Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Disclaimer: The Parliamentary Library does not warrant the accuracy of closed captions. These are derived automatically from the broadcaster's signal.
ABC News Breakfast -

View in ParlView

(generated from captions) Another suspicious fire burns

in Melbourne, and a court

appearance today by a arson

suspect charged over a

Gippsland fire that claimed 21 lives. The Federal Government

is urged to take control of hospitals from the States, as

part of a review into

Australia's health system.

Afghanistan President agrees

with Barack Obama's plan to

change the focus in the war on

fror, and address the loss of

civilian -- terror, and address

the loss of civilian

casualties, and a remarkable

catch by Adam Voges helps

Australia to a one-run win in

its Twenty20 match over New

Zealand. This Program is Captioned

Live.

Good morning, it's Monday, 16

February, I'm Joe O'Brien,. I

hope Virginia Trioli are. The

top story on 'ABC Breakfast

News' a 39-year-old man is due

in court this morning after

being charged with arson

offences offer one of the

Victorian fires that claimed at

least 21 lives. There are nine

large fires burning in

Victoria, but authorities say

none are posing any immediate

danger. Overnight fire crews

have been focussing on back-burning and building

containment lines to prevent

the state's water catchments

from being contaminated. There

was a brief scare for residents

of Belgrave in Melbourne's

east, a fire that's been viewed

as suspicious sent embers into

the air, sparking fears it

could spread. That fire is now

under control, after being

waterbombed from the air. And

in other news this morning, the

Rudd Government is being urged

to take over key aspects of the

nation's health system from the

States. The health reform commission, launched by Kevin

Rudd a year ago, will deliver

its draft report today, and

apparently it calls for the

Government to take over

advisory services in areas such

as dentistry, farmistry and

school services and the

establishment of megaclinics or

one-stop shops for health

needs. The NSW North Coast is

bracing for flash flooding. The

500 residents of the Bellinger

Valley, near Coffs Harbour have

been isolated by floodwaters.

Heavy falls are expected across

the State today. As part of

Barack Obama's new regime an

Afghan delegation will join a

review of US policy in the

region, addressing the loss of

civilian life and new ways of

fighting Taliban's militants.

Last week an Australian Special

Forces unit was involved in a

fire fight leaving five

children dead. As Israel's

election stale mate drags on

Foreign Minister Tzippi Livni

says if she's not made Prime

Minister she'll take the Kadima

Party into Opposition, the

centrist party narrowly won,

but the Lahti of Benyamin

Netanyahu is best placed to

form a right-wing Coalition, it

could freeze talks with

Palestinian peacemakers. 15

killed after a fire ripped

through a hostel in southern

Russia, up to 80 squatters had

been living in the condemned

three thf storey building. For

more on the Victorian fires and

the arson suspect appearing in

court. Luke Waters joins us from outside the Melbourne

Magistrates court. Luke, good

morning, just give us an idea

of what is going to happen

there today. Later in the

northern, he's charged, amongst

other things, with arson

causing death, recklessly and

intentionally lighting a

bushfire, if proven they carry

maximum jail terms of 25-15

years respectively, relating to

the Churchill fire, the fires

if Gippsland killing 21 people.

Given the sensitivities and

high emotion in Gippsland,

police transported the suspect

to Melbourne, saying that was

solely for his own

safety. There are several fires

burning around Victoria, give

us a run-down on what's

happening with them. Yeah,

there are nine fires at the

moment still burning. One of

the main areas of concern is

north of Melbourne in the

Kilmore Murrindindi blaze,

reasonable conditions over the

last few days allowed fire

crews to back-burn and

strengthen containment lines,

resources have been deployed in

and around the Melbourne water

catchments, 500 firefighters by

day and another 500 by night

strengthen lines around those areas, and that's because if

and when it rains, there are

fears that silt and ash will

run into the catchments,

causing some level of contamination. Last night there

was concern near the Dandenongs

at the town of Belgrave coming

under threat when a fire, which

took two aerial waterbombers

and 20 CFA crews to bring under

control. Arson Squad detectives

will be on the ground. It's

believed there's a strong

possibility that that fire was

the result of arson. Now, Luke,

there's obviously been a debate

over the last week after the

fires, about building

standards, and if homes have to

be improved to make them better

equipped to handle the heat of

the fires. What is happening

with that issue today? Well,

John Brumby has been strong

during the last week, that

bushfires know no state

boundaries, and Victorian

Cabinet will be thrashing out

whether, in fact, they joined a

national or are prepared to

wait for a National Building

standard or whether they'll go

it alone devising their own

bushfire building

standard. Luke Waters in

Melbourne, thank you. Returning

to Afghanistan, America's new

envoy to the country Richard

Holbrooke met with the Afghan President Hamid Karzai

overnight. The meeting waghts

the first direct contact

between the -- was the first

direct contact between the

Afghan President and new

administration following signs

that Hamid Karzai was out of

favour. It was agreed that the

Afghan President would support

America's view on the war of

terror. With President Karzai I

carry a personal message from

Barack Obama, a message of

support for the people of

Afghanistan, and for the democratically elected

Government of Afghanistan.

