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(generated from captions) CC Indonesia remains on high alert over a possible

terror attack as the executions

of the Bali bombers prompts the

Federal Government to reaffirm

its opposition to the death

penalty. 60,000 employees of

Australia's car making industry

wait to hear if the Rudd

Government will push ahead with a multibillion dollar

assistance plan.

Barack Obama's Chief of Staff

outlines the challenges ahead

for the next President saying

the new administration will

work in the spirit of

bipartisanship. With one day to

play in the fourth and final

Test Australia needs to make

history to retain the

Border-Gavaskar Trophy in

Nagpur.

Good morning, it's Monday,

10 November, I'm Cas r and I'm

Virginia Trioli. The top story,

'ABC News Breakfast', the

Australian Government reinfrss

its travel warning to Indonesia

in the wake of the death of the

Bali Bombers, Foreign Affairs

Minister Stephen Smith has been

shown intelligence that there

could be an attack

planned. Amrozi, Mukhlas, and

Imam Sumudra were exude by

firing squad in the early hours

of Sunday morning. Cleric Abu

Bakr Bashir presided over the

funerals of Mukhlas, and Imam Sumudra, Geoff Thompson reports

from Bali. Amrozi, and his

brother Mukhlas receive a rowdy

homecoming as dead men.

Hundreds of dead jihadist

supporters battled with police

as the terrorist remains

arrived in the family village

of Tenggulun in East Java.

Fresh graves were dug and the

bodies were in the ground. Now

their souls are flying with

green birds to heaven, said

family member. Imam Sumudra's

body arrived in Serang in West

Java at 10:30 to be carried

around to around. He called on

Muslims to be proud butchers of

non-Muslims. In Bali news of

the executions was welcomed by

Australian tourists with a

mixture of satisfaction and

fear. I have no feeling for

them whatsoever. Are you happy

it's happened. Absolutely. I'm

scared, scared that they might

retaliate with another bomb and

hurt the Balinese again like

before. The coordinated

bombings of padies pub and the

Sari Club killed 202 people

from 22 countries. 88

Australians, and 38 Indonesians

were among the dead. It was by

far the biggest terror attack

that had ever taken place in

Asia, and it was significant as

well because it was the first

real attack on foreigners on

Indonesian soil, we had had bombings, but they were

directed at local targets, this

was really the first post 9/11 bombing. Not ouriously

non-repentent through their

trials and convictions the

three Bali bombers were

sentenced to death on terrorism

charges in 2003. For the next

five years numerous appeals

ground through the courts while

the bombers continued to preach

Jihad from prison. More attacks

and arrests followed Bali,

while debates over strategy saw

JI splinter apart That bombing

in Bali served no purpose for

JI whatsoever. It didn't help

recruitment, it didn't bring

more people into the cause, it

didn't bring funding into the

cause, it was a disaster on

every single count. A disaster

which can now include three

more men in its final death

toll. However, they were

anything but innocent

victims. To other news now, the

Federal Government will today

decide how much assistance it

will give three car manufacturers operating in

Australia, and their 60,000

workers, trade unions along

with Toyota, Ford and GM Holden

say the 10% tariff on imported

cars should remain, a review

headed by former Premier Steve

Bracks said the tariff should

be halved by 2010. Pensioners

suffering from the knockan

effects of the financial crisis

are about to get a boost of the

Mc announced a cut in the

deeming rate, which is what is

used to calculate interest

earned. Pensioners with money

invested will get an increased

payment. A Russian nuclear

submarine returns to port after

an accident kills 20 people,

navy commanders say the

submarine was on sea trials in

the Pass if egg ocean when the

firing extinguishing system was

set off by mistake. They

suspect the victims died after

inhale a toxic gas used as a

fire suppressant. A man has

been questioned who ran a

school in Haiti who ran a

school that collapsed. Four

children have been found alive

since it happened Friday. An

outbreak of cholera adds to the

humanitarian crisis in the

Democratic Republic of Congo.

Doctors are trying to contain

the outbreak in one of the

largest camps outside the city

of Goma, support add ig

fighting between Tutsi rebels

and soldiers is continuing. The

man named as Barack Obama's Chief Executive in the White

House says the new President

will -- Chief of Staff says the

President will focus on the war

and economic crisis.

President-elect Obama will take

a bipartisan approach. The

Chief of Staff for the new

President will be focussed on

the basic problems facing the

country, as you outlined, it's

the first time in four decades,

there'll be a transfer of power

while you have American troops

fighting not one but two wars.

Secondly we have a huge

economic crisis at home, that

is looming large. That is going

to be the focus of his

policies, what happens on the

house and senate, on

chairmanship is their business.

The business of what we have to

do when we get sworn this is

focussing on what the American team care about. President-elect Obama is

clear when you look at his

career in the State senate, US

Senate and the campaign, that

we have to govern in a

bipartisan fashion, if you look

at the way the campaign is run

and the ideas, he said we have

to be bipartisan, the challenges are big enough, it

will be an ability for people

of both parties and independents to contribute

ideas to meet challenges on

health care, energy, tax

reform, education, that is the

tone, that is the policy, and

that is how we are going to go

forward. He said it for

us. Barack Obama's knew Chief

of Staff doing the rounds of Sunday morning television in

the United States. Now to

domestic politics in Australia,

Parliament is sitting today for

3 weeks, before the summer

recess, for more Ben Worsley

joins us from Canberra, good

morning, it could be a lively

few weeks given the

relationship or deteriorating

relationship between Kevin Rudd

and Turnbull. You would expect

so, the reports over the

weekend denied by Malcolm

Turnbull, I would add, that he

describes the Prime Minister's

wife as snubbing him at various

functions, he says that didn't

happen, but it's an unusual element in the Australian

politics, to be talking about the spouse of a Prime Minister.

