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(generated from captions) Swine flu declared a global

pandemic - the World Health Organisation concedes the

spread of the virus is now unstoppable. A warning unstoppable. A warning that

Kevin Rudd's health insurance

plan could force 100,000 to opt

out of the private system. An

Australian woman jailed for

assaulting Kuwait's Emir could

be on her way home. Cristiano

Ronaldo is on his way to Real

million transfer. Madrid after a record $161

Live. This Program is Captioned

Good morning, it's Friday, 12

June, I'm Joe O'Brien, I'm June, I'm Joe O'Brien,

Tamara Oudyn, the top story

ABC News Breakfast, Tamara Oudyn, the top story on

ABC News Breakfast, the World

Health Organisation has

declared a swine flu pandemic.

The lifting of the alert to

Phase 5 and 6 signals the first

flu pandemic in more than 40

years. The virus has spread to

74 countries, the spike in the

Victorian cases is a reason

behind the upgrade. Health Minister Nicola Roxon says there's no evidence to suggest

the virus is mutate engine

Australia. The WHO is pushing

drug companies to produce drug companies to produce a

vaccine as soon as possible. It

may not happen until

September. The world is now at

the start of the 2009 influenza pandemic. We are in the

earliest days of the pandemic.

The virus is spreading under The virus is spreading under a

close and careful watch. No

previous pandemic has been

detected so early, or watched

so closely in real time right

at the very beginning. With the

announcement from Phase 5 # to

Phase 6 clearly sends an

important message to country

that irrespective of what state that irrespective of what

of the epidemic is in the

country, they must maintain

continuous vigilance. As I

said, influenza virus is full

of surprises. For more Europe correspondent Emma Alberici

joins us now from London. So,

Emma, what does the fact that a pandemic has been pandemic has been declared,

actually mean? Well, it doesn't

actually mean that the disease

is any more deadly than it was

before. It only indicates that

the spread is truly global.

That is what the World Health

Organisation has conceded in

this announcement, raising the

level from 5 to 6, that it's a

global problem, that it can no

longer be contained within countries, within communities,

and this is the thing. When

they raised the level to number

6, they are essentially saying

that the spread of the virus

has moved among communities in

more than two countries, that

is obviously evident with, as

you mentioned, it's now in 74

countries, having infected more

than 28,000 people. Has the WHO

indicated that it will change

the way it's dealing with this the way it's dealing with

disease in - disease?. Well,

one of the moves behind raising

the level to six is to say to

countries, "You must remain

vigilant", as Margaret Chan, the Director-General of the Director-General of the

World Health Organisation said

there, but also not complacent

because there is a risk that

the more people that can tract

the disease, the more likely it

is to - contract the disease

the more likely it is to mutate

and become something far more

worrying than it is to date. To

date there's been 140 deaths worldwide, and it's important

as a footnote to consider that

every year normal seasonal

influenza kills around half a

million people throughout the

world. So this is in its

infancy, and the World Health

Organisation is very clear to

say that the most important

thing about this level being

raised to number 6 is that it's

been detected early, that as a consequence countries can

become more prepared, not

alarmed, but definitely more

alert. Have the warnings

pertaining to the people most

at risk changed at all. This

was something curious,

actually, out of the WHO

briefing today. That was that

what they can see so far - what they can see so far - and

there is so much that's still

unknown about the H1N1

so-called swine virus, what

they can detect is that it's

being most common transmitted

between young adults, and that, between young adults, and

in fact, those over 60 years

old seem to have some kind of immunity that they perhaps

picked up in the 1950s, in

their early years, because

those over 60 don't seem to be

catching it at nearly the rate

as young adults. And, of

course, those who are infirm

and already vulnerable because

they have other illnesses,

perhaps, or low immunity will

always be those most at risk as

well. The increase in cases in

Australia cited as one of the

reasons for the upgrade to

Phase 6. What kind of coverage

is that getting in the northern

helmise fer. It's been huge, - helmise fer. It's been huge,

Northern Hemisphere. It's been

huge, actually. Australia,

Victoria and Melbourne has been

coverage here in throughout the television

coverage here in the United

Kingdom and elsewhere in

Europe. The interesting thing

for the Northern Hemisphere,

for Europe and America is to

watch how the virus spreads and

how it might change in

countries like Australia and

Chile and Argentina in the

southern hemisphere, where you

are already in the autumn and

winter months, in the

traditional flu season, so

there has always been a concern

that the second wave of infections throughout Europe

and America will hit as the traditional flu seasons

approach, abs the autumn and

winter near. So this is why the

race to develop a vaccine is

on, because they are so

concerned that as the temperature starts to fall in

this part of the world, that

we'll see the kind of numbers

escalating as they have been in

Australia, so all eyes are on

Australia at the moment to Australia at the moment to see

what happens there, in that

traditional flu season, and

whether it mutates and whether,

you know, some are more

susceptible than others, who

may have different strains of

flue. Finally, as the disease

spreads, do you get the sense

that health authorities are

gaining a better understanding gaining a better

of it. Well, look, this is of it. Well, look, this is the

frustrating thing, I think, for

the WHO, and also the medical

officers of every country

throughout the world. There is

so very little known about it.

WHO constantly talks about the

fact that flue is a very

surprising illness. Everything

about it can be a great

surprise, and that is the

biggest concern, they like to

know exactly what the make-up

is of every disease so,

therefore, they can attack it.

