Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Disclaimer: The Parliamentary Library does not warrant the accuracy of closed captions. These are derived automatically from the broadcaster's signal.
ABC News Breakfast -

View in ParlView

(generated from captions) stage. Dame Joan Sutherland

dies in Switzerland. Exchanging views on what might be possible. Merciless savagery,

an inquest into the July 7

bombings begins in London. I'm I'm wa

lead Ali. The top story on ABC

News breakfast, she was known

Now at the world over as La Stupenda.

Now at the age of 83 she has

died As well as being hailed as

one of the 20th century's

greatest opera singers, she was

credited with putting opera on

the map in her own country.

Anne-Marie Nicholson looks back

at her remarkable life. She at her remarkable

thrilled opera audiences in the

world's great concert halls.

She was born in Sydney to

Scottish parents. Her father

died when she was just six

singer years old. Her mother was a

daughter to embrace music. Joan 'Sunday Telegraph' Joan 'Sunday Telegraph' irlpd's strongest influence, though,

was conductor Richard boning,

to become her life partner.

Winning an aha in 1951 was a

turning point. She pursued her

career overseas. She won a

at cough ent garden. She place at the royal Opera House

lacked stage skills and sophistication, while her voice

was stunning. I was fairly

stiff on the stage. In 1952,

Joan Sutherland sang her first Joan Sutherland sang

leading role at Covent Garden,

Amelia in the masked ball.

Seven years later she soored to

starredom with an acclaimed

performance as Lucia. The role

became her signature. It was at a the Italian s dubbed her La Stupenda. Soon she was

embraced by the Americans,

beginning a decade's long association with metropolitan

opera in New York. In 1961,

Dame Joan was named the

Australian of the year, but it

was another four years before

she returned home to perform.

Some were upset it had taken

her so long. Why has it been

so long since you've returned

to Australia. She performed to sellout concerts around the country with a known Italian tenor Luciano

Pavarotti. Dame Joan won many

royal favours. Her loyaltiesy

to the crown was fierce and

during the Republican

during the Republican debate in

the mid-90s, she sided with

Australians for a

constitutional monarchy. Her

where she complained about address to a flag-waefg lunch

applying for

applying for an Australian

passport raised hackles. It

also upsets me it's such a dam

job to get an Australian

passport, you have to go to the

post office and be interviewed by a Chinese or an Indian. She

spent her final years at home

in Switzerland. She returned

to Australia for special

occasions. Her last Australian

performance was in 1990. At

the age of 63, her farewell song at

song at the Sydney Opera House

was home sweet home. Her son

Adam, an outstanding legacy of

opera music and performances.

In other news this morning,

Immigration Minister Chris

Bowen will Bowen will meet Jose

Ramos-Horta. Mr Bowen arrived it will be the first round of in east

talks now with the East

Timorese government about a

proposed regional processing

centre there. Dr Ramos-Horta

has said any in East Timor would be has said any processing centre

temporary and he wants guarantees asylum seekers would

Regional leave after three years.

Regional communities are

gearing up for a fight as

public consultations on the

Murray-Darling Basin plan begin

today. Shepparton in central

northern Victoria has been

chosen for the first round of

talks. Irrigators say plans to slash

could destroy their lively

hoodz. The government hopes

the plan. Australian sprinter

Pearson has bounced back to claim gold claim gold in the hurdles

final. She put her recent dis

qualification from the 100

sprint behind her, with a

resounding win overnight, and

Steve Hooker won his second

consecutive Commonwealth gold

in the pole vote. Australia

has 64 gold medals, 40 silver

and 39 bronze. An inquest into

the July 7 London bombings has

been told the victims were murdered in acts of merciless

savagery. The first day of the inquest heard the attacks may

have been planned for the

previous days, but they previous days, but they were

The hearing will abandoned at the last minute.

each victim decided. It's The hearing will examine how

expected to last five months.

Israel has offered to renew a

partial freeze on settlement building if the Palestinians

recognise Israel as the Jewish

State. A Palestinian spokesman has rejected that condition.

Israel is under pressure to

renew its partial freeze on

building in the occupied west bank. The Palestinians are

threatening to walk away from

not review newed Chris Bowen

says he's had positive signals about setting up a regional processing centre in the

country. Mr Bowan arrived in the capital, Dilly, yesterday

afternoon and will meet with president Jose Ramos-Horta

today. I'll be discussing with president Ramos-Horta the

possible models for a regional

processing framework and consulting with him about the processing framework and also

views of the government as to which models would to progress. So certainly it will be a good two-weigh conversation exchanging views

on what might be possible from

Australia's point of view and also of course also of course from East

Timor's point of view. For

more, Melissa Clarke joins us

now from Canberra. Melissa,

Chris Bowen has his work cut

out for him in East Timor. Can

we expect him to return with

anything tangible? There's

expectation he'll come back

from the trip with something he

can talk about or point to, but

he's certainly been trying to

play down those expectations.

