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(generated from captions) The world mired in recession,

it's getting much worse, it's getting much worse, the

International Monetary Fund

offers its gloomiest assessment

yet. Overwhelming democracy,

queues at polling station,

ballot papers running ballot papers running out,

South Africans turning out in

force to vote. Questions about

border control as the Navy

escorts the latest boatload of

Island. asylum seekers to Christmas

A feeble batting effort -

Australia humbled by Pakistan

Dubai. in the one-day series opener in

Live. This Program is Captioned

Good morning, it's Good morning, it's Thursday,

23 April, I'm Joe O'Brien, I'm 23 April, I'm Joe O'Brien,

Virginia Trioli, the top story on 'ABC Breakfast News' on 'ABC Breakfast News' the

International Monetary Fund's

latest snap shot of the world

economy is about as bad as

world economists and nervous

policitians have been

predicting. predicting. The International

Monetary Fund report says the

world is in the grip of severe

resession Australia's economy

is predicted to contract by

1.4%, unemployment forecast 1.4%, unemployment forecast to

reach 6.8% by the end of this

year. The IMF's head researcher

says the global economy is in

its worst shape since World War

II. Overall we expect the

global economy to decline by

1.3% in 2009, this is year on

year. The weakest performance

by far of the whole post war

period. Growth will return in

2010, helped by strong

policies, but would remain just

under 2%, so still well below

what we would see as a normal

growth rate for the average for

the year. We bear, in the the year. We bear, in

United States, a substantial

responsibility, a substantial

share of the responsibility for

what has happened. The factors

that made the crisis so that made the crisis so acute

and difficult to contain lie in

a broader set of global forces

built up in the years before

the start of the present

downturn. Never before has the

world, so much of the world

been smulted aniously hit by a

coninfluence of economic turmoil. US secretary Tim

Geithner taking Geithner taking responsibility,

Danny Cipriani joins us from

Washington. Take us through the

- Mark Simkin joins us from

Washington, take us through the

figures and what they about Australia It's not pretty reading, particularly if you

are the person preparing are the person preparing the

Australian Government's Budget

forecast. They've been blown

out of the water. Indeed, all

the risks, according to the IMF

is on the downside. Do you feel

like you've been softened up in

Australia enough for this?

Possibly not. In 2009 the IMF

is predicting the Australian

economy won't just be in

recession, but it will be a

sharp contraction of 1.4%. By

2010 the good news is nothing

to write home about, if you can

afford to write home, a growth,

but growth of only 0.6%,

relatively aneekic growth, so

that means in the year 2010 the unemployment rate in Australia

is expected, predicted to hit

under 8%. So it's going to be

one of the most painful

reseegss Australia has seen for

some time. We've had a series

of figures coming from the of figures coming from the IMF

over the last few month, every

month it seems vastly month it seems vastly different

to the one before, I know there'll be scepticism around

the figures, but the the figures, but

International Monetary Fund is

warning of some risks to their

own projections. Well, that's

right. Just in January right. Just in January the

International Monetary Fund was

predicting 0.5% global growth,

that's sounding rough back

then, most people and

policymakers would say policymakers would say wow,

they were the good old days,

now we are looking in April

down to a contraction of 1.3%.

So yes, indeed, the IMF has

been having to play catch up

here, and they do warn here, and they do warn that

there are more downside

risksing and as you say particularly for Australia they

argue that Australia is in a

better position than some

countries because of a

relatively conservative fiscal

and monetary policy that's been

run in Australia, a pat on the

back for the Reserve Bank and

the Government in terms of its

Budget and interest rate

settics, but it warns that

Australia is at - settings, but

warns that Australia is at risk

because of a high-level of

external liabilities or debts,

it suggests there are risks

ahead. The bottom line is

Australia will be held Australia will be held hostage

to the international situation,

when you look at the figures

for the big economies, the

contractions in Japan, of more

than 6%, of the US of 2.8%, of

Britain, United Kingdom, more

than 4% - it's basically than 4% - it's basically that

we are going to be very much

tied into how they go, how this

financial mess sorts itself

out, whether, indeed, it can be sorted out any time

soon. Finally, you mention the

other economies, how about

China, the big one for us, in

our region. That's probably

the one piece of good news,

there's probably two pieces of

good news. Cypress, for some reason, according to reason, according to the International Monetary Fund

list is the one advanced

economy that will be growing

this year. More relevant to

Australia, of course, is China,

China will grow as well, about

6.5% growth, that is a slowdown

in Chinese terms, but it is

growth in global demand in that

sense, it will be important in

trying to keep people's heads

above water as they are

buffeted by the economic

waves. Mark Simkin, good to

talk to you, thank you so

much. In other news - South

Africans have turned out in big

numbers for the country's

general election, officials

predict on 80% turn out. By

mid-afternoon the flood mid-afternoon the flood of

voters left officials

struggling with long queues and

not enough ballot papers, it's

forecast to be the tightest

election since the end of

apartheid. The governing ANC is

expected to win. The Federal

Opposition says the Government

must explain how a boatload must explain how a boatload of

asylum seekers almost managed

to reach the Western Australian

coast, the Navy intercepted the

boat carrying 32 Sri Lankan men

and is escorted to Christmas Island. Opposition Island. Opposition spokeswoman

Sharman Stone says the incident

is evidence that the

Government's policies Government's policies encourage

asylum seekers to head for

Australia. The US Secretary of

State Hillary Clinton has once

again raised concerns over the

power of the Taliban in

Pakistan, in an address to

Congress, she said Pakistan was

basically abdicating to the

Taliban in agreeing to the

imposition to Islamic law in

parts of the country, and told

Congress the Obama

Administration is prepared for

tough sanctions against Iran if

dialogue fails. Extraordinary

scenes. Exodus of the fighting

in Sri Lanka continues, and the in Sri Lanka continues, and

Tamil Tigers suffered a blow.

