possible out of

what he does say. And news out

of Bradfield yesterday? Paul

Fletcher was successful. It's

now his, although he says he is

getting right into campaigning straightaway for the by-election, although we don't

have a date for that

by-election yet, but it does

mean there are 16 other

candidates, some of them very

promising candidates who didn't

get the position and they're

now being encouraged to put

their hand up for other federal

seats and also State seats

which they may noit be keen to

do given the rather difficult state of poll teches in New

South Wales at the moment, but

it seems John Alexander former

tennis great is being

encouraged to take on Maxine

McKew, so a is celebrity

challenge - sounds like a

reality TV show, having the two high-profile candidates

possibly face off against each

other, but the Liberals do have

wider concerns in pre-selection

battles. I think attention will

be turning north to the seat of fullback Merson on the Gold

Coast where Peter Dutton has

nominated and will face some

tough preselection against

local candidates as he tries to

save his political career by

moving away from his seat of

Dixon into the seat of

McPherson. There have been

moving and emotional scenes at

a reunion of Korean families.

Some of these parents and

children haven't seen each

other since 19 5 3 There are

reports North Korea has already

used the reunions to ask for

more aid. For this person, this

reunion was six decades in the

making. He came to the South alone, leaving behind his

children. His son originally

thought the Korean war would

end soon and one of his

daughters wept as she confessed

she came to believe her father

had died. This woman came to

the south as a nurse and says

she never believed she would

see her younger sister again.

When told about the reunions,

she thought she was dreaming.

These South Korean brothers

were separated when the eldest

was con crypted by the South's

military at the outbreak of war

and went missing. The two

Koreas are still technically

still at war. 16 reunion s have

taken place since 2000, but

they were cut short two years

ago. Last month, the North

agreed to another round of

reunions. As they began, the

head of the South Korean Red

Cross says its Northern

Territory counterpart told him

the reunions were a favour and

the South should response with

more aid. Most of those craving

a reunion are in their 70s or

older of the 127,000 South

Koreans who have lodged a

request in the last year,

nearly 40,000 have already

passed away. We'll take a look

at the front pages of the major

newspapers around the country now. The 'Sydney Morning

Herald' is reporting the New South Wales Government is to

strip the elderly of a portion

of their pension increase. 'The

Australian' reports support for

Labor has fallen in Kevin

Rudd's home State of Queensland

and regional Australia. The

Federal Government is reviewing

50,000 grants ahead of an

eventual end to stimulus

spending, the financial re-rue

reports. 'The Age' reports

unemployment is likely to fall

well short of the 1 million

originally forecast 'The Age'

reports water from the Murray

River pipeline may be unfit to

drink this summer. ACT alcohol

laws for a shake-up, reports

the 'Canberra Times' The Northern Territory Northern

Territory has a story about a

man-made trap that is designed

to sear ysly harm people has

been found at a tourist

spot. The AFL Grand Final celebrations continues for

Geelong reports the her Al ald

Sun 'The Age' reports Jarryd

Hayne has been cleared to play

in the Grand Final. 20,000

sites across Queensland State

Schools - asbestos, reports

'The Courier-Mail' Gale force

wind as cross the State

yesterday. If you would like to

send us your feel back, you can

do so to: Let's take a look at

our top stories on ABC News

Breakfast. The Philippines as

called for international aid after severe flooding across

the country. Rising waters have

killed at least 80 people and

left a quarter of a million

people homeless. Floods have

destroyed homes and washed away

roads. The Federal Government

is set to im -- is set to

reveal and improvement of about

$10 billion in the Budget

bottom line. Academy Award

winning director Roman Polanski

has been detained in

Switzerland. Polanski is facing extradition to the United

States for a 30--year-old sex

crime. He fled the United

States in 19 78 after pleading

guilty to having sex with a

13-year-old girl. Victorian Premier John Brumby has given

his vote of confidence to New Delhi's Commonwealth Games preparations Construction is

behind schedule for many of the

major venues, but Indian

officials are dis-MiGs

suggestions they won't be ready

for next year's Games. Indian

Commonwealth Games official vr

officials were eager for John

Brumby to see the efforts to

get the city ready for the

Games in October 2010. Mr

Brumby was given a guided tour

of the hockey ground as well as

the national staux where the

Opening Ceremony and the

athletics will be held of

the Full credit, if I could, to

the organising committee, to

the engineers, to the builders.

