Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Disclaimer: The Parliamentary Library does not warrant the accuracy of closed captions. These are derived automatically from the broadcaster's signal.
ABC News Breakfast -

View in ParlView

(generated from captions) This Program is Captioned

Live.

The government's education

bill is still stuck in the

Senate and a Labor backbencher

is called to explain his

conduct over an incident the PM

has called deeply offensive.

Australians caught up in Thailand's political

demonstrations begin arriving

in Sydney this morning after

protesters ended their blockade

of Bangkok's Airports.

Zimbabwe's government appeals

from urgent help from the

international community to

contaken a Cholera outbreak that's already claimed more

than 500 lives. And Robert

Allenby says he will try to win

the Australian PGA Championshp

for his dying mother.

Good morning, it is Thursday

the 4th of December. I am

Virginia Trioli. I am Barry

Cassidy. The top story on ABC

News Breakfast, the last

sitting day for politicians is

shaping up to be a difficult

one for the government. Its

$28 billion education bill is

city struggling to get passed

by the Senate with the opposition and Family First

unhappy with the plan for a

national curriculum. The

opposition is accusing the

government of announcing a plan

for infrastructure spending

without detailing where the

money will come from and there

is also a Labor backbencher

being investigated for taking a

photo of a man trying to set

himself alight on the lawn of

Parliament House. This

incredibly disturbing image

provided by the member of

parliament to the media outlet

raises a number of very

alarming issues. I ask you to

investigate immediately all the

circumstances surrounding the

capture of the photo by the

member for Dawson and the

provision of that photo to the

media. I ask you to

specifically advise the House

whether the photo was sold by

the member to that media

outlet. This afternoon at an

event I took photographs of a

serious incident. I later

passed those photographs to a

news organisation in return for a donation to charity connected

to disabilities. My actions

were highly insensitive, and

inappropriate and I am tonight

writing a letter of apology to

the family involved. I deeply

regret my actions and I

apologise once again for any

offensive have caused. For

more Ben Worsley joins us now

from Canberra. Good morning.

Take us through precisely what the backbencher admits to

having done. James Bidgood was

attending an event out the

front of parliament to do with

disability services. Now,

that's when alongside this protest occurred and this

gentleman, concerned about his

parents and demanding a

permanent visa, doused himself

in petrol and threatened to set

himself alight. James Bidgood

was there, took a photograph.

Now, this is where there are a

few differing events. Some newspapers are reporting that

he immediately went to a News

Ltd photographer, who was

arriving a bit afterwards, and

offered the photograph for

direct sale. The News Ltd

photographer, according to some

papers, said to the words

effectively "get lost". At

which point it seems James

Bidgood realised the lack of

judgment in his offer, and

offered to put any money he

earned from the sale of the

photograph towards of a

disability charity. Now that transaction eventually took

place and News Ltd began

publishing the photograph. He

is a backbencher so he can't be

sacked. But what has Kevin

Rudd done about it? He called

him into his office and

according to the PM's office,

the words are, he was heavily

counselled by the PM. Which is

a uf amix for being - ewe fa

mix by - Euphamism by Kevin.

He was the same fella who spoke

about the indiscretion of the

leak with George W Bush by

Kevin Rudd. He was ordered to

write an apologise as we saw

there to the fellow involved.

James Bidgood won the seat of

Dawson with a 13% swing in the

election to beat Deanne Kelly,

Kevin Rudd wave through so he was part of that whole

Queensland that got them so

many seats. Pre-selection

would be away off but I don't

know. Maybe he might be

looking over his shoulder. Now

what is Kevin Rudd saying about

this proposal that's been

suggested, without being

confirmed, they will go

overseas and try and borrow

large amounts of money for

infrastructure they will pass

on to the states? This is

fascinating on many fronts. It

was brought up yesterday by

Malcolm Turnbull and that

itself is interesting, because

the government is highly

suspicious that Malcolm

Turnbull has contacts somewhere

in treasury or someone that

knows - has their finger on the

pulse of policy that is likely

to come up. And now Malcolm

Turnbull has suggested the

government was going to set up

effectively a bank to borrow

billions of dollars to then

lend to the States to fund this

infrastructure. And therefore

it would avoid affecting the

government as bottom line.

Context of a dwindling surplus

already. The government hasn't

declined it and the Treasurer

says they are exploring all sensible opportunities, whether

this is sensible or not the perception isn't great because there is a suggestion Kevin

