Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Disclaimer: The Parliamentary Library does not warrant the accuracy of closed captions. These are derived automatically from the broadcaster's signal.
ABC News Breakfast -

View in ParlView

(generated from captions) A change of name for the swine

flu and thermal body scans

begin at Australia's

international airports. US

carmaker Chrysler files for

bankruptcy protection and forms

an alliance with Fiat. Five

people are kill after a car

ploughs into a parade involving

the nation's Queen and her

family. Wallaby Julian Huxley

says he wants to make a

SuperHornet comeback after

overcoming a brain tumor.

This Program is Captioned Live.

Good morning. Its Friday, 1 May, I'm Joe May, I'm Joe O'Brien. I'm

Virginia Trioli. The top story

- the World Health Organisation

is warning of an increased

threat of swine flu in threat of swine flu in the

southern hemisphere as the

region heads into winter. They

also say it will no longer

refer to the virus as swine

flu. This is into response from

meat producers. Australia will

today begin using thermal body

scanners at all airports to

check arrivals for the virus.

There are no infections here, but the number of global cases

has increased to more than 260

with 12 confirmed deaths. It is

particularly important to pay

attention to what is going on

in the southern hemisphere.

Even when you have the

introduction of a new influenza

virus, as we are seeing now, it

still usually follows a

seasonal activity N the winter

months of the southern

hemisphere we see more hemisphere we see more activity

in the southern hemisphere. in the southern hemisphere. So

it is possible that we will see

outbreaks of the H 1 N 1 virus

occurring more frequently in

the southern hemisphere than in

the northern hemisphere. Now in

Mexico the Government has been

shutting down parts of its

economy to slow the threat of

the H1.N 1 virus. Kim Landers

joins us on the phone. Good

morning. Can you bring us up

morning. Can you bring us up to

date on the situation with

date on the situation with the

number of confirmed deaths and

confirmed cases in Mexico City.

There has been some confusion

over that. Confusion, an

understatement! There is a lot

of confusion here in Mexico. If

you ask somebody in the you ask somebody in the street

as to how many cases or deaths

they've heard, people don't

have any idea. That is because

the information coming out of

the officials here in Mexico

seems to change a lot. As we

talk, Mexico's Government has

confirmed that 260 people

actually have the flu, but only

12 have died. You might

remember a day or so ago we

were hearing that thousands of

people had the swine flu and

that the death toll was around

about 180. So there is a lot of

confusion here as to what are

exactly the official figures

and how many people have and how many people have been

afflicted with this outbreak.

And there is a Government

shutdown that begins pretty

soon? There is a shutdown that

is due to begin tomorrow. The

President is saying that

everyone has got to stay everyone has got to stay home

for the next five days. He says

the police and the military

will be out on the streets. He

calls those essential services.

He says hospitals of course

will be open. And some

supermarkets. But he's saying

the best way to try and protect

everybody is for people to stay

indoors over the next five

days. I should point out it is

a public holiday tomorrow for

Labor Day and then the weekend.

So a lot of businesses would be

shut down. Some people are

saying it sounds drastic, a

five-day shutdown, but in

reality it's a day or two. Kim

Landers in Mexico, thanks very

much. Chrysler will file for

bankruptcy protection after

forming an alliance with the

Italian firm Fiat. This move

comes after talks broke down

with Chrysler's with Chrysler's creditors.

President Barack Obama is

supporting the decision and

will give Chrysler $11 billion

in Government loans. Chrysler

employs more than 50,000 people

around the world. At least five

people have been killed after a

car ploughed into a Dutch

national parade crowd, narrowly

missing the nation's Queen

Beatrix and her family. Others

were injured in the crash which

happened near the city of

Apeldoorn. Local officials say

the 38 driver appears to have

acted deliberately. The Chinese

Government is angry that

Australia's is planning an arms

build-up. The white paper will

outline the regional defence

plans which will be released as

part of the white paper to be

released in Sydney. The

Opposition has questioned the

Government's decision to brief

Chinese authorities before the

paper's release. Britain has formally ended formally ended combat

operations in Iraq, handing

over control of Basra to an

American brigade. Shortly

before the ceremony, soldiers

held a memorial service for the

179 Britons killed in Iraq

since the start of the war. The

end of operations kax a month

ahead of schedule. And an

investigation has been launched

in a Queensland nursing home

where two people are where two people are found to

have been bitten by myself. have been bitten by myself. The Queensland Health Queensland Health Department

has been criticised for being

slow to deal with a mouse

plague in the area. The Federal

Government says the Government says the Dalby

facility in Darling Downs could

be shut down if the situation doesn't improve. Returning to

news that Chrysler has filed

for bankruptcy protection in

the US. The US President Barack Obama says a partnership

between Chrysler and Fiat has a

strong chance of success. Today, success. Today, after

consulting with my auto task

force, I can report that the

necessary steps have been necessary steps have been taken

to give one of America's most

storeyed auto makers, Chrysler,

a new lease on life. I a new lease on life. I am

pleased to announce that

Chrysler and Fiat have formed a

partnership that has a strong

chance of success. It is a

partnership that will save more

than 30,000 jobs at Chrysler

and tens of thousands of jobs

at supplyiers, dealers and

other businesses that rely on

this company. It's a

partnership that the Federal

Government will support by

making additional loans that

are consistent with what are consistent with what I

outlined last month. The outlined last month. The US

President Barack Obama speaking

there. For more Mark Simkin

joins us from Washington. Good

morning, Mark. What does this

actually mean for Chrysler? Its

bankruptcy, but not as we know

it. In many countries

bankruptcy means the end of a

road for a company. But road for a company. But here in

the United States this

so-called chapter 11 bankruptcy

means that it is potentially

the road for recovery, if you

like. If you can mind the car

nalgs. What this allows the

company to do is to go into

bankruptcy court and have a

judge reorganise its affairs.