President Obama also welcomed

the suggestion President Karzai

had made in a letter that

President Karzai had sent to

President Obama, just a few

days ago. We have come here to

listen, and to learn your

points of view. I received

from ambassador Holbrook the

message of President obama, a

message of President Obama, I'm

very, very thankful that

President Obama has accepted my

proposal of Afghanistan joining

the strategic review of the war

against terrorism in the United

States. Hamid Karzai speaking

there. After years of delay

Cambodia's Khmer Rouge opens

starting by trying a former

prison chief. Duch and four

other former Khmer Rouge will

face the tribunal on various

charges of crimes against

humanity. The Khmer Rouge are

said to be responsible for the

oppression and deaths of almost

2 million people during the

'70s. The The survivors of the

Khmer Rouge have waited decades

for justice. Progress has been

slow. Even now the Khmer Rouge

tribunal has been criticised

for trying only five former

members of the regime when many

more were responsible. But the

case of the former prison chief

Duch is seen as a good place to

start It's an historic occasion

for Cambodia, after all these

years to, have the case

opening, the first case we have

is against Duch, or Kiang Guek

Eav for the crimes committed at

S21 involving Tuol Sieng

Prison, Prey Sor Prison, and

Chheung Ek. 'The Duchess' is

accused of war crimes and

prosecutors says there's crimes against human ity,

evidence for his to be a

clear-cut case. Some people who

were imprisoned in the '70s

want answers, and want to know

why their families were

killed. It's taken so long for

the tribunal to start many

former Khmer Rouge are dead,

incolliding the leader Pol Pot.

There are few survivors left to

pass on stories to younger

generations. It is a very good

lesson because they do not have

the personal history, but it's

very clear and loud message is

that when you commit a crime,

even after 30 year, that you

can have the ability to bring

those to justice. But most of

the tribunal's problems are

internal, it's been in

desperate need of funds and an

end to infighting over who and

how many former Khmer Rouge it

should try. And now to the front pages of the major

newspapers around the country,

'The Financial Times' is

leading with a story that the

US Government finally won

congressional support for the

$787 billion stimulus package,

those figures mess with your

head. Economists fear

compromise over the size and

content may dull the effectiveness. 'The Australian' reports fire authorities refuse

to sign off on a new national

building rules for bushfire

zones. They believe standards

are lax and lives will be put

at risk. As we heard earlier,

Luke Waters was saying the

Victorian Cabinet is

considering rushing them

through. 'The Age' says the

Victorian Government is

considering rushing through

fire planning measures,

preventing a repeat of the

State's bushfire disaster. The

'Sydney Morning Herald' says

the lives of thousands of

elderly people do be at risk if

developers trump council rules

and build retirement homes in

bushfire danger zones. Still on

the fires, 'The Sun' leads with

a photo of four children who

owe their lives to one man -

dressed in shorts and thongs,

Peter Thorneycroft doused the

roof of a Kinglake pub while

dozens huddled inside. We saw a

shot with him on the roof last

week. The Hobart 'Mercury' says

more than 80 people in Tasmania

are left with lifelong injuries

as a result of road crashes

this year. NSW students are

being bullied so severely that

they are threatening to

retaliate with violence,

reports 'The Daily Telegraph'.

The 'Advertiser' says plans to

build a fourth air warfare

destroyer in Adelaide have been

put on hold due to a lack in

Federal revenue. Adelaide

United coach Aurelo Vidmar

explains why he called Adelaide

a piss town. 'The Courier Mail'

reports a speed camera in

Wardoo Street Southport is the

State's most profitable,

netting 12,000 an hour in

revenue. That's 12,000 an hour

in revenue. I'll try to call

that up on the screen and give

you detail. And find out how

many drivers that involves.

'The West Australian' reports

on calls for an urgent inquiry

into maternity services after a

new study found babies born in

public hospitals are

three-times more likely to die

in the first month after birth

than those born in private hospitals. Finally 'The

Northern Territory News' says the Police Association calls

for security cameras to be used throughout the Northern

Territory. Now, if you'd like

to send your feedback on any of our stories:

Now, let's look at the top

stories on 'ABC News

Breakfast', a 39-year-old man

is due in court this morning,

after he was charged with arson

offences over the Churchill

fire that claimed at least 21

lives. In Melbourne east this morning, arson investigators

are trying to determine whether

a fire lit yesterday was

deliberately lit. The Rudd

Government is being urged to

take over key aspects of the

nation's health system from the

states. The recommendations are

being made by the health

commission report which also

calls for the establishment of

megaclinics, or one stop shops

for health needs. Afghanistan

has agreed to take part in US

President's Obama view of America's role in the Middle

East and the war on terror,

they'll focus on the loss of

civilian life and new ways of

fighting Taliban militants. To

finance, and the Japanese

Government is considering a

fresh stimulus package worth

$20 trillion yen to bolster the

economy. That's the equivalent

of $218 billion. Japan's Kyodo

newsagency says Tokyo is hoping

to compile the package ahead of

the G-20 Summit meeting in

April. To the markets:

In a short while Vanessa

O'Hanlon will be hereway look

at the national weather. Ahead

we'll review the newspapers and

this morning we'll be joined by

author and academic Waleed

Ally. With sport and an

interesting weekend of sport,

heaps of action in all sorts. Here is Paul Kennedy. Australian cricketers

finished the summer of

discontent with a victory over

New Zealand in a Twenty20 game

the the Aussies starting with gusto, faltering posting a

total of 150 - a bit below par.

The Kiwis led by Brendan

McCullum looked like winning

until a juggling act by vogue

changed the game.

Down the ground again. He's

got him. He got him. Swung

away. All the way. Southy will

finish it off. Another local

toss. This time. It's going to

be given. Straight in the air,

leading edge, who wants it. Hit

the boundaries. Just like

that. Has to be out, doesn't

it? It's not easy, this.

