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(generated from captions) the Federal Government prepares

for a alcopops battle but

dismisses the possibility of a

double dissolution. Somali

pirates launch a revenge

assault on a US flagship off

the coast of Africa, a French

warship captures 11 men from a

pirate mothership. A boatload

of asylum seekers is intre

septed near Ashmore Reef,

Australia's numbers could be

worth. A niggling ankle injury

rules out fast Bowler Brett Lee

from the one-day series against Pakistan.

This Program is Captioned

Live. Live.ercepted near Ashmore

Reef, Australia's numbers could be worth. A niggling ankle injury rules out fast Bowler Brett Lee from the one-day series against Pakistan. This Program is Captioned

Live. Good morning, it's

Thursday, 16 April, I'm Joe

O'Brien, I'm Virginia Trioli.

The top story on ABC News

Breakfast, Deputy Prime

Minister Julia Gillard denies

the Rudd Government is right to

trigger a double dissolution

with its failed alcopops with its failed alcopops tax.

The Federal Government plans to

reintroduce the bill next

month. The 70% tax rise was

rejected by the senate in

March, one of the key March, one of the key opponents

Steve Fielding looks set to

block the tax again. Julia

Gillard says the Government is

not trying to create a not trying to create a deadlock

between the House of

Representatives and the Senate

but is trying to tackle the

binge drinking problem. We

believe this legislation is

right, that the evidence shows

that for the time period this

tax has been in operation, and

the price of alcopops has

therefore been higher, that you

can see a reduction overall in

alcohol usage amongst alcohol usage amongst the

groups we are concerned about.

The strategy of Malcolm

Turnbull and his Liberal

Opposition would have us on is

one where the price of alcopops

comes down. Well, we are aren't

going to stand by and catch the

price of alcopops come down so

sweet sugary drinks are

cheaper. I think the Australian public would laugh if they public would laugh if they went

to the expense of an election

because they couldn't get a tax

hike on an alcohol product. The

Australian public would laugh

at them, let them try it. You

talk to people on the street,

the measure was not working, it

was turning people off the

issue of tackling Australia's binge drinking issue. Independent issue. Independent Senator

Steve Fielding speaking

Steve Fielding speaking there.

Hayden Cooper joins us from

Canberra. Good morning,

Canberra. Good morning, which

one is it, is the discussion

raging at the moment - is this

a serious attempt to get this

law back on the books or is it

just a trigger for a double

dissolution election? Well, I

think what it is is an attempt

to sharpen the Government's

attack on Malcolm Turnbull. Of

course, they want the bill

passed so they can continue to

collect $1.6 billion over four

years, and cite the health

reasons for the legislation,

which we have heard many times

over. I think what it is a

really an effort for the

Government to sharpen its

strategy against Malcolm

Turnbull, and to try to portray

him as a stubborn obstinant

road block not only for this

piece of legislation, but

others. The difficulty in

wanting to focus the attention

on Malcolm Turnbull is that

instead, in this tax argument

in particular, the focus is

just turned on the independent

Senators and Steve Fielding in

particular who is

intractable. It feels intractable. It feels familiar.

Steve Fielding hasn't moved an

inch in the passage of time.

It's only been a few

weeks. Neither has the Government. They are

reintroducing the same

legislation that he was very

clear in rejecting. That's right. They are bringing

right. They are bringing it

straight back up, hoping that

something changes. But they

will need to offer Steve

Fielding something more if they

are serious about getting it

through, and what he wants,

obviously, is the end of

alcohol ads during sport on

television. As you saw

yesterday, he had not moved at

all. So we are still deadlocked

in the Senate and it doesn't

appear too likely that this

bill will pass. On the other

hand the Government caved in on

the idea of keeping the money,

what they are going to do now

is split the bill and bring a

new bill in to allow them to

keep the 365 million already collected. And Hayden Cooper,

in other news this morning, we

know that the state

Attorney-Generals and the

Federal attorney meeting on an

issue gallanising attention across several

statements. That's right, statements. That's right, bikie

gangs are getting a lot

gangs are getting a lot of

attention all over the place,

today it comes to Canberra, a

city that doesn't have a

massive bickie problem, it must

be admitted, but... Except for

policitians of a weekend when

they get on the Harley Davidson

as all baby boomers want to do

these days. Occasionally, these days. Occasionally, yes, I am not sure if that's something you are in to

yet. Not me. Yes, there is a

meeting in Canberra, Attorney-Generals from around

the county, and it appears

unlikely that there will be

national set of laws or

national approach to dealing

with bikie gangs, and the

reason for that, one reason at

least, is that Victoria is

holding out and doesn't see the

need for uniform national

legislation. Many of the other

states do want it, they want to

go the way of South Australia,

which is - has brought in

draconian laws, but it doesn't

appear that there would be any

national guidelines announced

today. Good to talk to today. Good to talk to you

Hayden Cooper, thanks so

much. In other news - French

sailors arrested 11 pirates off

the coast of Kenya, a capture

coming after a failed attack on

an American ship. Crew members

of 'Liberty Sun' outmanoeuvred

attackers. A pirate commander

said the incident was not aimed

at checking a ransom but was an

act of revenge. 50 asylum

seekers intercepted off the

coast of the WA are on their

way to Christmas Island, the

sixth boat arrival, but home

afs Minister Bob Debus says

Australia's numbers are lower

than other parts of the world,

the Minister has been in Bali

for a regional forum on

addressing people

smuggling. Grief and anger

marked a memorial service for

96 soccer fans who died in one

of Britain's worst Stadium disasters, thousands were at

the Anfield ground for the 20

year commemoration of the

Hillsborough tragedy, and were

united for a 2 minute silence.