Rudd will be heading to the

Middle East to try to raise

some of these funds. The

parallels with the Whitlam era

Malcolm Turnbull to draw aobvious and very easy for

attention to. He did so with

flare. He called this the

Kevlani affair which is the

reference to the Kemlani affair

in the Whitlam era. So, it is an interesting development and

I would think Malcolm Turnbull

will be trying to make much of

it on the last sitting day

today. We will have a look at

the story later on. We won't

be able to keep the opposition

away from it. And the school

stand-off, any sign of a break

through? No, there are signs

that the opposition and Steve

fielding will put this amendment forward today when it

goes back to the Senate. It

was rejected by the Senate, it

went to the House. The

government stuck to its guns,

refusing to separate the

national curriculum for private

schools, the opposition and

Family First will put forward

an amendment alling for

equivalent accredited national

curriculum to allow flexibility

for schools like Montesori and

Steiner. Julia Gillard you

can't imagine giving to

pressure on this. She is not

one to give in lightly. We have

got Christopher Pyne the

opposition's education

spokesman on later and Julia

Gillard, so we will probably

get a better idea as the hours

unfold. But it will be a very

interesting day - La last day

of parliament. It may not be

the last date. There are suggestions they could be back

tomorrow or Monday. If you

would like to send us your

feedback on the stories we are

covering today -

If you twitter or have any

idea what that means, then

there is the code. In other

news the first international

flight to debart bapg bang -

Bangkok's main airport is due

to touch down in Sydney this

morning. The Thai Airways

through out last night carrying

388 passengers. Many of them Australian tourists, Thailand

will vote on Monday for a new

PM after Somchai Wongsawat was

forced to resign. The Zimbabwe

government has asked for urgent

help to tackle the Cholera

outbreak. The World Health

Organisation says Zimbabwe's

Health Minister met with

officials of aid agencies in

Harare to ask for medicine and

equipment. There are also

concerns the epidemic is being

spread throughout the region

with sufferers travelling to

South Africa for medical help. US Secretary of State

Condoleezza Rice has urged

Pakistan to cooperate fully and

transparently with Indian

investigationers into the

Mumbai attacks. She made a

visit to New Delhi which

sparked anti-American protests

in Islamabad. India disov

discovered and diffused

explosives at the Mumbai

railway station left last week.

Among the notable absentees to

the cluster bomb treat y are

the US, China, Pakistan and

Israel. Campaigners argue

cluster bottom - cluster bombs should be banned altogether.

Former PM John Howard is among

more than 400 formeder - former

world leaders signing a

petition to the Solicitor

General asking to free Aung San

Suu Kyi. US pressure George W

Bush senior and former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev also

signed the letter. Returning

to India now and those comments

by US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. Dr Rice said

the US was helping India in its

efforts to track down the

people responsible for last

week's Mumbai attacks. I have

said that Pakistan needs to act

with resolve and urgency and

cooperate fully and

transparently. That message

has been delivered and will be

delivered to Pakistan, but it

is a time when co-operation

between all peoples who suffer

these terrorist attacks really

is required and is necessary.

Whether there is a direct

al-Qaeda hand or not, this is

clearly the kind of terrorism

in which al-Qaeda participates.

It's a sense that you want to

not just terrorise in a general

sense, but you try and send a

strong message that people are

not safe, that businesses are

not safe. That economic

centres are not safe. We

experienced that in New York.

We are not going to jump to any

conclusions about who is

responsible for this, although

the United States is prepared

and is already actively engaged

in information-sharing, in

forrensic help to try to make

those links, For more on the

commercial flights arriving in

Sydney from Thailand this

morning Charlotte Glennie joins

us from Sydney Airport. Good

morning. What's happening

there? Good morning, well we

have just arrived at Sydney

Airport, to wait for a lot of

very relieved Australian

tourists who have been stranded

in Thailand for a long time

now. For the blockade that

lasted over a week. 8 days.

And they will be the lucky one

whose managed to secure a flight. The Thai Airways

flight arrives, it's a little

bit late. It arrives at 7:30

this morning but there is also

another flight arriving before

that, a Finnair flight very

soon. So we will see what

those passengers have to say.

Do we now roughly how many

Australian tourists might be on

board those flights? We don't

know. We do know there are

well over 300 people on these Thai Airways flight. A number

of them are Australians, there

has been a real scramble to get

tickets, there are said to be

as many as 300,000 people stranded in Thailand result of

this action which has taken

place over the last eight days

and so many of them, only a

10th so far have managed to get

out via other airports, such as

Phuket or via buses or trains.

So the people that managed to

get on this flight last night

were very lucky indeed. Are

there any many other flights

expected threout the day and

overnight bringing people back

from Thailand? There is

another Thai Airways flight

this afternoon but as far as

flights directly from Bangkok,

there is only these couple of

flights early this morning.

There are other flights that

will now be able to stop over in Bangkok, although the

Australian Government is still

warning people that the airport

is not fully operational yet.

It is back in action but it

will be a long time until the

backlog is cleared and in the meantime Australians are still being advised by the government

to strongly reconsider any

desire to travel to Thailand.

Thanks so much. So slowly

limping home from a very

difficult time in Bangkok. And

- well they put in all these

emergency measures' they had to

but as it happens the airports

are now starting to open again.

Now to the front pages of the

newspapers round the country

'The Australian' says the

national accounts figures

announced don't add up. The

national broad shooet says

spending should have been

increasing as Australia edged

towards recession. The

'Financial Review' agrees saying Australia is teetering

on the brink recession. And

the 'Daily Telegraph' reports

NSW politicians may face random

breath tests after a Nationals

MP was involved in a late night

altercation with a colleague.