Two senior officials have given Two senior officials have

themselves up to the military.

The rebels media coordinator

and interpreter were the ones

escaping from the conflict in

the Tigers last stronghold.

The acting Chief Financial

Officer of troubled American

mortgage gained Freddie Mac has

been found dead at his been found dead at his home.

David Kellerman took on the job

in September, when the US

Government nationalised the

company, the 41-year-old worked

for Freddie Mac for 16 years,

police say there were no suspicious

circumstances. There's been a

shake-up in the race for

Indonesia's presidency, the

country's second biggest party

dropped its support for the

incumbent President yooud r the

split in Government ranks

coming - Susilo Bambang

Yudhoyono, the split coming

when he was accused of being

patronising. Gavin Fang reports. President Susilo

Bambang Yudhoyono may be the

most popular political figure,

butities deputy has been

regarded as the engine of the

Government. Now that successful Government. Now that

double act appears over, with

the decision by Golkar not to

back SBY in the July

presidential election. The

party withdrew its party withdrew its support

after the President continually

refused to say whether he'd

choose a Golkar running mate.

The party says it might now

back another back another candidate.

As the big political party,

and all the political party and all the political party to

Democrat Party, they feel that

the way Democrat

the way Democrat and Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono Bambang Yudhoyono treated

Golkar Party, it's not Golkar Party, it's not proper.

They are insulted. It's

obviously insulted. Analysts

say the President has been

emboldened by his party's

apparent victory in

parliamentary elections two

weeks ago and is confident he

can win re-election with a

running mate from a smaller

party. But Golkar's decision

means the Cabinet will means the Cabinet will be effectively split until the

July poll. I don't think it's

going to really matter. The

Government is not going to be disturbed. Bambang Yudhoyono will take disturbed. Because Susilo

control. It's possible Golkar

might reverse its decision, but

it's challenged Indonesia's

President to risk a re-election

bid without its heavyweight

support. Plans have been

unveiled for the first war

cemetery to be built for Australian soldiers in more

than 50 years. The renans of

around 400 Australian and

British - remains of around 4

runs Australian and British

soldiers killed in a disastrous

- 400 Australian and British

soldiers killed in a disastrous

day in Fromelles are about to

be discovered. The bells of

Fromelles ring out over what

will be the final resting place

for more than 400 soldiers,

Australian and British, buried

in a mass grave a few hundred

metres from here. This is the

first war cemetery in some 50

years relating to World War I,

and it's a major project for

the Commonwealth war graves,

and a significant project for

the local community here. This

muddy field will eventually

look like this, drags fanning

out from the central cross of

sacrifice, gravestones all the

same, no matter what rank the soldier. TRANSLATION: We wanted this

project to go ahead as a way of

preserving the memory of these

men who died for our country. So that's a

shell. Part of a shell. I think

it's part of a shell. In the

graveyard stark reminders of

that terrible war remain, this

pile of war debris found in

just one part of the new

cemetery. Across the road the

laboratories and storage rooms

for the recovery phase are

being built. It follows the

exploratory dig confirming the

existence of a mass grave last

year, the remains of around 400

soldiers will be exhumed, soldiers will be exhumed, DNA

sampled and hopefully matched

with surviving relatives,

no-one is sure if it

works. It's a little

experimental, we don't know the

condition of the DNA at this

stage, initially we'll take

trial samples and making sure

that we can extract DNA. All

going well, it's hoped by 5 May

the excavators will move in, by

February next year, some

reburials can begin, nine

decades after the terrible

slaughter. Now we'll look at

the front pages of the major

newspapers. Starting with newspapers. Starting with the

Sydney Morning Herald -

reporting today the Australian

economy will shrink faster than

the global average this the global average this year according to according to the International

Monetary Fund. The Canberra

Times - based on Times - based on the International Monetary Fund

forecast Australia's economic

growth, unemployment and the

Budget deficit will be worse

than expected. The Age a

positive spin on the economic forecast reporting on forecast reporting on the International Monetary Fund

predetection of a recovery next

year. The Financial Review -

concerns of collusion between

the tax office, Crime

Commission, and Federal Police.

A former Swans footballer Daryn

Cresswell has told The Sun he's

filed for bankruptcy, gambling

costing him all his AFL

earnings. Dale Lapthorne an

accused Australian people

smuggler claims Federal Police

tried to recruit him a a spy,

and features a feet of on

orphaned Joey facing an

uncertain future. Deaf uncertain future. Deaf deaf Dale Dale ily Telegraph an accused Australian people smuggler claims Federal Police tried to recruit him a a spy, and features a feet of on orphaned Joey facing an uncertain future. Deaf deaf Daily

Telegraph Adelaide Advertiser -

the Federal Government raidsor

gang is considering means

testing the popular private

health insurance rebate. And removing subsidies for removing subsidies for extras.

The Mercury - a tenth of Tasmania bureaucrats could be

sacked. The Courier Mail - 125 million clean goal project could be

could be dropped. The Northern

Territory News a man is in a

serious condition after being

attacked about an axe during a

brawl involving more than 350

people. The West Australian -

latest arrival of asylum seekers intercepted in

Australian waters off the WA

coast. If you have views on any

stories: Top stories stories: Top stories - International Monetary Fund

says the global recession is

worse than previously thought.