A Government Minister's speech

was heckled by those angry

no-one has been held to act.

The Chairman of The Chairman of the Pacific

Island Forum condemns the

interim Government in Fiji

saying the country will

probably be expelled. Toke

Talagi says the Fijian Talagi says the Fijian people

have been made victims by the

decision to scrap the country's

constitution, Fiji's economy

took a hit,

took a hit, credit rating

downgraded and the dollar

devalued by 20%. A blockade by

French fishing boats causes

disruption on both sides.

English Channel. What started

as a dispute over tough as a dispute over tough ever

European Union quotas affects

passenger and freight ferries,

services out of Calais,

Boulogne and Dunkirk are

suspended hundreds suspended in

South England and 3,000 ferry passengers. Returning to the

increasing activity of increasing activity of Somali

pirates in the Gulf of Aden, US scraited Hillary Clinton says

the answer is to attack the

pirate's land bases, says pirate's land bases, says the

Secretary of State. These pirates are criminals, they

must be stopped, those that

carried them out must be

brought to justice. You need

to go after the land bases. We

have a good idea where they

are. We want to know what the

Somali Government, tribal

leaders who would not like the international community bearing

down on them, would be willing

to do to rid their territory of

these pirate these pirate bases. US

Secretary of State hint

speaking an - Hillary Clinton

speaking an hour or so ago. A

boatload of asylum seekers has

been intercepted off the WA

coast. The sixth boat to the

arriving, the fourth in a

fortnight. 40 people are under

escort on the way to the

detention centre on detention centre on Christmas

Island. We are joined Island. We are joined by

Andrew O'Connor, another week,

another boat. The Federal

another boat. The Federal Government is saying the approach to border protection

is working. Home Affairs

Minister Bob Debus is repeating

what sounds to be like a mantra

when a boat arrives, saying the

successful interception

demonstrates the effective

licence of the border

protection command, saying it's separating 24/7 with huge

resource and is stopping the

boats reaching the mainland. He

argues that you have to see it

in an international

perspective, while the number,

400 asylum seekers reaching

Australian waters is serious,

it's miniscule. Italy by

comparison was 35,000, Greece

10,000, Spain 15,000. The

Opposition is not convinced by

the argument. They are saying

it's not the point, there's a

dozen boats since August, more

than a dozen, 17 interceptions

in Indonesian waters on our

behalf. Whatever border

protection is achieving, it's

not chooefg g achieving not chooefg g achieving a

reduction in people smuggling

in our region. What we know

about the latest boat 49 on

board, all adults. Found on a

boat near Ashmore island on boat near Ashmore island on the

North Coast of WA they are

being taken to Christmas

Island, to the detention centre

where they'll be processed. We

understand they are adults,

there's no children or babies,

they'll be interviewed on

Christmas Island, undergo

health and security checks and

begin a process for assessing

status as asylum seekers. We

mentioned Bob Debus has been

attending a forum in Bali, has

there been resolutions out of

the that meeting. Nothing

concrete or specific in terms

of immediate changes, we heard

from Foreign Minister Stephen

Smith, a general Smith, a general acknowledgment

of the resolve of of the resolve of both

countries to deal with the

problem, part of which is

Indonesia must strengthen

legislate ive regime to be able

to prosecute people smugglers

beyond existing immigration

laws. The Opposition is laws. The Opposition is saying

the Government should come back

from the meeting with an agenda

or change, saying the

Government undermined border

protection, cutting back on

staffing and resources and say

the spike in the number of

boats coming here coincides

with the Rudd Government's

decision to abandon the

hard-line elements of hard-line elements of the

Howard Government's immigration

framework, the Government

maintaining that's not the

case, they have boosted border protection resource and will

continue to do so. Andrew

O'Connor, thank you for

that. Overseas - the trial of

the soul surviving suspected

gunman from the Mumbai attacks

has been thrown into disarray.

The court-appointed lawyer has

been sacked by the judge.

Forcing an journt, the case

expected to resume toward. We

have this report. Security was

tight as Ajmal Kasab already

delayed trial was due to begin.

Hundreds of police and soldiers

were in case to assure the

court appearance passed without

incidence. The lawyer was

reported two weeks ago and

agreed to take on the case He

asked that his lawyer be

present. He wanted an

undertaking. For a

precautionary measure the court

revoked my appointment. Kasab

is charged with murder, and

waging war, in relation to the

attacks on the financial

capital in November. The

21-year-old is the only

surviving suspect to be

arrested. He's accused of being

a member of banned Islamist

group Lashkar-e-Toiba, for the

first time the Pakistani

national appeared before the

judge in person and a

boom-proof court at the high

security Arthur Road jail. The

suspect asked the court to

provide a Pakistani defence

lawyer, the request denied,

Indian officials say Pakistan

will be asked to choose an

Indian lawyer to represent

Kasab. The request was

communicated to the Government

of Pakistan, since there was no

response, again a request response, again a request has

been made, we assured the court

that we'll follow the request

through diplomatic through diplomatic channel to

the Government of Pakistan. He

faces death penalty if

convicted of taking part in the

rampage, claiming more than 170

lives, and left a trail of

destruction in Mumbai. Kasab

had been due to decide what

plea to when the trial was adjourned. Now let's look at

the front pages of the major

newspapers. Traditional landowners in the Kimberley

agree to a native title deal

clearing the way for a major

industrial gas hub to be built

near Broome says The West Australian, The Financial Times

says the Rudd Government's

resurrection of the alcopops

bill intensifies pressure on

the Federal Opposition to

support its agenda or face a

double dissolution election.