That's beautifully hit. Hit

that well. Well enough. Not

good enough. He's caught it.

It's not on the rope, he's

going to go out, he toss it is

up. Goes out. Does he get in,

he trips, gets in. I reckon

it's out. That's brilliant.

It's up in the air. It's going

to go. It's all the way. They

are going to lose by a run in

the end. They'll end up a run

short. Australian Tim Cahill

scored to help Everton beat

Aston Villa and qualify for the

FA Cup. The homeside ahead.

Villa's goal coming from a

penalty, Everton awarded a

penalty, 2-1. Cahill put the

game beyond doubt with a goal

in the 76th minute dedicating

it to the victims of the

Victorian bushfires. Angry

Adelaide United coach Aurelo

Vidmar has been retained after

meeting the board and openers.

Aurelo Vidmar blew up after

losing to Melbourne Saturday.

Criticising his team and the

home city. He's apologised and

will coach them in the

preliminary final against

Queensland Roar. Just for fun,

let's listen to what Aurelo

Vidmar said. It was a disgrace,

absolute disgrace. Do you think

you owe Adelaide fans an

apology for what happened? We

owe the world an apology, for a

performance like that, it's a

disgrace. What is it down

to? Politics, that's what I put

it down to. In

Adelaide? There's too many

people in this club with hidden

agendas. That's the problem.

That 4-0 result was politics.

Nothing else. Whether you

involve directly or indirectly,

you have an effect. Has been

effect on everyone. That 4-0

result was because of that,

because of a piss-ant town,

this club will never win

anything until you get rid of

that crap. Everyone's involved,

mate, everywhere. It's a

disgrace. And you know because

you are involved as

well. Me. Yes. Briton adds

Laura Davies won the Australian

golf open after a tense finish,

Katherine Hull, Masters winner

finished well, but never looked

in contention. Karrie Webb

couldn't keep up her

outstanding form from the first

round, it was Davies who took

control on the final day, the

45-year-old bogeyed the last

hole, having done enough to win

the trophy. In the Northern

Territory Football League, they

have expanded offshore. The

Tiwi bombers played their first

home game on Bathurst island to

the delight of the Footy mad

locals, it's hoped the talent

can be harnessed to build on

the record number of 82

indigenous footballers listed

with AFL clubs. It's the first

time an NTFL match hit the

mainland, Tiwi Islands, 100km

north of Darwin, spurred

champions of the ilk of Michael

Long and his nephew Cyril Ri

oly, for the people of the

island group football is not a

sport, it's a relagion. They

are playing their first

inaugural game, it's fantastic,

for the locals to have

something of their own. The

day started with stars of

tomorrow rubbing shoulders with

heroes. If some players play

good, tet the recruiting

officer at Essendon to come

down. The historical match at

the $1.5 million Tiwi oval was

opened in style, including this

re-enactment of the 1942

bombing of Darwin. A minute's

silence was held for Victoria's

bushfire victims before the

Tiwi Bombers unleashed their

own brand of destruction,

running circles around the

Opposition taking a 9-goal lead

by half-time. A kick-start by

the coach wasn't enough to

inspire the Darwin buffaloes,

the Tiwis running out 92-point

victors, hopefully laying

foundations for future islander

footballers to reach the

AFL. Fantastic. They have a

home game up there. There's a

lot of background to that, a

couple of years ago the Tiwi

bombers were accepted into the

Northern Territory like, the

Darwin league running over

summer. It was put off because

they thought it would diminish

football on the island, and

that basically the Tiwi Islanders couldn't hold their

open. They came in, in the

first year they won the first

seven games by record margins,

dominate, they were fast and

unpredictable. This is their

second year, they are one the

strongest clubs in the Northern Territory. They'll win

more. What else do you want to

talk about Nothing. Andrew

Strauss made a century in the

first day of the second test in

the West Indies. What about the

catch, the Adam Voges catch. If

he held and had fallen out of

boundary, it wouldn't have been

counted. Yes. If his foot

touched the rope. He threw it

back in Tripping on the way to

get it. Good thinking, he knew

that's where he was going. Here

it is again. Hops over. But

pops it up high to give himself

time to get back over, then he

trips. Trips, as well, and

before that Brendan McCullum

was just destroying the

Aussies, they had another 20 or

so to make. They would have

made it easy. I think that

would have been the perfect

finish to the summer if New

Zealand had beaten us in the

last game of the summer,

Australia can take a bit away,

they leave for South Africa for

the Test series, a lot of

players didn't play last night.