That's a serious story. The

Victorian Government will spend

billions of dollars on new rail

and road projects to ease

congestion in Melbourne

according to the 'Age'. It

will include a new rail tunnel

but not a road tunnel as has

been speculated. The 'Herald

Sun' says a young boy may never

walk again after his mother

allegedly crashed her car

while drunk. The Adelaide

'Advertiser' says children

suffering cancer were overdosed

with championship -

chemotherapy over the last

years. The a Northern Territory hotel is in trouble

after allowing a drunk man to

stay on its premises and sing

karaoke songs acording to the

Northern Territory 'News'. An

interesting photo of Kevin Rudd

and former PM John Howard about

to shake hands last night in

the 'Canberra Times'. And John

Howard ran into David hick 's

father at the same event. The

'West Australian' reports a

boat of nearly 40 asylum

seekers has been intercept ed off the Western Australian

coast. Paula Wriedt has

applied to become the head of

the Tasmanian Chamber of

Commerce and Industry says the

'Mercury'. And Queensland

teachers have been advise to

stop using red pens to mark assignments because the colour

is too confrontational. I can

understand where they are

coming from because if kids are

marked in a black pen OK but a

red pen shouts at them. You

are much more sensitive than I

thought Barry. If you are

writing capital letters on an

email, it is shouting at

somebody. But they have been

accused of this left-wing Tom

foolry. The top stories on ABC

News Breakfast - The Federal

Government's education bill

remains in a deadlock in the

Senate over its plan for a

national curriculum. Meanwhile

Labor backbencher James Bidgood is being investigated for

taking a photo of' man trying

to set fire to himself and then

selling it to the media. Australians on board the first international flight to

depart Bangkok's main airport

for over a week begin arriving

in Sydney this morning.

Meanwhile Thailand's parliament

will vote on Monday for a new

PM after Somchai Wongsawat was

forced to resign. Zimbabwe

asks for urgent help to tackle

Cholera outbreak that's killed

more than 560 people. There

are concerns the epidemic is

being spread throughout the

region now with sufferers

travelling to South Africa for

medical help.

Australia just heard

Australia's border protection

is under jut any - scrutiny

again. The new boat carrying

35 people was intef Septembered

off WA's - intef Septembered

off WA's - intercepted off WA's

far north coast. We are joined

by Andrew O'Connor in our Perth

news room. Andrew, good

morning. What do we know about

this latest arrival? The

latest boat was spotted by a surveillance plane at Ashmore

Reef off WA's far north coast

on Tuesday after noon. It is

now being towed to Christmas

Island where the 35 or so

people on board will be

interviewed or assessed. It is

thought the boat came from Sri

Lanka which is interesting

because only a week ago here in

WA another boat of Sri Lankans

arrived on the mid west coast

near Shark Bay. They were

found by fishermen and local

campers and a couple of them

swam ashore and swd tor

directions. The government say

it is is quite unusual for

those boats to be coming

directly from Sri Lanka.

Normally they come via

Indonesia and the Home Affairs

Minister says the government

may need to rethink its

surveillance strategy to

counter this new trend. From memory that's about five boats

in about two months, is that

right? Kevin Rudd trotted out

statistics this week to try to

dismiss the suggestions from

the opposition there has been a

deluge of boats. In 2007 he

said there were five boats

carrying 148 people. In 2008

he was saying on four boat has arrived in Western Australian

waters carrying just 48 people.

I guess in terms of numbers

those numbers can change. That

four boats has become five.

Those 48 people have now become

83 and half of those have

arrived in the last week. So

it's not a surge but it is a

spike. And it is certainly an

increase in that number in the

last few weeks. So what are

federal authorities and the

Western Australian authorities, what are they talking about now

in terms of trying to increase

that surveillance then? Well

interesting will the Navy is

just preparing for a shut down

of a lot of its fleet right

round the country. The

Australian navy is having

enormous troubles recruiting

and retraining staff to try to

be more family friendly they

are giving Navy personnel

extended leave. That means

every boat that's not on

operational duty will be put

into harbour for that period of

time. The opposition says that

gives the green light to people

smugglers. The PM has said

that's simply not true. The

Navy says it won't affect their

security operations an the Navy

are not the only ones engaged

in this. There are custom s

and coast watch aircraft. As

part of the rethink Bob Debus

was talking about yesterday

they may look at redeploys some

of those assets perhaps further

south to try to encounter any

boats coming from Sri Lanka.

Thank you so much Andrew. The

uncomfortable truths or

impressions are really mounting

up now for a Rudd Labor

government aren't they? Into

recession, a possible deficit.

The easy accusation that a

Labor government is softer on

asylum seekers and people

smugglers and the like. With

these figures increasing it is

the impression that's created

isn't it. 148 last year, 83

this year. He said it is not a

surge but a spike. And also

you have got Christmas Island

still excised from the

migration zone and still have

mandatory detention in this

country too. US stocks have

dropped last night. The Dow

lost 90 points so far this

morning, a fall of more than

1%. The NASDAQ is down 8

points, and the S&P has also

declined. It lost 11 points, a

fall of more than 1%. In

Europe the FTSE closed slightly

higher. It gained 47 points, a

rise of more than 1% and to

commodities and oil is trading

slightly up at $49.30 US a

barrel. Gold is down, the

Australian dollar is buying 64 US cents.

Former Reserve Bank

Governor Ian McFarlane is

calling for radical changes to

market regulation. Mr

McFarlane headed the RBA from

1996 to 2006, and he says the

current crisis has invalidated

the model of a deregulated

financial system. He said

restoring market stability had

to be the priority. To me the

maedge - major challenges will

be to reign in what is left of

the shadow banking system. I

want to point out there is

nothing wrong with having

non-bank financial institution

s, they have a very important

role to play, as long as they

don't pretend they are banks

and have ill-liquid assets and

highly liquid liabilities.