The age - a sixth boatload of

asylum seekers have been

intercepted as part of a people

smuggling operation. The

Australian gash dash Indonesian

officials say they are

powerless to stop people smuggling. Sydney Morning

Herald, measures to stop legal

firms overcharging clients to

be considered at a meeting of

the Attorney-Generals. The

Mercury - Tasmania seeking

booster jabs during the

whooping cough outbreak face a

6 week wait for slack 6 week wait for slack scenes.

Rudd Government to demand

patients medical records under

a plan to stop doctors

defrauding Medicare defrauding Medicare says The

Courier Mail. Adelaide

Advertiser. Police will be at

the funeral of Jobie Dajka

turning away unwanted guests at

the funeral including Cycling

Australia. Former AFL Australia. Former AFL star

Aaron James and wife speak

about the heartbreak of losing

an unborn sundew it an

epileptic tiger. The Canberra

Times, no tax cuts according to

kaing in The Canberra

Times. Billions of litres of

water in aquifers will be used

as backup supplies and have a

picture of Carta, an orangutan

at the Adelaide Zoo

at the Adelaide Zoo lonely

after her mate days, face after her mate days, face the Adelaide Adelaide Advertiser. The Northern Territory News, boys and girls at and girls at the Don Dale Juvenile Detention Centre

separated after inappropriate

activity between inmates. If

you'd like to send feedback on

news stories, send emails to:

The top stories on ABC News

Breakfast - the Federal

Government is preparing for

another senate showdown when it

reintroduces alcopops

legislation next month. The Deputy Prime Minister Julia

Gillard denied the Government

is trying to trigger a double

dissolution. A boatload of

asylum seekers intercepted off

the coast of the and sent to

Christmas Island, the sixth

arrival in Australian waters in

year. 11 pirates captured off

the coast of Kenya. A the coast of Kenya. A failed

attack on a US ship was an act

of revenge.

A senior Reserve Bank

official warns the global

economic slump may have some

time to run despite hints of

improvement. Dr Luci Ellis says

financial conditions could

remain tight for several years

as confidence is fragile. Neal

Woolrich reports. While global

investors are scouring the land

for evidence of economic

recovery here in Australia recovery here in Australia the

Reserve Bank is doing its part

to keep a lid on

expectations. The present

financial crisis has followed a

period in which the price of

risk was unusually low and

conducive to the build up of

successors in credit markets,

these are unlikely to return

soon. What happens over the

next few years at least is

highly uncertain. Dr Ellis told

an economics conference in Melbourne that some

market-based indicators, like

share prices and credit margins

show tentative signs of

improving. While she warns

confidence is fragile, Dr Ellis

reaffirmed the RBA's view that

Australian banks are sound.

Part of the reason is the

realtive strength of Australian

household balance sheets, with

fewer home owners saddled with

loans that are big relative to

the value of their prompt It

seems relatively few households

in Australia face going into

negative equity even if housing

prices fall. By contrast in prices fall. By contrast in the

United States some private

sector estimates suggest more

than 10% of mortgage borrowers

are in negative equity, perhaps

as many as one in six. Luci

Ellis says there are many courses of the financial

crisis, including lax

regulation, underpricing of

risk and the low level of

interest rates, authorities are

focussing on solutions such as

the regulation of credit

agencies, pay structure within

financial institutions and bank

capital requirements. Colombia University's Frank Lichtenberg

says consumer education is a

problem that needs to be

addressed. Subprime addressed. Subprime borrowers

can be financially

unsophisticated. They have a

poorer understanding of the contract, a

contract, a financial contract

they are entering into, than

the originator of the loan. There's asymmetric information

between the two. He says in one American pilot program high

risk borrowers were forced to

submit intended loans to a

financial counsellor for

review. The study showed that

under those conditions there

was a fall in the supply of and

demand for loans, and also a

drop in default rates. In terms

of Australian institutions, at

least one local fund manager

believes banks are getting a

free kick through Government

policy. The chairman of MM and

E capital John McGowan argues

the Government guarantee is

helping big four banks gain too

much market power. If the

regulators by one means or

another isolate major trading

banks in Australia into a

larger olli goly they'll act in

the manner predicted. I am not

suggesting the players are

working with altruism, they'll

take advantage of the situation

where the regulator leaves the

door open. A similar problem could arise in the United

States even though major banks

have credit risk issues. The

survivors are emerging quickly,

and notwithstanding there are

exposure to people like

Goldmans, and the regime has

been set to protect them, watch

the spot, get in here, use that

to advantage. That means

there's likely to be less competition in the global

finance industry when the new

world order eventually emerges. To other finance news,

despite Obama's talk of

economic progress there's

gloomy news from the US.

Industrial output fell for a

fifth month in a row, it's at

its lowest level in a decade.

Consumer prices fell in the

first annual drop in more than

a century, a prominent risk

analyst brands optimism analyst brands optimism about recovery as recovery as delusional. UBS

plans to cut 9,000 jobs in an

attempt to control costs. The

bank says it lost about 2.4

billion in the first quarter of

the year. Let's look at the

figures. Stocks trading with

mixed mixed results:

In a few minutes Vanessa

O'Hanlon with a look at the

weather. Ahead a review of the

newspapers, and this morning

our reviewer is Barrie Cassidy,

the presenter of Insiders, and

Offsiders. With sport here Offsiders. With sport here is

Paul Kennedy. Good morning, the

future of one of Australia's best performed cricketers looks

bleak. It's been a sharp

decline for Brett Lee in the

past 12 months, a year ago he

was the Allan Border Medallist.