That will add, you would think

to the dynamics in the house,

and Malcolm Turnbull is unhappy

at the way Kevin Rudd has gone

about the reaction to the

global financial crisis. There

were angry scenes in the last

sitting of Parliament when Malcolm Turnbull accused Kevin

Rudd of basically ignoring him

and not briefing him on things

he had promised to brief him

on. Parliament sits today, the

Opposition will be pushing

heavily on the reaction to the

global financial crisis and the

phone call to George W. Bush,

what was said by whom to whom,

and various other things, for

instance, what is in or out of

the next Budget considering the

forever dwindling bottom

line. More immediately, of

course, an announcement today

on the car industry. In

Melbourne Kim Carr will be

releasing the Government's support packagement this

follows Steve Bracks, former

Victorian Premier's review of

the car industry. We are

expecting support from the

taxpayer to be to the tune of

$3-$3.5 billion, in the form of various forms of assistance,

particularly to the Green car

innovation fund, developing an

environmentally friendly car in

Australia, they are going to

reconstructure the car parts

sector, which has been

struggling of late, and we are

also expecting an announcement

on tariffs now as 'The

Bulletin' mentioned unions and

carmakers are hoping the

tariffs stay at 10%, we believe

that Kim Carr will announce

that it will be cut to 5% by

2010. In line with the Steve

Bracks review. Ben Worsley,

thank you. And in an hour or so

we'll interview Federal Government Opposition Leader

Malcolm Turnbull, if you have

questions you'd like to ask Mr

Turnbull:

New Zealand's Opposition

National Party swept to power

after seat's general election

one ousting Prime Minister

Helen Clark , Ms Clark says

she'll step down as Labour leader, the National Party is

expected to form Government

with the support of two smaller

others, ACT and the United

future apart. Kerri Ritchie spoke to National Party leader

John Key and asked about his

plans to turn around his

country's fortunes, he was

going to get the country back

on track financially, he

said. We have to go back to the

core processes, reining in

bureaucracy, reforming planning laws which have been con

straining New Zealand. It will

be important for the tax cut

program that will put the right

incentives in the economy. We want to invest more in New

Zealand, it's part of the idea

of having 40% of the super fund

in New Zealand. Look, over the

medium term we have to build

each standard, there's a lot

that can occur in that stance,

and engage all of the sectors,

I want to get around working

with the business community,

the unions, starting to get

everyone on the same page. New

Zealand correspondent Kerri

Ritchie joins us from Auckland. Good morning,

briefly, take us back through

how Saturday night played

out. Well, it was quite

remarkable really. The results

were known very early in Newspoll techs, that doesn't

always happen, there's a lot of

wheeling and dealing, New

Zealanders woke up the next

morning and knew the National

Party had the majority and

would form the next Government

with the help of the ACT party,

at the moment it's still a

little unclear who is going to

be involved in the coalition,

there are talks under way. John

Key says he wants an inclusive

Government. He doesn't have to,

he has his numbers, he'll speak

with the Maori Party, and I

think their historical links

are towards the left, to

Labour, and at the moment Maori

is trying to decide whether

they get on board. Over the

next few days John Key will

have discussions, he's hoping

to be sworn in within the next

week, he wants it fast-tracked

so he can go to the APEC

leader's summit in Peru. Things

are moving quickly, a lot of

people on the radio spoke about

Helen Clark, and her legacy,

and what a great leader she

was, that's the feeling around

at the moment that she deserved

respect, boosting the profile

of New Zealand. It sounds on

paper like an ungainly

Coalition between John Key and

the Nationals and the right

wing ACT party and left leaning

Maori group as well. How do the

commentators imagine that mob

of three will work together? Well, I think that it

- at the moment ACT and National, they've been speaking

for months, that's been worked

out. Yeah, the Maori factor,

Maori Party factor is the

interesting one, whether ACT

have five MPs, a significant

number in terms of politics, it

will depend how many - how much

John Key would like the Maori

Party to be involved, if at

allful he'll speak with Peter

Shah pels the co-leader to work

it out. It's an interesting

time over sheer. What is the

future for the Labour

leadership? We had Helen Clark

of course on the night step

aside, and then the next day

Michael Cullan, the deputy

followed her. At the moment there are

there are a number of names put

up. The defence - the Defence

Minister Phil Foff looks like

the -- Goff looks like the No.1

contender, probably it will be

some time before Labour's in a

winning position. Thank you so

much rich . Interestingly, it's

the ACT party and John Key

himself, they are big fans of

pretty free market open

systems, and that's the system

that has been copping a real

hiding from here to the United

States in the last few weeks

given the global financial

crisis, they see that as a path

forward for New Zealand. It

shows at the moment you can't

talk about worldwide trends to

the right, left or centre. In

Australia you have centre left,

New Zealand's turn to the

right. It's the it's time

factor. 9.5 years was

enough. Do you think the Cop

session speech by Helen Clark

was somewhat -- concession

speech by Helen Clark was

somewhat ungracious. Yes, it's

the sort of thing you would say

in advance of an election, not

afterwards. She was disappointed. To the front

pants of major newspapers, and

the execution of Bali bombers

dominated headlines. Australia

says Indonesia has been an high

alert for an attack. Supporters

clashed with police at the

burials, hundreds of hardline supporters demanding

revenge. In a photo reply kated

on many of the front pages,

'The Age' shows the coffin of

Imam Sumudra carried from a

mosque to his funeral. The

anger on the faces of

supporters is clear in the

image shown by 'The Sun',

saying the coffin was shrouded

in a cloth. The 'The Canberra

Times' reports Islamic leaders

spoke out against the bombers

to quell tension, the head of Indonesia's Islamic association

says they had not died as

martyrs. The 'Daily Telegraph'