Ponting, Clarke, Peter Siddle

looked great. Looking at your

package of it, it's a slogfest,

but it's fun. Yes, I think it's

fun. It's heaps of

fun. Sometimes it's best

watched in a two minute

highlights reel. Can we talk about Aurelo Vidmar,

please. How could we avoid

it. He may be sanctioned by the

FFA today, or tomorrow, and

probably he will be. What form

does that sanction take? Maybe

a fine. Longer term me may get

sacked after the season. Who

knows. He's been such a good

get for them. He's the man

that's taken them to the

Champions League. He's Coach of

the Year. Kos was coaching them

back when they -- Kosmina

coached them to the final, he

came out with a blast, there's

Vidmar meeting with the

owners. Kosmina came out with a

blast. There he goes, there's

John Kosmina, losing 6-0 to

Victory in a Grand Final,

devastating Kos meana and the

team. They played, ever since,

under the tag as chokers,

Aurelo Vidmar took the Reds to

the Asian Champions League, did

so well there, lost against a

great team Gamba Osaka, they

lost 6-0 pon aggregate. The

thing that per plexes me is I

haven't heard anyone explain

what the politics is about. I

logged on to the Adelaide

'Advertiser''s website hoping

that reporter who Vidmar said,

"You're involved", I thought

he'd give us an inside story,

all there is is a pointer to a

story tomorrow - tomorrow the

inside story, which makes me

think that the 'Advertiser' is

going to give itself 24 hours

to work out what he's talking

about. I was going to ask you

what the politics were, no-one

can explain it. There's

speculation that Aurelo Vidmar

is forced to cut players he

hasn't wanted to cut. Sounds

like there are egos within the

club and there are camps behind

ejos. And commentary, campaigns

run by certain sections of the

media that he resent. Like a political party. Sounds like

sport. Exactly, not only do

they have one team in the city,

they only have one major

newspaper, so the coverage they

get from games would be to

Aurelo Vidmar's liking or

disliking, if he thinks the

media is against him, the one

major newspaper is against him,

that's likely to annoy him

too. The piss-ant town comment

was probably ilchosen Do you

think? Just in terms of - he

wasn't necessarily meaning to

put down Adelaide itself. I

think he was, in terms of how

the town clearly wasn't

rallying in the way that he

thinks it should. All these

soccer coaches talk in that

strong sense of identifying

with the town, the town has to

come on board, if we don't get

the supporters, he means the

media as well, when he refers

to "this town". He's

incorporating all the elements

of the town. They seem to get a

with me or against me bunker

mentality. You would be aif

your home town wasn't behind

you, especially after being so

successful If you have not seen

a white-hot angry man, that's

the look to look for, if a man

looks at you like that, back

off quickly. In the 10 seconds

before the press conference he

was twitching, he wanted to go

hard. Have a go. If the first

question had of been what did

you have for breakfast He would

have said, "It's a disgrace",

he had it lined up ready to go

and didn't miss anyone. 'ABC

News Breakfast' can be watched

live on the web from anywhere

in the world.

Now higher is Vanessa

O'Hanlon with a look at the

weather for the first time this

morning. There's been decent

falls in parts of NSW with

Taree airport picking up 106mm,

flood warnings current for

parts of the Mid North Coast

and Hunter rugby leaguons, to

the satellite, in NSW, cloud is

forming at the moment from an

offshore low, causing rain and

the odd storm, cloud on a front

in southern WA giving showers,

and the odd storm, we have

Mormon soonal showers over the

tropics, particularly north of

WA. A low is causing widespread

rain over northern and eastern

parts of NSW , a trough in WA triggering thundery showers in

the west. The monsoon trough

causing storms in the north,

easterlies affecting inland

Victoria and South Australia. , a trough in WA triggering

thundery showers in the west. The monsoon trough causing storms in the north, easterlies affecting inland Victoria and South Australia.

Tt getting hotter in Adelaide

until Thursday.

See you in half an hour.

Top story on 'ABC News

Breakfast' this morning - a

39-year-old man is due in court

this morning after being

charged with arson offences

over one of the Victorian fires

that claimed at least 21 lives,

nine large fires are still

burning in Vic, authorities say

none are posing immediate

danger. Fire crews focussed on

back-burning and building

containment lines to prevent

the water catchments being contaminated. The Prime

Minister Kevin Rudd visited

firefighters and victims of the

bushfires at the weekend. Once

against he pledged the Federal Government's total

support. Together we rebuild.

And, brick by brick, house by

house, street-by-street, we

rebuild. We rebuild together.

Not just for tomorrow, not just

for next week, and not just for

next month. But until this

community is rebuilt completely.

APPLAUSE Kevin Rudd speaking

in Wandong yesterday. Here is

how you can make a contribution to 'ABC News Breakfast' - if

you'd like to comment on the

stories we are covering:

In other news this morning,

the Rudd Government is being

urged to take over key aspects

of the nation's health system

from the states, the health

reform commission launched by

Kevin Rudd a year ago will

today deliver a draft report

calling for the Government to

take over advisory services in

areas like departmentistry,

pharmacy and school services,

and also for the establishment

of megaclinics or one stop

shops for health need. The NSW

Mid North Coast is bracing for

flash flooding after heavy

falls, 500 residents of

Bellinger Valley near Coffs

Harbour have been isolated by

floodwaters, heavy falls are

expected across the state. As

Israel's legislation stalemate

drags on Foreign Minister

Tzippi Livni says if she's not

made Prime Minister she'll take

the Kadima Party into

Opposition, her centrist party

won the election, but the Likud

Party of Benyamin Netanyahu is

best placed to form a right

wing Coalition. A Likud-led

Government could freeze country

talks with Palestinian

negotiators. Venezuela voters

are taking part in a referendum

on the number of times

policitians stand for office, a

yes vote will allow Hugo Chavez

to stay in office before 2012.