The progress that has been

made, the tight time lines that

have been set - I think

everybody can look forward to

what will be a fantastic

Commonwealth Games in New Delhi

in 2010. A number of

approvals needed to start the

project here. After the project

has been approved, the pace is

on and full material and

machinery has been fully

mobilised. Now there doesn't

seem to be any delay s. Despite

this confidence, construction

of many of the Games' major

facilities is still behind

schedule and if New Delhi isn't

ready, then Melbourne might get

the Games by default. A couple

of weeks ago, the Queensland

Games Federation chief warned

the success of next year's

event is being put Jeopardy,

but John Brumby was careful not

to convey any impression that

the Melbourne Melbourne will

host the Games for the second

time in a row I've said

previously that New Delhi will

do a great job in terms of

hosting the Games. Ind yaps say

an successful event could set

the stage for a bid for the

Olympic Games. It's always hard

to know what to think with

those particular images because

you could have taken shots like

that halfway through the construction for the Melbourne Commonwealth Games or the

Sydney Olympic Games, but in

the case of India, it does look

like they're even further

behind than most countries

normally are. But you never

know until the opening day Exactly right. The

Australian Army says its latest

initiative to help close the

gap of Indigenous disadvantage

is working. The first recruits

have almost finished 7 months

of intensive training. The

recruits say the course is

offering them the opportunity

to get jobs that they would not

otherwise have been able to

apply for without any

obligation to join the armed

services. In the scrub near

Jabiru, men from remote

Indigenous communities are

learning patrolling skill as

longside regular recruits. The Indigenous development program

isn't just aimed at encouraging

them to join the Army, it is

intended to help bridge the

indigenous education gap which

is making it difficult for them

to get any job. Literacy and

numeracy training and gain

qualifications Good to pick up

on stuff and - like that you

missed out on in school. And

they're excited to have avoided

the cycle of apathy, grog and

lack of opportunity prevalent

in many remote

communities. Make a change and

sort of gone down the same

track, doing nothing, and

thinking that you're going to

get a job without actually

trying, you know. The Army says

the course is a way to give

something back to the

communities. We get many more

eyes on potential hazards to

Australian sovereignty. None of

the men in the course are

expected to join the Army right

away, but the Army views it as

a success because they're all

expected to be snapped up by

other organisations. My goal is

to after the course has

finished, to become - go into

the NT police force. Customs

and probably - yeah, that was

sort of my main one. The Army

plans to run the course annually. It is putting

together a course for women and

the Navy and Air Force are also

planning similar courses in

other states. In finance news,

today the Reserve Bank Governor

Glenn Stevens will face questions about the Federal

Government's economic stimulus

package. A Senate inquiry will

quiz the Central Bank boss over

potential fallout from the $42

billion stimulus spend as

Australia begins to recover

from the global recession. The

prospect of the package driving

up interest rates is likely to

top concerns. The inquiry

begins in Sydney this morning and Treasury secretary Ken

Henry will face the committee

later next week To the finance figures and the Australian

share market is likely to open

lower from a poor lead from

Wall Street.

In a few minutes, van

necessary la will be along to look at the national

weather And then a review of

the newspapers. With all the

latest in sport, here is Paul

Kennedy Thanks, Joe. Good

morning. It has been a big

morning for Cadel Evans. He won

the road race World Championships in Switzerland

overnight. We can look at the

pictures there. This is a

massive race. It is the first

time an Australian has won this

gold medal and the course is

over 260km. It finishes about 3

miles, about 5km from where

Cadel Evans spends most of his

time - his home away from home

there in Switzerland. He

attacked and said that it's a

slap in the face to all critics

to say that Cadel Evans never

attacks in big races. He beat a

world-class field. Quite

emotional. He kissed his

wedding ring which he keeps oen

a necklace when he races. Very

emotional after he finished

that race. A big story for

Cadel Evans having a terrible

Tour de France and then

finishing 5th in the Tour of

Spain. A great result for the

Australian there. We can go to

pictures from Singapore

overnight and another

Australian has had a

not-so-good race over there.

That's Mark Webber. He finished

his race early in the Singapore

GP. That ends his attempt to

try to win the World chvp. He

is too many points behind now

and a very disappointing race

there for his team. Lewis

Hamilton, last year's world

champion was terrific and he

won the race and you can see he

celebrated with some vim there

at the finish and gets a kiss

on the helmet from his

girlfriend there. She seems to

be all the rage when ever Lewis

Hamilton wins - she is on the

cameras more than he is. Good

result there for Lewis

Hamilton, not so good for Mark

Webber, the Australian. Go to

A-League news now and one

Sunday evening clash between

Adelaide United and North

Queensland Fury. Adelaide

United won that 2-0. Here are

the goals. One English Premier League

game. 5-2 to Sunday land. The

goals came in all shapes and

forms. Here they are.