It's latest forecast says the global economy will shrink by

1.3%, and the Australian

economy's contraction will be

more. South Africans turned up

in big numbers for the general

election, officials predicting

80% turn out. In some places

voters waiting for hours,

ballot papers running ballot papers running out. Federal Opposition says the

Government must explain how a

bode load of asylum seekers

nearly managed to reach the

coast of the Western Australia,

the boat carrying 32 Sri Lankan

men was intercepted by the Navy

and is and is underescort to Christmas

Island. As mentioned there's

been an overwhelming turnout been an overwhelming turnout in

South Africa's general election

leaving polling officials

struggling to cope with ballot

papers running out. It's tipped

to be the tightest election

indeed post apartheid era, indeed post apartheid era, the

African National Congress is

likely to win with ease, we are

joined on the phone by South

African political analyst,

Professor Adam Habib by the

hours of the country's independent Electoral

Commission. Good morning, thank

you for joining us. It's a

pleasure. What is the latest

you have heard on the count,

have they started to be

counted, is there exit

polls. They are just tart

started to be counted. Prg just

started to be counted. Most of

the voting stations are closed,

a couple are continuing, in

part because regulations state

if you are in the queue by

9:00pm at the closing time,

they have to see through all

the votes. The casting of the

votes of all the people in the

queue, so we might be an hour

or two away from the full

closure of all the polls, but a

lot have been done. We were hearing reports a couple of

hours ago that the voting time

might even be extended because

there's about touch a huge turn

up, but that's not going to -

sux a huge turn up. But that's

not going to be the case. It's

not going to be extended

country wise, but all the

people in the line by 9:00,

closing time will be seen

through, if it takes two to

three hours to see through and

end the queues, that will

happen, that is consistent with

the IEC regulationses, you

won't have the voting times

separately being extend the We

are hearing reports of ballot

papers running out in some

places, what do you know of

that. That happened in a couple

of places, it means that of places, it means that voters

have been moving around. Because voters have been moving

around, voting in alternative

voting stations, some run

shorter ballot papers, if all

those problems have been

resolved, ballot papers

forwarded to those station, all

the political parties are

happy. I don't think that any

of that - these administrative

bungle ups will

fundamentally... I think it

will be a widely respected poll

in South Africa by all the

parties. It seems to have

proceeded smoothly, as I

mentioned with a massive voter

turn out. To what do you

attribute that astonishing turn

up, Professor. I think there's

a couple of things underlining

it there's been a succession

crisis, and a competitive

persons for 2-3 years persons for 2-3 years with

Jacob Zuma, and Mbeki. That's

. Young voters have been

revitalised by the Obama

factor. The fact that there's

an Opposition party to an Opposition party to the African National Congress

awaked disillusioned votiers,

and the African National

Congress, has its structures

working. The kind of political

environment. Has effectively

galvanised all stakeholders within South African society,

and created the and created the circumstances

for the massive turnout.

Predictions are that they could

pass the 50% mark at this

stage. There doesn't seem to be

doubt that Jacob Zuma will be

the victor. No, absolutely the victor. No, absolutely not.

I think he will be clearly the

victor in the South African

election. The ANC - the only

thing in dispute is whether the

ANC will get the two-thirds.

There's a good chance it will

get the two-thirds itself. How

significant is that two-thirds

majority. We've been hearing the African National Congress

plans to alter the

constitution, making radical

changes if it gets the

majority, do you believe it

will do so and the two-thirds,

is it significant. I don't

think it's required for the

constitution amendment, they

have this two-thirds for the

last 6-7 across, there's been

minor changes, nothing fundamentally changing the

spirit of the constitution,

that's supported by the Opposition parties themselves,

these minor changes, I don't

think that's the real issue,

clearly the two-thirds is of

symbolic value to the ANC. For

the Jacob Zuma team, if they

get the two-thirds, they can

see the hosting of Mbeki does

not have organisational

consequences, losing the

two-thirds suggests Jacob Zuma

acted hastily with regards to

Mbeki, and the organisation

paid the consequences by losing

the two-thirds. It has to do

with internal ANC politics

rather than fundamental

decisions, any desire to change

the constitution itself. Pre-

tore Adam Habib, finally, how

long before - Professor Adam

Habib, how long before the

result? Two to three days, they

are normally announced

Saturday. I suspect the first

results will come out within

the next hour, and by tomorrow

afternoon, we should have a

good idea who won the

election. Good to talk to election. Good to talk to you

Adam Habib, thank you very

much. It seems to have run

reasonably smoothly, which is

terrific. It's interesting, terrific. It's interesting, if

Jacob Zuma wins, which everyone

seems to think he will, he'll

be the first Zulu to have ever

been President of the South

Africa. It's a big step Astonishing humble

personal story in his early

life, which we'll talk about as

the morning goes on, we'll

update you on the outcome and

counting of the South African

election as the morning

progresses. Let's look at

finance news, and the latest in

the BrisConnections mess, small

investors in the airport toll

project of considering an offer

from Macquarie Group, allowing

them to walk away from their

obligation, but larger

investors would be left in the lunch, Francene Norton

reports. There may by might at

the end of the tunnel for 600

unit holders. Many Australians

who bought into the scheme

didn't know about instalment

liibilityies dues Wednesday,

with unit holders expected to

pay $1 or $2 for every unit

they own. Macwary would they own. Macwary would take

over the debts. Stakeholders

will get nothing. Where there

is $2 to be paid in liabilities

on these smars, zero sounds

like a fairly attractive

offer. That's cold comfort for

many so-called mum and dad

investors who bought lots investors who bought lots of shares when the shares when the price

collapsed. In a statement to the stock exchange

BrisConnections warned

acceptance of the Macquarie

offer by the majority the unit

holders may with have consequences in respect of the

requirements for the continued

listing of units on the ASX. It

could be a bad outcome for

those investors, there is at

least a potential for them to

sell these units on market.