It can break contracts and hang

the debtors, hang them out to

dry. Get in there and

completely rebuild the company.

It's like the old $6 million

man. Rebuild it, stronger,

better, faster. Although in

this case it's more like an $8

billion car company. That's

billion car company. That's the

amount of additional money the

Government is putting in to

keep it afloat. Give us insight

into the behind the scenes

negotiations in terms of the

companies and people involved

in getting Chrysler to this

stage? Well, that's been going

on for weeks. Very tense, very high stakes negotiations

between all the so-called

stakeholders. Pretty much all

of them a-agreed to take hair

cuts, as it is known here. The

unions agreed to pay cuts and

reductions in benefits. The

company itself agreed to

changes. The banks who own

about 70% of the Chrysler debt,

they agreed to take a bit of a

bath on some of that and not

get their full amount of money

back that they are owed. back that they are owed. But

the hold outs were a group of

hedge funds who controlled

about 30% of Chrysler's debt.

They refused to sign on to any They refused to sign on to

of the restructuring deals so of the restructuring deals

late last night, 11th-hour

stuff, the rescue plan fell

apart and they were forced to

file for bankruptcy. Barack

Obama is willing to cast the

hedge funds as the villains. He

had very stern words for them

today, accusing them of essentially sabotaging the

deal, putting their own personal financial interests

ahead of the company and

national interests and he said

in a very stern voice, "I do

not stand with them." Making

that very clear. What does this

mean in terms of number of job

losses for Chrysler itself? In

the short-term, the expectation

is that there won't be any job

losses. That's what the company

and Barack Obama are saying.

There shouldn't be any job losses. It is impossible to losses. It is impossible to say

in the long-term that won't be

the case. The company has shed

vast numbers of staff already.

The bankruptcy allows it to The bankruptcy allows it to cut

more to make further reductions

and get tougher and meaner. It

is worth noting that all the

car companies had fought

strenuously to avoid going into

bankruptcy. It argued who will

buy a car from a company that

is bankrupt. So the suggestion

was is bankruptcy the spin and

the company could emerge

stronger, but there is a risk stronger, but there is a

it could emerge weaker and more

vulnerable. GM has more vulnerable. GM has

connections to Australia than

Chrysler. What's the situation

with GM? The same negotiations

we were seeing with Chrysler

are going on with GM. Their

deadline is June 1. They are

basically trying to get

everyone to the table and agree

on a plan there. Otherwise,

what we are seeing with

Chrysler could be a blueprint Chrysler could be a

for the bankruptcy protection

we may have to see with what

was once the world's biggest

car company, GM. Mark Simkin in

Washington, thanks very

much. Thank you. Now we much. Thank you. Now we return

to the Netherlands where we told you earlier at least five

people are dead after a car

crashed into crowds at a

queen'sday parade. The car

narrowly missed a bus narrowly missed a bus carrying

Queen Beatrix and other Queen Beatrix and other members

of the Royal Family. Philip

Williams reports. Crowds had

gathered to see Queen Beatrix

and her family in an open-top

bus. It took a final turn when

the car ploughed into

spectators, narrowly missing

the bus and crashing into the

monument. Behind, a trail of

carnage. The dead and injured

scattered on the road. The scattered on the road.

Royal Family was clearly

horrified by what police say

was a deliberate attack. The

car's driver was seriously injured. He's under police

guard. They are not saying

much about the 38-year-old

driver, other than they think driver, other than they

it wasn't a terrorist attack.

Despite frantic attempts, some

victims were beyond help.

TRANSLATION: Even the

princesses were bewildered and

crying. When we saw that, we

knew something had gone badly wrong. Dutch Queen was clearly

shocked. TRANSLATION: What

began as a lovely day has ended

in a tragic drama that has

shocked us all deeply. We are

speech willess that something

so terrible could have happened. Crowds had been celebrating Queen's Day, a

national holiday. Security had

been tight with hundreds of

police involved in an operation

that was months in the

planning. And yet the driver of

the black car somehow breached

results. the defences with fatal

Returning to Federal politics

now and the release tomorrow of

the long-awaited defence white

paper and Hayden Cooper joins

us from Canberra. Good

We've been talking about us from Canberra. Good morning.