The leader of 10 years says the

amendment is needed for

Venezuela's social of the

revolution. At least 15 people

have been killed after a fire

ripped through a hostel in

southern Russia, an emergency

official said up to 80

squatters had been living in

the condemned 3-storey

building, seven were injured

and are being treated in

hospital. President Obama's

Special Envoy Richard Holbrooke

in Afghanistan held a joint

news conference with the

country's President harz,

announcing -- Hamid Karzai,

announce ing what will be

included in the policy. Richard

Holbrooke, the new US Afghan

negotiator said America was

listening. We have come here to

lisp and to learn your points

of view. But it's a sign of how

bad relations are that it's

only now that the Afghan

President will have a say on a

major new American war plan for

his country that's close to

pleegs. I'm very, very thank --

completion, I'm very thankful

that President Obama accepted

my proposal of Afghanistan

joining the strategic review of

the war against terrorism in

the United States. The new US

war plan will include up to

30,000 extra troops, most of

them will be sent to the

Taliban heartlands of Helmand

and Kandahar where British

troops have been fighting hard

battles,le aim to stabilise the

country ahead of elections in

August. With poverty and

unemployment the biggest

concern for Afghans in a poll

from the BBC, the Government

mired in corruption, the Obama

Administration is impatient for

progress. What's your

name? President Obama himself

said recently that President

Hamid Karzai's Government was

detached from the community

around it. The death of a

marine commando yesterday

brings to 144 the number of

British troops killed since the

invasion of Afghanistan. They

are thinly spread. But British

generous now talk in optimistic

terms about being able to

secure more ground and improve

the lives of Afghans when more

US troops come. But there are

other challenges. The new US

envoy came to Kabul from

Pakistan, across the rugged

mountains of the north-west

frontier whose people have

never been conquered, it is

here that the war will be won

or lost. In an effort to

strengthen Australia's security

cop rails with Pakistan Foreign

Minister Stephen Smith will

meet his counterpart in tak

Stan, his visit to Pakistan is

the first made by a Foreign

Minister, he'll hold talks with

the army chief and the

President Asif Ali Zardari.

Stephen Smith spoke with

Alexandra Kirk from ABC Radio's

'AM' before flying out. Part of

my visit will be to look at an

enhanced defence cooperation

including the training that we

may be able to provide and the

expertise we may be able to

provide in terms of counterterrorism and counterextremism, we are

looking, for example, at the

potential of a four-fold

increase in the number of

Pakistani armed forces

personnel to whom we provide

training. So trying to add our

expertise, enhance our

cooperation, enhance these

arption, we see as very

important to -- arrangements we

see as important to the bi

lateral argument with Pakistan,

it has implications to the 1100

troops in orz in

Afghanistan. Foreign amps

Finance Minister Stephen Smith

speaking. The director of Taiwan's National Palace

Museum, has visited Beijing's

Palace Museum in a trip

crossesing the divide. The trip

coming 60 years after a great

transfer of art in world

history, the removal of half a

million arta facts from Beijing's Forbidden City before

the Communist takeover on the

mainland. It's the first visit

to the mainland by a director

of Taiwan's National Palace Museum. Chou Kung-Shin says a

lot of work needs to be done to

ease the bitterness after the

transfer of art facts years

ago. She'd like to see cultural

exchanges between her

institution and China's Palace

Museum, some hurtles remain,

China insisting Taiwan's National Palace Museum change

its name to the Ty pay Palace

Museum avoiding the contentious

issue of Taiwan sovereignty TRANSLATION: We

are grateful for the visit to

have been arranged and we had

the chance to see the

maintenance of the

palaces. Chou Kung-Shin says

she'll discuss the possibility

of borrowing portraits for an

October exhibition in Taipei.

As far as lending items from

the National Palace Museum to

the Beijing counterpart it only

will happen if agreements are

signed by China for their safe

returns. Bge says there's one

Palace Museum, and the

collection in Taipei belongs to

it. 2008 saw a spike in

violence in Sudan's war torn

region of Darfur, as the

violence escalated so did the

number of Darfury refugees.

Children are some of the worst

affected by the war in the con

flict that continues to rage

there, but as Nidhi Dutt found

out those that spaebd the

bloodshed are comfortable

calling -- escape the bloodshed

are comfortable calling

Australia home. This

photography workshop in

Melbourne Australia is a long

way from Sudan's War torn

region of Darfur, happy of

these youngsters have witnessed

the destruction of their

homeland making the dangerous

journey to safer shores with

their family. For the older children like 'Asia Pacific

Focus', the memories of their

-- like Ashia Mohammad, the

memories to escape the conflict

that has claimed the lives of

200,000 people are still

fresh. When I was from Darfur

people got shot in front of

you. They torture, they get

beat up. It was like, "Oh, my

god, this is horrible, life

shouldn't be that way", you know. And here it's very

peaceful. I mean, you know.

Seems like it was - it's tough

talking about what's

happened. Yeah. Ashia Mohammad

spent her summer holidays

taking pghts of her new life in

Australia. -- pictures of her

new life in Australia, her

picture stories along with

others feature in the siz, a

collection of pictures taken

from -- exhibition, a

collection of pictures taken

from the children from the

Darfur community. I thought

there was a steps that we

should avoid the starving child

in a newspaper photograph that

everyone is familiar with, and

has a look at the photograph

and turns the page. We wanted

to do something different to

show how dynamic the community

is, expressing individuality

and absolute joy at having the opportunity to live in

Australia. Armed with disposable cameras these

children have been wandering

the streets of Melbourne.