Having said that, a Having said that, a vaccination

for the H1N1 virus is well and

truly under way by the

manufacturer glochlo Smith

Klein, they came out today to - GlaxoSmithKline. They came out

saying while production is in

its infancy, it's under way,

they should be in mass

production by July with greater

numbers available to the

general community in the months

following that. It will be,

following that. It will be, if

you like, just in the nick of

time for the winter months in

Europe and America. So much

unknown about the virus, far

more unknown than known. Emma

Alberici, in London, thank

you. In other news - Access

Economics forecast that four

times as many people as

Treasury expected may drop their private health cover

under the Rudd Government's new

plan, access predicts up to

100,000 may go without private

health insurance. The

Government says higher health

costs due to means testing

rebates will be offset by tax

cuts. An Australian woman

convicted of assaulting the

ruling Emir of Kuwait could be

on her way home, on her way home, 44-year-old

Nasrah Al Shamery was sentenced

in April for two years jail for

the verbal assault, during an

altercation with security

officers at Kuwait adds

airport. She's been in custody

since December. The father of

tennis player Jelena Dokic has

been jailed for 15 months for threatening to blow-up

threatening to blow-up the Australian Embassy in Australian Embassy in Belgrade.

Damir Dokic says he's been

sentenced for threatening to

kill the Australian Ambassador

and storing illegal weapons,

his threats parked by a

magazine interview in magazine interview in which

Jelena Dokic claimed she left

her family because of her father's abusive

behaviour. Bosnian television

telecast recent footage of what

it says is Ratko Mladic, but

several Serbian leaders say the

pictures are at least eight

years old. The footage emerged

days before the European

Union's Foreign Ministers are

to discuss Serbian's efforts to

catch Ratko Mladic, he's wanted

for genocide. Passengers from a

stricken Airbus A330 have safely returned to Australia

after an emergency landing in

Gaum. More than 200 were on the

flight from Japan to the Gold

Coast when fire broke out in

the cockpit. Another plane was

sent from Sydney to retrieve

passengers to the island and

taken to Brisbane. Former

Labor leader Mark Latham has

labelled the Australian Defence

Force meatheads with limited

intelligence and primeval

interests. His outburst in a

newspaper column drew

condemnation from defence

supporters, but so far nothing

that strong has come from his

former colleagues who now former colleagues who now hold high office. From high office. From Canberra,

Greg Jennett reports. He was

ever the fighter. I'm deadly

with the Nerf bat. Never the

warrior. What's that do. Mark

Latham concealed his contempt

for the Defence Force during

his Opposition leadership, now

he's uninhibited. In an opinion

peace targetting his formal

mate Joel Fitzgibbon, a mate Joel Fitzgibbon, a vintage

Mark Latham sprayed against:

He's obviously insin uting

that people in the Defence

Force are some form of

subnormal people who love

killing. That's not on in this

society. Mark Latham returned

to a theme first explored in

the 'Latham Diaries', this time

though taking it further,

leaving a Largo Lad exposed to

demands to repud -- Labor

Government exposed to demands

to repudiate him There are

thousands of families that have

lost a husbands, partner, son

or brother wearing our uniform

under our flag in Afghanistan,

every person who wears our

uniform will be deeply offended

by what has been said by Mr

Latham. There was no repudiation. Kevin Rudd repudiation. Kevin Rudd didn't

stop for questions tide. It's

good to see you guys picking on

someone your own size. Into

through his office he says: iform under our flag in Afghanistan, every person who wears our uniform will be deeply offended by what has been said by Mr Latham. There was no repudiation. Kevin Rudd didn't stop for questions

tide. It's good to see you guys picking on someone your own size. Into through his office

he says: His Deputy offered

more of the same. The men and women of the Australian Defence

Force do a first-class job. A

fantastic job. It isn't enough

for defenders of the Defence

Force, they expect more, not

only because the military can't

climb into the ring, but

because this is a Government

that hasn't hesitated to

weigh-in on other

weigh-in on other media

scandals of recent

days. Compare Rudd's admonition of Rangi Chase These guys

should collectively get up and

hang their head in shame. Or

his and Julia Gillard's

interest in celebrity interest in celebrity chef

Gordon Ramsey. I think he

should confine himself to the

kitchen. A new form of

low-life. They can condemn

the Rangi Chase, Rugby League,

and so-called celebrity chefs,

why not a former Australian

politician makes despicable statements. Condemnation

fatigue, perhaps. Greg Jennett with that report. Deputy Prime Minister Julia Gillard Minister Julia Gillard says the

Federal Government is sticking

with official Treasury

estimates that the number of

unemployed will peak at 120

million in 2011, saying the

Government has done its best to

cushion the impact. I'm sticking with official

estimates, Treasury modelled

what it thought the global

recession would mean for our

economy, and with our fiscal

stimulus supporting more than

200,000 jobs, Treasury expected

unemployment to rise to 8.5%,

for that to happen over for that to happen over a

period of time, unemployment in

the terms of economists is a

lag indicator, it comes slowly,

so that peak is expected in

2011. They are the latest

official forecasts, there's a

lot of volatility in the global

economy, a lot of volatility in our economy. Deputy Prime

Minister Julia Gillard speaking on 7.30 Report last on 7.30 Report last night.