He's been ruled out of the

one-day tour of Pakistan, he

had ankle Surrey in January,

he's not fit to go leaving -

surgery in January, he's not

fit to go. Johan Botha was once

again charged with illegal

action. The man who captained

the Proteas against Australia

over summer was reported for

chuck engine a Test debut in

2006. He maintains he's

straightened his elbow

problems, but was reported

after the one-dayer against

Australia this week and will be

subjected to strange looking

tests. Zimbabwean tests. Zimbabwean cricketer

Andy Flower has been given the

task of beating Australia in

the Ashes as coach of England,

this is what he said. When I

went on the West Indian tour, I

didn't know if I wanted to

apply for this job. Halfway

through I made my mind up that

I did. I wanted to do it. I'm

ambitious for England cricket,

I'm honoured to begin the

position. So I believe the last

three months will stand me three months will stand me in

good stead, yes. I think I'm

honest. And open. I'd like to

see an ethos of improvement. We

are carrying on the hard work,

we'll take it forward, working

harder. The world's biggest

tennis stars begin well at tennis stars begin well at the

Monte Carlo Masters, on his

honeymoon, playing his first

match on clay, Roger Federer

breezed past Andreas Seppi,

6-4, 6-4, still trying to win a

first title of the year. Rafael

Nadal, King of clay Nadal, King of clay beat Juan

Ignacio Chela 6-2, 6-3 and has

been 134 of his past 138

matches on that

matches on that surface. UEFA Champions League finals

continuing, Arsenal leading

Villareal 2-0, 3-1 on

aggregate. Manchester United

ahead of Porto on aggregate

leading 1-0, the scorer the

captain of Portugal.

How about that, how many

players in world football would

dare to try that. Perfect. He

got his weight behind it, hit

it the way he wanted to hit

it. We'll bring you up to date

with those - both important

quarter finals in the next half

hour, they'll be over by hour, they'll be over by then,

I'll have a picture of who is

in the semifinals of the UEFA

champions. ABC News Breakfast

can be watched live on the web

from anywhere. Here is Vanessa

O'Hanlon with the O'Hanlon with the weather.

There were reports of damage

around Melbourne yesterday with

the heavy winds, it was messy

in Tasmania, that's going to

continue in Tasmania

today. That's right. Yesterday

heavy snow fell over the

Highlands, the snow Highlands, the snow restricted

to the highest peaks, the wind

gusts for some coastal and

highland's regions spected to

exceed 100km/h, because of a

front not as severe as yesterday, but showers over

Tasmania wr, and coastal Tasmania wr, and coastal parts of the South Australia and

Victoria. The high keeping the

southern interior clear and

cloud along a trough in the

west causing storms along

inland WA, the cloud driven

across the far south-east by

the strengthening south-westerlies, and south-westerlies, and cloud

over the northern tropics

carrying a few storms, as we

head around the states, in

Queensland most of the Eastern

district have a few district have a few isolated

showers for the north and

north-east. Afternoon and

evening thunderstorms as well.

NSW - the high keeping most of

the state dry up until the

weekend. Early morning fog in

the north-east and frost on the north-east and frost on the

Southern Tablelands. Victoria - cloudy, isolated showers for

the south-west ranges, frosty the south-west ranges,

start for the north and Easter

head of a sunny day. Tasmania -

wet, scattered showers about

the west and north increasing

to rain, isolated showers for

the rest of the state. South

Australia -ist laid showers

developing south of Port

developing south of Port

plingon, Adelaide to Keith. Scattered over the

south-west. WA - isolated

showers and thunderstorms for

southern interior, northern

parts of the United Kingdom in

the north, showers and storms

about the Gascoyne. about the Gascoyne. Showers

over the top end. Ahead to

tomorrow: See you in half an

hour.

Let's look at the top story -

the Government's preparing for

another senate showdown when it

reintroduces its alcopops tax

legislation next month. The

plan was rejected by the senate

in March. Now one of its

in March. Now one of its key

opponents Senator Steve

Fielding looks set to block the

tax again. The Deputy Prime

Minister Julia Gillard denies

the Government's trying to

create a deadlock. We believe

this legislation is right. We

believe the evidence shows that

for the time period this tax

has been in operation, and the

price of alcopops has been

higher, that you can see a

reduction overall in alcohol

usage I monks the groups we are

most concerned B the strategy of Malcolm Turnbull and

of Malcolm Turnbull and his

Liberal opposition would have

us on is one where the price of

alcopops comes down. Well, we

aren't going to stand by and

wast the price of alcopops -

watch the price of alcopops

come down. I think the

Australian public would laugh

in fe went to the expense of

having - at them if they having - at them if they went

to the expense of having an

election for the sake of one

bill. This measure was not

working, it was turning people

off the issue of tackling binge

drinking issues. Senator Steve

Fielding speaking. What do you

think the Government is up to

with a reintroduction. Pops or

legislationle send an email to:

In other news - 49 asylum

seekers intercepted off the

coast of the WA are on their

way to Christmas Island, the

sixth arrival in Australian waters, Home Affairs waters, Home Affairs Minister

Bob Debus says Australia's

numbers are lower than in other

parts of the world. He's been

in Bali for a regional forum on

combatting people smuggling. A

French warship tap tours 11

pirates off the coast of -

captures 11 pirsates after a

failed attack on an American

ship. The crew of the 'Liberty

Sun' outmanoeuvred attackers. Pirate commander Abdi Garad

says the attack on that ship

was an act of revenge, not an

attempt to extract a

ransom. Grief and anger mark a

memorial service for 96 soccer

fans who died in Britain's

worst soccer Stadium disaster,

thousands were at Anfield for

the 20 year commemoration of

the Hillsborough tragedy, they

were united for a 2 minute

silence but a Government

Minister speak was heckled by

those angry no-one was held to act. The Chairman of act. The Chairman of the

Pacific Island Forum condemns

the interim Government in Fiji,

saying they'll be probably

expelled from the expelled from the organisation,

Toke Talagi says the Fijian

people are made victims. Fiji's

economy took a hit, the credit

rating downgrade and the dollar

devalid ud by 20%. One of the

Tamil demonstrators protesting

in Canberra has been taken to

hospital. The 27-year-old has

been on a 4-day hunger strike.

Members of Australia's Tamil

community want the Federal

Government to push for a

ceasefire between Tam ills. A

similar process in Canada sou

two taken to hospital. In

Britain, 30,000 stood in

silence to remember the '96

football fans who died in

Britain's worst stadium

disaster, crushed to death

during an FA Cup semifinal

match at Hillsborough in Sheffield. Richard Bilton

reports, emotions ran high in

Liverpool, the city where all

the dead came from. This is a

house and family where what

happened at Hillsborough never

goes away. 20 years ago Mary

Corrigan watched her eldest son

Keith leave here for a football

match. She never saw him

again. You never will walk

alone, son. We are with

alone, son. We are with you.

You are with us. Today was

important for the Corrigans,

and all those whose lives and all those whose lives were

change indeed an afternoon. I

can remember more of that day

than what I did last week,

yesterday. Every minute is

ingrained in my head. It will

be. It destroyed us, destroyed

us. Broke my heart. My will

blew up that day. It was a

semifinal in the sunshine. Mary's son and Liverpool Mary's son and Liverpool fans

were in this end of the ground.

These steel pens were These steel pens were packed

and then a fatal decision, the

police decided to open an exit

gate to let in yet more people.

2.5 minutes after the match

they came over the top of the

fence, police tried to hold

them back, at the moment it is

simple mayhem. That radio

commentator didn't know what

was happening, the Taylor

report said police organisation

was to blame. Only one

ambulance allowed on the pitch

as 96 people died. So this

afternoon people came queued like it

... viable on a global scale

for at least 20 years, if at

all. But scientists say the

world has less than a decade to

slash emissions to avoid

dangerous climate change. We

are being sold a pup here, if

you look at Treasury's

modelling, they are telling us

this technology won't be this technology won't be viable

until 2033. We have scientists

like James Hanssen telling us

the world can't afford to burn

coal the way we are for 10

years? In Australia it's

called new generation coal,

boasting commitments from the

Federal and State Governments

and industry of $2.5 billion

over 10 years, including for

pilot projects like this one in

Victoria's otway ranges,

testing whether CO2 can be

stored safely underground. We

have to make this a success as

nation. The Federal Government

is pressing industry for

biggest demonstration projects

to be done faster, two of the

biggest pilot projects, one run

by santo, and another by Rio

Tinto and BP have been

suspended. As long as we tell

ourselves that we are about to

invent clean coal we come up

with excuses for failing to

invest in R&D or renewables,

and in the rapid roll out of

renewables and failing to

recognise what an urgent change

we face, the promise of the

potential of clean coal tap

tours the political

imagination, unfortunately the

engen ears and scientists don't

seem to follow through. That

report by Margot O'Neill. Last

week the United States Defence

Secretary Robert Gates

announced a shake-up of

America's military forces. The

effect of the changes will be

seismic, with military programs

slashed, and some others bolstered. Ross Bray reports.

In is the American military

machines in action. It's able

to project power around the

globe, it's a formidable force,

costing a bomb to maintain. How

big and for how long US

military power will remain like

this is now the question. We

are witnessing a global power are witnessing a global

shift right now, and this shift right now, and this is

sort of the canary in the

coalmine of that shift. America

cannot afford to live on the

cheap and spending up big.

That's the bottom line. Dr Adam

Cobb Cobb is Professor of

International Relation at the

US marine staff college in

washed. He says America's de -

Washington, he says America's

declining economy and the wars

the United States have been

involved in over the past

decade is driving the

change. The United States is no

longer a super power, it could

be argued, if you set aside the

issue of nuclear weapons, it

will have to make choices like

everyone else has to make

choices into the future,

adopting small wars into the adopting small wars into the overall structure of overall structure of the

defence Budget is a first. It's

plain recognition of what has

been going on since 2001, but

it signals that the future of

warfare may not be what those

with who are allied with

secretary Rumsfeld saw, which

is big wars, alla World War II.

US Defence Secretary Gates is

cutting big spending high tech

high end programs such as

airborne laser aircraft, stalth

destroyers and missile systems.

More controversially the F-22

Raptor program will end,

regarded as the best fighter in

the world it was designed for

air superiorority against a foe

like Russia or China, they cost

$143 million per plane. The new

move takes the spending away

from hypothetical large-scale

future wars to better prepare

for the type of wars the US is

fighting now, such as in

Afghanistan and Iraq. Smaller

wars that allow America's foes

advantage rather than taking on

the full might of the US armed

forces, the new look US military, assuming the changes

past the senate will spend past the senate will spend more

an troop numbers, more use of

intelligence gathering predator and unmanned drones,

helicopters, and smaller ships

better suited to shallow

coastal water operations.

coastal water operations. The

Joint Strike Fighter, the F 35

to replace the expense ive F-22

Raptor. There was an increasing

frustration within the previous

administration as well as this

one that the military was

always thinking about tomorrow,

and the wars it was fighting

today were coming in second

place. Dr Andrew Davies is a

program director at the

Australian strategic policy

institute in Canberra. Dr

Davies says with a $600 billion

Budget the US can afford a big

war and smaller conflicts. The

new strategy is a matter of

emphasis, and will a

repercussions for US allies, he

says economic power and

military power are linked,

America won't be the dominant

economic power in the future.