Taking it away from them Taking it away from them means

it will be harder for them to

sell. The proposal saves face

for the Queensland for the Queensland Government

over the public private

partnership We made a decision

that taxpayers would not bear

the risk from people who made

private investments in a company BrisConnections. Renegade

entrepreneur Bolt looks set to

a void - Nicholas Bolton look

set to avoid by transferring

his stake to a family friend. A BrisConnections spokesman BrisConnections spokesman tried

to stop it going ahead. The

stock exchange rejected its

request. Britain Britons face

tax increases on fuel, beer and

cigarettes as the Government

hands down its Budget, coming as the International Monetary

Fund predicted the economy

would string to 4.2%, debt

doubling to 79% of Gross

domestic product by

2013. Aviation giant 2013. Aviation giant is

Football League the effect of

the downturn, Boeing - feeling

the effect of the downturn,

Boeing downgraded the forecast

for 2009 as airlines postpone

deliveries of the plaps. We'll

look at the figures - planes,

we'll look at the figures: nes. We'll look at the figures - planes, we'll look at the figures: figures: feeling the effect of the downturn, Boeing - feeling the effect of the downturn, Boeing downgraded the forecast for 2009 as airlines postpone deliveries of the planes. We'll look at the figures - planes,

we'll look at the figures: In

a few minutes Vanessa a few minutes Vanessa O'Hanlon

with a look the the weather,

and a review of newspapers,

this morning we'll be joined this morning we'll be joined by

Deputy Editor of the Sunday Deputy Editor of the Sunday Age

Mark Forbes. Now Paul Kennedy

with sport. Pakistan beat

Australia easily in the first

one dare in the United Arab Emirates, Shahid Afridi taking

6/38, bowling the Aussies out

for 168, Pakistan making the

runs with four wickets in hand.

Here are the highlights.

To the Asian Champions League

and Newcastle lost 1-0 to

Nagoya, leaving the Jets with a

must-win match in a fortnight

at Beijing. Here are the big moments.

There are two games in the

English Premier League,

Chelsea-Everton n a preview of

the FA Cup Final, no scores in

that, the Manchester United

game against Port mith, one

goal Man U, Wayne Rooney the scorer. scorer. smith, one goal Man U, Wayne Rooney the scorer.

Probably not too early to say

the Aussies are in disarray

over there in the Middle

East. How did Pakistan rate as

a one-day team going into

this? Up and down, they can be

good and terrible, Shahid

Afridi took 6/38, his best

figures ever, and best by Pakistan against Australia

ever. Their spinners did the

damage, Australia's batting was

pretty terrible. They were 1/le

8 and cruising along, and -

#/88, cruising along - 1/88,

and cruising along Is this a

mental issue. It must be

fatigue, that's all you can put

it down to, they have personnel

problems, Sean Marsh, who has

come back from a hamstring

injury strained his hamstring

again, they punted on again, they punted on bringing

Andrew Symonds back in, he

failed. He wasn't alone in the

middle order. They all went

down to the spin bowling, down to the spin bowling, no

Ricky Ponting. The guys are led

by Michael Clarke, it seems a

little cobbled together, this

tour. Great for Pakistan, it

has to be said. They looked

delighted to be playing

international cricket again,

and good for them, I guess. At

least there's a new Pakistani superstar. ABC News Breakfast

can be watched live on the web

from

from anywhere. Here is Vanessa O'Hanlon, and

O'Hanlon, and there's happy

South Australian farmers. There

sure is, good news, rain in

time for the sewing season,

computer models show the

highest falls for the

north-west pastoral cricket up

to 25 millimetres, the troughs to 25 millimetres, the

in the west moving deeper into in the west moving deeper

South Australia, the band

expected near and ahead of a

cold front reaching

cold front reaching central

districts during the afternoon

into the evening, the trough

and cold front reaching western

NSW and Victoria causing rain

obvious the southern half. Friday pushing east. A cold

front is on the way over the

weekend bringing falls to the

south-east, along with the

trough and cold front. There's

a great big broadband of cloud

moving across the southern

states causing thundery showers

in WA, South Australia in WA, South Australia and the

Northern Territory, cloud and

southerly winds and showers

lingering over the NSW North

Coast. Dry air over Queensland Coast. Dry air over

it will be fine, light showers

about the East Coast and

isolated storms over Cape York

Peninsula. NSW - isolated

showers on the North Coast clearing throughout the Central

Coast, late patchy rain moving Coast, late patchy rain

to the far south-west. Victoria

- morning fog in Gippsland

ahead of a warm day, cloud

expected to increase with rain

developing in the east late

this afternoon or into the

evening, Tasmania fine, drizzle

in the north, fog patches. Now to South Australia - most of

the action is happening, a

total fire ban for most

districts except the western

agriculture, gusty agriculture, gusty northerlies,

rain across the state except

for the north-east. Western

Australia - isolated showers

and thunderstorms for the Eucla

and interior, 15mm of rain

expected along the coast.