That's what we had with the shadow banking system. The

second thing we have to do is

find a better way of measuring

the aggregate gearing ratio of the financial system and use this as a guide to policy. I

think we will have to

incorporate the risks arising

from the reward structure of

management into the regulatory

frame work. We will have to do

something to address the

inherent procyclicality of

preventional risk management

frameworks and bank

supervision. We will have to

resist the calls for self

regulation, as one astute

commentator observed, self

regulation is to regulation as

self importance is to

importance.

Finally, we have to do

something about bringing the derivative instruments, particularly credit default

swaps back on to an exchange so

we can at least measure their

extent and the risks embedded

in them. As well as to reduce

a counter party risk. Former

Reserve Bank Governor Ian

McFarlane there. In a few

minutes Vanessa O'Hanlon will

be here with a look at the

national weather. Also we will

have a review of some of the

newspapers and this morning we

are joined by Gaye Elcorne.

Good morning, Australian

golfer Robert Allenby said his emotions won't get in the way

of him winning the PGA

Championshp which begins at

Coolum this morning. Allenby

admitted his mother's terminal

illness and her appearance at

Huntingdale last week caused

him to falter at the Masters,

but he looked comfortable on the Sunshine Coast yesterday

and will start as one of the

favourites today. Allenby's a

confident and powerful presence

in Australian sport. His press

conference yesterday revealed a

more sensitive side. A loving

son who would like to win the

tournament for his mother

Sylvia. She is doing the best

she can. It is a tough time

for all of us. So... you know,

we knows what going to happen.

We can't control it. But the

most important thing is that we

can give her all the love we

can and give her all the - you

know, all the greatest memories

that we can as well. To keep

her spirits high and keep her

fighting for as long as she can

and same for my Dad too. But

we are all struggling. Yeah.

We are a close family. You

know, we... I am the youngest

of four and it is - it is

tough. It's... you don't want

to see your parents go. You

want to hang on to them

forever. I want to win this

week and I want to win the

Australian Open. And I know I

should have won last week. But

you know, I just let my

emotions get to me and - but

it's hard. I have never had to

deal with anything like this in

my life. Racing Victoria will

decide today whether to take

actions against connections of

Melbourne Cup runner up

'Bauer'. It has been revealed

the treatment the horse

received is shockwave therapy. It is technically against the

rules in Australia before a big

race. The overseas trainer

says he was acting on advice

from a racing Victoria

appointed vet. Former

Melbourne Cup winning jockey

Chris Munce has been cleared to

ride again by NSW racing.

Munce was jailed for his

involvement in Hong Kong's tips

for bets scandal, but NSW

racing believes he has paid for

his actions and yesterday gave

him a licence to ride. He may

compete in a race at Randwick

as early as next week.

Australian NBA star Andrew

Bogurt has come to the aid of

struggling NBL Sydney spirit

to prop up the rescue package.

He pledged his support before

the NBL and spirit player as

agreed on the deal. The capital

and team-mates agreed to a pay

cut and other franchise owners

also passed the hat round.

Bogurt will tip in about

$30,000. He is on a $30

million deal over six years

with the Milwauke, bucks. The

association wanted something a

little more permanent. Not the

white knight situation. It was

a chunk of cash from him that eventually got the deal over

the line pretty much. The

players came to a 56% pay cut.

So they are doing their bit.

But Bogurt has done well there.

He used to play for Rob

Beverige the coach. He played

on a national youth team for

him about five years ago.

That's the connection. It is

really a great PR move and

sends a great signal the player

of that standing and reputation

wants to put his money where

his mouth is. That's true his

standing now is fairly high up within basketball. Not just in

Australia but he is a big-wig

over in the states and there

was another basketball story

last night. Brian Gorgion had

his 500th victory as a coach in

his 714th game which ties the

legendary Collingwood coach

Jock McHales record. You

mentioned Chris Munce is free

to ride again but he was banned

by the Hong Kong racing club

for another year. He was

suspended for 30 months which

included his jail sentence. It

would have kept him banned till

September next year. So the Australian authorities are

basically saying "well, under

Australian law you wouldn't

have been charged with a crime

anyway. So we are not going to

uphold that suspension". It

shows you there is no coordination with international

racing bodies. The Hong Kong officials are a little bit

peeved by it all. They say

remptions may - relations may

be stranged between the

co-countries, racing Victoria

have said Chris Munce will have

no problems getting a licence

down here as well. No coordination between Australian

racing bodies I suppose. And what vets should do and

shouldn't do in a lead-up to a

big race. You can watch us

live on the web from anywhere

in Australia - Visit - you can

click on the watch live icon.

Now Vanessa O'Hanlon joins us

with the national weather.

There has been more storms in

south-east Queensland. 30,000

homes were affected. There is

more storms on the way. With

cloud building in a trough it

is bringing more showers and

storm as cross the eastern

areas and we have more cloud

over the lower half of WA. It

this is also causing showers

and storms, a low will drag

showers from WA to SA and

western parts of Victoria and

NSW and the trough in the east will cause showers and

thunderstorms near the NSW

ranges and again in southern

Queensland. In Queensland -

to tomorrow -

I will see you in half an

hour.