A lot of what he has said

publicly about this trip is they're going to be looking at

different options for regional

frameworks and progressing

talks already in place through

the Bali process. When you get discussion from politicians about options for regional frameworks, I think that may

well fall into Dom Watson's

definition of weasel words when

you hear terms like

"framework". This is about

trying to get everyone on the

same page. That's why the trip

for Chris Bowen will be not

just East Timor but also

heading off to Jakarta, which

he'll do

off to quala lum pur after

that. He'll be looking to get positive signals from East

Timor about the potential for a

processing centre for refugees there. there. He'd be

he's hearing so far, even though Jose Ramos-Horta has

laid down the law in some

respects, saying that he would only accept a temporary

processing centre, it would

cost 30 million to set up and

run each year. East Timor is

now talking in specifics now talking in specifics in

details, it's starting to set down the something could be negotiated.

So from the government's point

of view, although it might be

tough talk from East Timor,

it's talk in the direction

they're hoping for. We won't

expect them to come back with

something signed, sealed and

delivered, but there should be

progress for Chris Bowen on the issue out of the trip. It

raises the question, though,

how long do you think the government has before there's n expectation it will deliver

something on this? Well, Chris

Bowen is more likely to have to

deliver something domestically

before being able to deliver

this international option,

because, short-term measures that he

announced shortly after

becoming immigration Minister

really only boosted the number

of available beds to detain

asylum seekers by about 1,000

and the numbers are already

close to stretching point. He

has made it clear a number of

times that a more long-term solution isn't too far away,

but that may well be a domestic

solution, either a massive

expansion or a reopening of one

of the previous centres here,

rather than an international rather than an international

one. If he can make enough

headway on the domestic front,

that may give him more internationally, but if he

comes up against barriers at

home for any long-term domestic

solutions, that will put the

pressure on speeding up international solution. Murray-Darling consultations begin today.

Could be fireworks. Do you

think it's a case of people with pre-determined positions

going to put their case to the

Government? Look, there will

certainly be people attending

some of these consultation

forums who, no matter what they

hear, will not want to see any

water taken out of irrigation There's also likely to be some people who won't be satisfied

with the amount of water being

returned to the river from the

other side as well. You're

always going to have a quota at

either end of

made up their mind about how

they feel about the issue.

What What the Murray-Darling Basin

Authority will need to do when

it visits all of the different

regional communities, they're

going to 23 all up, Shepparton

today is the first one, they

first ly need to explain the

guide to the plan that they've

put out, because there's

certainly some misinformation

about. We've heard some farmers and that they don't want to give 40% that they don't want to give up

40% or 30% or 20% or what has been allocated for their

region, and that would mean they would have to cut down

their plantings, whereas the

government has made government has made it explicitly clear time and again

it will only be purchasing water from willing sellers,

it's not as if every farmer in

each region has to sacrifice

this percentage of their water.

In the first instance, the Murray-Darling Basin Authority

needs to make sure what it's

proposing is clear, and second

of all, it needs to set the

groundwork for where the negotiations will come, because

this is only the guide to the be a final draft and be a final draft and sign-off by the Minister to go through parliament. There's plenty of

room for communities that have

concerns to negotiate for

compensation for economic and social impacts. for them to negotiate for the

Government to spend more investing

investing in irrigation infrastructure to save water rather than directly purchasing

back water and seeing some

farms close down. When it gets

down to the real business end

of things, it's over those

topics that will become the

crucial ones. We'll speak to

the mayor of Shepparton Geoff Robertson later

Melissa Clarke in Canberra,

thanks very much. The inquest

into the London suicide

bombings of 7 July 2005 began

in London overnight. in London overnight. The attacks on the

the worst peacetime attacks to

take place in the city, take place in the city, killing

52 people. Chris pin Black is

the author of 7/7 the London bombs, bombs, former security adviser

to the government. He joins us

now. Good morning, thanks for

joining us. Good morning, nice

to talk to you. The point of

this particular inquest is to

examine the circumstances around every death place as a result of the

bombings. It seems, at least

from this distance, to have been

been driven largely by the need

of family relatives and members

to get a sense of into their particular

circumstances on that day.

Well, yes. I think it is

partly driven by the families. Obviously they want to know every circumstance of their own

who died but that's important

to them. It's also partly been

driven by this is the way we deal with these things.