And Joe, and Virginia, it's

going to be a big week leading

up to the NRL Grand Final.

Melbourne won through and

Parramatta won through. The big

story yesterday was whether

Jarryd Hayne would get rubbed

out for this incident just over

the try line there, and he

didn't - he got off. It was

downgraded to allow him to play

in that grime. That is compared

with this incident from Brice

Gibbs the West Tigers player

who got 3 weeks. We didn't

actually get to see all of that

in the end. I don't know if we

can replay that, but if you

compare the two, Jarryd Hayne

would seem to have been very

lucky to have got off with

that. It looked deliberate to

you, guys? Well, there was no

need to do what he did. The guy

was over the try line and came

down with his knees at the

end. Very dangerous thing to

get your feet or knees near

anybody's head over that try

line. It is frowned upon, but

of course Jarryd Hayne is the

best player in the league, best

player in the world, in fact,

and the NRL would like to see

him play in the Grand Final. If

he didn't play, it would have

been considered a bit of a

non-event, maybe, but it

certainly would have hurt

Parramatta's chances of beating

Melbourne. How strong was Billy

Slater for Melbourne on

Saturday night? He was

awesome. Those tries were

great. He seemed to be in a

perfect place where everything

he did just bounced the right

way and reading the play 3

second as head of the rest of

the players and Ingomar ing was

also a dominant. Greg

Inglis... Inglis is phenomenal.

Moments in that game where the

entire team was going full

tilt, but they looked like he

was running forward as he ran

past. Sometimes it looks like

he is in second gear as well.

It will be great for the

spectators because Hayne,

Inglis and Slater all seemingly

at the top of their game and we

will see some great attacking

skills in the NRL Grand Final.

We won't labour too much on the

AFL Grand Final. All the

analysis was done yesterday and

I spent several hours watching

several different programs to

see the analysis of the game,

safe to say that Geelong was

very fortunate and I think the

acceptance speech at the end by

Mark Thompson said it all when

he said, "we were lucky to win

today." Very proud of his team

for hanging in there and doing

what they did and St Kilda will

be ruing those missed opportunities. They seemed to

be very nervous in that first

quarter, the Saints. Yes,

Schneider missed that early

goal from about 15m out and on

the flip sooid Geelong which missed its opportunities the

year before kicked straight.

Mooney kicked straight, Hawkins

kicked straight and that's

sometimes the difference and it

was on Saturday. Did you think

Mooney was a possible candidate

for the Norm Smith? Maybe not

Mooney, no. There were a lot

that could have got it. I think

Chapman was the right choice

and - because he was the guy

who broke the game open and

probably was the difference,

particularly with that last

goal, but with 26 possessions.

The other guy was the surprise

packet of the day was Jason

Gram from St Kilda who looked

totally out of place in the

preliminary final. Was he

playing on Ablett? No, seemed

to be roving across halfback.

He is the look like for Jones

who was playing on Ablett. They

look the same with the bleached

hair. I thought if they had

fallen over the line at the

end, scm. Gram would have won

the medal. A lot of money bet

on the Norm Smith. He would

have been 60/1, but Paul

Chapman was won of the

favourites and I think a

deserve player to win that

medal because he is such a

great competitor. Such a great

game It was, yes. ABC News

Breakfast can be visited live

anywhere. As you saw on the AFL

final coverage, it was pretty

wet and miserable in Victoria

over the weekend and a fair few

showers over the south of the

nation, Vanessa That's right,

Joe. Good morning. It's

catch-a-cold morning : In

Tassie, Mount Wellington has

added another 36mm to their

wettest September ever.

Conditions are calming but will

still be cloudy through the south-east with showers in

Tasmania and Victoria. Band of

cloud and a burst of showers

also for the south-west and

still fairly dry despite the

cloud that's sitting over the

Northern Territory and inland

Queensland. Now, all this crazy

weather has been mostly due to

a deep low. This should move

east today allowing strong

winds and mof of the showers to

east from the south-east. A

mostly sunny day under this

high and for southern Western

Australia worm gusty

northerlies ahead of another

cold front due to bring a

showery change to the

south-west. In Queensland,

extreme fire conditions for the

south-east coast, Darling Downs

and Granite Belt. Showers in the the tropics.