You are watching ABC News

Breakfast. A Federal

Government minister is being

investigated for taking a photo

of a man trying to set himself

on fire. And then selling the

image to the media. Labor backbencher James Bidgood took

the picture on the lawn of

Parliament House yesterday as

the man doused himself in

petrol. He then sold the image

to News Ltd in an exchange for

a donation to charity. The

PM's office has described the

incident as deeply offensive. This incredibly disturbing

image provided by the member of

parliament to the media outlet

raises a number of very

alarming issues. Mr Speaker I

ask you to investigate medley

all the circumstances

surrounding the capture by the

member for Dawson and the

provision of that photo to the

media. I ask you to advise the

House whether it was sold by

the member for Dawson to that

media outlet. This afternoon I

took photographs of a serious

incident. I later passed those

photographs to a news

organisation in return for a

donation to charity connected

to disabilities. My actions

were highly insensitive. And

inappropriate. And I am

tonight writing a letter of

apology to the family involved.

I deeply regret my actions.

And I apololgise once again for

any offence I have caused. And

the Rudd Government is still

struggling to have its $28

billion education bill passed

by the Senate. This morning we

will be speaking to opposition

education spokesman Christopher

Pyne and why the opposition

won't support it and Julia

Gillard a little later. To

send us your thoughts on the stories we are covering today

or if you have any questions for Julia Gillard or

Christopher Pyne you can send an email at - le The Zimbabwean government

has asked for urgent help to

tackle the Cholera outbreak

that's killed more than 560

people. The World Health

Organisation estimates another

11,000 people are infected with

the gas gastric disease.

Matthew Cochoran is from the

international Red Cross. He

has just returned to Jo

ohannesburg and joins us on the

phone. Tell us about what you

understand at the moment,

particularly about the spread

of this disease, and the

movement of people. Yeah, it

is quite concerning. The

situation as you said in

Zimbabwe is critical. We are

seeing now an outbreak that

rivals the outbreak in Angola a

couple of years ago where

80,000 people were infected and

3,500 people died. I was on

the boarder this morning and we

are seeing a lot of people come

across, probably about 1500

people a day. The critical

issue is because they are

moving irregularly across the boarder they might not make themselves available. They

might not seek out the

assistance that is available.

They might not even know there

is serious Cholera risks in the

situation on the South African area. So even though the

side of the border is under

control somewhat, we are

watching it very closely, because this can be like a

spark in the bush. It really

can blow up very quickly. Are

the South African authorities

well on to this Matthew? Are

they monitoring people across

the border and trying to give

them the health checks they

need? They are. We had had

some bad news yesterday.

Cholera was found in the

Limpopo river, which is the

pretty much the border between

Zimbabwe and South Africa and

so means the situation is no

longer a migration issue. It's

very much a South African issue

and we are working very closely with the South African

government to politicise this.

This is not about population

movement. In South Africa it

is a legitimate health issue

and we need to be getting this

information out there. The

cruel thing about Cholera is

that it is actually so easy to

prevent and so easy to treat.

It is basic hygiene. Washing

your hands after you go to the

toilet. Washing your hand

before you prepare or eat food.

If you get sick it is really

just rehydration. But if

people aren't aware of this

behaviour, if they are not

aware the risk is there, then

they are not empowered to take

the decision we need to take.

for the South African We are odd advocating strongly

government to really ramp up

their response. At the moment

it is in control but we have to

be preparing for a worst case

scenario. The situation inside

Zimbabwe itself of course

sounds absolutely dire. To the

point where we understand

doctors and nurses actually

went on a protest against what

wasn't being done for the

people inside that country.

Yes, I had a conversation

with a head of delegation in

Harare this morning and he

mentioned that the situation

there seems very tense. I mean

the difficult thing, just

mentioned how the approach to

Cholera should be public

education, it should be getting

this information out to people.

Letting them know what they

need to do. Now, if you know

what you want - if you know

what you need to do, if you are

committed doing what you need

to do, you still need the

capacity to do that. You still

need clean water. You still

need access to very basic

health care. We heard over the

weekend the water fly in Harare

was turned off because the

government didn't have colour

chlorine to treat the water.

Even if people are committed to

take the steps they need to

take it is difficult for them

to take it. 600 people have died according to the World

Health Organisation. That

figure could actually be a fair

bit higher. It will guess

worse. We are two weeks away

from what we expect to be a

severe flood season. It has

already started raining in

northern Zimbabwe and it has

started raining in the Congo

and that will rush through the

Zambese river which runs

through the heart of Africa.

It needs concerted action from

international organisations and

from governments in the region

and we are advocating very

strongly with our partners in

Zimbabwe that they allow us to

provide the assistance we know

we can provide. This is what

the Red Cross does. This is

our bread and butter but

obviously there is issues that

need to be addressed before we

can really move in with the

hardware and software so to

speak. Thanks so much for

joins us today. Thanks.

Police in New Zealand say an

initiative to have Maori

offenders directly dealt with

by their own commentity is - community is having results. New Zealand correspondent Kerrie Ritchie

reports.