We've been talking about the

white paper it feels for

months. We're finally going to

get to look at it. Sometime

after a few foreign countries

have looked at it first! That's

right. Finally the day is about

to arrive. It will be released

tomorrow by the PM on board a

ship at Garden Island in Sydney

which only confirms that the

naval theme, the Navy, is a big

winner. Submarines alone will

get about $30 billion. It is

the largest update for many

years. It will frame

Australia's defence thinking Australia's defence

for the next three decades or

so. It will also detail

so. It will also detail some

of the strategic threats which

are expected and they range

from everything from people smuggling to climate change and

also the rise of China, is a

more controversial area. We

will hear more about that when

the PM releases it on Saturday

morning. Yes, and the

Opposition is still angry that

China, China got to look at it

before the Opposition. It

doesn't seem to be as concerned

about other country's leaders

looking at the document ahead

of them? That's right. Its

main concern was raising the

matter of China. As we heard

earlier in the week, the

department, or the department, or the Government

at least, believes it's a

matter of course to brief other

nations. The other pe Kewellarity is that it is Kewellarity is that it is being

released on a Saturday, which

is a blackhole news day. It is

not the way that many in the

defence community had envisaged

it. There was expected to be a

media lockup. So journalists

could go through the white

paper. Hundreds, possibly up to

a thousand were expected to be

invited to industry briefings

and briefings for analysts. But

all of that has been all of that has been scrapped

by the Prime Minister's Office

in favour of the launch at

Garden Island in Sydney. As for

the motivation, it's a little

harder to arrive at. It could

be the Government doesn't want

to appear lavish about to appear lavish about military

spending in the economic

climate. It may be the

political obsession with a

photo opportunity, a case of

style winning out over substance. There is nothing to

be lost from having your PM

standing astride a very large

ship down there at

Woolloomooloo. The Government

clearly seems to be wanting to

get some information out early.

That's the bad news in relation

to the Budget? That's right. I

think the Treasurer has figured

out if you want information to

be put in the public domain,

bring it up at COAG with a room

full of Premiers and Treasurers

and someone will leak it. We

see today more updated figures

from treasury. These are the

numbers that may well be in the

Budget in a couple of weeks.

They are not great numbers at

all. They are even worse than

expected. Revenue, for example,

is likely to be eroded by $50

billion next year. That's about

$200 billion over the next four

years. Up until now we've been

told it's about $115 billion.

It's clear that situation is

still deteriorating. On unemployment, treasury expects

that to reach 8% and that to reach 8% and beyond

next year. As for the actual growth figure, that's growth figure, that's expected

to be a cracks of about half to be a cracks of about half a

per cent next year. So the

numbers just keep on getting

worse. I'm sure we haven't seen

the end. Thanks for talking to

us Hayden Cooper. We'll go to

the front pages of the

newspapers around the country. The flew crisis has been

featured. 'The Canberra Times'

says leaders at the COAG

meeting in Hobart yesterday

agree to take all necessary

measures to stop a major

outbreak in outbreak in Australia. The 'Sydney Morning Herald' reports

Australians have been advised

to stockpile food and water in

case of a flu pandemic, but

they are being advised not to

panic. Those two bits of advise

go together! Malcolm Turnbull

is preparing to accuse Kevin

Rudd of being too close to

China. The 'Mercury' warns

Tasmanian teenagers being

housed in adult psychiatric wards because the state does

not have appropriate facilities

for young people. The

'Australian' reports the Rudd

Government is bringing in a

tough new dole regime for the

young. The 'Adelaide Advertiser' says parents will

be stripped of family tax

benefits if their children are

not learning or earning not learning or earning under the new the new regime. The 'Australian

Financial Review' reports Financial Review' reports the

Federal Budget is facing a $50

billion revenue shortfall next

year as we were discussing.

This is as the recession

slashes revenue to the

Government. The 'Age' says the

Chinese Government is ruffled

over the defence white paper

and the report that it will

have a military billion dollarup. The 'West Australian'

Government will reap the

biggest share to liquidators biggest share to liquidators of

Alan Bond Bell Group. Jeff

Kennett is defiant of being

fined for insulting league officials. The 'Daily

Telegraph' reports on two very different funerals held

yesterday. One for yesterday. One for billionaire

Richard Pratt and one for Richard Pratt and one for a

baby found abandoned in Sydney in in February. The 'Northern

Territory News' says a Darwin

pub has banned tradies wearing

dusty work clothes. They've

lost all their clients! And lost all their clients! And the

'Courier Mail' says it is

shameful that Queensland health

knew about a mouse plague at a nursing home before residents

were actually attacked by the

rodents. That's a shocking

story that one. If you would

like to send us your feedback

on any of the stories we're covering, you can contact us here:

Top stories - Australia will

begin using thermal body

scanners at all international

airports. There are no

infections here. Chrysler has

filed for bankruptcy protection

in the US and has announced it

is forming a partnership with Italy's Fiat. President Barack

Obama has supported the move saying the White House will

give the struggling company

another $11 billion in

Government loans. And at least

five people have been killed

after a can car ploughed into a

Dutch national parade, narrowly

missing the nation's Queen and

her family. Several others were

seriously injured and local

officials say the driver appears to have acted

deliberately.

A West Australian Supreme

Court judge has ordered a

syndicate of banks to pay more

than $1.5 billion to the

liquidator of Alan Bond's Bell

Group of companies. The

decision follows a ruling last

year that the banks knew that

the Bell Group was insolvent

when they loaned it money in

1990. Joanna Menagh reports.

Alan Bond's Bell Group of

companies collapsed in 1990.

Now almost 20 years on, its

liquidator has won what is

believed to be one of the

biggest judgments ever awarded

in Australia. Well, the actual

amount is sensational in size. I'm pleased with the

decision and think it

represents vindication of the

taking of the action in the

first place. The liquidator's

claim was against a syndicate

of 20 Australian and

international banks which took

$283 million from the Bell

Group after its collapse. It

argued the banks shouldn't have

taken the money because they

knew the Bell Group was

insolvent. Last year, after

years of legal wranglings, the

judge found in favour of the

liquidator N his final

judgment, he ruled that the

banks should pay out $1.58 billion. The impact on the

banks is hard to know because

we don't know what they've

provided for. They were

obviously expecting it wouldn't

necessarily be entirely

favourable to them. In NAB's

briefing a couple of days ago

they indicated they had been

providing something. Exact

figures the banks could lose is

not clear because as creditors

they are entitled to some compensation N a statement compensation N a statement a spokesman said:

The liquidator has called

for an end to the case. I would

like to think that the banks

would accept the umpire's

decision, pay the money, allow

me to finalise the liquidations

and move on. The court battle

was backed by the State

Government controlled insurance

commission of WA and is believed to have cost more than

$200 million. To finance news

and new figures from Australian

property monitors property monitors indicates

that the housing market in

Australia may be starting to

pick up. Data shows there was a

slight rise in house prices

during the March quarter.