Frosty on the northern

ranges. Isolated showers for

the south-east. In Victoria,

minor flood warnings for the

western port catchment. Morning

hail and thund in East

Gippsland. Showers about the

south. A major warning for the

Jordan River. Showers are

thinning out, more scattered about the west, south and

eastern parts of the state.

South Australia - showers frost

and fog over the agricultural

area. Showers will extend to

the south-east this

afternoon. In Western

Australia, windy conditions and

showers, hot gusty northerly

winds over the south-east. Up

in the north of Western

Australia, hot and dry for the

Territory. Mostly sunny.

Looking ahead to tomorrow,

another dry day for Brisbane:

More weather in half an hour.

Top story on ABC News

Breakfast - the Philippines has

appealed for international aid

after the worst flooding to hit

the capital, Manila, in more

than 40 years. Rising waters

have killed at least 80 people

and left more than a quarter of

a million others

homeless Officials say the

9-hour deluge submerged houses

and flooded roads. Some areas

of the city are under 6m of

water. For more on this, we're

joined on the phone by prove

Mark Turner from ANU's

department of policy and

management. He spent 35 years researching the Philippines.

Good morning, what's your work

with the Philippines over the

decades. What's been the focus

of that? Good morning. I've

done a variety of work in the Philippines, ranging from

writing on Philippines

development, pill feens

politics, social changes in the

Philippines, in various parts

of the country, including

Manila far south and far north

of the country. We've seen

dramatic vision from there this

morning of people standing on

debris in raining rivers.

What's it like seeing those

sorts of pictures? It's very distressing. I've never seen

such flooding on such a scale

and such dreadful damage and

human suffering from flooding

there. Flooding is a regular,

regular occurrence. How is the

Philippines situated to handle

this sort of thing? The

Philippines is used to

typhoons, and this is a typhoon

which has come through, and to

handling flooding, but I think

in this case it is flooding on

a scale which, as you said

earlier in your news, hasn't

happened for at least 40

years. And the fact that the

Philippines has appealed for international aid, how

significant is that? That is

significant because the

Philippines and typhoons which,

as I say, regularly occur and

floods regularly occur, it

generally does not ask for

international aid. I think the

reason - or this shows that the

Philippines finds this is a

disaster on an unprecedented

scale when regarding

flooding. And when you hear of

the Philippines asking for

international aid and you see the pictures you've seen, do

you think Australia should be

helping as much as it can? Yes,

I think the Philippines is one

of Australia's friends in the

region, and both because of

that and because of the

humanitarian consequences of

the flooding, I think it would

be a very good thing if

Australia contributed.

Australia has a very close relationship with the

Philippines. Have you heard

from anyone in the Philippines

yourself? No, I haven't.

Actually, I have family in the

Philippines, but they are in a

different - well, some of them

live in Manila, but they tend

to live in high-rises, but we

haven't heard yet from them. What's your understanding

of how wide an area has been

affected. We've heard about

Manila itself. What have you

heard about other areas that

have been affected? I haven't

been able to hear about other

affects. Most of the news

coming in is from mostly the

wider Manila area which is

Manila and to the south.

Normally you get bad damage and

typhoons up further to the

north of Manila as well because

the typical typhoon track goes

through Manila and continues up

the north and out into the

South China sea. We've seen

shots of the military helping

people in this situation. Is

the military a critical part of

the rescue effort when these

typhoons and flooding generally

hit the Philippines? When

things get very bad, yes, the

military is an important aspect

of the relief effort because it

is the military which has the

equipment and infrastructure

and ability to move man and

sort of equipment and supplies

quickly to the places where

they're needed. Prove Mark

Turner in Canberra, thanks for

that. OK. Thank you. Now, here

is how you can contribute to

ABC News Breakfast:.

In In other new this

morning, Australia is thought

to be about $10 billion better

off than expected. 'The

Australian' newspaper is

reporting today that the

forecast of a $3 2 billion

Budget deficit for last

financial year has been slashed. The Federal Government

is expected to reveal the

revised figure tomorrow. The

turnaround could bring the

Budget back into surplus a year

earlier than expected. The

Opposition says it's time for

the Government's stimulus

spending to end. Film director

Roman Polanski has been

detained in Switzerland and

faces extradition to the United

States for a 30--year-old sex

crime. Polanski fled the United

States in 19 78 before he was

sentenced for having sex with a

13-year-old girl. Swiss

authorities say Polanski is

being held under an

international alert issued by

the US Government. The director

was to have received an award

at the zur rim Film

Festival. The body of a

Queensland man who died while

trek ago long the Kokoda Trail

has arrived in the pap Papua

New Guinea capital. The father

of four was walking to raise

funds for a children's cancer

charity. Two more boatloads of

asylum seekers were intercepted

off Australia's north-west

coast yesterday afternoon the

border protection sighted the

boat around 90 nautical miles

north-west of Darwin. 12

passengers on board. The second

boat was intercepted just north

of Ashmore Island. All on board

have been taken to Christmas

Island. Tasmania is still

cleaning up after heavy rain

and strong winds hit the State

on the weekend. Wild weather

caused power outages to more

than 36,000 homes around the

State. Gale force winds of 90km/h also swept through New South Wales overnight. Sydney

and the Illawarra south coast

region were the worst-aif heed.