That fact again puts China

centre stage. The ability of a

country like China to control

the immediate environs happen

sooner rather than later. What

will happen over time is the

ability of China to control

areas at greater distances areas at greater distances from

the Chinese mainland increases,

so the US and China will have

to reach a new accommodation.

The period that we have seen

since the end of World War II

is coming to an end. What America's strategic direction

will do is put pressure on

America's allies to fund programs and assist America

where needed. I think one of

the things we'll see is the US

asking allies to do more. We

have seen that with Japan over

the last few years, the US made

calls on the Japanese to do

more for their own security, it

wouldn't be surprising if we

see them asking more of Europe

and countries like Australia as

well. Countries around the

world, Europe, Asia, will have

to look at their circumstances

and question to what extent

have they consciously or

subconscious ly relied on

America to step in if something terrible happened terrible happened and

re-examine where they stand in

the world, how many they can

afford. For Australia, the

country labelled as America's

Deputy Deputy sheriff...

..it's going to put this

country delicately between a

slowly declining friend and

rapidly emerging and trading

partner China. No doubt

something the political and

defence plarns of this country

are grappling - planners of

this country are grappling

W Australia and US alliance

will throw up policy struggles.

We'll have to think hard about

what it means for us to be a

country located in Asia,

essentially, when the

cornerstone of our defence

policy for 60 years as been an

alliance with the United

States, which will need to

creed ground in the area. This

is a change in the way is a change in the way the

United States military is doing

its business, it will have

ramifications for allies into

the future. You are the future. You are watching

ABC News Breakfast, let's look

at the top stories - at the top stories - the Federal Government prepares for

another senate showdown when it

reintroduces the alcopops

legislation next month, the Deputy Prime Minister Julia Gillard denies the Government

is trying to trigger a double

dissolution election. A

boatload of asylum seekers

intercepted off the coast of

the WA, sent to Christmas

Island, the sixth arrive in

Australian waters this year. A

French warship captures 11

pirates off the coast of Kenya,

a failed attack nearby on a US flagship was an act of revenge.

Now for a look at the national

papers, we are joined by the

presenter of Insiders, and

Offsiders, Barrie Cassidy.

Alcopops, it's a Groundhog Day,

it goes around. It does, a

clever headline clever headline on Sydney

Morning Herald, is, "Same again

thanks", it is. Nice. It's the

same legislation, they are not

attempting in this case to

rewrite it, trying to make it

attractive to those voting

against it, it raises a

question what is the question what is the motive.

The Financial Times alcohol

pops tax shapes as poll

trigger, I don't think it's

about a double dissolution at

all. It will sit as a shot

across the bows to Malcolm

Turnbull. It's about how they

want to portray Malcolm

Turnbull. He said no to the

stimulus, he said no to high

speed broadband, no to the

Ruddbank, no to Ruddbank, no to the Emissions

Trading Scheme, what they want

to do is portray him as this is

Turnbull's tendancy to say no

to everything they put up. Is

that what every Government that what every Government does

in relation to Opposition leaders, it's tough in

Opposition, you have to say no,

providing alternatives. There's

a different climate. There's a different climate. There's a global financial crisis r

there's a sense of urgency, governments need to do

something, they have him on the

rocks, Bill Hayden had a

reputation for being negative,

that's what they are trying to

do wr Malcolm Turnbull. Remember what Kevin Rudd did in his early days of leadership

as the Opposition, he

neutralised Issue after issue

saying it we'll sign up for

that". The issue was gone,

press moved up. He knocked them

on the head. Yes, we like

it. It knocked everyone off

their game. They didn't expect

politics to go that wayle

another thing on the issue, the

Government as a gag squad,

young staffers. Sorry. A gag

squad, writing lines for the

Ministers to draw laughs Ministers to draw laughs in

Question Time. They are to blame. Paid hundreds of

thousands. According to Matthew

Franklin they are trying to

come up with a name for Malcolm

Turnbull. The best they've come

up with is the abombinable no

man. Back to the man. Back to the drawing point

of order. If it was Dr Nelson,

it would be Dr No. It doesn't work for Malcolm work for Malcolm Turnbull. Can

you imagine the you imagine the discussions

around the table. You'd hope

it doesn't take up too much

time. Unless they are former

employees of John Stewart's

daily show, I don't want to

know. The biggest merging big

political story is the rising

tide of boat people as The

Australian scribes it. 49

yesterday, six for the year. I

think what is interesting about

this is of course it's going to

be a debate about the softening

of John Howard's policy whether

it led to this. There are interesting statistics in the

Australian. How many asylum seeker applications were seeker applications were there

in Australia last year, in Australia last year, 4,750,

how many came bay boat, 179. So

how are they getting in, by

air. So the number coming in by

boat is lk insignificant in

terms of the number coming into

Australia by whatever means and

applying for asylum. That's

always been the case, the

majority came in via the

airports, had passports stamped

and overstayed. Australia, by

world standards, we only report

what happens in Australia, by

world standards, we are not at

the pointy end of this. I saw a

figure in relation to that,

when the asylum seeker on boat

problem was at its hig, there

were 1,000 or 12,000, compared

to other parts of the world,

it's miniscule Those figures

are there to demonstrate that.