Hayden Cooper joins us now from Canberra for more. Canberra for more. The Deputy Prime Minister there was

speaking in the wake of those

unemployment figures from

yesterday. There was a pretty

positive reaction to those

figures, despite the fact that

1700 people or more people were

on the doll queues. Yes,

because 5.7% was viewed as because 5.7% was viewed as not

that bad. Australia has been

there before recently March,

and now we are back at the same

point of 5.7% unemployment, so

while not happy about it, I think that the general feeling

around here is that the

Government would be pretty

relieved that the number didn't

go higher. The thing to watch

now will be whether the initial

levels of 8.5% by the end of

next year are still reached,

but as you just saw, Julia

Gillard is not quite ready to

suggest that that is not the

case. Hayden, one of the most controversial Budget

initiatives were the changes to

the private health insurance

rebate. We have a report out

now questioning the Governments

figures on that. Yes, and this

is one more bill which could be

defeated in the senate in the

next fortnight. The Coalition

opposes the news means test on

the private health insurance

rebate and crossbenches have

their doubts as well. Outside

the Parliament some of the

private health providers are

trying to turn their trying to turn their discontent

into new figures to use in

their argument. Catholic health

Australia is the latest, it has

gone to Access Economicses and

commissioned a study on what

the impact might be. The

verdict is that up to 100,000

Australians might ditch their

private health cover as a

result of the these changes,

and that is something like four

times the figure predicted by

Treasury. So it's a bit more

pessimistic, and another set of

statistics which will be lobbed

into the mix and used by

opponents of this change are - but it is hard to but it is hard to say whether

or not these figures will turn

out to be correct. It's not hard to say whether Kevin Rudd

is going to continue with his

attempts to sound blokey. Fair

crack of the whip, Joe, come on. That was the Prime

Minister's response yesterday.

He tongue in cheek had a bit of

a laugh at himself, and gave

his own back to some of the

criticism in the paper for his

Australian language he's been

using lately, fair shake of the

sauce bottle was his favourite,

which came out a few times the

other day. One language expert

puts it the best today in the

papers when he says, "The

problem for Kevin Rudd is that

he's pulling out these phrases

from the back of his head which

were lodge indeed there, like,

30 years ago. It's not the sort

of strin which is in common use

today". That's why he looks a

little silly. Hayden Cooper in Canberra, thank Canberra, thank Strine which is in common use today". That's why

he looks a little silly. Hayden Cooper in Canberra, thank

you. Now to the front pages of

the major newspapers around the

country. Australian - America's

top envoy raises key

difficulties with PM Kevin

Rudd's plan for an

Australian-led Asia-Pacific

community. Supporters of the

main challenger in today's Iranian presidential Iranian presidential elections

have been warned against street

rallies. The Financial Review rallies. The Financial Review - Australian Tax Offices high

wealth taskforce will target

executives and directors. This

tax time. Sydney Morning Herald

- Chinese authorities are

threatening trade sanctions

against BHP Biliton, and Rio

Tinto if they join their iron

ore businesses without

permission from China's

competition watchdog. The Age -

china's threatened sanctions

and swine flu the first global

pandemic as the WHO gives it

the highest alert the highest alert status. The

Herald Sun - ex-loosive

interview with the Melbourne

pilot landing a burning -

ex-loosive interview with a

Melbourne pilot landing a jet

in Gaum. And saints and the

Blues review. The Daily

Telegraph, a convicted child

killer has taken to cycling

around Sydney's western

suburbs. Adelaide Advertiser -

authorities to name and shame

restaurants failing hygiene

tests and an Indian student has

been attack indeed a shopping

centre. The Canberra Times centre. The Canberra Times -

primary school class

quarantined but says the school

has been kept open as a further

six cases of swine flu are

detected, bringing Canberra's

total number of infection toss

23. The Mercury - Tasmania

faces recession, job cuts and

empty covers in the wake of the

State Treasurer handing down a

$4.3 billion State $4.3 billion State Budget. The

Northern Territory News a woman

escapes injury after her car is

destroyed by a freight chain.

If you'd like to send feedback:

The top stories on ABC News

Breakfast - the world health or

nice has declared a swine flu

pandemic saying the recent

spike in Australian cases was a

contributing factor. More than

1300 people have the virus in

Australia, with around 30,000

infections worldwide. Access

Economics has warned Kevin

Rudd's health plan could force

100,000 people to opt out of

the private system. Four times

more people than Treasury

predicted may drop their health

cover under changes to rebates

and Medicare levy surcharges. An Australian woman

convicted of assaulting

Kuwait's ruler could be on her

way home. 44-year-old Nasrah Al

Shamery was sentenced to two

years jail for assaulting the

Emir during an altercation with

security guards at security guards at Kuwait's

airport. In finance news - Oz

Minerals shareholders voted

overwhelmingly to accept a $1.7

billion asset sale to China's

Minmetals. Intestors Minmetals. Intestors criticised

Oz Minerals's directors over their handling of the company

affairs. Neal Woolrich

reports. Oz Minerals may have

secured a company-saving deal,

shareholders were in an

unforgiving mood. Mood of the

shareholders was angry,

justifiably so. China's

Minmetals increased by 15% its

offer to buy most of Oz

Minerals assets. 92% of Oz

Minerals shares were cast in

favour of the $1.7 billion deal

What I can't understand is why

they didn't come to the

shareholders asking for more

equity, I can't believe in this

environment why we wouldn't

have stumped up a few more dollars. A proposal dollars. A proposal from

Macquarie Group fell flow and a

capitisation plan was re

rejected by the Oz Minerals

board on the ground it was

inferior to the Minmetals inferior to the Minmetals deal,

saying the increased offer

reflects the improvement in

commodity and equity

markets. When they came and

rescued us, they made, what was

what I thought was a generous

offer at the time. Thank gosh

they did. The market has moved

up a bit, we've been, of

course, discussing that in what

our perceptions had changed. Oz

Minerals will retain Minerals will retain the

Prominent Hill gold and copper

mine in South Australia along

with small projects, Barry

Cusack says it will leave Cusack says it will leave the

company debt freeholding half a

billion in cash, a far cry from

late last year when Oz Minerals

banking syndicate refused to

roll over the company's debt

facilities threatening its survival. Chief survival. Chief Executive

Andrew Michelmore says the

company was vulnerable company was vulnerable because

of the exposure to base

metals. We are hit faster metals. We are hit faster than

iron ore coal mineral

countries, with long-term

contracts. We take instant

prices off the LME, base metals

are hit faster than others. The

banks said they wanted their

money back. Warning that other

mining companies may face a

similar predicament as they

seek to roll over funding

arrangements. While the

Minmetals transaction received overwhelming support, Oz

Minerals faced a backlash Minerals faced a backlash on

executive pay. One-third of

shares cast in favour of the

non-binding poll of Oz

Minerals's remuneration report.