A Marae is a sacred place for

Maori. It is where cult year

is celebrated and where wedding

and funerals are held but in

Gisborn they are being used for something new. This is New

Zealand's first Marae based

Youth Court where there is a

big emphasis on respect. They

will either know how to give a

greet anything Maori or they

will learn. 14-year-old Thomas recently had his case heard

here. The people done the

robbery s are all in jail now.

I count myself lucky. Maori

make up 15% of the country's

population but 50% of prisoners

of they encourage young Maori

to choose cult year over crime.

If it works we won't see them

again. Rather than the talk of

three strike you are out.

Parents say the program has

given them hope. Here you are treated as a person, as

somebody. At court you are

just a numberful We see the

attitudes are left at the door

and oven in the District Court

or Youth Court we see people

walking in and it's just a huge

swing in attitude. More

respect. Police agree the

current system doesn't appear

try something new. to be working and it is time to

The South Australian

government is under fire

following a second scare

involving cancer treatment in

public hospitals. It has been

revealed 11 children received

overdoses of a chemotherapy

drug at the Adelaide Womens and

Childrens Hospital between 2005

and October this year. Matt

Smith joins us from the

Adelaide news room. Take us

through the details. Yes,

well it is found that a

computer problem, a mistimed

computer and also human error

lead to the overdosing of 11

children between the ages of 1

and 15 over a three year period. Between 2005 and

October this year. An

independent investigation found

that this overdosing didn't

have any impact on the children

that were treated, although the

chemotherapy drug used can

increase the risk of secondary

cancer. And but this is not

the first time this has

occurred is it? That's

correct. Will there are

nearly 900 parents at the Royal Adelaide Hospital who were

underdosed in getting treatment

and the minister only tabled a

report on that last week. So there have been many problems

that have been having. It has

been atribute uted to staffing

problems and staffing issues in Adelaide and South Australian

hospitals. It has been an

issue for quite some time. The

AMA now says it wants to know

what auditing procedures there

are in place to make sure this

doesn't keep on happening. And

when you say it could lead to

secondary cancer is there any

evidence that in fact this

mistreatment I suppose has

caused further complications. There was one

child who has since died but

the independent report has

found that was not connected to this problem. So at this stage

it appears the health system

has got away without this having a major impact on

children's health. But I think

they have been very lucky. Is

this becoming a real pressure point for the government? The

opposition is saying both the

Health Minister and the COE of - CEO of the Health Department

should be sacked. It is saying

when the Health Minister was tabling the report into the

first problem he already knew

about the second problem but

made no mention of it. However

the State Government is saying

- and also being backed up by a

cancer group - they couldn't

release details new they knew

all the facts otherwise mass

hysteria could have been

caused. Thank you for that

report. The 1990s saw the rise

of the Russian Oligarch, a new

generation of businessmen who

grew wealth write buying barg

gain priced government assets.

But the global financial crisis has exposed many of

these embuyers as being -

empires being built on death.

Scott Bevan - on debt. Scott

Bevan reports. At this Moscow

trade show it is not just the

exhibits that are flashy.

So are many of those

attending. For this is the

millionaire fair. A plea

ground for those who have money

or at least appear to and are

looking for that little

something to show it off. A

lot of people have a lot of

money. And they want to - buy

everything very expensive. And

it f it is expensive things the

well off want, then this is

their place. The value is more

than 1 billion yearos, That is

just under $2 billion worth.

With everything the idol rich

or active may desire or need.

3 million and a half. Dollars

or R, bles? Dollars. Still

dollars. I hope. And hope

flows like champagne at the

fair. Enough it seems to wash

away concerns of the financial

woes that have beset the globe.

Rich men don't feel this

crisis. For many Russians the

natural attitude towards money

is use it or lose it. It seems

some of Russia's richest people

are losing it. The country's storfgts have dive - stock

markets have dived more than

60% since May and oil prices, a

source of huge wealth for both

Russia and quite a few of those

at the top of the money tree

have sleed. This year we have

87 billionaires and of course

not all of them will make the

list next year. Probably just

30 or 40. We are still reval

ating their fortunes. Is it possible that some billionaires

will have their fortunes wiped

out? I can exclude that there

will be these personal

bankruptcies. But I - it is

still early to name names. The

Bloomberg newsagency recently

looked at the assets of the 25

richest Russians. Based on how

much stock has fallen in the

crisis. They estimated those

25 Russians have lost a

combined $230 billion US. We

will take very rough numbers, I

think most of them lost 50, 60,

some of them 70% of the money.

Of course it's paper money, but definitely these losses are

very serious. Andre Kortonov is from a non-government

organisation. He says the

crisis has exposed the deep

flaws in how many of Russia's

wealthiest people build their

empires, on borrowed money,

often from western banks, now

those detectives have to be

repaid as the - those

detectives have to be repaid.

So business has been turning

for the government to help and

money. The government has

obliged. By next year it is

expected Moscow could have

spent about $55 billion from

its reserve fund. TRANSLATION:

The government adopted a

program of action to minimise

the after affects of the crisis

in Russia to inveg rate the

banking system and support some

sectors of the economy. Since

the end of sort offent union,

the - Soviet union, the

relationship between the

Kremlin and the Russian people

has been flipped. It was the

erra of the Oligarchs. The state seized back control. Analysts say this financial

crisis will only strengthen the

state's dominance of Russia's

rich and their assets. For the

government can use its bail-out

mun y to expert even more control over not only how

business is done but who gets

to do it. Right now business,

at least big businesses, have

become hostages to the State in

the sense that the State

decides who is going to survive

or who is going to prosper.