Figures to the end of March

show prices overall fell by

almost 4%. The department store

Target will stop providing

plastic bags in its stores from

next month. The move could save

up to 100 million bags from

landfill each year. It comes as

SA prepares to go plastic bag

free at all retail outlets on Monday. Does that mean landfill

will be full of all those green

bags you get instead? They are

the ones that will be

re-used. To the figures and

looking at the markets.

Soon Vanessa O'Hanlon will

take us through the national

weather. Then we'll look at the papers that have been

published. Our review will be

writer, Gideon Haigh. Now with

sport, here's Paul Kennedy. Australia's World Cup

fallback, Julian Huxley, wants

to make a SuperHornet comeback

barely a year after having a

brain tumor removed. A year

ago Julian Huxley's life was

turned upside down. Doctors

discovered he had a brain tumor

after he suffered a head injury

during a match against

Queensland in March last year.

Now he's seeking clearance to

make a comeback to the game he

loves. Julian is very keen to play. I don't think anyone

would look to stand in his way

from a passion point of

view. He's proven his fitness,

but the ARU must grant him

permission to return to the

field. The key thing for us is

the medical-legal issue to make

sure that if anything were to

happen that the Brumbies would

be covered. Brumbies have reshuffled their backline for

Saturday's game against the

Reds. The Queenslanders haven't

beaten the Brumbies in ten

years. Fhibbs will run on at

scrum half and Gerrard and

Fairbanks will return from injuries. It's good to come

into a must-win game. In AFL news, Jeff Kennett says he

won't be following the league's

directive to attend umpiring

school as Ryan van Haalen

reports. He has opted to pay a

$5,000 fine instead. Jeff

Kennett's comments came after

the Port Adelaide game close to

two weeks ago. In a letter to

the league, the Hawks President

said undergoing reeducation

with the umpiring department would put further pressure on

the umpires. and he would pay

the fine to prevent further

sanctions against the Premiers.

In an apparent swipe at AFL, he

said in the future his said in the future his comments

would be as bland as those who

seek to control us. The seek to control us. The coach

is among those who questioned

Collingwood's spirit in the

wash-up of the Anzac Day

defeat. Now he says it's time

to move on. No use getting

caught up in chopping people's

heads off because of one

game. Shaw has recovered from

an injury but Dydak looks an injury but Dydak looks set

to miss several more weeks.

Cooney is welcomed back and Akermanis returns from

suspension. It's a boost for

the dogs coming off the dogs coming off successive

losses to face an unbeaten St

Kilda. They are the best two

teams at this stage. I think to

test against those teams is the

way to go. Melbourne's Russell

Robertson plays his first game

after snapping an Achilles

tendon in round ten last year.

Victorian pace bowler Dirk

Nannes had a good night. He

removed Gilchrist and Gibbs. To

make him feel better, Virenda

Sehwag says he's the fastest

bowler he's faced. Let's look at why.

COMMENTATOR: He must be out!

Massive moment. A quick

bowler has him with a short pitch. Dirk Nannes is one of

the leading players in the

Sheffield shield. He's 32 years

old and hasn't played for

Australia. He's a very, very

interesting person. He speaks

Japanese, plays the sax aphone,

owns a ski resort travel company and has been a World

Cup skiier. He's signed up to

represent the Netherlands at

the next World Cup because

Australia won't pick him and

he's got a dual passport so he

can play for the Netherlandses

in the next World Cup. Has he figured in the selection

process for Australia? He's

been a late bloomer. I'd be

surprised if they haven't

discussed his case, but he took

the moment wickets in the

Sheffield shield this year.

He's highly He's highly credentialed.

Virenda Sehwag is his captain

and said he's the fastest

bowler he's ever faced. That's

a massive statement from Sehwag

who has played ten years who has played ten years of

Test cricket. I would be very

surprised if Australia doesn't

turn around and pick him for the Twenty20 World Cup. The

coach of Victoria, who also

coaches him, he's coaching coaches him, he's coaching that

New Delhi team and said New Delhi team and said he

would be the first player he

would pick. I didn't know the

Netherlands fielded a

team. They've just qualified.