English-speaking people, if people die in mysterious or sus

pishus circumstances, we have a

coroner, an inquest, sitting over the body. Actually,

although there's been a delay,

we're really going through our standard procedures. standard procedures. I think also the third thing driving it

is there is a suspicion that

maybe the lessons weren't fully

learned from the day either on

the intelligence side, which I

think will be dealt with at the

end of the inquest, or indeed

on the rescue side. There's

some questions as to whether,

even though we'd rehearsed the

procedures, did we do them as

well as we could have? I to get to those two points in a

moment. I guess it would seem,

it's almost a coronial inquest

one might expect coming so long

after the event. It surprises because there have

been court cases in relation to

the a cued of this bombing

before we even get to this

inquest. Well, I think there

are a couple of court cases. I

went to one at kingstone crown

court of men accused of being

connected to this plot. They

were eventually, after complicated things, acquitted.

You can't give a man a fair

trial if some other legal

process has come to a slightly different conclusion from the

one, the jury in those trials

would have come to. There has

been a delay. The problem, I think, with the whole thing is

that the information about what

actually happened on that day,

which is what an inquest is about, only came out in dribs

and drabs and some of it and drabs and some of it looks

as though it was spun pretty early to be different from the

way it turned out, the idea that

hadn't seen them before, the

idea some of the rescue

operations went swimming ly

when they didn't. I think

there's a national sense that

maybe we didn't confront the

issues early enough or honestly

enough. That's why I think

people are welcoming this five

years later So on the first day

of hearings, then, what has the

inquest been told? Well, it

has new facts. There have been

a lot of legal mum bow jumbo

leading up to this, if you have

been following it. There are new facts out today that people

won't have heard in public

before. A car carrying six men

left the bomb factory in Leeds

that day. that day. So we're beginning

to get an inkling that perhaps

the plot was bigger than

actually what we saw on the

streets of London. I mean, to

be honest, my view and in fact

it was the view, a lot of people the day after the

bombings if it was just the

suicide bombers involved in it,

I'm a Dutchmanment I think

that's another thing that we've never we didn't want to. We were

into community cohesion,

important after this. We

didn't want to sit down and

work out who else in work out who else in Leeds and other parts of the country

sympathised with it, turned a

blind eye to it or may actually have been part of the

plot. What do you know already,

Crispin Black, might be

revealed in the inquest about

the nature of security and

surveillance in Britain and

just how good or bad it might

be? Well, I hope - I'm pretty into any of the tricks of the trade that our intelligence

services use, and nor should

we. They're like card tricks.

Once our enemies understand how

we do it, it makes it much more

difficult to follow them in the

future. But what I do hope

will come out, if there are any little embarrassments in either

the way the communities that

produce these bombers behaved

or in the way the intelligence services interpreted their

warnings or in the way the

police and the rescue services

operated that day, lady justice hallet, who seems quite a

feisty lady, will allow them to

be brought out in public. The only way you'll only way you'll learn lessons, it's like alcoholics anonymous,

the first step is to realise perhaps you haven't performed

at a standard you'd like. It's

only after that you can start

to put things right, if God forbid we have a go Thanks very

much, Crispin Black. Now to the front pages of the newspapers

around the country, the

Australian reports that the latest news pol shows Tony Abbott's approval rating has dropped 9%age South-east

Queensland residents are expecting rain Drivers caught

by speed cameras given free

photos to shore up confidence

in the road camera in the road camera system The

Canberra Times says workers are

shying away from paid parking

in Barton. This has been a

community divider, this one.

The last area downtown Canberra

where you could park for free,

they've put in overhaul of industrial awards

has left hundreds of employers

unsure how much to pay their

staff. Westpac Bank has announced announced to boost women in

management roles The age says

the Victorian government struck

a deal with police to reveal

secret files on protestors before signing off on the State's desalination plant.

You can see they've managed to

get a photograph of dame Joan Sutherland. Daly telegraph

says the athlete who claimed Sally tested positive to a banned substance. Wow. Fertilitiy

rates are rising because career

women on high incomes

understand they can't delay motherhood. The mercury says

says the father of a baby boy

who died in 2008 his estranged

wife had confessed she smothered their son. The

Northern Territory news says

two 78 -year-old men had a

vicious brawl over a dog. The pooch the pensioners and the

punch-up, nothing like a little

bit of elit ration in the feedback on the stories we're

covering today, send your email

s. You can send text messages

to 0429996655. To talk about

the show online, we're on

Facebook and Twitter. A quick

look at the weather around the

country, Sydney can expect a

shower or two clearing today,

24, Melbourne a shower or two 24, Melbourne a shower or two

developing, 24, Brisbane a few

showers easing or as we've been

hearing, more of the deluge in

Queensland. For Perth, a sunny

day, 24 degrees Adelaide is

later, a top of 23, Hobart rain

developing, possibly thundery,

20. Canberra can expect fog,

then a shower or two, 21, and

Darwin has showers, afternoon

storm and 33 degrees on the

way. These are the top stories way. These are the top stories

on ABC News breakfast today.