says the men died as cowards. The three men where

led from the cells to the

orange grove, executed without

a struggle according to the

Adelaide 'Advertiser', quoting

sources at the Bato Prison sake

saying Amrozi looked pale and

afraid. The 'Sydney Morning

Herald' said Australia stepped

up warnings for Australian

tourists heading to Indonesia. And the 'The Courier

Mail' says the deaths brought

closure to the families of the

victims. 'The West Australian'

says there's been two hoax bomb

threats against the Australian

Embassy. In the US, the 'Financial Review' says

President-elect Barack Obama

called for a stimulus package

to revive the American economy,

the review saying Obama will

push for a $100 billion package

in a meeting with President

George W. Bush. And the

'Mercury' says Gunns pulp mill

was planned for the wrong spot

according to former Tasmanian

Premier Paul Lennon, he spoke

out about the mill in doubt of

weaning built saying it should

have been planned for land near

Burnie, not in the Tame rar

valley. Easy to say it now. In 'The Northern Territory News'

two extra board members have

been hired at $100,000 a year.

The top stories in break, the

Australian Government

reinforces travel warnings to

Indonesia in the wake of the

execution of the Bali bombers, the Foreign Minister Stephen

Smith says their deaths

reinforced Australia's calls

for a moratorium on the death

penalty. The motor industry

waits with bated breath for a

Federal Government announcement

on tariffed, unions and

manufacturers hope the

Government will back the tariff

of 10% on imported cars. Barack Obama's Chief of Staff Rahm

Emanuel outlines the

President-elect's ambish plan

for the White House, speaking

on US morning television as

pictures were released of

Barack Obama and his family on

election dayment -- day.

And to finance, and markets

closed positively in the US,

and Europe last week. Staff Rahm Emanuel outlines the President-elect's j plan for the White House, speaking on US morning television as pictures were released of Barack Obama and his family on election dayment -- day. And to finance, and markets closed positively in the US, and Europe lam plan for the White House, speaking on US

morning television as pictures were released of Barack Obama and his family on election dayment -- day. And to finance, and markets closed positively in the US, and Europe lfor the White House, speaking on US morning television as pictures were

released of Barack Obama and his family on election dayment -- day. And to finance, and markets closed positively in the US,

and Europe last week. , speaking on US morning television as pictures were released of Barack Obama and his family on election dayment -- day. And to finance, and markets closed positively in the US, and Europe last week. The World Economic Forum

closed if Dubai overnight, 700

of the world's leading thinkers

discussing issues of global warming, terrorism and

financial crisis. Fears of a

looming "Depression topped the

agenda, but Klaus Schwab urged

the group to look beyond the

pressing concerns. We have a

tendency to be concerned with

the financial crisis. But this

meeting also brought into

evidence so many other issues

like climate change,

particularly climate change,

like water security, like food

security which have to be

traffed in a smult -- addressed

in a sument anious way,

otherwise we -- in a

simultaneous way, otherwise we

run from one crisis to another

crisis. The financial crisis

will be followed by a food

cries, or a climate crisis and

so on. So the challenge to -

the challenge the world has now

is to have enough intellectual

capacity and leadership to make

sure that all those kinds of

settings are necessary

priorities are mitigated. And

some good news for borrowers,

Aussie Home Loans announced it

will cut the variable home loan

rate to 6.99". They cut the

standard variable rate by 1% to

7.65%, below the big four

banks. The news is off the back

of the Reserve Bank's interest

rate cut of a three-quarters of

a percentage point last

week. In a few minutes Vanessa

O'Hanlon will look at the

weather, and also ahead we'll

have a review of the nurls

today. This morning we are

joined by author of Monash

University elect tourer Waleed

Aly. Now the sport and here is

Paul Kennedy. There's been more

controversy in the fourth Test

between Australia and India,

Australia 0/13 chasing 382 for

victory coming into the final day. The Aussies could have

been chasing a smaller target

if not for a slow over

rate. Australia's prayers for a

fit enough Brett Lee to start

day four were answered. He'd

been placed on a drip due to

illness. India took a lead past

100 as Virender Sewag started

to pounce on loose

bowling. Like he did in the

first innings, the opener

clouted past 40. VJ's approach

as conventional. With his score

on 41, VJ was agauged

LBW. Clipping the leg

stump. Virender Sewag deserved

a century, falling eight short.

Jason Krejza producing

something special to remove VVS

Laxman. In his last innings

before he retires Sourav

Ganguly nel, he missed out on a

hat-trick, Sachin Tendulkar was

run out on tea. The homeside

crashed 6/166. The Australians

slow over rate forced them to

bowl part-timers in the last

session. It's our fault, we

bowled slowly enough to put us

under that pressure, you can't

pick and choose when you bowl

the overs, you have to bowl

every day in every session. MS

Dhoni, and Harbhajan Singh

capitalised scoring 50s,

sharing in a 108 run stand.

India dismissed for 295.