Longstanding director Michael

Egar received 56% of the vote,

well below 90% or more that

incumbent directors

attract. The key concern for

investors is the fall in

investments, and they are angry

about an $8 million payout

handed to Oxiana's former CEO

Owen Hegarty. If you look at

the downturn people suffered

since September, it looks a big

number, of course it does. At

the time it was what we had to

do to move forward. Minmetals

says the transaction is a

defining moment in its history.

The majority of Oz Minerals

employees will join the new

owners. Andrew Michelmore will

be Minmetals Australian CEO on completion of the transaction,

expected to occur in the next

week, and will retain a

shareholding in Oz Minerals,

and suggestions other investors

do the same Stick with Oz

Minerals, it has a great

future. You only need to look

at the graphs that Barry put up

to show that we have tracked

down with everyone else, and as

the market tracks up Oz

Minerals will track up, as

Barry has said, it's Barry has said, it's a

fantastic base, it will be

clear of debt, it's got huge prospectivity. After the experience of the past six

months, the board will have a

harder time selling an upbeat story to current and prospective shareholders. Neal

Woolrich reporting there. To

the figures now, US stocks

closed with mixed results closed with mixed results on

Wall Street:

In a few minutes Vanessa

O'Hanlon will be here with a

look at the weather. And a

review of newspapers, this

morning we'll be joined by

executive editor of Herald executive editor of Herald and

Weekly Times Alan Howe. With

sport Paul Kennedy. Manchester

United's Cristiano Ronaldo has

been sold to Real Madrid for

$161 # million, the Red Devils

will miss him, his transfer fee

will be used to underpin the club's business plan, club's business plan, BBC's

Mihir Bose reports. Cristiano

Ronaldo, achievements are the

stuff footballing dreams are

made of. Cristiano Ronaldo scores. In six seasons scores. In six seasons at

Manchester United he scored 118

goals On the brink, West

Ham. In January he was voted world Player of the world Player of the Year. To

Cristiano Ronaldo. Brilliant

finish. And today sold for ?80

million making him the world's

most expensive player, a price surprising the manager of the

world's richest club in

United's closest rival. The

level of investment they have

to allocate to get the top

players in the world is

obviously huge, that's

illustrated by the deals illustrated by the deals that

have been done in the last few

days. So if you want to enter

the market you have to pay that

money. United are the most

successful club in the Premier

League, they are cold hard

pragmatism to the club. The

controversial takeover by the

Florida based Glazers put on

debts of ?700 million. That

requires servicing, with a deal

like this, a player keen to go,

and Sir Alex Fergusson

agreeing, business logic

dictates the deal be

done. Structure of Reale allows

them to be Australia ten

tashes, less need to -

Australia ten tashes. There's

less need to control

costs. This deal shows the

football world has been fractured. Manchester United

and Reale continue to thrive,

others are struggling to

survive. Newcastle, north-east

is up for sale at a knock down

price of ?100 million, the

Irish sports channel needs ?50

million to stay in business,

its collapse jeopardising the

future of many clubs. Modern

footballers cherishes celebrities, Cristiano Ronaldo

is a special celebrity,

attracting interest while

holidaying in Los Angeles, his

pretty boy looks combining with

a stunning physique making him

attractive to marketeers, he's

another site. His driving

skills do not match his

footballing ones, and he can be cruel as demonstrated cruel as demonstrated through

the 2006 World Cup, when he got

his United team-mate Wayne

Rooney sent af. Manchester

United has an exciting history

full of legendary players.

Found at the Old Trafford,

while sorry to see Cristiano

Ronaldo, fans were confident of

future successful Shock,

horror, surprise - I wasn't

surprised, it's been coming for

a long time. A player like him

is a big loss. I'm sure we'll

bounce back and buy somebody

else. Cristiano Ronaldo's

skills will grace a different

stage, one where he felt he

belonged. As is often the case

in football. He may come back

to haunt Manchester

United. Mihir Bose reporting.

The Broncos playing The Broncos playing the

Bulldogs despite not playing

all week. The club said it

considered pulling out but

decided to go ahead with it because the players want because the players want to.