Dame Joan Sutherland has died

at her familiaritily home in

Switzerland. She was 83. Dame

Joan is regarded as one of the

greatest opera singers of the

20 thd century. East Timor's president will president will meet Immigration

Minister Chris Bowen in Dilly today. plans for a regional processing

centre on East Timor. Dr Ramos-Horta said Ramos-Horta said any processing

centre must be temporary. An inquiry into the 7 July London

bombings has begun in the UK.

The inquest heard victims of

the attacks were murdered in

acts of merciless savagery. acts of merciless savagery. It also heard emergency services

struggled to cope when the

bombing struck London's underground rail network.

We'll show you live pictures

in Chile where an attempt to

rescue 33 miners trapped deep underground could begin in the

next 24 hours. A test of the rescue capsule rescue capsule has been successful, descending almost

the whole way down the 622

metre shaft. The men have been

trapped in the mine near the

top of Copiapo since a collapse

on 5 August. The BBC's Andrew Harding has this Harding has this report. A

makeshift curtain now hides the

tunnel entrance. Behind it,

think near s have finished welding

under 100 metres of steel

piping to reinforce the top

section. Spare tubes now taken

away to make space for this.

The slender torpedo known as

the Phoenix escape capsule. Especially designed, it's being

lowered on the sort of cable

used for ski lifts. Imagine

taking a lift 130 storeys straight down into the ground.

This is how it should work. After

After more testing, the Phoenix

will take a paramedic down the

shaft to the trapped miners.

The first man chosen to rescued will then be strapped

inside the capsule. He'll wear

a biometric belt around his

chest to monitor his vital

signs. On the slow journey up, he'll be in constant

communication with the surface,

have a special water-proof

suit, sunglasses to protect his

eyes after being in the dark

for two months and oxygen to

breathe. If the Phoenix gets

stuck, the bottom can be

separated and the miner winched

back down. This is the exact diameter of the rescue diameter of the rescue tunnel.

It will be quite a squeeze both

for the escape capsule and the miner inside, very clos tra

phobic. On the way up, the

tunnel itself curves at least

three times and passes through

empty chambers from the old

mine. The risks ahead really

are very substantial. But the

very latest news here is

encouraging. These pictures

are from an earlier trial, but

we've just heard the Phoenix

has made its very first full

test run unmanned, getting to

within just a few metres of the

trapped miners. In the camp

for the miners' families, a

long wait is nearly over. To

the markets now, the Dow steadied around 11,000 overnight on continued

speculation the federal reserve

is planning another boost for

the US economy. The Dow is up 9 points, the

9 points, the naz dak also rose

9. to the oil indices,

The Australian dollar is

buying 98 US cents, 70 Euro

cents and 62 pens sterling.

Now it's time for the sport

with Paul Kennedy. Australian hurdler Sally Pearson has put

the disappointment of the disappointment of last week's dis qualification behind

her to win gold in the pet

event. Steve Hooker also won. There was another weight

lifting gold medal as well. To

give us a wrap-up of what's

happened in the past 24 hours

in Delhi, here's Michael Rowland. A perfect start and a

dream run, Sally Pearson's

moment of Commonwealth Games

triumph finally arrived last

comprehensive fashion the final comprehensive night when she won in

of the women's 100 metres

hurdle event. After the race,

Pearson wept tears of joy and

relief, a stark contrast to the

tears of anguish we saw very

much on public display after

she was controversial ly

the disqualified from the final of

the women's 100 sprint final.

Also at the main stadium last night, Steve expected, took out the final of

the pole vault event, chalt enged in the early stages by

England's Stephen Lewis, but he notched up another notched up another gold medal,

victory a crowd favourite and famous

victory for him in that event.

Australia's rugby 7s side had a

rather mixed day yesterday. It

came up initially in its early

pool matches against Uganda and

Sri Lanka, not exactly big names in the world of

international rugby and the

Australians managed to wipe the

field with both of them, but

then the Australians came up

in the form of England, and against somebody their own size

England prevailed in what was a

tough encounter, winning 21

points to 19, but the

Australians still very much a

serious medal prospect in the

rugby. Now, Cahill rugby. Now, Cahill made, the

chairman of the Games

organising committee and quite

possibility the most unpopular

man in India is under mounting pressure over the poor crowd

sizes we're seeing. The latest

case in point is the sparse

turnout at the thrilling men's

road race final on Sunday that

saw Australia's Alan Davis including the triumph in saw Australia's Alan Davis including the likes triumph in a competitive including the likes of mark kaf

endish. There were sparse crowds along the route crowds along the route and

Games organisers hoped for bum

per crowds at one of Delhi's main shopping senors a short

distance from where I'm

standing. You could find a

Rajasthan rifle there and not

hit anybody. It wasn't a good

look, but he's now blaming the

media for a very poor crowd

turnout. Most of the

spectators were happy to see it on

on television and also there

was a news item that said canal

place had been ploked for all

people. That had an people. That had an impact on

the people. But the starting

point and finish point was are making improvements for the

marathon and marathon and cycling event Undoubtedly he's counting

the days until the Delhi Games are over. One of the

highlights today is the men's

hockey sfl that pits Australia against New Zealand. Will the

Australians triumph against

both the Kiwis and oppressive

Delhi midday heat? We'll find

out later today. That's all for now from Delhi. Michael

Rowland there and Virginia is Googling to see what a

Rajasthani rifle looks like.