Australia was at stumps without

loss, and require 369 runs for

an unlikely win on the final day. Australia beat Papua New

Guinea 46 of 6 in the Rugby

League World Cup. David

Williams scored three tries on

debut. Luckily the game wasn't

as one sided as many

predicted. Papua New Guinea

made its way on to the field

with pride and some

trepidation. A team meeting

prior to the game concluded the

players had nothing to lose,

early signs were positive from

the visitors, until the ninth

minute when debutante David

Williams scored the first of

three tries. He has it.

Williams has scored the first

try. Five minutes later the

Australians fumbled what should

have been another six

points. Slides. He's lost the

ball. The Kangaroos were being

made to work hard. Slipped the

ball away. Monaghan

over. Monaghan's second, his

fourth in just three games, was

a little easier. Monaghan gets

another. The wolfman scored his

double, the Kumals looked like

folding after the break. The

path intercepted by

Prince. Papua New Guinea

pressed for a much-celebrated

try against the Kangaroos. Has

to play at it. The next two

tries came easily to the Cup

favourites. And then this - the game highlight. Papua New

Guinea on the last, a kick in

goal. I think he's scored.

We'll check with the video

referee. It was a try to take

home to a nation mad for rugby

league, and proud of their

representatives. Very

emotional. But I just want to

thank, you know everyone, all

the rugby league world. I came

here to play. For my family and

country. I wish them the best. In English Premier League

Chelsea moved back to the top

of the table. Two Nicolas

Anelka goals give them a 2-0

win at Blackburn, Blues leading

Liverpool on goal difference,

Fulham up to 10th after beating

Newcastle United. In boxing Joe

Calzaghe beat Roy Jones junior

in a New York blockbuster,

billed as the fight of the

year, the undefeated Welshman

beat one of the best. Jones knocked Joe Calzaghe down

earlier, Joe Calzaghe will

contemplate retiring. In the fight at Maddison Square

Gardens did more good for the

sport than a stoush in the NSW

Central Coast on Friday night.

Investigations continuing into

that profession at event which

was a debacle after the match finished. Supporters of the

winner rushed into the ring

trading insult with the

opponents. It was an

embarrassment to Australian

boxing, the commentators said. Investigations continuing

today. That is astonishing. It

wasn't good. The cricket

controversy continues after Day

3 we were complaining that it

was a slow sort of defensive

technique, and then last night

the criticism of Ricky Ponting

has been savage. It has. Saying

that he protected himself by

bringing on a couple of

part-timers to lift the over

rate and let India off the

hook. I can't recall a time

when the newspapers ganged up

in this way against an

individual, in this case Ricky

Ponting, it's across the media,

agreeing he put himself before

the country, because of the

slow over rate, protecting that

because he wanted to play for

Australia against New Zealand

in two weeks time in Brisbane.

If the slow over rate gets so

bad, then the ICC suspends the

captain for a test. I can

remember another time when they

ganged up on one person. Allan

Border. Ricky Ponting last

summer after the Sydney test,

they were scathing,

commentators asked for him to

resign. Even ABC commentators

ors after tea were scathing

about the tactics, they wanted

to get at him and Tim Neilson,

they were unhappy with the

tactics. As they saw it, this

trophy, the Border-Gavaskar

Trophy was the important thing,

and far more important than a

game against New Zealand in two

weeks time. That's the

accusation, and the outcome of

the slow over rate, but the

insin use is that he was doing

it to save his skin. Have we

shown that. So he wouldn't be suspended. That's without

doubt. That's the decision he

made at the time. He thought

6/166. Jason Krejza bowling one

end, he thought, "I'll rush

through overs at the other

end.' Cameron White bowled a

wide costing five, hit for a

four and the pressure valve

eased. That's what it came down

to. Every ball was described as

appalling. He they were upset

with the whole thing. We'll

somewhere highlights or low

lights. Watch the one going for

four. The criticism of Ricky

Ponting is mounting from all

direction, what do you guys

imagine will be the immediate

outcome of that. It's tough,

there's an alternative, his

name is Michael Clarke. It's

tough, look at his record,

second to Steve Waugh in terms

of win/loss ratio of all time

as an Australian captain, his

record is phenomenal up to this

point. He loses another series

like he lost the Ashes in 2005,

and the questions will be

asked. I feel sorry for him,

I'm an unabashed Ricky Ponting

fan, I love the guy. He's put

himself in a tough

position. Thank you Paul. A reminder 'ABC News Breakfast'

can be watched live on the web.

Whether you are at home or in

the office you can stay across

the main news stories of the

day. You'll find the

information about the breakfast

team and catching up on

interviews that you might have

missed this morning. Vanessa

O'Hanlon joins us for the

weather. Good morning. We are

expecting a dry day ahead for most of the capital most of the capital cities.

Looking at the satellite

photo cloud along southern WA

and South Australia with a weak

front is causing showers, a

cloud mass over northern WA in

a developing cross generating

thundery showers and cloud over

eastern Queensland is

triggering showers near the

coast of the Queensland -

isolated showers along the East

Coast and inland, fine and

drive over the interror. NSW in

for isolated showers on the northern half. Coast and

adjacent rains with a top of 24

in Sydney. Victoria - fine with

high cloud agreesing in the

west. Warm to mild with light

winds. Tasmania - scattered

showers about the west

extending to the south. South

Australia - in for possible

light morning drizzle over the

lower south-east district,

otherwise a fine and sunny day

ahead. South-western Australia

drizzle, clearing in the great

southern. Up to the north,

afternoon and evening showers

and storms for Broome and the

Top End.

I'll be back in half an

hour.

Bot boted The top story on 'ABC News 'ABC News Breakfast'.