They've run a tournament They've run a tournament in

South Africa at the moment. The Netherlands, Kenya,

Afghanistan, Ireland and I

think Ireland and Netherlands

were the teams that qualified. Intriguing. They

become the whipping boys of become the whipping boys of the

World Cup, but they've always

got a couple of interesting

players. Canada usually win

there's as well. With Dirk

Nannes on their side, they Nannes on their side, they may

not be whipping boys no

more. The Netherlands will be

disappointed he can only bowl

ten overs. ABC News Breakfast

can be watched anywhere. Here is Vanessa O'Hanlon with the

weather. April was a month of

records. It sure wa - was. We

had the coldest morning in

Melbourne. Hobart has had its

wettest day in eight years with

67mm, 15 above average and over

the other side of the country,

Perth has had its dryiest day

in 15 years. For the next week,

a high will continue to linger

over the Bight. This is giving

us the cold nights and fine

days. This morning it will be

particularly cold over NSW and

eastern Victoria, but with the

cloud and wind increasing from

a front, the rest of the

south-east shouldn't be as cold

as yesterday. Showers will

increase over SA, Victoria and Tasmania as south easterly

winds and a weakening trough

that is well off the east coast will cause showers north of

Sydney, heavier over the

tropics. Easterly winds over

the interior will warm up

the interior will warm up the West Coast in time for the

weekend. A band of cloud

crossing Bight is bringing

showers to the coast. Showers

will increase over Victoria and

Tasmania. Showers in the cloud

along the NSW is clearing as

well. For Queensland today -

there will be heavy showers

over the northern Cape York peninsula. Showers along peninsula. Showers along the

South Coast. NSW - isolated

showers near the coast north of

Sydney and tonight light showers should develop along

the south border. In Victoria - frost warning for the north-east. Scattered source in

the west. They will extend

eastwards N Tasmania - scattered showers for the west

and north. Throughout the

morning they will extend to

most areas before clearing

tonight. Across to SA where a

few light showers are expected

in the south. Most of those

should fall along the

coastline. Partly cloudy up in

the north, but it will remain

dry. WA - a fine day. Cloudy

with light drizzle about the

Eucla. Far south-east golfields

and the coastal districts. For

the Territory - isolated

showers and a storm or two over

the Arnhem district and North

Coast. Fine for the remainder.

Ahead to the weekend and late

showers are expected in Sydney.

The top story on ABC News

Breakfast this morning - Australia has begun Australia has begun using

thermal body scanners at international airports to check

people flying in for the H1N1

flew virus. The World Health

Organisation says that at least

260 people are confirmed to

have the flu virus and that 12

people have died. The WHO says the southern hemisphere will

come under greater threat from

the H1N1 flew as it heads into

winter. It is particularly important to pay attention to

what is going on in what is going on in the

southern hemisphere. Even when

you have the introduction of a

new influenza virus, as we are

seeing now, it still usually

follows some kind of seasonal

activity N the winter months of the southern hemisphere we see

more activity in the southern

hemisphere. It is possible that

we will see outbreaks of the

H1N1 virus occurring more frequently in the southern

hemisphere than in the northern

hemisphere. That was hemisphere. That was the World

Health Organisation. So far

there are no confirmed cases of

the strain in Australia, the strain in Australia, but

New Zealanders have had New Zealanders have had to deal

with the virus for a week

now. One man experiencing the

event is associate Professor Paul Kelly from Paul Kelly from the Australian

National University. He joins

us on the phone from Wellington. Welcome and thank

you for joining us. Describe

for us a broad sweep of

for us a broad sweep of the measures that New Zealand has

put in place to try and deal

with this? New Zealand's been

coping with this situation

since last weekend and they've

been on full alert, really,

since that time. Ins since the

arrival of the students back

from Mexico. What measures does

that include, being on full alert? Frequent discussions by

public health authorities.

They've ramped up laboratory

capability and they are also

doing active screening at

airports for incoming

passengers the Americas and

have moved on, as Australia

has, to screening all

passengers coming off all

flights. We've put in place thermal scanners at airports as

well in Australia. What is your

view of the efficacy of such a

procedure? Well, the thermal

imaging was used in some

countries during the SARS

epidemic and previously when

there has been raised awareness

about the avian flu issue. It wasn't used in Australia during

that time there. Was a study

done in Cairns a couple of

years ago which demonstrated

that thermal imaging is an

accurate way of estimating people's temperature. The

problem is I guess there are

all sorts of reasons why all sorts of reasons why people

may have raised body

temperature when coming in from

overseas. It wouldn't

necessarily be the H1N1 flu. So

how it would work in this

context I guess remains to be

seen. And also we are hearing

that the name of the flu has

been changed because there's been complaints made by the

pork industry, which is

interesting. Have you been

hearing whether in New Zealand

there has been a backlash

against pork products against pork products because

of the name of the flu? I think

that's been an interesting

aspect. The name swine flu is

evocative and has caused panic

issues and the mass culling issues and the mass culling of

pigs in Egypt, which has no

evidence base to do anything about controlling the disease. So I think it is right. This is a huxian

disease. It is the humans that

are flying, not the pigs! Good

to talk to you Professor. Thank

you. Thank you. Now you. Thank you. Now remember

you can make a comment about

the news stories we're covering

each day. You can send an email here:

In other news - the American

carmaker Chrysler will file for

bankruptcy protection after

forming an alliance with the

Italian firm Fiat. The move

comes after talks broke down

with Chryslerer's with Chryslerer's creditors. President Barack Obama is

supporting the decision and

will give Chrysler another $11 billion in Government loans.

Chrysler is one of America's

big three carmakers and big three carmakers and employs

more than 50,000 people around

the world. The Chinese

Government is angry that

Australia is planning an arms

build-up in response to China's

military presence according to

Fairfax newspapers. The Rudd

Government will outline Australia's regional defence

plans in a white paper

tomorrow. They are believed to

include the addition of up to

12 longe-range submarines. The

Opposition has questioned the

Government's decision to brief

Chinese authorities before the

paper's release. A car has

ploughed into a Dutch national

parade, killing five people and

narrowly missing the narrowly missing the nation's

Queen Beatrix and her family.

Several others were seriously

injured in the crash which

happened near the city of

Apeldoorn. Local officials say

the 38-year-old driver the 38-year-old driver appeared

to have acted deliberately.