Karmichael Hunt has been

confirmed as the code's confirmed as the code's second

swine flu case. They'll go

ahead tonight. The inaugural

Australian football awards were

held in Sydney. Socceroos

goalkeeper Mark Schwarzer

capped a great season for cap

and country,

and country, named Player of

the Year. Tim Cahill named

player's player by his

peer. The first two games of

the Twenty20 World Cup have

been played surprise qualifier

Ireland beaten by New Zealand,

the Kiwis smacking 198 bowling

the Irish out for 115. England

set South Africa a target of

111 and the Proteas cruised to victory. Jacque Kallis making

50 and took two wickets, he

looks like a player of the tournament. Do you have any

idea what percentage of that money Cristiano Ronaldo gets

himself, the vast majority himself, the vast majority goes

to the club. The vast majority

goes to the club, he'll be on a

good pay packet. I'll do some

research and find out the breakdown. ABC News Breakfast

can be watched live on the web

from anywhere:

It's a frosty morning over

the east. Here is Vanessa

O'Hanlon. Good morning, once

again it is lots of minuses again it is lots of minuses in

Queensland for the peanut

capital of Australia

Kingaroy-4.2, Innis mini US

5.5, chilly temperatures due to

the clear skies. There's an air mass moving into South

Australia causing showers Australia causing showers for

Western Australia and South

Australia. Cloud over eastern

Victoria causing a few showers

in cold south-westerly winds. For Queensland, Victoria and

NSW, a frosty start to the

weekend ahead of a sunny day as

that high continues to move

further over NSW, after

tomorrow morning, the high

moving to the northern Tasman

relieving us of the chilly

mornings, a low maintaining

strong showery winds across southern Western Australia, the

cold front moving from the cold front moving from the west

to the south-east. Freshening

winds, light rain pushing winds, light rain pushing into

South Australia, Tasmania and

Victoria. Queensland - chilly

for southern inland areas,

isolated showers for Torres

Strait and Cape York peninsula.

South to Cardwell. NSW - fog

and frost, far south-west

getting a late shower. High

cloud over the inland parts. Victoria - severe frost

warnings, particularly for the

north, isolated showers north, isolated showers in

Gippsland clearing, showers

moving to the western border.

Tasmania isolated showers in

the north-west, moving to the

northern and western parts of

the state and into the evening.

For South Australia - cloudy

with stronger north-westerly

winds along the coast. In the

south heavy rain over the west,

light rain for the rest of the

state. Western Australia -

showers moving from the West

Coast, moving further inland,

windy, showers, odd storms

across the southern

parts. North - isolated

showers, further showers over

south-west Kimberley. Warmer

winds for the Alice. Ahead to

the weekend -

See you in half an hour.

The top story on ABC News

Breakfast - the World Health Organisation has declared a Organisation has declared

swine flu pandemic, the first

in 40 years. It's raised the

alert level to the maximum of

six, and warned of a wave of

new infections, Natalie

MacGregor reports. It's

official, we are in the midst

of our first flu pandemic in

four decades. The world is now

at the start of the 2009

influenza pandemic. Despite the declaration, declaration, the World Health

Organisation says it won't

recommend closing borders, or

restricting the movement of

people or goods and

services. The virus is

spreading under a close and

careful watch. No previous

pandemic has been detected so

early. Reaching six on the WHO

scale doesn't mean the swine

flu virus has become more

deadly, but it will trigger

heightened health measures in

193 countries. Phase 6 doesn't

mean anything concern severity,

it's concerning geographic spread. We have to different

between the two. H1N1 is making

its presence felt throughout

Asia weeks after the outbreak

in Mexico. In Hong Kong in Mexico. In Hong Kong a

number of students returned

positive tests. With the source

unknown the Government acted

quickly. All primary schools,

kindergartens, childcare

centres, and special schools

will suspend classes In

Australia the number of swine

flu victims jumped to more than

1200, the fifth largest number

worldwide. Five people are in

intensive care, though the

Government is playing down

those cases. Those who are

hospitalised generally have

been had other existeding

conditions and

complications. The Philippines

confirmed new cases, China confirmed new cases, China too

warned to brace in a surge of

infections. WHO advise China to

make sure the health care facilities in the company are

well equipped. In all there's

been been 28,000 infections

reported in 74 countries, 141

people have died. If you have

thoughts on the upgrading

thoughts on the upgrading of swine flu to pandemic stated

us, here is how you can

contribute to ABC News

Breakfast, you can send emails to:

In other news - four times as

many people as Treasury

predicts may drop their private

health insurance under the Rudd Government's Budget Government's Budget changes,

Access Economics predicts up to

100,000 people may decide to go

without private health, that's

significantly more than the

Treasury's forecast of around

25,000. The Government says

higher health cost due to

means-tested rebates will be

offset by tax cuts. An

Australian woman convicted of

insulting the ruling Emir of

Kuwait could be on her way

home. 44-year-old Nasrah Al

Shamery was sentenced in April

to two years jail, allegedly

assaulting the Emir during an

altercation with security

officers at Kuwait's airport. She's been in custody since

December. The father of tennis player Jelena Dokic has been

jailed for 15 months in Serb

yah, Damir Dokic sentenced yah, Damir Dokic sentenced for

threatening to blow-up the

embassy in Belgrade. He

threatened to blow-up the

ambassador, and illegal weapons

were found at his home. Footage

emerges of the Serbian emerges of the Serbian suspect

Ratko Mladic, Bosnian

television broadcast of the

images, but several say they

are eight years old, are eight years old, European

Foreign Ministers are to

discuss effort to catch Ratko

Mladic in the coming days, he's

wanted for genocide. Passengers

from a stricken Jetstar Airbus

A330 have returned to Australia

after been emergency landing on

Gaum. More than 200 were on

board the flight when the

cockpit caught fire. A plane

was sent from Sydney to

retrieve them from the island retrieve them from the

and bring them to Brisbane.