We'll get back to you on that.

Usually the most unpopular man

in India is anyone who gets out

Sachin Tendulkar. He batted

and batted and batted

yesterday, made 191 not out and

it put India in a strong

position in that second position in that second Test,

5/435, just 30 oor so runs

behind the Australians. It's

flat deck and Sachin Tendulkar

took the most of it. Murali

Vijay also made a century in a

Let's look at some of the

highlights of day 3 of the Test highlights of day 3 of the Test in Bangalore. It's into the

crowd. takes him to 99. Huge

anticipation around the ground.

Didn't waste any time. Reaches

Reaches 100 with a 6. Reaches 100 with a 6. What a

magnificent innings this. His

49th 100 in test match cricket

and his 11th versus the

Aussies. test 100, he pumps

the air in delight. It's been

a long wait but it's well worth

it. He's batted with the

master for most of the time.

The finally the partnership has That is close, he's gone. And it's straight to Ben

Hilfenhaus. Tendulkar will march off the field on 191,

reached his 49th 1 o-0 in Test

match cricket today. It looks

good for a double 100, if not

more. Ricky Ponting, it's been

a long day in the field for the Australians. Certainly has

been, and Australia's bowling

attack doesn't look very potent at the at the moment. Whether it's the picture or not, Nathan Hauritz's figures are certainly

not impressive going into the

ashes series, which is not far

away now. There has been a positive doping test at the Commonwealth Games. The

Nigerian sprinter who won the

race was disqualified.

been tested positive to a

substance. There's been 900

tests, 750 have come back and

it's the only positive so far.

That's good news at That's good news at least I think it's par for think it's par for the course. Usually you have at least one

positive test. It would have

to be one of the most

contentious moments, to make things even more

complicated That race - maybe

people should forget about the

race. They should run it again. Most of them are still

there. Sally Pearson is

certainly smile now after the gold medal. last night, sorry to have a

half idea of this, but half idea of this, but some

commentary in relation to the positive

positive drug test and a person from her team saying the

extenuating circumstances around that substance

took would be explanation for

it. I remember thinking what,

since when do extenuating

circumstances - I was so tired,

so stressed, I simply had to

take drugs." It was a methyl

something. But there's always extenuating circumstances

around drug taking, isn't

there? Precisely. First of

all it didn't happen, the test is wrong, and then the extenuating circumstances. Yep,

yep, "My mother gave it to yep, "My mother gave it to me

", blah blah blah I think the

Shane waun defence is always a

good one. I wouldn't mind

looking at some of that cricket vision. I've been running the

Shane waun for captain of the

Australian side campaign for so

long now. No-one sends me

money to run the campaign. Captain of Rajasthan, where

they have rifles. ABC News

breakfast can be watched live

on the web from anywhere.

Visit the main website

you'll find a link to news 24

which is streamed live every

day. Vanessa O'han lan joins us

for the weather. On the

sunlight image, a cloud band coming down from the north-west

tropics across South Australia

and into Tasmania. It's

drawing moisture into a trough

and increasing storms. Over in

the north-east, fresh

showers, mainly in Queensland,

but much lighter than they have

been. A high over the Tasman

is weakening, so we should see

the rain system ease over Queensland and New South Wales,

but strong winds will bring

rain to Queensland's Central

Coast, but more heavy rain is

on the way for the end of the

week. In Queensland today, the

rain will extend further north

to be about Bowan today, afternoon showers and storms in

the northern tropics. New

South Wales, isolated showers

about the far north-east, later

in the day showers will develop

across the south. Victoria

this morning scattered showers

over the north and near the

south-west coast, they'll

spread across the State during the afternoon and evening. For Tasmania, morning the north, rain will develop

this morning in the west and

reach the south around midday

before it extends right across

the State. South Australia,

rain across the west and south,

with a south-westerly change

late in the day. For Western

Australia, a dry and sunny day

on the way in the south-west,

but rain and storms for the

eastern interior. For northern

WA, rain and storms coming down

from the Kimberley, with heavy falls in the east. Rain and storms across the Northern Territory, 30 degrees for Alice Territory, 30 degrees for Alice

Springs. Tomorrow rain will

clear from Adelaide, expect a

shower or two in Brisbane, a

top of 24 degrees and

Melbourne, 20. That's the

latest weather. You're

watching ABC News breakfast.