North-west Kimberly, isolated

showers and storms similar for

the territory coast. Cloud

increasing over the Alice, showers and storms. showers and storms. Late

showers in Sydney and Canberra,

going for a top of 20, becoming

windy in Melbourne. 19. More

weather in half an hour.

The top story on ABC News

Breakfast, Breakfast, the International

Monetary Fund's latest snap

shot of the world economy is

not a pretty pic, the latest

report saying the world is in

the grip of a severe

recession. Australia's economy predicted to contract by predicted to contract by 1.4%,

the IMF head researcher says

the global economy is in its

worst shape since the end of worst shape since the end

World War II. We expect the

global economy to decline by

1.3% in 2009, this is year on

year. The weakest performance

by far of the whole post war

period, growth will return in

2010, helped by strong

policies, but would remain

under 2%, so still well below

what we would see as a normal

growth rate for the average for

the year. We bear in the the year. We

United States a substantial responsibility, a substantial

share of the responsibility for

what has happened, but the

factors that made this crisis

so acute and difficult to

contain lie in a broader set of

global forces that built up in

the years before the start of

the present downturn. Never

before has the - so much of the

world been simultaneously hit

by a confluence of economic

turmoil. Tim Geithner there,

we'll go to Canberra for an

Australian perspective, Australian perspective, and

Hayden Cooper, we know why

people were jumping on the

recession bandwagon in the last

couple of days. We do, in the

face of figures like these,

ignoring the prospect of a

recession is impossible. The

numbers out of the IMF are grim

for Australia, they are

approaching the levels of the

1991 recession, so they don't

look good at all. Although mild

compared with many other

nations, they are still

signifying bad news ahead. The

other thing to remember, of

course, is that this is the

fifth downgrade from the IMF in

the last six months, no-one

knows whether these numbers

will turn out to be correct, or

whether there'll be another

downgrade in another month or

so, we could be back again

talking about another equally

bad set of numbers. Talking in

terms of bad sets of numbers,

we have the Budget in a we have the Budget in a couple

of week's time, you'd have to

expect there are going to be

severe cuts in some severe cuts in some areas. Yes,

that's right, the Government

has no choice, because it needs

to claw back money somewhere,

and it said that it will be

trying to return the Budget to

a surplus eventually, and that

will take an overwhelming

task,. I think what the IMF

figures confirm is Kevin Rudd

is absolutely right when he

says he has the toughest job in

modern economic history, and

that revenues have taken their single biggest hit single biggest hit since World

War II. The IMF suggests that the Governments like Australia

should keep the money flowing,

but it notes that the money

already spent on stimulating

the economy hasn't necessarily

succeeded in stabilising it. So

that's the challenge for the

Government, but the difficulty

in that is debt, and more stim

lottery spending requires more

- stim lottery spending

requires debt and that's a set

of numbers that gets worse. It

will be a big figure, Hayden

Cooper in Canberra, thank you

for that. In other news - South

Africans have turned up in big

numbers for the country's

general election, officials

predict 80% turnout and by

mid-afternoon the unexpected

turn out left officials

struggling with long queues and

too few ballot papers, it's

forecast to be the tightest

election since the end of

apartheid in 1994. The

knorching ANC is expected to

win a comfortable majority. The

froms says the Government must

explain how a boat - Federal

Opposition says the Government

must explain how a boat lode

must explain how a boat lode of

asylum seekers almost arrest

the Waugh coast. Opposition

spoecks swoman Sharman Stone

says the boat managed to bet

been 40 miles of Barrow

Island. Hint voiced fears over

Taliban - Hillary Clinton

voiced fears over voiced fears over Taliban.

Secretary of State Clinton said

Pakistan was abdicating to the

Taliban in agreeing to the

imposition of Islam ek law in

parts of the country, she told congress the Obama Administration is prepared for

tough sanctions against Iran if

dialogue fails. As tens of

thousands of Sri Lankans flee

the violence, senior Tamil

Tigers gave themselves up to

the military, a media

coordinator and interpreter

escaped the conflict. Their

surrender is seen as a blow to

the separatist group. A major

international conference on

Somalia began in Brussels, with

the country's piracy problem

top of the agenda. Video

emerged said to show Somali

pirates holding an Egyptian

ship Friday, shot by a local freelance journalist allowed on

board by the pirates. More on

the huge turnout in South

Africa's general election, the ruling African National

Congress is expected to win,

but analysts say it could be

its smallest majority. ABC's

Africa correspondent Andrew

Geoghegan reports from

Johannesburg. Casting his vote

for just the fourth time in his

life. 90-year-old Nelson

Mandela braved the cold weather

and a large pack of onlookers

to exercise his Democratic

right. The former President one right. The former President

of the 23 million South

Africans registered to vote in

an election the ruling ANC was

expected to win in a landslide.

ANC leader Jacob Zuma is almost

certain to become the country's

next President. The emergence

of rival parties posed the

biggest challenge to the ANC's

15 year fall, long queues

forming across the country.

Most people were forced to wait

for hours. To many South

Africans, this is more than an

election, it's a celebration of

democracy, 15 years after the

country's first Democratov poll

these people cherish their

right to - Democratic poll

these people cherish their right to determine their

future. Can you tell me who you

vote for. That's my secret.