There are concerns that

today's elections in Iran could

be rigged. Iranian be rigged. Iranian President

Mahmoud Ahmedinejad is under

serious challenge with

reformers drawing large crowds

at rallies in the capital. Real

power rests with the Islamic

clerics, but young Iranians are

more defiant of the country's

hard-line reliage cows leadership. Middle East

Correspondent Ben Knight

reports from tairan. Music and

dancing are still officially

illegal in Iran, as these young

men are cakely reminded. As

this - quickly reminded. As

this campaign gains moment Um

the young are pushing laws on

dress and behaviour to the

limit. Saying things that would

normally land them in jail. TRANSLATION: I was TRANSLATION: I was loving

George W. Bush, I hoped he'd

attack Iran getting rid of this

regime. More than two nirds of

Iran's population is under -

thirds of Iran's population is

under 30, too young to remember

the Islamic Revolution. Their

desire for change exploded in

Iran during this

campaign. Every day thousands

of them are on the streets

wearing Green, the symbol of

the reformist can't

the reformist can't date

Mir-Hossein Mousavi. I love Mir-Hossein Mousavi. I love you

Mir-Hossein Mousavi, I love

victory. The authorities are

giving them a long leash, for

now.

To borrow a phrase, there's

something happening here, what something happening here,

it is isn't exactly clear, this

has been going on for a week,

all of this excitement and

enthusiasm. The question now

becomes what happens if the

election doesn't go the way

these people want them too. Can

call of this desire for change

simply be put back in the bottle.

TRANSLATION: I hope TRANSLATION: I hope ma'am

Mahmoud Ahmedinejad is

re-elected so the chaos goes on

until the regime collapses. Mahmoud Ahmedinejad

still has enormous support.

Especially in the poorer more

Conservative parts of the

country, but here in

Tehran. These supporters are

useless rich kids, they can't

understand he's the best

President in Iran's history. On

the fine day of the the fine day of the campaign

Mahmoud Ahmedinejad appeared on

State television to make a

final attack on his three

TRANSLATION: We have precise opponents.

information that they believe

in their defeat, the nation is

against them and they are

beaten. They want to create

tension, I demand the nation to

keep its calm. As the polling

day draws closer Mir-Hossein

Mousavi supporters warn of

chaos if there's signs that

this election has been rigged.

A Guardian Council spokesman says cheating is says cheating is impossible.

TRANSLATION: We give assurance

s to all supporters and

candidates. They should be

confident every single vote

will be protected. Authorities

warn that they are ready to

deal with any post election

violence. Ben Knight with that report. In Western Australia

the State coroner will hand

down findings in a long running

inquest into the death of an

Aboriginal elder who suffered

fatal heatstroke while being

transported in a prison van.

The inquest heard evidence the man was left in the van man was left in the van for

hours in temperatures exceeding

40 degrees before collapsing

and dying, for more Andrew O'Connor joins us from the

Perth newsroom. Thanks for

joining us, what are people

expecting to come from the

coroner's findings today. I think the expectation this

morning is that there'll be a

strong report that will have

findings critical of the Correctional Services findings critical of the WA

Department, and the contractor

GSL. Over recent months the

inquest heard evidence pointing

to systematic failures from the

time Mr Ward was taken into

custody on a drink-driving

charge through to the time he

was found unconscious in the

back of a van. His family

expresses a desire that the

findings and the report will

hold someone accountable for

his death. They spoke of his death. They spoke of a

desire for someone to be charged in relation to his

death so they like others will

look closely at the coroner's

report. Has this case attracted

a lot of attention. It has, probably unusually so, I think that's because of the

circumstances of this case. We

had a respected western desert

Elder bundled into the back of

a van, taken on a 4-hour

journey in searing desert heat.

He was put in a van without

functioning airconditioning.

That fact was not known to the

guards transporting him.

Neither did they make a single

check on his welfare during the

course of the 4-hour journey,

when they did, the temperature when they did, the

in the back of the van reached

50 degrees, he was unconscious,

slumped in the back, his body slumped in the back, his

temperature nearly 42, he had

third degree burns on his body

from the searing floor of the

van. Those circumstances

shocked and shattered shocked and shattered his

family and community, and the

wider community, have created a

sense of disbelief at a sense of disbelief at a time

when someone who left a dog in

the back of a a car could face

cruelty charges. Are indigenous people optimistic that things

will change after the report is

handed down. I think they are

hopeful, but I think they are

probably profoundly ambivalent

about the prospect of change,

his family hopes this lp lead

to a dramatic change in - will

lead to a dramatic change about

the way Aboriginals are dealt

with in custody. There's been doubts expressed doubts expressed about whether

or not the State Government

will have the will or will have the will or be

prepared to commit the money to

deal with these sorts of

systematic problems, because

way back in 2001, the inspector

of custodial services raised

doubts about the condition of

prison vans, saying they were

dangerous, but nothing was done

to upgrade them. They look back

as far as 20 years ago when

Royal Commission into as far as 20 years ago when the

Aboriginal deaths in custody

made 300 recommendationing,

here they are in 2009 mourning

the death of another indigenous person. Andrew O'Connor in

Perth, thank you. The United

States has been beefing up its

defence measures against North

Korea, washes says there's a

chance to re - Washington says

there's a chance to resolve differences through

diplomacy. As the United

Nations considers tougher

sanctions officials from north

and South Korea held a rare

meeting about the jointly managed industrial managed industrial estate along the border, Parthena