Still to come on the program,

we'll find out what the rise of

the Australian dollar means for

exports. Also ahead, we'll newspapers. This morning we're

joined by radio Australia broadcaster Phil Kafcaloudes.

Leading the news this morning, Dame Joan Sutherland has died

in Switzerland, she was 83.

The Australian soprano died

after a long illness. Dame

Joan was known as La Stupenda

for her incredible voice and performance ability.

Immigration Minister Chris Bowan will meet the East

Timorese president today. It

will be the first round of

direct talks with the

government about a proposed regional refugee processing

centre. Dr Ramos-Horta any processing centre in East

Timor would be temporary and he

wants guarantees asylum seekers

would leave after three years.

Regional communities are gearing gearing up for a fight as public consultations on the Murray-Darling Basin plan Murray-Darling Basin plan begin

today. Shepparton in central

northern Victoria has been

chosen for the first round of

talks. Australian sprinter

Sally Pearson has bounced back

to claim gold in the 100 metre

hurdles final. She put her recent recent dis qualification from

the sprint behind her with a

resounding win overnight. Steve Hooker won his second consecutive Commonwealth gold

in the pole vault. Australia

still leads the medal tally

with 64 gold, 40 silver and 39

bronze. a Greek policeman been sentence ed to life in

prison for murdering a

schoolboy in 2008. The

incident sparked mass unrest in

Athens and neighbouring cities.

The 15-year-old was shot dead in December 2008. As just

membered, she was known all

over as La Stupenda. Now at

the age of 83 she has died. As the greatest opera singers of

all time with a phenomenal

technique, she was credited

with putting opera on the map

in her own country. we look back at back at her remarkable life. For more than four

decades, Joan Sutherland

thrilled opera audiences in the

world's great concert halls.

She was born in Sydney to

Scottish parents. Her father

died when she was just 6 years

old. Her mother was a singer

and inspired her daughter to

embrace music. Joan influence, though, was

conductor Richard Bonynge, who was to

was to become her life partner.

Winning the sun aha in 1951 Winning the sun aha in 1951 was a turning point and Dame Joan

pursued her career overseas.

She won a place at the royal

Opera House at Covent Garden.

But while her voice was

stunning, she lacked stage skills and solve is particularation. I

particularation. I was fairly

gosh and fairly stiff on the

stage. In 1952, Joan Sutherland

sang her first leading role at

coughen garden Amelia in masked ball. Seven years later

she soored to international

starredom as an acclaimed

performance as Lucia. the role became her signature. It was

at a performance in venis that

the Italians dubbed her La Stupenda. Soon she was

embraced by the Americans,

beginning a decade's long

association with the metropolitan opera in New York. In

In 1961, Dame Joan was named

the Australian of the year, before she returned home to

perform. Some were upset it

had taken her so long. Ms

Sutherland, why has it been so

long since you've returned Australia? She performed to sellout

sellout concerts around the

country, with a then

little-known Italian tenor

Luciano Pavarotti. Dame Joan

won many royal favours. Her

loyalty to the crown was fierce

and during the Republican

debate in the mid-90s she sided with Australians for a

constitutional monarchy. Her

address to a flag-waefg lunch

where she complained about applying for an Australian passport raised hackles. It

also upsets me it's such a damn

job to get an Australian

passport now. You have to go

to the post office and be

interviewed by a Chinese and or

an Indian. Dame Joan spent her

final years at her home in

Switzerland. She returned to

Australia for special occasions. Her last Australian performance was in 1990, at the

age of 63 her farewell song at the Sydney Opera House was home sweet home.

Dame Joan is survived by

Richard Bonynge, her son Adam

and an outstanding legacy of opera music and performances.

Anne-Maria Nicholson, ABC News. A remarkable career. I think there's every there's every reason that you'd want to say something want to say something about

that. It's one of the defining

careers in the arts in

Australia, and so many people

would have had the joy of

seeing her perform here and

even abroad. It's her

longevity that's amazing. She

made these comments a few years

ago about how younger singers

are being trained and the vocal

technique they don't have and that she had in spadz. Technique gave her Technique gave her the

longevity of her career.

That's because she knew how to support that voice with breath

and in the correct physical way

so she could keep singing for

so long. A lot of singers

don't have the long career

because they literally run out

of voice, run out of puff. She

definitely is a touchstone. I

have had the misfortune have had the misfortune of having singing lessons on

occasions and she's always one

the singing teachers refer to.

To make you feel really bad? They're certainly not trying to turn me into her, I garptee

that. If you'd like to comment on her contribution to on her contribution to the

opera or other story, such as the Murray-Darling consultations occurring today,

send emails to us. you can

send text messages to : to talk about the show online,

we're on Facebook and Twitter.