Australian Government

reinforces its travel warning

to Indonesia, in the wake of

the execution of the Bali

bombers, Foreign Affairs

Minister Stephen Smith has been

shown credible intelligence

that an attack could be

planned. Australia's position

on the death penalty has been

rearm. A moratorium is

something Mr Smith will support

at the next meeting of the

United Nations General

Assembly. I draw again to

Australians our travel advice

about the need to consider or

reconsider travel to Indonesia

or Bali, with have credible

information that terrorists may

plan attacks in Indonesia we continue to have credible

information that Bali is an

attractive place for terrorist

attack, or for terrorists to

contemplate attacks, and we

worry about the previous sites

of attack in Bali, where young Australians congregate,

beaches, bars and shopping

malls. So far as as the general

question of the capital

punishment is concerned

Australia for a long period of

time opposed capital punishment, that's essentially

a bipartisan view at State and

Federal level and international

forums Australia makes that

point. We urge countries that

continue to ply capital

punishment not to do so. In the

near future the the UN General

Assembly we'll call for a moratorium on capital punishment, that's been

Australia's position for some

time. Steven Smith talking an

'Insiders' yesterday. To other news, the Federal Government

will decide how much assistance

it will give three car

manufacturers operating in

Australia and their 60,000

workers, trade unions with

Toyota, Ford and GMH say the

10% tariff on imported cars

should remain, a review headed

by former Victorian Premier

Steve Bracks say it should be

halved by 2010. Pensiones are

about to get a boost from the

Federal Government, families Minister Jenny Macklin

announced a cut in the deeming

rate the figure the Government

uses to calculate interest

earned on financial investments

for pensioners, pensioners are

money invested will have an

increased payment later this

month. A Russian nuclear

submarine returns to port after

an accident killing 20 people,

the submarine was on sea trials

in the Pacific Oaks with more

than 200 people -- Pacific

Ocean with 200 people on board:

Haitian police questioned the

man who ran a school that cople

apsed killing 90 people, most

of the victims were children.

Rescuers continue to look for

survivors in the rubble of the

school in the capital

Port-au-Prince, four children

have been found alive since it

happened Friday. An outbreak of

cholera adds to the humanitarian crisis in

Democratic Republic of Congo,

doctors try to contain the

outbreak of the gastroenteritis

in one of the largest camps

outside Goma, sporadic fighting

between Tutsi rebels and

Government soldiers continues

despite calls for a crease

fire, we'd like to get your views or the stories we are

covering, and we'll have a -- an interview with Malcolm

Turnbull in half an hour, if

you have questions send an

email or text message.