Stavropoulos reports. The Stavropoulos reports. The plant

is seen as a symbol of possible

reconciliation between the two

countries, now its future is in

doubt. For the second time in

more than a year South Korean

officials headed to North Korea

but the talks there lasted less

than an hour. Pyongyang is

reportedly demanding huge pay

rises for its workers and a

payment of $500 million in

rent, coming as no surprise to

Seoul officials with low

expectations given the north's

recent nuclear and missile

tests. The talks came as tests. The talks came as the

United Nations Security Council

finally agreed to tougher

sanctions against North Korea

in response to its nuclear test

last month. This sanctions

regime, if passed by the regime, if passed by

Security Council will bite and Security Council will bite

bite in a meaningful

way. Agreement on the draft

resolution won the reluctant

support from Russia and China. Having sanctions and

things like this is not our

choice, but a certain political

message must be sent. It re

associates is UN ban on North

Korea and nuclear missile

tests, calling fon Pyongyang to

retract a - upon Pyongyang to

retract a decision to withdraw

interest the nuclear

proliferation treaty Once

imposed I expect it to be

effective. The weapon, metal

carbon sanctions will be

discussed, it includes stronger

levels of sanctions than the

existing resolution 17:18

sfloo. Are Russia and China on

board western countries hope

for a unanimous vote in for a unanimous vote in favour

of the sanctions sending a

strong signal of international

unity. You are unity. You are watching ABC

News Breakfast - the top

stories - the World Health Organisation has declared Organisation has declared a

swine flu pandemic. Saying the

recent spike in Australian

cases was a contributing

factor. More than 1300 people

have the virus in Australia,

with around 30,000 infections

worldwide. Access Economics has

warned Kevin Rudd's health plan

could force 100,000 to opt could force 100,000 to opt out

of the private system. Four

times more people than Treasury

predicted may drop health cover

under changes to rebates and

Medicare levy surcharges. An

Australian woman convicted of

insulting Kuwait's ruler could

be on her way home, be on her way home, 44-year-old

Nasrah Al Shamery was sentenced

to fiviers jail for assaulting

an Emir during an altercation

with security guards at

Kuwait's airport. Now for a

look at the papers, we are

joined by executive editor of the Herald and Weekly the Herald and Weekly Times,

Alan Howe. Welcome. Good

morning. Iran - big day there

today. It is. Mahmoud

Ahmedinejad is sort of on Ahmedinejad is sort of on trial

with his people. It's looking

increasingly, going by his

angry outburst, that things

aren't going well. He seems to

be getting more desperate as

the week wears on Two-thirds

of Iranians are aged 30 and

less, they are unaware of the

revolution, and, of course, his

role in it. This guy put the

world on the cusp of one of its

great punctuation marks, he has

a nuclear program, which a nuclear program, which he

says is for power generation,

most nuclear programs are not

buried hundreds of metres beneath populated place,

there's no doubt what he wants

to do. This is a guy saying

anyone that recognises Israel anyone that recognises Israel -

you and me and the rest of

Australia - should burn in the

fires of Islamic nation's - we

don't plan to do that, but burn

them first. Rest assured,

that's exactly what will

happen. The picture from the

correspondent Ben Knight is

that there's a wave of support

for the Opposition , but a real

concern about what could happen

if the Opposition doesn't win and there's and there's continued

demonstration on the streets. Or, indeed, if the

election is rigged. How will we

know. These are difficult

elections to monitor. There was

interesting footage of the interesting footage of the ABC,

there was young people playing

music, dancing illegally and

being arrested, bravely. A

couple of people said, "We

couple of people said, "We wish

George W. Bush was there, there

was the certainty we'd be

invaded, something would

happen, we may be liberated",

that's what they need. Mahmoud

Ahmedinejad said, "We have

economic problems", like the

President of Haitis saying, "We have a few economic have a few economic problems,

we are working on them". You

see the photos of people with

the P sign wearing the green of

the Opposition parties, you

wonder that after the election,

if Mahmoud Ahmedinejad is in

power, that those people might

- what penalties those people

could suffer or could they be

hunted down by security

forces. There's been a

relaxation of general standards

hasn't there? It's an educated

plural society unlike most plural society unlike

Middle East. Women get a bit of

a say. They do have an

elaborate political debate

taking place in code. There's a

friend of mine working at the

Bar lain university in Tel

Aviv, spending most of his day

decoding what is said by the

newspapers, they have many of

them than we have, but they

might sell less than The

Sun. It's a plural place, it

will be interesting to see what

happens. Talking about the

papers, we'll get you to pull a

paper up. And show us the

article. The Rudd story For the

last two days has been the

degree to which he's apparently

embraced the terminology of the

rest of us. Of course, this is

the terminology we used to use

when he was one of us, that's a when he was one of us, that's

long time ago. I looked here, I

have gone instantly to it. The

headline on the Australian

says, "Linko clashes with

Kevin's". Kevin Rudd has been

out of mainstream Australian

life since he became a quite

educated man in the Queensland

Government. He's adopted this

technique of speaking to common

Australians using what he

believes to be common

terminology, language of Chipps

Rafferty, we have moved on from

fair suck of the sauce bat.

He's not the first to try this.

Many years ago Billy McMahon

was interviewed by David Frost,

coming up to the 1972 coming up to the 1972 election,

which he was certain to lose,

he was Australia's worst Prime

Minister. His hearing was

poor, so was his speech, but he

had an operation and he said to

David Frost in a moment he

thought was a thigh slapper, he

said, "I have my hearing fixed

and they say if I have another

operation I'll have the hearing

of 20-year-olds, I don't know what 20-year-olds listen to

these days, David", curiously

enough Malcolm Fraser who never

said a funny thing ever except

an election campaign outback

NSW at a pub, he was going in

ordering a beer, which looked

funny, like a prop. And he said

- young bloke yelled out, "When

are you lowering the price of

beer", he said, "When you are

old enough to drink drink it",

beer's gone up since. When Bob

Hawke did it, it's believable.

Is it believable when Kevin

Rudd does tm Hawk's

Australianness wasn't mannered.