Bigger issues in Melbourne with

the problems of the nightclubs,

and Robert Doyle, and Robert Doyle, former

Opposition Leader, Lord Mayor

met with the industry and came

up with an idea of yellow and

red cards when things are out

of control in the nightclubs.

Yellow cards handed to people -

they want to give a warning to

them, we think it's a minor

offence, watch yourself and red

if they need to be thrown out.

They say it works in Surrey in

England where it's been

trailled. I can't imagine how

if it gets to that point where

somebody needs to be thrown

out. Handing them a red card is

more effective than picking

them up by the scruff of the

neck. The other strange part of

that suggestion was he wanted

the pubs and clubs to inform

each other of the red cards.

What you are supposed to do is

ring the pub down the road ring the pub down the road and

say we've thrown out this guy,

we've given him the red card,

don't let him in, upon which

the pub says, "What does he

look like?" You know, so big.

T-shirt Carrying a red

card. Part of the proposals is

to have ID cards with scanned

identification numbers on them,

so they can keep particular

people out of clubs. You think

if there were people in those

situations, they'd have the

nous have several cards with several different numbers. That's the way it

works in England, they have special cards, once you have

been thrown out. It identifies

you when you turn up at the

next place. What does the

so-called responsible service

of alcohol policy mean that's

in place if it gets to that,

it's about how much they are

served how often and how the

pubs and clubs want to keep

them in, getting them boozed

up. Mel Gibson, did you notice

overnight the story about Mel

and the mystery woman has

become Mel and the mystery

women. He gets around. I am not

sure. Based on this story I

wouldn't jump to the

conclusion. Did you notice

something odd about the women

involved. They are called

Oxana. Yes. If we get the

picture up, I don't know if you

can hold it up again. That

page. The tall brunette is

Oxana, the one in the middle

playing the piano wear an

evening gown is Oxana, and then

there's Oxana, who is there

wearing a little cut-off shorts

They are Russian pop singers,

the third is identified because

they say a woman in a

photograph in Costa ricka

doesn't like like either,

raising the possibility of a

third. The first is identified

by Internet cheater and end up

with the same name and

nationality. You get the

feeling the media is feeling the media is confused.

They are desperate to track

down the real story. Has Mel

spoken about any of this. Not

that I have seen. Only they

want to keep it private. It's

working for them. It will

happen. Good to have you on

board. Thank you. A reminder,

you can watch all. Breakfast

streamed live every morning.

Now with sport here is Paul

Kennedy. The future of one of

Australia's best performed

crickers looks bleak, it's been

a sharp decline for Brett Lee,

a year ago he was named the

Alan border medallist. He's

been ruled out of the one-day tournament against Pakistan

because of injury, he had ankle

surgery in January, leaving him

without a chance to prove himself himself before the Ashes tour. The world's biggest tennis stars begin well at stars begin well at the Monte Carlo Masters on his honeymoon, playing a first match on playing a first match on clay, Roger Federer breezed Roger Federer breezed past Andreas Seppi, 6-4, 6-4, the Swiss champion trying to win a first title of the year. And the

beat Juan Ignacio Chela, 6-2, 6-3, and has won 134 out of his past 138 matches on this surface. He's a genius. He is. After weeks of uncertainy, and a court hearing in and a court hearing in Paris, Formula 1 boss Jenson Bhutton car is - wait for it - legal. Brawn has gone both races but a question mark remained over the rear diffusers, which I don't know what they are. After eight hours of evidence hours of evidence the International Court of Appeal ruled the cars complied with regulations. What a whole lot of trouble to go to to get the ruling Is that the hired foil - the thing at the back keeping the car down so it doesn't launch. Yes, but I don't launch. Yes, but I don't know what the controversy was, over teams saying it wasn't

legal. You mentioned earlier

briefly in your news bulletins

that the Hillsborough 96 dead

were remembered last night.

There's amazing pictures out of

Liverpool from last night. They

released 96 balloons there, and

25,000 people were at 25,000 people were at anfield.

There was controversy when There was controversy when one of the

of the policitians was heckled.

Mainly it was a remembering of

the 96 people who died. It's

hard to believe it was so long

ago. Those pictures that you

saw when it initially happened,

you just never forget those

images. These are powerful.

They rung the Church bells 96

times. A lot happened since.

Some of the fans were disappointed that

disappointed that nobody has

been held to account for the

tragedy That seems to be key to

the ongoing anger, and we

showed earlier the politician

who spoke at that service being

heckled by the Liverpool crowd.

Because the approach and the

line taken by local police at

the time, up to this day was

that the issue was caused that the issue was caused by

drunken Liverpool fans, they

arrived late and crushed forward causing the

forward causing the crush. That

was shown in an investigation

to be absolutely not true, that

the police were at fault, and

the police have been - never

really taken responsibility,

it's caused an ongoing waves of

anger by people that lost

children and loved ones at the event. If nobody had event. If nobody had done

anything wrong, everything was

OK and it was the fans fault,

why have they changed

why have they changed stadium regulations, wholesale.

Everything is different now,

it's more expensive to go to

the football, but people say

safety has no price. Heckled is

an understatement in terms an understatement in terms of

what happened. Hundreds,

thousands of the supporters

yelled in unison. It was well

orchestrated. It's been a long

time, they've been campaigning

for a long time for someone to

be held to account account.