For more now on the execution

of the Bali bombers, we are

joined by Dr Greg Barton, a

research Professor in the

politics program at Monash

University. Good morning. Can I

get your response to the apparently credible

intelligence that the

Government is telling us it's received over potential

threats. What is your response

to that, does it surprise you

at all? It's not surprising,

it's what we should expect, and

may be a reason why there's

been a long drawn out process

in the execution. What do you mean? Indonesian authorities

have done well in stopping a

variety of terrorist attacks,

and would have monitored all

sorts of noise in the system in

the last few months, waiting

for a time when they felt

confident. The Government has

been saying it's happy with the

cooperation it's refusing from

the Indonesian Government in

relation to dealing with JI and

that maligned effect in

Indonesia, do you believe that

it's been eradicated for

downgraded. I think it's been

diminished, but there's a vocal

but significant minority in

Indonesia that believe the

story of the bombers, JI, that

it is a noble struggle. That's

not going away for a long

while, it's driven by

international affairs, it's not

just an Indonesian

matter. There's an article

putting the whole thing into

balance, talking about what is

happening in the villages, the

villages are saying, "These

people are important, they are

not of us, we don't like them,

they are radicals", the

impression in Australia is,

because you see the media

coverage and photographs, is

you can form the impression

that this is the general

reaction within Bali and more

widely in Indonesia. It's true

and sad for that village of

Tenggulun, clearly it's a

regular village, those faces we

see an TV and people in the

crowds, we have seen them

before. They are at every demonstration, they are

travelling around, they are not

from the area, this is not a

terrorist factory, that's good news, we'll see the

demonstrations because there is

a small but vocal minority

around. There was a reference

from one of the reporters on

commercial television talking

about another chapter in

Indonesia's shame. The

terrorists killed the people,

not Indonesia, if you look at

what Indonesia did, it tracked

down the people, convicted them

and executed them. Most of the

victims of terrorism, jihadi in

this case, are Muslims, most in

Indonesia are Indonesians, this

group we remember them for the

Bali bombing, but before they

were involved in violence in

Indonesia, where thousands died

in Centre Sulawesi, perhaps

10,000 killed in the conflict,

and this group Jemaah Islamiah

contributed to that. The death

toll is greater than anyone

else's, but we think of the

events when they are

international, not of the

suffering going on for a long

time. Indonesian authorities

did well. The sentencing and

the execution of the Bali

bombers, would you say it

enjoys major ity support. It

does absolutely. The people in

some ways who buy their story,

are a minority, but it's a

minority that's a difficult

presence for the ipd

nearbyians, it won't go away

quickly, most would like to

move on. Can I take you to a

point you made before, that JI

influence is largely influenced

by international events, can

you speak to that, what do you

mean by that. It's the

narrative driving this group,

they are involved in a Cos mig

struggle, fighting for good --

cosmic struggle, fighting for

good against evil. In other

places like Iraq and

Afghanistan. A lot of these

guys, the core leaders, Bombers, trade in Afghanistan,

and in Pakistan, and that is

going on, Indonesians and

south-east arns are in that

part of the world, until

Afghanistan and Pakistan are

stabilised we'll see problems

coming out of them directly. What do you think the

economic future for Bali is,

undering the Government is

Vidsing people not to go there,

they suffered enormously

economically after the bombings

in 2002. Who do you think the

future is. It's difficult. I

mean, one would hope in the

medium long term they'll move

on, this will be forgotten and

have no impact. It depends on

what happens over the next few

weeks or month, as we saw in

2005, the second bombing,

although there was a resilient

response to the first bombing

in 2002, after the 2005 bombics

things were quite for a long

while, we hope there's no

incidents, if already, it will

be bad for the people at Bali,

they just want to move on,

putting this behind them. Is it

a slim chance to hope there

won't be future attacks such as

that in the next few months.

On the contrary, bops is that

there won't be an attack. If

there were, it will be awful,

we can't disregard a low

probability event, there's a

real risk, small but real. Greg

Barton, thanks for joins ugg on

the program. Barack Obama's

campaign is hailed as one of

the most well executed. He made

it clear he had a great deal of

support along the way, not

least of course from his wife.

Michelle Obama will bring a

history of public service and a

degree from Harvard law school

when she becomes the 44th First

Lady. She's known as mum to

Shalia and Malia and calls

herself a mult lty taskering.

Her husband describes her

another way. The rock of our

family, the love of my life,

the nation's next First Lady

Michelle Obama. The daughter of

a pump operator, Michelle Obama

grew up on the South side of Chicago, attending Harvard law

school, getting a job at a law

school where she met her

husband. That's why I married

Obama, because of those values,

he was cute too. That helped. I

want to be realistic here. He's

cute. And it's her ability to

provide support for at least

the next four years that have

experts saying she'll be as

influential a First Lady as the

United States have seen. First,

her comfort in speaking to

large groups, her ease, I think

the years of professional

experience, her law degree, she

seems as comfortable in front

of 3,000 people as her husband

does. Historian Betty Boyd

opinioned a number of books

about American first ladies,

saying Michelle Obama said's experience in the legal

industry and a mother will

bring a new dimension to the

Obama presidency. I think the

biggest advantage that Michelle

Obama brings to the White House

is the two young daughters, we

only get children this age

every 50 years, you have to go

back to the Kennedys to get

children as young as the

younger Obama daughter, and

Americans love children in the

White House. Their father will

hope Americans feel the same

about him when he makes the

move to the White House in

move to the White House in January. Well the

Governor-General Quentin Bryce

joined hundreds of Australians

in France at a memorial

dedicated to fallen soldiers,

the start of the battlefield

commemorations mrking the 90th anniversary of the First World

War. The Queen led the annual

Remembrance Day celebrations at

the Cenotaph. This report from

BBC. It has been the focus of

National remembrance ever since

it was placed here after the

end of World War I, it is the

Cenotaph, simple in design,

profound in meaning, a monument

through which we imagine all

those who went off to war and

never returned. 90 years after the First World War ended the

Queen came to the Cenotaph as

she and her predecessors have

done in every peace year, to

lead the tributes. At 11:00 a

field gun signalled the start

of a national 2-minutes

silence. BELL TOLLS

At the Cenotaph the Queen

placed her wreath on behalf of

Britain and the Commonwealth, a

wreath of red poppies

surrounded by laurl leaves. For

the second year Prince William

laid a wreath, paying his

tribute to the hundreds of

thousands of young soldiers who

perished on the western front

and elsewhere. Harry Patch, 110

is one of three surviving

British servicemen who fought

in the First World War, he laid

his wreath in Wales and

Somerset. You can't forget it.

Once you have been through it. The anniversary of the end

of the First World War will be

on Tuesday, when the armisities

that brought the war to a close

will be recalled and the debt

we owe to those who died will

be honoured, a debt to whom

those we cannot see but owe so

much, a debt that will never

end. You are watching 'ABC News

Breakfast', the top stories now

- the Australian Government

reinforces travel warnings to

Indonesia in the wake of the

execution of the Bali bombers,

the Foreign Minister Stephen

Smith says their deaths

reinforced Australia's calls

for a moratorium on the death

penalty. The motor industry

waits with bated breath for an

announcement on tariffs, unions

and manufacturers hope the

Government will back industry

protection of 10% on imported cars. Patient police have

questioned the man that ran a

school that collapsed quill

killing at least 90 rescuers

continue to look for survivors

at the capital Port-au-Prince.

Now for a look at the

National papers, we are joined

by author and Monash University

lecturer Waleed Aly, good

morning. It's impossible to

avoid Bali It's everywhere,

every paper. The Fin review, I

think is not reading with it,

apart from that it's everywhere

and the photos bear a

resemblance to each other in every paper. The only

difference I can find in all the papers on the Bali coverage is the commentary, that's where I want to have a look. Starting with 'The Australian', who are running an editorial, not the only ones to do so. Interesting editorial because it captures the difficulty at the heart of this issue for to understand how it would undermine counterterrorism as a whole merely to point out that the execution of these people Australia was opposed to. I think their concerns were more

political. That's the word I think that should be used. It is very difficult. I should think for the tabloids, to run a line the day after, that these people are executed, some passionate line against the death penalty when you know it will upset and stir up some of your readers. It's a very difficult thing to do. Particularly - you know the Australian being a Conservative newspaper has gone hard on terrorism as an issue would find it difficult to do. The focus is on families of victims, which is an easier line for media to take. I think we should give credit to the Government in the sense that they must recognise that most Australians welcome the fact that these people were

executed, yet on 'Insiders'