And on what terms. Andre K

ortinov says this could provide

the country with an opportunity

to reshape and diversefy with

oil and gas money. But he not

hopful of I'm afraid many mistakes will take place and a

lot of money will be wasted

before Russia becomes serious

about structural reforms.

Still, for some it's a case of

crisis, what crisis. There is

also a Lois Vitton shop and

there are still Ferrari s,

hotels are still full. So life

goes on. Whether that's life

as Russia's rishest is yet to

be known. You are watching ABC

News Breakfast. The top

stories, the Federal Government

education bill remains in a

deadlock in the Senate. Meanwhile James Bidgood is

being investigated for taking

photo of a man trying to set

fire to himself and then

selling it to the media.

Australians on board the first

international flight to depart

Bangkok for over a week are

arriving in Sydney this

morning. They were stranded up

to 8 days after anti government

protesters took over both of

Bangkok's two main airports.

Zimbabwe asks for urgent help

to tackle the Cholera outbreak.

There is concerns the epidemic

is spreading throughout region .

And for a look at the narp

national papers today. We are

join by Gaye Elcorn. You have

thrown the switch to

vaudeville. I know you have

got some very serious stories

on. So the first story I

chose, I will get to more

serious ones was a lovely story

written by Stephanie Bunbury

from the 'Age'. About Shane

Warne the musical. It is a

show that's been created by

Eddie perfect, very sharp. I

think he played ale.ander

downer in Keating the musical.

There is something about a

brilliant larrikin who we have

known and watched and laughed

at and turned in to a musical.

There is something very

Australian about that I would

have thought. He goes into

full song and sings "I sent

some texts and Australia

forgets, I won them the

occasional game". I am dying

to see it myself. The question

is, is Shane Warne going to

give into temptation and go and

see it himself? The story

points out Paul Keating during

the Keating musical was very

wary of it at first and then

took to it and used to turn up

to every opening night

apparently. He saw it about

three or four times. He got up

on stage. Whereas Shane Warne

argued at one stage there

should be a law against this

kind of thing. It has been

carefully legaled according to

the story. But you know, going

back to Fiorello and the days

of the New York governors and

mayors. You can always take

someone's life and turn it into

a Broadway play. They are

legal. It should be great fun.

The second one, is a much more serious story but again an

interesting story. It is slim

holiday season ahead for

households. It is a story about what came out yesterday

and consumer spending has

essentially stalled. Just

ticked ahead a little bit, at

the idea of what this will do

to Christmas sales. What is interesting in the coverage

this morning in this story and

others is the idea that there

is a desperation for people to

actually spend. Usually they

have been wanting Australians

to save money. Now it is

please splurge for us for the

signs seem to be even though sake of the economy. And the

the stimulus package is going

to be a - delivered they next

week a lot of people might hang

on to a fair bit of that and WE are being told to please spend.

You will. You will hang on to

it or you will retire some debt

government wants you to do. which is the last thing the

Although the timing coming on

just before Christmas will

probably guarantee most of it

will be spenld. Whether you

like it or not. The economists

seem to be divided on that a

bit. I have read about 40

might be spent. Sales of

clothing I think is down. But

I read in this story today that

sales are bigger and wider are

up. So people are spending on

different things, spending to

forget. The third one is a

story I know you have been

running today. Coalition shaky

on the national curriculum when

which is in all the papers

today. The issue issue - it is

an issue I think is an

interesting one and will

develop about the independent

schools and how much they will

resist what the government is

doing. There is also the issue

of apart from the national curriculum which was their policy themselves, the

Coalition, also the issue of

the transparency in some

independent schools not wanting

to provide all their financial

details to the government. I

think that's the more

interesting issue. And it is

not getting the same attention.

The national curriculum. Both

sides of politics support it.

little at the moment on this They are arguing over very

thing. They are arguing over

processes rather than the

curriculum itself. Yes. But

the trance partner - transparency thing, I can't

figure out what bothers the

private schools so much but

revealing not where the income

comes from but just so much

they have. It seems to be from

what they say, that they think

it's a bit - there is another

agenda going on there that they

- it is a Trojan horse for them

to lose money. But again

- Because this will reveal

their more wealthier than they

say and therefore the

government will start reducing

funding. That is what they

seem to be saying. What's

wrong for schools that are getting significant amount of

public funding actually saying

"how much funding do you have?

". I can't see the public

interest argument for them not

revealing their funding. The

national curriculum one seems

to be a little bit of

similarity in what about these

very small schools funded quite

a lot. Very small Christian

schools or school was different

ideas for curriculum. Ideas

most Australians might not even

approve of. Do they have to

come to a different standard

curriculum, lot government and have a more national

seems to be saying we have got

flexiblity here, can you still

do Montessori as long as the

that's an interesting debate basics are covered. I think

that will probably go on,

certainly some of the private

schools in Victoria especially

are very opposed to it and

fighting it. In a political

sense one that has to be

resolved today. Today. Doesn't

it Or they don't get nar money

in - money in January. When

money is at stake it might

concentrate the minds. You

have got a focus on Rolf Harris

as well. The end of the sagas

that been running in some of

the papers. You feel a bit

sorry for him. He is 78. He

has come out here on a tour and made comments about Aboriginal

people who he did in a song

years ago which he regret s and

apololgised for. He wrote

"they are useless, get rid of

thel". It is in tie me

kangaroo down sport. And he

came out in the last couple of

weeks and said Aborigines

should all get off their ars

because they should clean up

their own backyard and clean up

their own mess and not leave it

to the rest of us to do so.