Liverpool not fittingly lost to Chelsea yesterday, they are Chelsea yesterday, they are out

of the UEFA of the UEFA champions,

Manchester United beat Porto

1-0, they go through to the

semifinals, and Arsenal winning

3-0 beating Villareal. Arsenal

playing Man U and Chelsea

Barcelona. Here is Vanessa

O'Hanlon with the

O'Hanlon with the weather. With

all the winds that we had yesterday throughout Victoria

and Tasmania, Wilsons Prom in

Victoria recorded wind gusts of

up to 159km/h. North-westerly

wind strengthening ahead of a

front crossing the south-east.

Exceeding 100km/h, causing

showers over Tasmania showers over Tasmania and coastle parts of South

Australia and Victoria. The

Australia and Victoria. The

high keeping the southern

mainland clear, cloud along the

trough in WA causing storms for

inland areas. Loud is being

driven across the far

south-east by - cloud is south-east by - cloud is driven

across the far south-east by

westerlies, cloud over the

tropics, unstable air causing

storms over the territory.

Queensland - eastern districts

with isolated showers for the

north and north-east, north and north-east, afternoon and even thunderstorms, NSW

and even thunderstorms, NSW -

the high keeping the state dry

until the weekend. Early

morning fog in the north-east,

frost on the tablelands.

Victoria - cloudy, isolated showers for the south-west ranges, frosty for the north

and east ahead of a sunny and east ahead of a sunny day.

Tasmania - wet, scattered

showers about the west and

north increasing to rain by the

afternoon, isolated showers for

the rest of the state. South

Australia - isolated

Australia - isolated showers

developing south of Port

Lincoln Adelaide to Keith. Scattered over the lower

south-east. In WA - areas of

rain over the central interior,

isolated showers and storms

expected for the southern

interior and northern parts of

Eucla. North - showers and

storms, isolated showers over

the top end, Alice Springs -

cloudy, lying rain. Ahead to tomorrow:

The sunshining in Perth.

Still ahead - we'll speak to Opposition health

Opposition health spokesman Peter Dutton about the alcopops

bill - yes, it's back. We'll be talking to the Health talking to the Health Minister,

Nicola Roxon about that, Nicola Roxon about that, about

what the motive

what the motive is behind the introduction of the same

legislation, and in the next

hour we'll talk to a crocodile

researcher about plan toss

allow trophy hunters into the

Territory to kill a

croc. Coming up after the break.

The Federal Government

prepares for a new alcopops tax

battle. Is it a trigger for a

double dissolution? Another

boatload of asylum seekers

intercepted near Ashmore Reef, the Federal Government says

Australia's arrival numbers

could be worse. Somali pirates

launch a revenge assault on a

us-flagged ship off the coast

of Africa, a French warship

captures 11 from a pirate

mothership. A niggling ankle

injury rules out fast Bowler

Brett Lee from the series against Pakistan.

This Program is Captioned Live.

Good morning, it's Thursday,

16 April, I'm Joe O'Brien. 16 April, I'm Joe O'Brien. I'm

Virginia Trioli, the top story

on ABC News Breakfast, the

Deputy Prime Minister Julia

Gillard has denied the Rudd

Government is trying to trigger

a double dissolution with a failed alcopops failed alcopops tax. The

Federal Government plans to

reintroduce the legislation

next month. The 70% tax rise

was rejected by the senate in

March. A key opponent March. A key opponent Senator

Steve Fielding looks set to

block the tax again. Ms Gillard

says the Government is not

trying to create a deadlock between between the House of

Representatives and the Senate

but the aim is to tackle

Australia's binge drinking

problem. We believe the

election is right, that the

evidence shows for the time

period this tax has been in

operation, and the price of alcopops has therefore been

higher that, you can see a

reduction overall in alcohol

usage amongst the groups we are

most concerned about. The

strategy Mr Turnbull and strategy Mr Turnbull and his

Liberal Party Opposition would

have us on is one where have us on is one where the

price of alcopops comes down.

Well, we aren't going to stand

by and watch the price of

alcopops come down so sweet

sugary drinks are cheaper. I

think the Australian public

would laugh at them if they

went to the expense of an

election because they couldn't election because they couldn't

get a tax hike on an alcohol

problem. The Australian public

would laugh, let them try. You

talk to people in the street.

This measure was in the work,

it turned people off the issue

of tackling Australia's binge

drinking issue. Senator Steve

Fielding. For more Hayden

Cooper joins us from Canberra.

Good morning, as Steve Fielding

says, the Australian public

might laugh at the Government

for trying to trigger an

election over this legislation,

but at least the Government

might get rid of Steve Fielding

if they did so. It must be

tempting to them. I think it

would be a temptation, and the

trigger might be there nonetheless provided nonetheless provided the

legislation is knocked back at

the end of June or after that.

But still, I think it should be

considered unlikely that

there'd be a double there'd be a double dissolution

over the alcopops tax. I think

a much more likely scenario

would be a significant piece would be a significant piece of

legislation like emissions

trading causing that sort of

trigger. For the moment this is

more about politics, and an

effort to launch a new and

fresh attack on Malcolm

Turnbull, and accuse him of

resisting not only this piece of legislation, but many

others. The Government must

feel, I guess perhaps they've

taken private polling on this,

that there is a perception out

there that Malcolm Turnbull is

the constant naysayers, he

seems to have said no to

virtually everything the

Government's lobbed Government's lobbed up. Yes,

there are a few other measures,

the Ruddbank is one which will

come up, Emissions Trading

Scheme, the Opposition doesn't

look like supporting, and

alcopops, so