Stephen Smith volunteered the

information they'll go to the

UN, arguing for a moratorium on

the death penalty. I was

surprised by that. They could

have stayed silent. That's what

I expected. Normally when you

deal with terrorism related

issues, it's touchy stuff,

politically it plays out in a

uniform way. The Government

seems to buck the trend and

raidsing the issue of the death

penalty, proposing a moratorium

at that moment was a gutsy

thing to do. Whether it will

backfire, we'll see. Similarly

a lot of the press coverage

picked up stories from family

members and so on, there's a bit of a mixed response coming

out of that. I know the 'Sydney

Morning Herald' is running with

that, obviously 'The Sun' is

doing a lot on it. There seems

to be a message that, "Well,

executing these people doesn't

necessarily solve the issue for

us, it doesn't bring the

victims back, get rid of the

pain", in a strange way, it

doesn't bring closure. There's

a bit of ambiguity around that

and how people feel about it.

It's easy to say in the

abstract, "Yes, I'd like to see

them executed", it perhaps when

it happens doesn't fulfil expectations. The tormenting

stops, because of the way the

guys handled it, they must be

tormenting until the execution,

tormenting the families, there

was no remorse. Yes, I'll glad

you raised that because the

second piece I want to discuss

was an opinion piece in the

'Sydney Morning Herald',

written by a former analyst,

Indonesian analyst from the Office of National Assessments,

ONA. He's blaming

ONA. He's blaming the

Indonesian Government squarely

for the fact that these

prisoners, when they were in

prison, not now, were using the

media so easily, And were

allowed tax Keeping their

narrative going on and on. Only

the Indonesian Government can

be to blame. Now, I don't want

to be too cynical. You can

predict the media will go to

Abu Bakr Bashir, he'll provide

the same commentry when someone feels the need to hear

that. That's true, that's the

nature of these crimes, they

are publicity crimes, that's

the way terrorism works. It's

the Indonesian jail system, we

see a lot of Schapelle Koshi

for someone that's behind

bars. I might have made the

point elsewhere, this is the point people need to

understand, you are talking

about a country that a decade

or so ago is under a dictatorship, it's moving into

a democracy, managing 250

million people and the

transition into a free media is

difficult for a society to

undergo that rapidly. So when

you see - I think this explains

the media interest, and the

media activity, that it's Haifa

open. Everything is said and --

hypoopen, everything is said,

it's freer than it can cope

with, it's trying to get the

transition right. When the Bali

bombers come along, they are

good media talent and a lot

flock to them. Australian

media, given the chance and opportunity would have done the

same thing, we have seen a lot

of those images beamed into our

lounge rooms here, we have to

be a little understanding about

the development of Indonesia as

a nation, and the growing pains

that it's going through. What

caught your attention for 'The

Sun', hold that up so we get a

shot of that. That's the

photograph that sort of

appeared on many of the front

pages of the papers today. 'The

Sun' is scrirk itself as a news

pictorial, it's more pictorial

on than on most days. It goes

with the photo, but as you go

into the paper, more of the

chaotic scenes, and photographs

of all the victims, there's one

page that has a photograph of

every single victim of the Bali

bombings, this one here. She is

scenes are quite common, I

think, in the tabloid press at

at time like this, where you

get the pictorial angle. What

grabbed my eye was on the

opinion page, where 'The Sun'

ran heavily on this with the

opinion page, all but one piece

was dedicated to it. They run

an interesting piece by Brian

Deegan, who was a

magistrate. And the father of a

victim. Whose son died. He

makes an interesting point,

saying, a few actually n a

short piece. As the Bali

bombings have receded into

history more and more there's

been less of a tendency to mark

the anniversary, more of a

fascination with the execution

of those who did it. He

describes this change in

perspective as perverse, that

we've almost forgotten the

victims, and the focus is on

the perpetrators in a vengeful

way. He retells a moving

account of a time when he was

asked on radio whether he

approved of the execution of

the Bali bombers, and he

paused, he didn't quite have an answer, this is a person that's

vintly opposed to the death

penalty -- violently opposed to

the death penalty, for a moment

he was unable to come to an

immediate answer about it. That

shook him. That rattled him. He

realised after a while he

paused and thawing, "No, no, I

do oppose the death penalty

still", but the question about

whether or not I oppose the death penalty should not be

left to someone grieving for a

lost relative or something like

that, that's not the way to

make a decision like this. Once

you decide that you are against

the death penalty, that's the

end of debate. He's had unbelievable compassion and

intelligence, he's a remarkable

man, he's been quoted for years

on this issue, he's always,

always takes you by surprise at

how many humanity he has. It

may be a judicial thing, maybe

he detaxes himself from the

issue to analyse it enough. The

newspapers don't seem to be. We

return to the families and

their victims, it's fair

enough. The fact you have one

of them who is able to analyse

the issue in this forensic way,

I think, is really interesting,

it's a moving way that he's

recounted that story. Waleed

Aly, thank you for joining

us. Thanks for having me. A

reminder about the web site. Abc.net.au/breakfast. There you

can watch the entire program

streamed live. Whether you are

at home or in the office you

can stay across the main news

stories, now Paul Kennedy with sport. Australia will have to

create history to win the

fourth Test against India at

Nagpur, the Australians bowled

India out, chasing 382 on the

fifth day. Jason Krejza took 12

wicket in his first Test, only

the third Australian debutante

to take a 10 wicket hall.