Britain has formally ended

combat operations in Iraq,

handing over control of Basra

to an American brigade. Shortly

before the handover ceremony,

soldiers held a memorial

service for the 179 service for the 179 Britons

killed in Iraq since the

killed in Iraq since the start

of the war six years ago. The

end of operations came a month

ahead of schedule. And an

investigation has been launched

into a Queensland nursing home

where two people have been

bitten by myself. bitten by myself. The Queensland Health Queensland Health Department

has been criticised for being

slow to deal with a mouse

plague in the area. The Federal

Government says the Dalby facility on the Darling Downs

could be shut down if the

situation doesn't improve. The

Indian election has now reached

its raffleway point. Protesters

clashed in the northern states

of Kashmir and Jammu, but

voting has been relatively e c f l

peaceful. Results are expected

after two more weeks of

polling. Michael Coggan

reports. The third round of

voting in India's massive voting in India's

general election started

quietly with voters lining up

at booths in more than 100 constituencies. Armed guards

were brought in to keep an eye

on voters in the eastern state

of west bangal. TRANSLATION: We

want the new Government to work

for our benefit. We for our benefit. We are voting

with the hope it will do

something about inflation. But

in the north Indian state of

Kashmir and Jammu, there were

clashes between security forces

and migrant workers protesting

against being denied a right to

vote. TRANSLATION: We are

losing trust in the country's

democracy, but we'll get our

demands fulfilled and we're

ready to pay any price for

it. Voter turnout numbers were

low in the many of the nine

states voting in this phase as

searing temperatures hit most searing temperatures hit

of the subcontinent. In the

financial capital, Mumbai,

India's rich and famous were

out early, encouraging others

to vote. The prime ministerial

candidate for the main

Opposition party, the BJB cast

his vote in the BJP heart land

state, confidence his alliance

can defeat the ruling Congress

party. We will emerge as the largest coalition in the

country. Most people will vote

for our alliance. Another prime

ministerial hopeful; the ministerial hopeful; the Queen

of the untouchables and Chief

Minister of Utter Pradesh, cast

her vote. The results of the

marathon month-long voting

process will be revealed on 16

May. But with a multiparty

Coalition Government the most

likely result, the new PM of

India won't be known until new

political deals and allegiances

are struck in the days that follow.

In WA the nation's longest

running and most expensive

court case has ended with a

judge ordering 20 banks to

judge ordering 20 banks to pay

more than $1.5 billion to the

liquidators of Alan Bond's

former Bell Group of

companies. It's the latest

chapter in the 14-year struggle to recover money taken by the

banks when the Bell Group collapsed. Andrew O'Connor

joins us now from the ABC's

Perth newsroom. Good morning.

This might be the latest

chapter, but is it the last

chapter? I think everyone

involved in this would

certainly hope so. This is

really the last piece of

corporate debris to be cleared

resources collapsed in the away after the 1980s. Bell

'90s. The litigation has

'90s. The litigation has cost

up to $200 million. At the

centre of the case ace sign by

the liquidator to recover $280

he says they million from the banks. Money

he says they weren't entitled

to when they took it from

to when they took it from the

Bell Group of companies when it

collapsed. Now that was the

centre of the long-running

civil trial that ended last

year in October. The judge then

handed down a judgment which

found in favour of the handed down a judgment which he

liquidator, but stopped short

of making an order to pay. He

said the parties needed to go

away and find a negotiated

settlement outside of court.

They went into mediation, but

there was no settlement reached

and that is what has led to the

final judgment. Isn't the

allegation that the banks were

trading with Bell while it was

insolvent? That's right. The

claim is that the syndicate claim is that the syndicate of

20 banks loaned money to 20 banks loaned money to the

Bell Group of companies at a

time when they knew the company

was insolvent. And as a result

of that they weren't entitled

to take that money after the

company had collapsed. They

simply had to take their place

among other creditors and wait

their turn. What have the banks

been ordered to pay? Well nrkts final judgment yesterday

Justice Neville Owen ordered

the syndicate of banks to pay

$1.58 billion. Now $350 million of that is direct compensation.

$1.2 is interest payments and

another $80 or so is legal

fees. What they will end up

losing is not clear. The banks

themselves are creditors. They

are in a curious position of

even if they agree to hand over

the $1.58 billion they would do

so on the expectation that the

liquidator would have to hand

some of that bank. The banks

are going straight to a higher

court anyway? It's not clear at court anyway? It's not

this stage what their plan is.

They said yesterday that they

expect to recover a substantial

amount of this money if they do

pay it, but the other probably

more worrying thing for anyone

involved is they have flagged

the possibility of an appeal

and believe they have strong

grounds for an appeal. If they

sought leave and were granted leave, the whole thing could

end up back in the courts. The

liquidator is hoping that is

not the case. He was expressing

the firm desire that the banks

would accept the umpire's

decision and simply hand over

the money. Give yep the history

of this case, that may be

wishful thinking. Nobody will

be closing the file. Andrew

O'Connor in Perth. Thank you.

Overseas now and life remains

a day-to-day struggle for more

than half a million people in

devastation of Cylone Burma, 12 months after the

Nargis. Food shortages remain

and many still live in

makeshift sheld ers as the Burmese Government and

international aid agencies

struggle to find relief operations. The Delta still

bears the scars of devastating bears the scars of

Cylone Nargis. It roared in

from the bay of Bengal on May from the bay of Bengal on May 2

last year, killing 134,000

people. Half a million people

still live in makeshift accommodation, which has become a permanent feature of the

landscape. With the new cyclone

season under way. An even

greater problem is that many

people are still going hungry.