They've snappeded all over the

survey, from the Victorian

markets to the local fire

station, some of the children

produced technically

outstanding pictures, making

use of light and shade, depth

and perspective I'll get your

photos and wrap it around the

outside. As the teacher knun

explained others rebelled

against the -- Rob Gunstone

explained others rebelled

against the manual snapping

with instinct instead. We

briefed them saying, "Get

photos of things you like in

Melbourne", and she found a

shop window with two very

beautiful dresses on Man

quince, in the window, and she

took a photograph of it. When

we get the film back, she's

caught her reflection perfectly

between these two dresses and

if you talk about, you know, a

refugee from Darfur and their

experience of Melbourne, this

image seemed to sum up things

in some way. These pictures

capture the close bond Ashia

Mohammad shares with mum, dad

and six sig liption,

representing the happier -- six

siblings, representing the

happier times her family

shared, for Ashia Mohammad who

could barely say hello in

English, these are symbolic of

hope, opportunity in freedom,

things she could only dream of

having in Darfur. In my

country- I want the peace for

the people there, to have, so

they can have peaceful I want

to visit them again to see

everything totally

changed. Kabir Dhanji captured

the worse of east and central

Africa on film, from Zambia and

the Democratic Republic of

Congo to Sudan and Chad. He

said the opportunity for

children like Ashia Mohammad to

document their new experiences

is an important part of the

healing process. It's

important, and it's something

that will come across in the

exhibition, it's not

necessarily to see these people

as people from Darfur or any

other migrant population, it's

important to see them as

Australians, that's what they

are now. For Ashia Mohammad, it

will be time before the

memories of violence and

destruction fade. What she

witnessed of a war that

continued to wage in Darfur is

a sensitive and emotionally

charged issue. The Government

of Sudan caused this hunger,

all this problems and torture,

it's time for the Government to

step up, and take serious

responsibilities for their

actions and by helping the

people of Darfur, that's all

they need and all they should

have. Ashia Mohammad is not the

only young person to feel

strongly about the conflict

raging in her homeland. Dr

Berhan Ahmed suggestions it's

an open wound affecting the

entire community, but it's

critical to keep the children

focussed on the path ahead and

engaged in the wider Australian

community to avoid serious

social and cultural problems in

the future These kids, they

need, they are feeling that

they are part of this society,

and the society has to give

them that opportunity, now, if

they don't get this

opportunities, and if they

can't build themselves equal

footing like other children,

they'll feel marginalised,

they'll feel isolated. That

creates revenge, hatred. While

the dangers of unmanaged

migrant integration is

documented. Kabir Dhanji says

his pictures tell the story of

a community keep to explore new

horizons and play an active

roll in Australian society Time

and time again I think the most

familiar comment having

photographed, you know, large,

large portions of the community

this Melbourne, and Sydney is

how much they absolutely enjoy

and appreciate everything that

they have in Australia. These

are opportunities beyond their

wildest dreams. These are

simply foches of backyards, --

photographs of backyards,

families and children leaving

ordinary lives, the humble

disposable camera allowing

these children to turn the page

on a world of conflict and

focus on what should be They

kept see between one child and

another child difference.

Unlike the adults where we see

between us, as in colour, race,

religion, but kids never see

that. If we give them the

opportunity, if we lisp to

their voice, it will give us a

better time in Darfur. You are watching 'ABC Breakfast News'

top stories, a 39-year-old man

is tu in court after being

charged with arson offences

over the chump hill fire that

claimed 21 lives, in Melbourne

east, arson investigators are

trying to determine whether a

fire that burned bushland in

Belgrave was deliberately lit. The Rudd Government is

urged to take over key aspects of the nation's health system

from the states, the

recommendations are made by the

health commission report which

calls for the establishment of

megaclinics, or one stop shops for health needs. Afghanistan

has agreed to take part in US

President Barack Obama's review

of America's role in the Middle

East and also of the war on

terror. The group will focus

on the loss of civilian life

and new ways of fighting

Taliban militants. We spent

time in Washington DC and also

in Talsa, which might warrant conversation, and he's back

with us to look at the National

paper, the author and Monash

University lecturer Waleed

Ally. Good morning. You want to

talk about it. Alsa. Anyone

that gets there, the song

famous by important country

songs, I'm interested. Everywhere you go

there's a song. We got caught

in an ice storm in Talsa. There

were 300m of snow, something

ridiculous, we had - couldn't

leave the hotels for a day. You

have come back to the land of

floods and bushfires. Two

opposite extremes in weather,

climate change is an issue, not

in the papers today. How is

that for a Segway. The 'Sydney

Morning Herald', I should pref

as this by saying the bushfire

are the main story, the story

catching my eye in the 'Sydney

Morning Herald' was about Julie

Bishop. Whether or not her

position is - Julie Bishop, her

position, if it's secure. Up to

80% of Liberals would like to

see her moved into a different

portfolio. Which is a pretty

extreme. I would like to know

where they get the figure

from. It's always a source or,

you know, a party insider. Are

these sources with hit ep

agendas. Exactly. They all have

those. If they are, We keep on

hearing after a string of

gaffes all this pressure is

building on Julie Bishop. I'd

like to hear them go through

the string of gaves to outline

the case against -- gaffes to

outline the case against

her. It's not the longest list

in the world. What is

interesting is the Government's

response, which has been

clever. Saying -- Julia

Gillard's response is

smooth. Taking a hit for

Turnbull because Turnbull has a

narrative that's hopeless. The

Opposition or Government said

do this when someone is in

trouble. Usually in the

Opposition the Government

position is, "Leave them

alone", then you know they are

really in trouble. Exactly.