At least 500 calls were made to

the State's emergency

services. The US Secretary of

State Hillary Clinton has

threatened Iran with crippling

sanctions unless the country

comes clean on the purpose of

its nuclear program. The US

made the warning ahead of an

international meeting with Iran

next step. The first step is

the meeting on October 1st with

the P 5 plus 1 with the Iranian

s to see if they will begin to

change their policy in a way

that is satisfactory to the

great powers, and then if that

doesn't work, then I think you

begin to move in the direction

of severe sanctions and their economic problems are difficult

enough that I think that severe

sanctions would have the

potential of bringing them to

change their policies. I think

- you ask me how long do I

think we have. I would say

somewhere between one to three

years. They have to come to

this meeting on October 1st and

present convincing evidence as

to the purpose of their nuclear

program. We don't believe that

they can present convincing

evidence that it's only for

peaceful purposes, but we are

going to put them to the test

on October 1st. A group of

Aboriginal ranges have left the

dry heart of Australia to visit

a very wet part of Tasmania.

For some, it's their very first

trip out of the Northern

Territory. John Hughes, track

builder. Philippa Duncan from the Stateline program joined

them.

How old are you? 38. Has it

just been you haven't wanted to

leave the Territory? Just never

even thought of leaving the

Territory. Just happy to stay

at home. Then came an

invitation too good to refuse.

Tasmanian track builder John

Hughes was helping Stephen

booth and the Aboriginal crew

on the trail west of Alice

Springs of he asked the rangers

south to see how bush-walking

trags are built in

Tasmania It's really good

training for them to come down

here and see what we can do

with dry stone and it's very

similar to Alice where it's

dry. Not today - dry, you know,

but when it rapes, it rains

heaps. I made sure they

understood it's very cold down

here. Out of that, 9 of the

guys decided they could handle

the cold. What most people may

not understand is the close

connection these fellas have

with their families and their

land, and that was a big

decision for them to leave both

their families and their

land. Wasn't expecting it like

this, hey. Yeah. So it would be

alright if it was

sunny? Yes. You weren't warned

about Tasmania's weather? I was

told it would be cold. That's

about it. We just heard it

would be cold, but not raining.

He tricked us! The downpour

provided the perfect conditions

for John Hughs to show of a

dry-stone arch bridge on a

popular track to the bay. The

bridge was built without mortar

and is a first for an

Australian walking track. As

you pull the framework out,

when he let it drop, all the

rocks just tighten it up and it

makes an amazing sound of all

crunching. The rocks all just tightening... everyone stood

back and was just amazed by the

sound. John Hughes has been

designing and building tracks

for a quarter of a century. If

you've tackled the Overland

Track, Lake saint Clare or

Mount Wellington, chances are

you've walked on some of his

handiwork. He is also

responsible for Victoria's

Great Ocean Walk, the track to

the promontory light station

and of course tracks of the

Patira trail. Definitely John's

crew is legendary on the track. In fact, some of the work

they've done if the last 20

years is still there - in fact,

better now than the day they

laid it. Tadz's big wet didn't dampen enthusiasm for the

track. Really good. Really good

track. Give us a fair idea how

we're going to do it. The 1.5km

stretch of track took 10 people

two years to build. If walkers

take the time to look, they

will see reminders of the past,

and animals like dogs and

snakes in the beautifully

crafted dry-rock walls. You

could have just thrown the

rocks in and done it quickly,

but we sort of tried to blend

it in. Every day is different,

but the rocks sort of talk to

you saying, "Pick me! Pick me!"