Visitors 0/13 at stumps. Ricky

Ponting has been criticised for

his captaincy, India suffering

a collapse, 6/166 when Ponting

felt he had to bring on

part-time bowlers to lift the

over rate allowing MS Dhoni,

and Harbhajan Singh to get

runs. Ricky Ponting won't be

rubbed out. He was facing

suspension, but has he allowed

India to win the

series. Australia beat Papua

New Guinea 46-6 in the Rugby

League World Cup. Pregame

predictions of a 100 pointed

thrashing, Papua New Guinea was

competitive. David William

scored three tries, the Kumuls

scoring a try late. They were

unlucky to be placed in the

pool of death. It's something

of death. Game of death,

play-off of death. The critical

thing about Ricky Ponting's

decision is that had he bowled

his best bowlers, there's a chance Australia would have

been chasing 300 rather than

382. That's the difference. It

put the game beyond reach

almost. It's a major

difference, 382 creating

history, 276 was the highest

run chase. West Indies did it

in the 80s, when Richards made

a run a ball century, you go

back a long way to a great

team, it's 100 extra runs. Honolulu joins us with

the weather. Warmer weather on the the way.

The photo image shows cloud

moving across southern WA and

South Australia, a cloud mass

also over north-western

Australia and a developing

trough. Generating showers and

clouds over Eastern Queensland

triggering showers near the

quoffed. Queensland - showers

along the East Coast and

inland. Fine and dry over the

interror. NSW has isolated

showers likely this morning and

tonight on the northern half of

the coast and adjacent ranges,

in Victoria - fine, cloud

increasing from the west. A top

of 25 in Melbourne. Tasmania -

scattered showers to the west.

Extending to the south. Hobart

a top of 20. South Australia -

possible lying morning drizzle

over the lower south-east

district. Otherwise fine and

sunny. South of WA isolated

dridsle in the mornings,

clearing in the great southern

by the afternoon. Up to the

north, afternoon and evening

showers expected storms for

Broome and the Top End. zzle in the mornings, clearing in the great southern by the afternoon. Up to the north, afternoon and evening showers expected storms for Broome and the Top End. lying morning drizzle over the lower south-east district. Otherwise fine and sunny. South of WA isolated drizzle in the mornings, clearing in the great southern by the afternoon. Up to the north, afternoon and evening showers expected storms for Broome and the Top End.

Much warmer weather on the Much warmer weather on the way.

Still ahead on ABC News breakfast we'll speak to

Opposition Leader Malcolm

Turnbull on the program. He has

a few questions to answer and a

kerfuffle about comments he may

or may not have made about

Therese Rein. He said he was

misquoted or taken out of context, one or the

other. Coming up after the

short break on break .

Indonesia remains on high

alert over possible possible terror attack after the

execution of the Bali bombers

prompts the Government to

reaffirm their opinion on the

death penalty. 60,000 workers

in the car making industry

waiting to see if the

Government will push ahead with

an assistance plan much Police

question the head of the school

in Haiti as the death toll

rises. With one day to play in

the fourth and final Test Australia needs to make history

in order to retain the

Border-Gavaskar Trophy in

Nagpur.

Good morning, again, it's

Monday, 10 November, I'm Barrie

Cassidy, I'm Virginia Trioli,

the top story on 'ABC News Breakfast', the Australian

Government has reinforced its

travel warning to Indonesia in

the wake of the deaths of the

Bali bombers, Foreign Affairs

Minister Stephen Smith says

he's been shown cred ill

intelligence that terrorists

could be planning an

attack. The bombers Mukhlas,

Amrozi, and Imam Sumudra were

executed by firing squad in the

early hours of Sunday morning,

Abu Bakr Bashir, cleric

presided over the funeral

ceremonies of Amrozi and

Mukhlas in east Java, supporters tussling with

police, Geoff Thompson reports

from Bali. Amrozi, and his

brother Mukhlas receive a rowdy

homecoming as dead men.

Hundreds of their jihadi

supporters battled police as

the terrorists remains arrived

in the family village of

Tenggulun in East Java, fresh

graves were dug and the bodies

were in the ground., "Now their

souls are flying with green

birds to heaven", said family

member. Imam Sumudra's body

arrived in Serang in West Java

10:30 to be carried away for

burr yam. His will handed out

revealed the depth of his hate

calling on Muslims to be proud

butchers of non-Muslim

civilians. In Bali news of the

executions was welcomed by

Australian tourists, with a

mixture of satisfaction and

fear. I have no feeling for

them whatsoever. Are you happy

it's happened. Absolutely. I'm

scared that they might

retaliate with another bomb and

hurt the Balinese again. The

coordinated bombages of Paddy's

Pub and the Sari Club killed

202 people from 22 countries.

88 Australians, and 38

Indonesians were among the

dead. It was by far the biggest

terror attack that had taken

place in Asia, and it was significant as well because it

was the first real attack on

foreigners on Indonesian soil.

We had had become bombings

before, but they were directed

at local targets, this was

really the first post 9/11 bombing. Notoriously

unrepentant through their

trials and convictions the

three Bali bombers were

sentenced to death on terrorism

charges in 2003. For the next

five years, numerous appeals

ground through the courts while

the bombers preached jihad from

prin. More attacks and arrest

followed Bali, debates over

strategy saw JI splinter

apart. That bombing in Bali

served no purpose for JI

whatsoever, it didn't help recruitment, bring people into

the cause, funding into the

caution it was a disaster. On

every single count. A disaster

which can now include three

more men in its final death

toll. However, they were

anythin