They are happy with Julie

Bishop where she is. What is

interesting, having come back

from America, the thing that

struck me about the stimulus

package discussion here, and

the discussion there, is that

the Opposition in both cases,

the Conservative side of

politics, in America seems to

have found its voice, the

Republicans found their voice

on the stimulus package,

rediscovering what they were

about. Some commentators saying

Obama reminded Republicans who

they were in a way that George

W. Bush couldn't. Here, it

seems that the Opposition

hasn't quite found its voice on

this issue as a party, and

Julie Bishop is suffering as a

result of that. Haven't they

argued kind of along the same

lines, the Conservatives versus

Labor, in terms of tax cuts

versus cash handouts,

Government spending. The

difference in America is you

suddenly had this flame, that

all the Republicans could

gather around and say this is a

huge spending bill, and it was

pork, here, that phrase, I

never heard the word pork so

much in my life. Here the

narrative seems to have been

lost a little. There's been

Umming and Arsening, are we

going into debt. It's not an

issue in Americas, they've had

a huge debt. It's an

interesting contrast. Julie

Bishop's situation highlights

the fact that the Federal

Opposition hasn't found a

narrative that works for it. Some of the commentary in

the newspapers is interesting,

it makes the point that it's

difficult for someone like

Julie Bishop to find her voice,

there's been criticism within

the party she's not effective

enough against Wayne Swan, who

they rrded as terribly

ineffective. It's hard to do

that when Turnbull is making

the run, and its an issue that

matters to him, he has

expertise in it, what does that

do to your Treasury person. Has

Malcolm Turnbull found his

voice. I am not convinced. Joe

Hockey seems to be findise his

effectively. He may end up

stepping into the

portfolio. Ben Worsley will

join us, we'll talk about that

from Canberra A fascinating

juxtaposition. What else took

your eye You know the

Government is running a

consultation with the community

on whether or not we should

have a National Charter of

Human Rights of the Telstra

weighed in with a submission

submitted in October, on human

rights, saying that it's very

supportive of the charter, not

for reasons that you might

expect Telstra to be supportive

of a charter but because it

believes human rights in

Australia have been

fundamentally eroded citing the

detention of children in

immigration detention. I never

heard Telstra have a voice on

anything like this. The

submission talks about the fact

that it values protection of

free speech. And... By mobile

phones. And "given the highly

regulated nature of much of its

business", I am not sure of the

direct connection, it seems out

of the left field. I have to

plead ignorance, I kept

understand why this is -

Telstra are not responding to a

question about why they would

submit something like that.

Corporate, social

responsibility is a good thing,

this is odd, isn't it? Well,

there is something of a culture

within Telstra, amongst a few

key executives who do have a

bit of a commitment to what you

might call social justice

issues, in particular

indigenous Australia, and we

know they have been public on

that, and have some awards and

sponsorships that they do to

try to bridge the gap. There's

a little form there, not on

that issue, never on

detention. Indigenous affairs

is not the major focus.

Looking at the submission,

there may be other elements as well. I don't know, I don't

think it's necessarily a

badening that companies get

involved in this. It comes down to the shareholders, it's

odd. At the end they link it

back to comment on the highly

regulated nature of business,

so... By the way, leave us

alone. That is the argument. If

you support a Charter of Human

Rights the business case is

that that imposes greater

regulation if anything, it

won't ease regulation. Privacy

issues will arise. It seems -

obviously the Charter of Human

Rights applies to Government

organs, not private. It's

odd. Maybe there's a division

of Telstra that the execs don't

know about. They've popped up

with the submission. The human

rights decision. Maybe that

explains some of the fees on

certain bills. This story, I

think, it's only - it's a

little story, it's an

interesting instructive

one. This is in the aige today.

About attacks that have taken

place in -- age, attacks taking

place in India,

anti-Valentine's Day attacks,

Hindu nationalists find couples

in public and attack them in

one way or another, just by

ridiculing them, forcing them

to get married on the spot, in

some cases beatings were

involved. It's seep as a bit of

a development in the Indian

culture wars, about the extent

of foreign, western culture on

Indian culture. I mention this,

I think it's a little snippet

of the kinds of identity

politics, and kinds of

community-based violence or

culture-based violence we are

seeing throughout the world.

This is a greater trend, kind

of the response to

globalisation, the desire to

preserve a kind of local

culture or identity. Everything

from white supremacy through

Europe to this stuff in India.

I think it's actually the

growing trend in intercommunal violence. That's interesting,

particularly because I'm sure

it's a part of the world, but

also a intrareligious quarl, if

you like. I don't think much of

the western world has focussed

on it, we are aware of Islamic

hardliners in various

countries. The Taliban throwing

acid on the schoolgirls. Some

of their critics in India call

it the Talibanisation of India,

they are not the first to

respond to Valentine's Day,

Saudi Arabia banned Valentine's

Day, there was a black market

in flowers. This is the point.

While we focus on these sorts

of developments in the context

of the war on terror, I think

it's worth recognising that we

are seeing something of an emerging trend in identity

politics, it's not confined to

a region, it's a broad

response, it was an interesting

story that caught my eye,

placed in that context. That's

in Australia as well We have

values debates and other

countries are as well. It's

becoming more parochial. Thank

you for coming back. You can watch all of the 'ABC News

Breakfast' streamed live every

morning.

Now here is Vanessa O'Hanlon

with a look at the

weather. Good morning. With

fires burning around the

Dandenong the winds are blowing

in a east to south-easterly

direction at a gust of 24km/h.