TRANSLATION: Before the

cyclone we were fine. Nowadays

we face many difficulties. Now

we don't even have enough food.

That's a major indictment of

the cyclone recovery as the

irrawatty Delta used to be the

food bowl. Families search the

waterways for fish and many people have started to people have started to grow

vegetables in their backyards

to avoid starvation. The way

how to earn money has not been

recovered. Aid groups have

introduced work for money

programs to help survivors earn

money so they may eventually be

able to get a new house. This

elderly man is one of the lucky

ones. He's received funding

from an aid agency for his new

house. The wait for others

will be long as a UN program to

provide new housing has raised

only 4% of the target amount.

You're watching ABC News

Breakfast. The top stories this

morning - the World Health

Organisation warns of an

increased threat of the H1N1

virus in the southern

hemisphere as the region heads

into winter. Australia will

today begin using thermal body

scanners at all international

airports but there are still no

infections here. American

carmaker Chrysler has filed for

bankruptcy protection and

announced that it is forming a

partnership with Italy's

partnership with Italy's Fiat. President Barack Obama has

supported the move, saying supported the move, saying the

White House will give the

struggling company another $11

billion in Government loans.

And at least five people have

been killed after a car

ploughed into a Dutch national

parade narrowly missing the

nation's Queen and her family.

Several others were seriously

injured and local officials say

the driver appears to have acted deliberately.

And now for a look at the

national papers, we're joined

by writer Gideon Haigh. Good morning. Good morning.

Writer, it sounds so stuffer.

I prefer journalist. I wish you

would come on with pinched

glassed. As someone who has a

long and extinguished career as

a finance report er... Long... And he's written

about Alan Bond a great deal.

What do you make of the long

awaited settlement with the

banks and liquidators. It's

amazing for me to look up and

realise this story is still

going on. I sat in a courtroom

in London in 1990. I have vivid

memories of this. It was one of

those cases between Bond

Corporation where some of these

financial arrangements were

discussed. That was 18 years

ago. I was a much younger man

in those days! It was a

fascinating case. I got sued by

Bond Corporation for a piece I

wrote. It shows you when the

quantum of money is big enough

and the critical mass of

lawyers is great enough, lawyers is great enough, a

story like this can caper on

under the crack of doom. under the crack of doom. But

it is ridiculous that a matter

can take this long through the

courts. It is kind of

ridiculous, but bankruptcy is a

law unto itself. It is

interesting you were talk being

chapter 11 bankruptcy in the US

before in the case of before in the case of Chrysler.

They have a completely

different regime. Your

correspondent likened it to the

$6 million man. The funny thing

was I wasn't impressed by $11

billion. I want trillions these

days! You've been spoilt!

Closer to home you are looking at the coverage of the

imminent, we're told, flu

pandemic. The name has been

changed, it's not swine flu.

It's now H1N1. 8 confirmed

deaths in Mexico... 12

confirmed deaths... Does make all the all the difference. The 'Sydney

Morning Herald' reports

Australians are being advised

to stockpile food and water. I

read this this morning! They

are not. Generic guidance in

the Federal Government's

pandemic plan details modest

precautions. A departmental

spokesman called for calm. It's

like Corporal Jones running

around in Dad's scam Army. When

a Government moves on a an

official pandemic war footing,

one of the procedures is you

are encouraged to put food

aside. A spokesman said he

agreed it was agreed it was confusing. The

'Sydney Morning Herald' adds to

the confusion. That is

completely disingenius. It

reports that the spokesman had

not read the Government's

132-page pandemic plan.

Giveaway! This is a Gotcha

story from the 'Sydney Morning

Herald'. Has Kate Benson read

the 132-page pandemic

plan? She's the plan? She's the author. Perhaps

she can resite it while

gargling. The 'Age' does it in

six paragraphs. That was the

appropriate treatment for it.

The Herald Sun gets into the

story. It says the state could

be in lock down if swine flu

takes hold. Schools,

restaurants, theatres and restaurants, theatres and gyms

could be shut and AFL matches

cancelled or played in empty

stadiums. AFL matches cancelled

is the mark of the collapse of

civilisation. There is no

chance that your life will be materialisticly affected. Don't

have a flush at the airport as

you go through the thermal

scanner, but big deal. scanner, but big deal. Frankly

you have to submit to a full cavity search these days

any. So you feel the media

coverage has been

sensationalist? Yes. This

column says God save us, we'll die and from another foreign

virus. Get a grip people, you

are embarrassing yourself. This

piece resites a list of

previous pandemics and

obsessions. And has a line - it

is madder when you release how

easy it is to cut off your

hands. Don't go to Mexico and

wash your hands. Can I get

this clear, you are giving

Andrew Bolt a pat on the

back? I am. Is a great column.

Sometimes Bolt gets it right.

He is so punchy and pungent and

unambiguous. Andrew, you are

all the better for getting

through 1430 words without

mentioning the words "the

left". It's interesting you

race missgivings about the

media coverage. Yesterday I was

feeling anxious about the

coverage when you look at the

raw figures. A toddler died in

the US. Toddlers die in the US

every single day of varies

things. But putting in all of your misgivings to everyone who

came through the show,

including including the Chief Medical

Officer of Victoria, their

response was universal. It is a

serious threat. It is at the

risk of contagious infection.