I've travelled with Kevin and

seen him in casual situation,

he a common talking normal

Australian, you don't want the Australian, you don't want

Prime Minister acting like that

all the time. It looks like

it's manufactured. There's

alarm ing hairstyles you'd like

to draw our attention to. I

would, I have my Beatles tie

on, recently sentenced to 19

years in jail. I can't

understand why. Phil spectre.

He should have for He should have for destroying

The Beatles and Let It Be. Can

we have a look at the article.

-- They are in all the papers,

Phil spectre in the second

trial was convicted of

murdering Lana Clarkson. There's the real Phil

spectre. Hold it to your

left. We have been seeing him

on trial over the last couple

of years in the last two cases,

he has the frizzy hair, the

flat white hafr and the fact flat white hafr and the fact is

he has no - hair, and the fact

is he has no hair. Lana

Clarkson, had she survived, I

wonder if you'd say, "What

first attracted you to the drug

addict ageing puny

multi-million air producer".

He's not looking too good

now He's a mess. He now He's a mess. He should

have been convicted and jailed

many years ago for destroying

Let It Be and other recipes, no

person in music has a greater

reputation built on nothing.

His first album Teddy Bears

came from his father's tomb

stone. To know him is to love

him, that won't be written on

his tomb stoom. Finally Mark

Latham. The newspapers have not

made a big song and dance

made a big song and dance on

the fact he's been critical of

Australian soldiers risking

their lives on our behalf in Afghanistan and around the

world. Had is a nation forged

in the heat of a battle in

1915, which we lost, and lost

tens of thousands of lives,

more Mark Latham to dismiss

them as animals, basically

which is what he said, I'd like

to see what the late John Mann

ash and Albert would have to

say. This is the man that say. This is the man that could

have been Prime Minister Thank

god he wasn't the day after he

was elected Deputy Opposition

Leader Julia Gillard said I

like mark he looks and sounds

like an Australian. I thought

he looked like an idiot. A

reminder, you can reminder, you can watch ABC News Breakfast streamed

live. With sport here is Paul Kennedy. Manchester United Kennedy. Manchester United star

Cristiano Ronaldo has been sold

to Real Madrid for a world

record fee overnight. The

Spanish giant paying $161

million for his services, million for his

Cristiano Ronaldo the Cristiano Ronaldo the world

Player of the Year. The Red

Devils management see the sale

as an opportunity to secure

finances. Swine flu will not

get in the way of the NRL match

between the Broncos and

Bulldogs. Brisbane threatened

to pull out because its

had been quarantined and unable to pull out because its players

to prepare themselves, it

followed a positive test, by

full-back Karmichael Hunt, but

the players convinced the club

to let them play, a forfeit recorded, Karmichael Hunt is

likely to play. The first

likely to play. The first two

super 8 games at the Twenty20

one have been played, surprise

qualifier Ireland was beaten by Kiwis, they snacked 198 bowl the Irish out for - 115. India set South Africa a target of 111. The Proteas cruising to an easy victory. I've been doing research on the Cristiano Ronaldo transfer fee. The money goes to the club. rumoured to be a salary for him of what would be the equivalent

of $360,000 a week. And in the sixth year of that contract Australia as the cloud moves Western Australia and South hour. Showers for southern hour. Showers for have more coverage next you are heading to the snow, we Snow falling over the hills. If Snow falling over the hills. coldest June day yesterday. Canberra waking up to its been, unbelievable snowfalls, snow resorts. What a week it's start to the season for the weather, it's been a great O'Hanlon with a look at the world's best. Here is Vanessa prime. He's considered the be younger, 24. He's in his extraordinary. Not bad. He may is he. 26. That's week. Not bad money. How hold he'd be paid almost a million a

east. Cold south-westerlies

causing showers over causing showers over Victoria's

East Coast. Queensland,

Victoria and NSW, it is a

frosty start to the weekend

ahead of a sunny day as a high

continues to move obvious NSW. After tomorrow morning, that

high will move to the northern

Tasman, and relieve us of cold

mornings we've been having, a

low maintaining strong showery

winds across the southern parts

winds across the southern parts

of Western Australia and South

Australia, and the cold front

moving from the west to the

south-east, freshening winds,

light rains pushing into South

Australia, Tasmania, and

Victoria. For Queensland, a

chilly morning for southern

inland areas, isolated showers

for Torres Strait and Cape York

peninsula moving to the south

of Cardwell. Widespread frost

and fog, the far south-west getting a late

getting a late shower and high

cloud. Severe frost warnings

for the northern parts,

isolated showers in the far

east Gippsland, clearing this morning and the showers morning and the showers moving

to the western border tonight. Tasmania isolated showers in

the north-west moving into the

northern and western parts of

this State this afternoon,

further into the evening. South

Australia - cloudy, stronger Australia - cloudy,

north-westerly winds along the

coast. Heavy rain over the

west. Light rain for

west. Light rain for the rest

of the State. Western Australia

- showers moving from the West

Coast heading inland, windy,

showers, odd storms across the

south. In the north isolated

showers clearing from eastern

Pilbara showers over south-west

Kimberly, fine and dry for the

Territory. For tomorrow:

Still

Still ahead on ABC News

Breakfast - we'll speak to the

Opposition spokeswoman for

immigration and citizenship immigration and citizenship Dr

Sharman Stone about violence

against Indian students. That's

coming up, stay with us.

Spokeswoman for immigration up, stay with us. Indian students. That's coming Stone about violence against and citizenship Dr Sharman

Swine flu declared a global pandemic,

pandemic, the World Health Organisation concedes the

spread of the virus is now

unstoppable. A warning that unstoppable. A warning

Kevin Rudd's health insurance

plan could force 100,000 to opt

out of the