And conditions remain dry this

week. In NSW cloud is causing

rain and storms, and we have

cloud on a front in southern

WA. That's giving showers and

the odd storms, there's more

monsoonal showers over the

trough , maim near a low in the

north of WA. Now the low is

causing widespread rain over

the nowhere and eastern parts

of NSW, while a trough in WA

will trigger more showers and

in the west and the monsoon

trough causing storms in the

far north, easterlies affecting

inland Victoria and South

Australia. Queensland has showers and thunderstorms for

the East Coast, north of

Rockhampton, isolated showers

and thunderstorms for the

Southern districts. In NSW,

showers in the north and east,

raping in the north-west. Heavy

falls about the hunter and

North Coast. Victoria with a

dry day, odd showers in the

east, around the Gippsland,

smoke haze at times. Tasmania

patchy drizzle tending to

isolated showers, about the

north and inland parts of the

west. In South Australia -

possibliy smoke haze over the

south-east because of Victorian

fires, warm in the southern

coast and the inland areas. In

WA there'll be light rain that

falls down along the coast for

Albany and also esperans with a

top of 29 storms about the

Kimberly, rain and storm for

the top end. Dry and sunny for

southern parts of the territory. Tomorrow:

and sunny for southern parts of and storm for the top end. Dry storms about the Kimberly, rain Esperance with a top of 29

the territory. Tomorrow:

Now still ahead on 'ABC News

Breakfast', one of the biggest

stories of the day which is the

division between the States and

the Commonwealth over control

over health care and the Opposition will join us to talk

about that. We'll have the

latest information on the fire

situation in Victoria. That's

coming up after the short

break.

Another suspicious fire

burns in Melbourne, and a court

appearance today by an arson

suspect charged over a

Gippsland fire that claims 21

lives. The Federal Government

is urged to take control of

hospitals from the states, as

part of a review into

Australia's health system.

Afghanistan's President agrees

with Barack Obama's plan to

change the focus in the war on

terror and address the loss of

civilian casualties. And a remarkable catch by Adam Voges

helps Australia to a one-run

win in its Twenty20 match over New Zealand. This Program is Captioned

Live.

Good morning, it's Monday,

16 February, I'm Joe O'Brien,

and I'm Virginia Trioli. The

top story on 'ABC News

Breakfast', a 39-year-old man

is due in court this morning

after being charged with arson

offences for one of Victoria's

fires that claimed at least 21

hives, nine fires are still

burning in Victoria, none are

posing any immediate danger,

overnight fire crews have been

focussing on back-burning and building containment lines to

prevent the water catchments

from being contaminated. There

was a scare for residents of

the Belgrave in Melbourne's

east, a fire that's been viewed

as suspicious sent embers into

the air sparking fears it could

spread. That fire is under

control after being waterbombed

from the air. For more on the

fires and the arson suspect

appearing in court, ABC

reporter like-Waters joins us

from outside the Melbourne

Magistrates Court. -- Luke

Waters joins us from outside the Melbourne Magistrates

court. Run through what will

happen at court Later in the

morning a 39-year-old Gippsland

man will appear here at the Melbourne Magistrates court,

he's charged with possessing

child pornography, arson

causing death, and deliberately

and recklessly lighting a fire,

the fire-related charges carry

chal terms of 25 and 15 years

-- jail terms of 25 and 15

years in principle. His charges

relate to the Churchill blaze

east of Melbourne, where 21

were kill. Sensitivities and

vol tilties around Gippsland

prompted police to move him to

Melbourne, solely for his own protection. There are nine fires burning around Victoria

at the moment. What is the

worst of those. Well, the

majority of the resources have

been directed and deployed

towards Melbourne's catchment

arse, 500 firefighters each day

-- areas, 500 firefighters, a

shift change and 500 more

coming on to protect those,

when it raps, there's fears

silt and ash may -- rains,

there's fears silt and ash may

contaminate the waterways.

There was a disturbing case

where arson is suspected in - near Belgrave, small

communities came under threat.

Firebombers from the air and

also 20 CFA crews were used to

deploy to bring that blaze

under control. Arson Squad

detectives will be on the

ground in the next couple of

hours to investigate that, but

at that stage they say it is

suspicious. And, Luke, as you

understand it, why is it

dangerous if the fires do go

near the catchment areas, what

does it do to the water? Well,

basically, we were told last

week in a press conference that

the fears are that the silt and

ash, which are caused during

the week, during the fires at

their worse, can run off, get

into the water and spoil the

water quality, and it's then

that the water authorities make

a determination as to whether

or not those water catchments

are closed down or not. We

understand one has been closed

down, or brought offline, is

the term they use. Since the

fires have happened, there's

been a debate about the

standard of structures in fire

prone areas, where is that

debate at today? Today that'll

be taken to the Victorian

Cabinet. The Victorian Premier

John Brumby has been strong

last week, reiterating that

bushfires know know bund rirks

and an issue they are thrashing

out is whether they'll wait and

goway national standard or

introduce their own standard of

building code for bushfire

prone areas. Luke Water in

Melbourne. In other news the

Rudd Government is urged to

take over key aspects of the

nation's health system from the states. The health reform

commission launched by Kevin

Rudd a year ago will deliver

its draft report, and it calls

for the Government to take over

advisory services in areas such

as departmentistry, pharmacy

and school services and calls

for the establishment of

megaclinics or one stop shops

for health needs. The NSW Mid

North Coast is bracing for

flash flooding after heavy

falls, the 500 residents of the

Bellinger Valley, near Coffs

Harbour, is isolated by

floodwaters, heavy falls

expected across the state. As

part of the Obama's new rage

eem an Afghan delegation will

join -- regime will join a

review of US policy, addressing

the loss of civilian life and

new ways of fighting Taliban

militants, a Special F