You need to put pandemic plans

into place in order to prevent

it happening. Sounds like we

have plans and sounds have plans and sounds like at

the moment the system works

extremely well. Be careful

crossing the road as well,

people. We're not talk being

thousands of deaths right now.

That means the plans are

working. Thousands of deaths,

wouldn't that be a great

story. Now you are being silly. Finally, on panic

stations, there is an interesting story on the interesting story on the front

page of the 'Age', an un-named

Chinese Government source is

confused by the Australian

Government's white paper. In

fact he says for us this is

confusing. This is in confusing. This is in response

to the possible build-up in

Australian defence spending as

a response to China's military build-up. Haven't they

contacted Mrs Lui? She is such

a skilful interpreter. The

fourth paragraph says the spokesman emphasised that the

relationship was strong enough

to withstand tension over

defence policy and says China

is decade az way from having

anything like a credible

balance to American power. The perfect self-neutering

story. It's worth a leak. And exclusive. We will see that

long-awaited and long-awaited and discussed

white paper. Reports that the

Opposition will still run on

its line that Kevin Rudd is too

close to China. He speaks

Chinese. Possible foreign

agent. Anyway, thanks for that. Thanks. You can watch

all of us streamed line every

morning here:

With sport and a look With sport and a look ahead

to the weekend, here's Paul Kennedy. Former Wallaby Julian

Huxley wants to return to

SuperHornet rugby a year after

having surgery to remove a

brain tumor. The Brumbies would

have liked him to play this

season, but it is unlikely as

his case is still to be

reviewed. The Brumbies will

play the Reds tomorrow night.

Victorian pace bowler Dirk

Nannes is making headlines in

the Indian Premiership League.

He took two for 16 last night

as his Delhi team beat the top

rated opponents. He can't get a

game for Australia at the

moment even though Virenda

Sehwag says he's the fastest

bowler he's faced. More

swimming records may be swimming records may be set

with the introduction of new

technology being trialled in

Australia. Experts say these

non-slip starting blocks will

reduce times based on track and

field starting blocks. They

will improve stability and

limit errors. They will be

OKKed by authorities and

hopefully they won't cause the o t o e s controversy being stirred up by

fast suits. Lucky they are

non-slip! That's what you want

in a starting block. Somebody

has slipped off a starting

block before and we have the

highlights of Thorpe falling

off the blocks years

ago. Surely this will lead to a

reduction in times. It is

unfair to the people who have

set records up to this

stage. Yeah, I guess, but

technology improves in all

sports. Good tennis rackets are

unfair to others too. I wanted

to drag Gidon in here and see

if you know much about Dirk

Nannes? As you were saying earlier, he's an interesting

bloke. He's one of these

cricketers who because the

rewards in the game are later

these days hasn't had to choose

between career and cricket.

He's able to start his career

at the age - in his early at the age - in his early 30s.

In Australia you can do that.

Stuart Clark is an example of a

player who didn't break through

until he was 30 years old.

Sehwag says he's fast. On the

speed gun he's not as fast as

someone like Brett Lee. But I

think it's the angle. He bowls

a precise line that cramps up

the batsman, which is why he's

effective in Twenty20. Can I

ask you a question - something

else happening in cricket over

England. Phillip Hughes has

made his second century for

Middlesex. The first Australian

to make two centuries in his

first two county games first two county games since

Andrew Symonds. He shared a

200-run partnership with the

captain of

England! Interesting. I got an

email from Mike Atherton, the

former England captain who had

been watching Hughes in England

and said what do you know, he

looks sensational. I said he

will make a million this summer

in England. Will he make a

million for Australia? He's one

of those players who is at the

start of his career, is hungry,

hasn't been worked over by

Opposition attacks. Bowlers are

still working out how to get on

top of him. There is a lot to

this guy's game. Excellent. Thanks. Now here is Vanessa

O'Hanlon with a look at the weather. Thanks. People looking

forward to a weekend in the

snow we've had record snow we've had record April

falls this week. Mountain

bulla, which you can see will

be the first resort to open five weeks ahead of the

official season. No snow in the

past 24 hours, but the whole

resort is covered in snow and

it's a chilly 0.6 of a degree.

Next week - a high will

continue to linger over the

Bight. It will cold over NSW

and eastern Victoria with cloud

and wind increasing from a

front. The rest of the south-east shouldn't be as cold

as yesterday. The showers will

increase over SA, Victoria and

Tasmania. South easterly winds

and a weakening trough well off the east coast will cause

showers north of Sydney.

Heavier over the tropics. We

have a mass of cloud sitting

over in the south-east. That

will cause a few showers mainly

over Victoria and Tasmania. But

there will be drizzle in WA and

SA. Most of that will be SA. Most of that will be next

to the coastline and we'll have

a few showers through NSW.

Queensland - most of the storm

activity will be contained to

northern Cape York peninsula.

In NSW - north of Sydney there

there be isolated showers. Tonight light showers should

develop along the south border.

Victoria - frosty morning

start. Scattered showers in the

far west. They'll will extend

across mountain districts. In

Tasmania - scattered

Tasmania - scattered showers

for the west and north.

Throughout the morning they

will extend to most areas

before clearing tonight. And

across to SA where there are

light showers in the south.

Most will fall on the

coastline. Cloudy in the north,

but it will remain dry. WA -

fine day with a little bit of

cloud and light drizzle about

the Eucla. Mostly sunny for the

northern half and for the

Territory - isolated showers

and a storm or two over the

Arnhem district and North

Co