Again, insensitive really. Not meant - meant quite well

probably but he has had to eat

humble pie again and he has

apololgised for those comments.

So it is the end of an

uncomfortable story but no-one

wants to speak ill of Rolf

Harris, but his comments were

over the top in this e era but

he has had to say I am sorry again, Lowitcha gets another

apology That's right and she

graciously accepted. You can

watch all of ABC News Breakfast

streamed live every morning.

Now here is Paul Kennedy once

again with the headlines.

Australian golfer Robert

Allenby said his emotions won't

get in the way of him winning

the PGA Championshp which

begins at Coolum this morning.

He admitted his mother's

terminal illness and her

appearance at Huntingdale last week caused him to falter at

the Masters but he looked comfortable on the Sunshine

Coast yesterday and will start

as one of the favourites today.

Racing Victoria will decide

today whether to take action against connections of

Melbourne Cup runner up

'Bauer'. It has been revealed the treatment the horse

received that has caused an

inquiry was shockwave therapy.

It's a standard physiotherapy

but it is technically against

the rules in Australia before a

big race. The overseas trainer

says he was agt acting on

advice from a racing Victoria

appointed vet. And Andrew

Bogurt has come to the aid of

NBL team Sydney spirit in p a

rescue package. Captain Jason

Smith and his team-mates agreed

to a pay cut and other

franchise owners have also

passed round the hat. One

other little thing that caught

my eye this morning, which was

out of our time frame yesterday

on the program it appears

England is going ahead with its

tour of India, At this stage

they have committed to it. It

is interesting though. They

did their own security

assessment and that's what they

came up with. It's great for

the sport really and in

particular Indian cricket. So

a show of good faith there and

no doubt they would have

checked their security

measures. And the Twenty20

matches will be going ahead as

well but it is a scheduling problem, not a security

problem. They missed that

window and will have to move

too many things round to sneak

that in. We will have to wait

till next year for that

Champions League. The

Wallabies are playing the

barbarians this morning.

Nicknamed the BABAs is which is

one of the great nicknames in

sport. Now lon takes a -

Vanessa O'Hanlon take s a look

at the weather. Cloud that is

bringing in over in the east

which is in a trough and it is

potentially carrying severe

storms to Queensland that are expected for south-east

Queensland. More cloud over

the lower half of WA in a

second trough is causing

shorms. - showers and storms.

The trough in the east will

cause showers around storms

near the NSW ranges and in

southern Queensland and on to

Queensland, isolated storms for

the east and south-east. Showers and thunderstorms for

the northern tropics and a hot day in Mount Isa.

To tomorrow -

Thanks so much Vannessa.

Stay with us, coming up in the next hour on ABC News

Breakfast, one Christopher

Pyne, Barry, the shadow

Education Minister, you want to

listen very carefully to the language he uses when you speak

to him. For his side of the

story and then Julia Gillard a

little later on in the story.

We will see if either side is budging. That's coming up after this very short break.

The government's education

bill is still stuck in the

Senate and a Labor backbencher

is called to explain his

conduct over an incident the PM

has called deeply offensive. Australians caught up in Thailand's political

demonstrations begin arriving

in Sydney this morning after

protesters ended their blockade

at Bangkok airport. Zimbabwe

appeals for urgent help from

the international community to

contain a Cholera outbreak

that's claimed more than 500

lives. And Robert Allenby says

he will try to win the Australian PGA Championshp for

his dieg mother. - dying mother.

Good morning, it is Thursday

the 4th of December. I am

Virginia Trioli. I am Barry

Cassidy. The top story in ABC

News Breakfast, the last

sitting day for politicians is

shaping up to be a difficult

one for the government. Its

$28 billion education bill is still struggling to get passed

by the Senate with opposition

and Family First unhappy with

the plan for a national

curriculum. The op osition is

accusing the government of

announcing a plan for infrastructure spending without

detailing where the money is

coming from and there is also

the Labor backbencher being

investigated for taking a photo

of a man trying to set himself

aloit on the lawn of Parliament

House. This incredibly

disturbing image provided by

the member of parliament to the

media outlet raises a number of

very alarming issues. Mr

Speaker, I ask you to investigate immediately all the circumstances surrounding the

capture of the photo by the

member for Dawson, and the

provision of that photo to the

media. In addition I ask you to specifically advice the

House whether the photo was

sold by the member for Dawson

to that media outlet. This

afternoon an event I took

photographs of a serious

incident. I later passed those

photographs to a news

organisation in return for a donation to charity connected

to disabilities. My actions

were highly insensitive and inappropriate and I am tonight

writing a letter of apology to

the family involved. I deeply

regret my actions. And I

apologise once again for any

offence I have caused. And for

more Ben Worsley joins us from

impa Canberra. It is not so much the investigation, the

investigation is probably over.

They have had the t