National wide, there's only

party we knew suffered for us

is what I can say to you. The

ANC. Of course. Give them

another 15 years, everything

will be right. A new generation

of voters wanted a change of

Government. Impatient the lives

have not improved under the

ANC. It's been a long time,

since I did my metric in 2004, there's no job

opportunities. Late at night

after the polls had after the polls had officially

closed people were queuing to

have their say in this young

democracy's future. As we

mentioned in Western Australia

another boatload of asylum

seekers is awaiting transfer to seekers is awaiting transfer

Christmas Island, intercepted

by the Navy off the mid-west

coast. Andrew O'Connor Jones us

from Perth. We've been from Perth. We've been warned

there are more boats on the

way, in is no real surprise,

the boat was found a long way

south, wasn't it? That's south, wasn't it? That's right,

I don't think there was a

surprise that another boat was

on the way or it would have

been intercepted. What was

unexpected, it was where it was

found. The boat of found. The boat of Afghan

asylum seekers which exploded

arrived as many before it arrived as many before it at

Ashmore Reef, about 600km north

of Broome off the far north tip

of Western Australia's coast.

This boat was found at Barrow

Island, brimed is 150km west of Karratha, midway up the coat Karratha, midway up the coat at

Barrow Island, a long way

south, 1,000km south of Ashmore

Reef, which is quite an unusual

place for the boats to be

found. It's not unprecedented.