It's quite funny. People just

get the natural feel tore it

after a while. The whole idea

in the Territory is many of the

non-Indigenous people come and

go all the time, whereas, of

course, the understanding is

Indigenous mob - their country,

their land, they're always

going to be there and if we can

pass these skills onto the

local people, then those skill

also stay and with people like

John, we can hopefully learn

these skills and then keep them

in the Territory and keep them

particularly in our case on the

Larapintra trail. The ranges

have quickly warmed to some of

Tasmania's other attractions. Their first

impression - particularly after

one day in Melbourne, was

Tasmania was really, really

friendly. People certainly -

their initial reaction to seeing an Aboriginal person

from the Territory was a little

bit of shock, but they very

quickly got over it and were

very, very, very friendly, and

that's what the guys are

talking about, is how friendly

Tasmania is, and they seem to

be enjoying the food as well -

it's quite fresh down here.

Next stop is Bruni island,

Mount Wellington and Lake saint

Clare. They're excited about

seeing the snow. I just don't

think they really understand

how cold it can get. So it will be... Make our first

snowman! I want to go home!

Go home! REPORTER: Get warm? Philippa Duncan reporting

there from a very chilly Tasmania. Beautiful cold. You

are watching ABC News

Breakfast. The top stories this

morning - the Philippines has called for international aid

after severe flooding across

the country. Rising waters have

killed at least 80 people and

lft a quarter of a million

others homeless. Floods have

destroyed homes and washed away

roads. The Federal Government

is set to reveal and improvement of about $10

billion in the Budget bottom line. 'The Australian'

newspaper says the forecast of

a $3 2 billion Budget deficit for last financial year has

been slashed. And the Academy Award-winning director Roman

Polanski has been detained in

Switzerland. Polanski is facing

extradition for the US for a

30-year-old sex crime. He fled

the US in 19 78 after pleading

guilty to having sex with a

13-year-old girl.

Let's have a look at today's

papers and we're joined by

Monash university lecturer

Waleed spz Aly. Good morning.

The G20 and 'The Australian' I'm starting with today because

it probably has the most

extensive coverage on the

issue. This is page 5 which is

almost entirely devoted on it.

Greg Sheridan is arguing - and

this is interesting, is that although Kevin Rudd can't claim

all the credit for the G20

becoming the premier economic

forum in world politics, he can

certainly claim some of it

around that that a significant

factor in this shift has been

Australia's increased reception

in Europe because of the passing of the Howard

Government which was not

focused at all on Europe, and

orientated more towards the US,

so the idea here is that the Rudd Government or Kevin Rudd

particularly himself, has been

spending a lot of time hounding

the phones particularly in

Europe to try to win over

people in the G8 to expand this

into the G20, and so his

foreign policy direction and

his sort of Foreign Affairs

wonk ishness, I guess, has paid

off handsomely and turned

Australia into more of a

globally orientated nation,

rather than one that was orientated towards a particular

alliance. That seems to me a

useful insight that Greg

Sheridan is providing, but also

an interesting shift in the

rhetoric, because 'The

Australian' also is also

running an editorial on this

giving two thumbs up to Kevin

Rudd and saying that one of the

things that this has done is

shown that the previous

approach of John Howard and his

personal relationship with

George Bush is an outdated,

outmoted approach and we're now

moving into a different sort of

era of international

politics. To what extent,

though, do you think Rudd's

lobbying on that role was

incidental and the G20 - it was

inevitable the G20 would

replace G8 anyway? I'm glad

you asked that because that

leads us into Paul Kelly's

piece. Paul Kelly still thinks

Kevin Rudd's role was

important, that that lobbying

to have an effect, but to say

if Kevin Rudd didn't exist that

it wouldn't have happened is

stretching it a bit far and

everyone seems to acknowledge

that. Paul Kelly's analysis put

this more into the context of

global political trends

generally and particularly the

decline of US power, and so

what this is is suddenly you

have a more cosmopolitan

president in the United States

with Barack Obama as distinct

from a more lateral President

in George W. Bush who

originally came into the White

House as a domestic president

not, nlg 9/11 came along and

changed that. But also at a

time when the limits on US

power is being exposed more, the with global economic crisis

and the war in Iraq and so son.

So now have an American

administration which is

recognising the limitations of

what it can do and recognising

that there needs to be multilateral action on a whole

range of things, which partly

is borne through the failures

of the Bush era. So for Paul

Kelly this is an expression, as

much of anything, of a US

recognition of itself rather

than of anything to do with

Australia. When you add Greg

Sheridan's point in that this

also had a lot to do with

Europe - the G8 is basically

Europe plus America and Japan -

that's basically what it is.