The long-awaited inquest into

the July 7th terror attacks on

London five years ago have

begun. 52 people were killed

when suicide bombers attacked

underground trains and a tube station staff and emergency services in the minutes following the minutes following the attacks were played for the first time.

London correspondent Phillip

Williams has this report.

Ladies and gents we need to clear clear Russell square now. It's

taken more than five years, but

finally the relatives of the 52 victims may get answers to

questions that have long added

to the burden of grief. Could have been prevented.

Everything done possibly could

to save people, was the

emergency service there on

time? On the one hand, we're

all getting on with life in some way terrible grief with us, but I

think officially and public ly

there needs to be some kind of there needs to be some kind of line drawn. I'm a super adviser, we just had a

explosion, there appears to be

something ahead of the train in

the track. We've

evacuated. New information has

been released, audio recordings

of the exchanges between rail

staff and emergency services just

just after the bomb attacks on

three trains in the London

Tube. We have smoke coming

from the tunnel, we from the tunnel, we have customers on the track? Yep. Would you please

get as many ambulances as you

can to here. We have

injuries Despite the

increasingly alarming calls, it was still unclear what they

were dealing with. So they're not bombs? No, it's not believed to be terrorist related Eventually the authorities began to fear the

worst. I'm leaning worst. I'm leaning towards terrorists at the moment. Yes. But I can't tell you that. For

the relatives, it was not

reassuring, the confirmation

for some that the emergency

response was woefully

inadequate. It was sham bolic. They were clearly unprepared and they clearly had

not been trained to deal with

any system or any major event whatsoever. This was the day of

the attack, the four suicide

bombers seen together. The

explosives were in the

backpacks. They would take 52 backpacks. They would take 52 innocent lives and leave so many physically and

psychologically scarred. The

inquest is expected to inquest is expected to last

until next March. A British aid worker hostage in Afghanistan may have hostage in Afghanistan may have accidentally been killed by US forces during a rescue mission. International forces originally

said she died on Friday when

one of her captors debt nated a suicide vest, but America's top

general in Afghanistan has told David Cameron that probably wasn't the case. Mr Cameron

says new details have come to light suggesting her death may

have resulted from a US

grenade. General Petraeus has since

since told me that review has

revealed evidence to indicate

that Linda may not have died at

the hands of her captors as originally believed. That

evidence and subsequent

interviews with the personnel involved suggests that Linda

could have died as a result of

a grenade debt nated by the

task force during the

assault. The consequences from that will

that will be very serious.

Eight years since the first

Bali bombings, a group of

survivors is still struggling

to establish a peace park on

the side of the club destroyed

by the main blast. To coincide

with today's anniversary of the

study showing the park could be

self-funding, and bring other

cultural and social benefits to Bali. The group has little

money in the bank and if the owner of the land maintains he wants to build a new nightclub there. Indonesia correspondent

Matt Brown reports from Kuta. Eight years since terror

struck the heart of Kuta the

site is still a car park. A small group of survivors, including West Australian Phil

Briton, have released a new

study of the benefits of stake a peace park on the land. It felt a little disheartoning

it's a place where people died

right there on the soil and

people are driving cars and motor bikes and motor bikes and stuff like that. While the attacks remain

a seering memory for the survivors, the current owner

wants to build a new nightclub.

I lost 7 dear friends there

and 202 people died there, you

know? It shouldn't be a

nightclub, there shouldn't be people drinking beer right

there. There shouldn't be people partying. By charging visitors, one US dollar to enter, the organisers argue it

would finance itself, raising US$36,000 a year. Souvenirs and refreshments would boost

that revenue and there would be

other benefits to the

community. Show the world, I

suppose, that terrorism is bad

and when someone sort of dishes

you that card, we're going to

make something beautiful out of

it. The memorial across the

road from the site is already

on Bali's busy tourist map.

Nearly 450,000 Australians came

to Bali last year, and that

number is on track to sky

rocket to 670,000 this year. And the organisers say the park

would easily attract around 100

visitors each day. You know,

you sit there in front of that

memorial and you think of the

past and you mourn. I want the

park to be a reflection place

and somewhere where people can

look forward to the future and

a spiritual garden as

such. However, the peace park

association is yet to turn to the task of raising money in

earnest. The land is worth

millions of dollars and even

local government officials who

support it worry the support it worry the project is

dragging on. The peace park is

a good idea, he says, but we

don't want to disadvantage the

owner of the land either. The

organisers hope to buy the land

and open the new park before

the end of next year. You're watching ABC News breakfast. The top stories: Australian

opera singer Dame Joan

Sutherland has died at Sutherland has died at her family home in Switzerland, she

was 83. She's regarded as one

of the greatest opera singers

of the 20th century. East

Timor's president will meet

Immigration Minister Chris

Bowan in Dilly today, Bowan in Dilly today, discussing plans for a regional refugee processing centre refugee processing centre on East Timor. Dr Ramos-Horta has

said any processing centre must be

be temporary. An inquiry into

the July 7 London bombings has begun

begun in the UK. The inquest

heard victims of the were murdered in acts of

merciless savagery, it also

heard emergency services

struggled to cope when the

bombing struck London's underground rail network.