Last November we talked about

another boatload arriving another boatload arriving at

Shark Bay. Where some of

Shark Bay. Where some of the

asylum seekers managed to wade

ashore and ask locals for

directioning, it's unusual not

unprecedented. What do we know

about the people on

board. According to Bob Debus, board. According to Bob

they are Sri Lankans, all men,

they arrived here yesterday,

tracked by Border Protection

for about 24 hours before

entering Australia's migration

zone, when erp intercepted, I

spoke with Border Protection a

few minutes ago, and they said

the asylum seekers were

transferred to a nval patrol

boat and are on their way to

Christmas island undergoing security and health

checks. Thank you for that

update. Andrew O'Connor. To update. Andrew O'Connor. To the

Sri Lankan Civil War in the

country's north-east, the long

running conflict between the

Colombo conflict and Tamil

Tigers is proving to reach a

bloody end. More than 80,000

civilians have escaped from the

last stronghold of the Tigers,

there's more than 100,000 in

the war zone, international aid

agencies fear a humanitarian

catastrophe. Sam Pari is an

analyst and joins us from

Sydney. Good morning, do you

concede it appears the Tamil

Tigers are all but

defeated. That's what the Sri

Lankan Government seems to be

reporting, however, the Tamil

Tigers still are able to give

reports from the ground, and

several incidents have several incidents have happened

over the last 26 years where

the international community and

the Sri Lankan Government

thought the Tamil Tigers were

defeated, but they have proven

otherwise. Have they been

pushed to a small area before

though? I think this is - this

would be counted as one of the

several incidents where several incidents where the

Tamil Tigers have - the Sri

Lankan Government seems to have

the upper hand. We wouldn't

know until further incidents

take place and really until take place and really until the

Tamil Tigers state that they

are going to end their armed

revolution or armed freedom

struggle. We hear there are 50,000 Sri Lankan soldiers in

the area. Do you know how the area. Do you know how many

Tamil Tigers soldiers are in

the last little part of Sri

Lanka. I don't have that figure

for you, no, sorry. Can you see

the Tamil Tigers agreeing to a

surrender? I cannot honestly

see that. The Tamil Tigers were

forced to pick up arms because

of successive discrimination by

successive singlular successive singlular dominated

Sri Lankan governments, and the

choice to pick up arms was

after several decades of

engaging in non-violent

peaceful protests, hunger

strikes, peace protests. When a

decision has been made by the

Tamil community, I cannot see

them surrendering having

sacrificed so many fallen

heroes to the freedom

struggle. Give us an idea of

the form of some of that

discrimination that took

place. Sri Lanka got

independence from the independence from the British

in 1948, and for the last 61

years the Sri Lankan Government

his been distriment nating

against the Tam ills -

discriminating against the Tam

ills in education, employment,

several Government backed

ethnic riots have seen

thousands killed, the latest

and largest in 1983, 4,000

Tamil civilians were killed in

a matter of four days,

furthermore the Sri Lankan

Government under the guise of a

war on terror has been

conducting a racist war against

the Tamil people, bombings of

hospitals, churches,

orphanages, the escalation we

see is only in the last two

years, but prior to that for

the last 30 years, there has

been continuous been continuous bombing,

shelling of Tamil areas, and

they've been up to 100,000

people who have died in the

civil or war, the majority, 99%

Tam ills from the north and

east. If you say the Tamil

Tigers will not surrender, what

are your concerns about what

could happen in the small strip

of land, there's supposedly

tens of thousands of

tens of thousands of civilians

in the area The international

community called repeatedly for

an immediate ceasefire, the Sri

Lankan Government has turned a

deaf ear to this. In September

last year the Sri Lankan Government kicked Government kicked out United

Nations and aid agencies from

the Tamil areas Roe moving

independent international

witnesses, no media has been

allowed to enter the zone since

January, when the Sri Lankan

Government pulled out of the

ceasefire, my concern is for

the hundreds of thousands of

Tam ills caught, and the Tamil civilians caught in Government

held areas, more than 400,000

are held in detention centres,

which have been compared to

concentration camps by concentration camps by members

of the British parliament of the British parliament and

European parliament, about

350,000 Tamil civilians have

been held in detention camps

since 2001 and haven't been

relocated, my concern is for

the continually increasing

Tamil civilians held in

detention camps, military

occupied detention camps where

they don't have freedom of

movement, they are taken away

from questioning, you don't

here where they've been taken,

they disappear. The Tamil

population at large in Sri

Lanka is under threat, if the

Tamil population is going to be

treated this way when treated this way when the Tamil

Tigers are armed, imagine what

the case would be it there are

no armed groups to protect the

Tamil civilians. What is the

key Dr Sam Pari to a peaceful

solution, you have the Tamil

Tigers forced into a small

strip of land, you say they

won't surrender, how can a

humanitarian catastrophe be

avoided. A humanitarian

catastrophe can only be avoided

if the Sri Lankan Government

taking the advice from the

community, accepting a call for

a ceasefire, gives up the

military onslaught, sits at a

table and negotiate a political

solution to the legitimate

grievances of the Tamil people,

they have wanted a separate

state for several decades, since the British left since the British left they

have been asking to go have been asking to go a

separate way, they have seen separate way, they have seen no

Sri Lankan Government,

dominated by the singular

majority will treat them as

equal citizens and ask for the

original lands back, it's

basically a bad marriage, and

the tam ills want a divorce,

and the Sri Lankan Government

should recognise they are only

asking for lands they are

entitled to, that they ruled,

were owners to before the

British came and colon ised the

island. The only way I can see

a long term peaceful solution

is sitting down as civilised

people and discussing the

concerns of all Sri Lankan citizens, taking citizens, taking into

consideration the legitimate

worries, grievances, concerns.

Tamil people and coming to a

solution not involving blood

and destruction and death of

innocent civilians, women,

children, elderly are

slaughtered, massacred. In the

last 48 hours, more than 4,000

Tamil civilians have been

killed. This in our eyes is

genocide. We've been saying a

genocide has been taking place,

a few days ago a former a few days ago a former deputy High Commissioner to Sri Lanka, Mr Bruce Haigh used those terms, he called this a genocide. For a member of genocide. For a member of the Australian Government, an Australian authority who has experience in Sri Lanka to come out and call this a genocide community including Australia steps in, does something steps in, does something about this. We cannot let another Rwanda take place. Dr Sam Pari in Sydney, thanks for talking to us this morning. You are watching 'ABC Breakfast watching 'ABC Breakfast News' we'll look at the top stories, the International Monetary Fund says the global recession is worse than thought. The latest forecasts says the global economy will shrink by 1.3%, the Australian economy's contraction will be slightly more. South Africans turn up more. South Africans turn up in big numbers for the country's general election, officials predicting 80% turn out in some places voters waiting for hours, ballot papers were running out. The Federal Opposition says the Opposition says the Government must explain how a boatload must explain how a boatload of asylum seekers nearly asylum seekers nearly managed to reach the coast of to reach the coast of the Western Australia, the boat

carrying 32 Sri Lankan men were

intercepted by the Navy and is

under escort to Christmas

Island. For a look at the

national papers, we are joined

by Mark Forbes, the deputy

editor the Sunday Age. Another

morning, another morning, another boatload. And

I think we'll see this is

continuing to be a big media and political issue

and political issue in the

weeks ahead. Probably rivaled

only by the Budget, we are

seeing the fallout of the

instability over in Sri Lanka

in a practical sense on our

doorstep and everyone seems to

want to make a degree of

political capital out of this.

It seems fair in this latest

incident to ask the question

about how the boat did about how the boat did get so

close. We've been tracking it

for four or five days, it's

clearly slipped off the radar

so to speak and nearly made it

to Australian shores. Bob Debus

made a point that they are made a point that they are not

able to intercept until it's in

Australian waters though. With

that argument. No, but my

understanding of this latest

case is it made it quite a substantial way in substantial way in to

Australian waters. Hopefully

this incident is not going to

be as dramatic as the last

one. We'll bring up the front

page of 'The Age', like many

papers has it on the front.

There is a picture there of the

other boat, as we have been

told, several more boats on

their way. We were speaking earlier in the program earlier in the program about

the problems in Sri Lanka, you

made mention of that. The

discussion, I guess, to be had next is what a next is what a country like

Australia, what its obligation

is to offer safe haven to

people in a lot of strife in people in a lot of strife in a

number of areas in our region,

how do you reckon the

discussion will go? I think we

are going to see, you know, a

partial return to dog whistle

politics. I think each time we

get an incident like this get an incident like this the inconsistencies in our approach, and the

approach, and the slightly

watered-down, more humanitarian

approach of the current Government is thrown into a

harsh glare. How is it with the

last boatload people who last boatload people who got

airlifted to one hospital get

treated on one basis, and

people who got airlifted to

another centre are treated on a

totally different basis, the

whole inconsistency about, whole inconsistency about, "You

are in Australia but you are not in not in Australia", it is still

here, and hasn't been done

which way with by the current

Government. That's true. The

fact that there were 32 Sri

Lankans on the latest boat,

we've had the stories this

morning about the troubles

there. The Opposition is still

pushing this line that the

Government's policies are

indicating a, "Come on down" kind of attitude has

developed. I suspect there is

some element of that, some element of that, though

it's interesting when the - I

saw reports yesterday from

Pakistan, when people have gone

in and said, "How about this

flood to Australia?", and

officials say, "Australia",

everyone wants to go to everyone wants to go to Europe.