You still have to win over

Europe in that case, and so

Australia's standing in Europe

and also in, you know, the

undoubted importance now of

China and India make a very

important - add very important

dimensions to that. Moving on,

but I guess still staying with

a subject that links in with

all of that, the 'Sydney

Morning Herald' is looking at

Australians' response generally

to our continued presence in

Afghanistan? Well, a couple

of articles here, one in the

'Sydney Morning Herald' and one

in the 'The Age'. The 'Sydney

Morning Herald' is running a

piece on a study that has just

been done, a research of UMR

research, a poll of a thousand

voters showing that support for

the war in Afghanistan in

Australia is really on the

Wayne. This used to be the good

war that the whole nation was

behind, Iraq being the counter

to that, but it's now seeming

that that is far from the case.

The nation is more than ever

devoted on this. 41% of voters

support Australian troops being

there, 35% are opposed. That's

to Australian troops being

there at all. When you start asking the question whether or

not we should have more, 26% of

Australians agree, or voters

agree that more troops - they

would support more troops being

sent. 51% are opposed. Which

says that the nation isn't

entirely solid on the cause, I

think, because if you are right

on board with the cause, wow

probably support more troops,

unless you had some kind of

policy reason for saying it

wouldn't work, and I doubt -

this is an assumption, but I

doubt that a lot of responds to

that kind of survey are

necessarily thinking in policy

terms. I think they're thinking

more about do we want

Australian lives risked, for

example. There has been much discussion about whether Kevin

Rudd and others, his deputies,

have made the case obvious and

well enough and the same point

has been made in the United

States about Barack Obama,

about why we need to be there.

That was a given by quite some

time. I'm sure it's going to

seem to some people that this

is almost a sudden change

because right up until the

moment is changes, it seemed it

was a fine idea. Yes, I think

so. Once they realised how it

turned out - it's funny how

when a war starts going badly,

the reasons for being there... The timing does

support that. It started to go

badly some time ago, nonetheless Australian attitudes stayed positive

towards it. Well, I don't

know that these questions were

asked until quite recently.

What we do know and this is

where the report in the age age

becomes relevant is that Barack

Obama is in a position now

where he is going to have to

start considering sending more

troops. We know that General

Stanley McCrystal who is

heading the effort there is

about to ask the President to

send between 10 and 40,000 more

troops, but what 'The Age'

report does mention that is

interesting is that Barack

Obama - while he is getting

that recommendation, is

reluctant and is also finding

other people in his ear who are

sceptical that this is a

strategy that will work. These

people include Colin poul, but

also include other Democrat

senators like John Kerry and

Reid. If there is an - if Barack Obama doesn't feel that

this is something he wants to

do, he may not go for a surge ,

which of course gets Kevin Rudd

off the hook because if Kevin

Rudd is asked, that puts

himself in a difficult

position. He has positioned

himself to say no, but I don't

know that he would. Which

doesn't leave a very bright

future for Afghanistan Well,

you could argue that a troop

surge wouldn't, either. And the

Kiwis? This is fantastic.

This is from the 'Daily

Telegraph', but a survey just

being done in z asking New

Zealanders to list the greatest

living New Zealander and

they've come up with someone

who has been dead for 1861

months. Greatest living? Yes,

greatest living. Maybe they

didn't focus on the living

bit. Maybe he is immortal.

What's interesting. Second

place is former Prime Minister

Helen Clark who they just voted

out of office. I'm not sure how

that works! I think this is all

indicating there must be a very

small pool of talent from which

to pick. Is that what that

means? I'm not going to say

that. Does this show go to New

Zealand. Come on, they've got

all the members of split ends.

Phar Lap? Well, is he not

living. And a whole locket lot

of actors that Australia has

claimed are Australians. Take

Russell Crowe. Did Kerry make

the list at all All Blacks legends were mentioned. Puzzling that all

morning. Thanks for having

me. Now with a look at sport,

here is Paul Kennedy Good

morning. Cadel Evans has won the World Championship road

race in Switzerland. Evans

broke away from the other

contenders with 10km to go in

the 262km race around held on

all the way to the finish. He

is the first Australian to win

that race since cycling

involved professional riders.

Mark Webber's dream of a World

Championship in Formula One

will have to wait another year.

His brakes failed him in the Singapore Grand Prix and he

didn't finish. He can no longer

beat overall leader Jenson

Button because he doesn't have

enough points at this stage.

Lewis Hamilton, his second

victory of the season. Jarryd

Hayne was cleared to play after

a review of an incident against

the Bulldogs . There it is

there. You can decide for

yourself. The decision is

curious because a West Tigers

player was suspended for 3

weeks for a similar incident

not long ago. There you go.