We are getting a small fraction

of people that are being

displaced from Afghanistan,

from Sri Lanka and places like from Sri Lanka and places like

that. I mean, this whole debate

is a bit is a bit uncomfortable. The

Daily Telegraph front page

story was interesting, where

they talk about a deal with the

devil in terms of of people

smuggling. I mean, this bloke

isn't the devil. He was, you

know, arguably providing a

service to try to service to try to assist people

to seek asylum. They

need... Come on, they ship them

on to leaky boats, they have no

intention, taken them offshore,

abandoned them. You are not

sitting here defending people

smugglers are you. They are not

the vilest form of human life.

Some may be, some may argue,

"We are trying to get the people where they

people where they want to go",

it's frankly not surprising

that people are attempting to

make money out of it, it is

more lucrative to move people

than goods or even to move

drugs. It's not surprising

people are trying to make

money, whether they are doing

it scupulously is the matter

under discussion. We under discussion. We shouldn't

be surprised the be surprised the Australian Federal Federal Police are recruiting

men like this, you don't get

intell and information about

underground networks. Without

getting underground. Getting

grubby yourself. There's

another story, which we have

been tracking in The Sun

today. Well, I mean, Richard

Pratt's very public illness and

we presume his imminent passing has sparked

has sparked a massive media

campaign. I mean almost

unbelievable over the top

coverage, The Sun today has a

full page on him singing light

opera with a friend yesterday.

The Bolgandarmes given his

battle with Australian

authorities, I'm ambivalent about

about this issue, the bloke is

not bad, but the idea that once

someone is on the critical

list, they are a saint. What

about the idea as a newspaper

man, he has not died, he's

unwell. The coverage in some of

the papers sugs that this is -

these are the almost obiture

Aries, that's the coverage you

give to someone when they have

died, off that status, died, off that status, this is

a sample of newspapers trying

to get in advance of a

story. As long as it's bring in

the present tense. I think

this is clearly a managed media campaign, we are seeing

intimate detail about what's

goin on at Pratt's bedside,

media - going on at Pratt's

bedside, being aloud in the grounds of his grounds of his property. It's

reputation rehab. Yes, a

barely disguised campaign to

suggest the current charges

against him should be withdrawn

to allow him to pass in peaceful Newspapers don't have

to play that game, they don't

have to get involved in four or

interesting development in the five pages of coverage, it's an

way that stories are way that stories are tracked,

at least in the case of one

paper. It is, I suppose it has paper. It is, I suppose it has

the added benefit and can

travel more broadly purely

because this is a bloke who is

fairly heavily involved in fairly heavily involved in one

of the great country's of the great country's great

Football Clubs. Thank you for

stating your allegiance there.

For reasons that escape me you

want to talk about want to talk about the Bachelor

of the Year I'm back in the

country, I'm single again, I'm

for very upset that... Are you up

for it. Not at all. I don't

think I made the

footnote. Could you match Axel

Whitehead, he's been Whitehead, he's been made

Bachelor of the Year. The

musician and sometimes soapie

star. His main claim to fame is

a couple of years ago he

exposed his member at the ARIA

Awards. That's right. Talk

about reputation rehab. There's

your winner. Yes. He managed your winner. Yes. He managed

to get back on the front pages,

good to see you, thanks so

much. First Vanessa O'Hanlon

joins us now for a look at the

national weather. It wasn't too

long ago we said how hot it is

in Perth, they've had their

coldest day in 13 years -

actually the coldest day since

November yesterday, now it's November yesterday, now

around 6 degrees, chilly, we

look at the maps, we'll see the troughs causing this change troughs causing this change of

weather are moving deeper into weather are moving deeper

South Australia, and a cold

front dragging rain right

across the south, the rain reaching Central Districts in reaching Central Districts

South Australia later today,

the trough and cold front

reaching western NSW tonight

causing rain over the

south-east Friday as it pushes

further, a stronger cold front

on the way over the weekend

bringing falls to the

south-east. Along with the

trough and cold front there's trough and cold front there's a

broadband of cloud moving

through southern Australia,

with it bringing thundery

showers through parts of WA, showers through parts of

South Australia and the South Australia

Northern Territory. Cloud and

southerly winds, showers

lingering over the NSW coast.

As we head around the As we head around the States,

dry over Queensland, fine over

the next few days, a few light

showers about the East Coast

and isolated storms over Cape

York. In NSW, isolated showers

on the North Coast clearing this morning on this morning on the Central

Coast. Late patchy rain moving

into the far south-west. For

Victoria - morning fog in

Gippsland ahead of a warm day

cloud increasing with rain

developing in the west late

this afternoon or evening, fine

in Tasmania - drizzle, fog

patches, strong wind warnings

for lower eastern and western

coastal waters. South Australia

districts except - total fire ban for most

districts except the western

agriculture, gusty northerlies,

wide spread rain except for the

north-east. Western Australia - isolated showers and

thunderstorms for the Eucla,

15mm of rain for the coast.

North-west Kimberley, isolate

showers and storms similar tore

the Territory's coast. Cloud

increasing over the Alice.

Showers and storms. Tomorrow:

Now still ahead on ABC News Breakfast, reaction to International Monetary Fund Breakfast, reaction to the

grim tidings about the world

and the Australian economy. All

the economies are shrinking,

the global economy in general the global economy in

of course and the International of course and

Monetary Fund suggesting that

countries need to keep stimulating their economies as

well. More spending coming

up. Bring it on. More after the break. Stay with us. break. up. Bring it on. More after the

of course and the International the global economy in general the economies are shrinking, and the Australian economy. All grim tidings about the world

up. Bring it on. More after the well. More spending coming stimulating their economies as countries need to keep Monetary Fund suggesting that

break. Stay