Now, that race that Cadel Evans

won - 5km - the finish line

being 5km from his home base

over there in swits land. A

magnificent result. An

Australian has won the World

Championship road race once

before - Jack Huben back in 19

50, back when the event

included only amateur riders,

and so Cadel Evans there. He

said after the race and I

quote, "Golly, it's been a

great week for Geelong." He

comes from Geelong. That World

Championship road race is

coming to Geelong and Melbourne

next year, but Cadel has

already said that the course

that he rode last night suits

his riding much better because

of the positioning of a couple

of different uphill stages and

so he has taken his opportunity

there And overcome the problems

with the Tour de France. What

was his specific problems there? Well, the Tour de France

- he didn't have a great team,

which was his main problems an

the Australians can work

together in those World

Championships and they would be

pleased for him. Thanks, Paul.

Now with the weather, here is

Vanessa We've already seen some

pictures of Tasmania this

morning. These pictures were

filmed in Melbourne overnight.

A band of rain is still moving

over the east of Victoria and

winds are still gusting around

90km/h at Wilsons Promontory.

Lots and lots of rain over the

weekend. To the satellite image

and still a cloudy day for the

south-east with showers in

Tasmania and also Victoria. A

band of cloud and a burst of

showers for WA's south-west and

still fairly dry despite some

cloud that's sitting over the

Northern Territory and inland

Queensland. This crazy weather

has been mostly due to a deep

low that is moving easterly,

allowing strong winds and most

of the showers to ease from the

south-east today. Further to

the east, a cold morning for

inland parts, but mostly sunny

underneath this high, and for

southern Western Australia warm

gusty northerlies ahead of a

cold front due to bring a

showery change to the south

evident. In Queensland, extreme

fire conditions for the

south-east coast, Darling Downs and Granite

and Granite Belt.

New South Wales - frost on

the northern ranges. Isolated

showers about the south-east.

In Victoria, minor flood

warnings for the western port

catchment. Showers near and

south of the divide. Morning

hail and thunder thrugts

Gippsland should clear. Jordan

River - major flood ing warnings. South Australia -

isolated showers frost and fog

over the agricultural area. The

showers will extend to the

lower south-east this

afternoon. In Western

Australia, you've got a cooler

change that will move through

the south-west T will bring

windy conditions and showers.

Hot gusty northerly winds about the south-east. For Western

Australia's north, hot and dry

for the Territory - mostly

sunny, cold morning in the

south ahead of warm northerly winds. Looking ahead to

tomorrow:

Still ahead on ABC News

Breakfast we will hear from

John Ryan about Australia's

dependence on prescription

medicines. More on that new

this morning that Australia is

about $10 billion better off

than expected. Our Budget

deficit isn't going to be so

bad. Stay with us on ABC News

Breakfast. That's coming up

after this short break.

The Philippines calls

for international aid. Severe

floods leave more than a

quarter of a million

homeless. Signs of an economic

rebound - the Federal

Government to show a $10

billion improvement in the

Budget bottom line. Film

director Roman Polanski

detained in Switzerland 30

years after he fled the US on a

rape charge. And Cadel Evans

bounces back to win the road

race at the World Championships

in Switzerland. Good morning.

It's Monday, 28 September. I'm

Joe O'Brien And I'm Virginia

Trioli. The top story on ABC

News Breakfast - the

Philippines has appealed for

international aid to help deal

with floods that have killed at

least 80 people. The country's

biggest deluge in 40 years

triggered mud slides, buried

homes and turned roads into

raging rivers. At least a

quarter of a million people are

now homeless. The BBC

reports. Even here, where

people are used to typhoons, they rarely see anything like

this. Nothing but debris

keeping them afloat. It was one

of many dramatic rescue

attempts across the Northern

Philippines as the rain fell

and just kept falling. Roads

turned to rivers. People took

he have Fuge where they could,

even on power cables, as the

water level rose and most of

Manila was left under water.

TRANSLATION: It happened very

fast. All of a sudden

everything is under water. I

was not able to save anything

except the shirt that I am

wearing. The Government called

it a hundred-year flood. This

year has already been a deadly

typhoon season in South-East

Asia. The national TV

weatherman blamed global

warming. Others blamed the

Government for not moving

quickly enough. As the rain

stopped and the floodwaters

receded, the extent of the

damage across the capital city

and 25 provinces became obvious. The number of dead and missing increased throughout

the day and is expected to

continue going up. And as a

thick layer of mud covered

everything, the survivors began

the clean-up. Short of food,

water and shelter. A third of a