We'll look at the national We'll look at the national papers, joined now by Radio

Australia broadcaster Phil Kafcaloudes. Good morning.

Good morning to you both.

I've just had a few weeks in

the UK and I've been observing how a coalition government

works with opposition in the

UK: the thing that struck me

is how well they seemed to get

together the

new coalition. No insults, no

big problems going on there.

Then you come back to Australia

and what do you see? It's all

over the papers this morning insults are traded, barbes going all over the place,

mincing poodle, a reference to Chris Pyne when Julia Gillard

was deputy Prime Minister. If

we look at some of the stuff

out today, it's a worry. We

have Tony Abbott falling in the polls. polls. The question why comes

up. Well, part of it could be because of some of the comments

that have been made, but on the

front page of

they say that their belief is

that it could be because he has called for more troops in

Afghanistan. What's the basis

for that? Their belief? Don't know. Perhaps it's nice de believe Australians believe Australians don't believe Australians don't want that, maybe, that's one of

their suggestions. If you turn

to page 2 of the Australian,

there's a whole lot of other

reasons put down there. This

comes to the barbes I was

talking about before. Both

parties, according to Peter Van onsolon

spinning, as Kevin Rudd did,.

Julia Gillard making the most

of the jetlag comment of the jetlag comment that Tony

Abbott put forward as a reason

why he couldn't why he couldn't visit the troops in Afghanistan. Join Julia Gillard on the trip.

That's right, on that one. He

later did, of course. As a

response to that, because he

was planning his own trip and

Julia Gillard knew he was

planning his own trip, he

referred to Julia Gillard of course

course as referring to

Machiavellian bastard ry, those sort of comments. Again, I didn't see those sorts of didn't see those sorts of

things in the UK, funny about

that. You may have got there at

a nice time. I probably did.

There was Ed and David

Miliband, of course, having a

go at each other. I wonder, though, if a bit much

stock is placed in analysing

these polls. We've had an

election, the two-party preferred vote hasn't moved

that much, it's just a dip in approval rating for approval rating for the

opposition leader. I disagree.

I've been wondering for weeks

now why the Australian hasn't done a

you have a couple by now.

Three years out from the next election It's interesting that that droppoff in Tony Abbott's

percentage support has been so

significant and that actually the Australian has waited this

long before we can see this

according - often very accurate

Newspoll. That to me is Newspoll. That to me is

telling. I don't know if the

Australian is right putting it

down to policy difference or

him perhaps talking about increasing troops to

Afghanistan. That might be a

bit early for that and three

years out from the next poll,

it could be the bickering It's what because the poll was taken at the weekend, around about the

time of that. The Age, there's

a cartoon you want to look at.

Yes, just to tie it Yes, just to tie it all up

here. It's Tony Abbott getting

off the plane there and on the

left-hand side he's there

saying welcome, but in fact I

can't actually read it. It's

the smallest thing I've seen in

my life. What's the point of

it? Point of the cartoon - I'm

glad you can finally make it,

yes, jetlag is a bad thing cope with, talking to soldiers

on the tarmac on the tarmac there. This is the problem for Tony Abbott,

isn't it, even if it's not a

serious issue he didn't visit Afghanistan at that time, it

becomes a reference point

will doing him until the next

election. It's an easy joke,

easy punchline to be made.

Easy joke, unfair joke, of

course. His point is that Julia Gillard knew he was

going. It was just at that

time when she said, "Go with me", he time when she said, "Go with

me", he said, "No, I have

another commitment." If he

hadn't said jetlag, have made a difference That's

what he said. If he hadn't

said that - If he had another

visit planned, he didn't have

to say the issue was jetlag,

just "I've got a just "I've got a visit planned". From this election

campaign onwards with both

leaders, offer the cuff

statements they make are just silly. Tony silly. Tony Abbott actually six months ago said

occasionally I will say stuff

that I don't really mean. Of

course he got slapped around

for that. Maybe he shouldn't

say anything perhaps. I'm not

sure that works We're seeing evidence of it now, I guess. Page 1 of the Age. East Timor,

I know you've covered that this

morning. We have Chris morning. We have Chris Bowan, the new Immigration Minister, having talks having talks with Ramos-Horta

in East Timor. We spoke to him

on our program yesterday and

put to him all the issues about

what the MPs were saying. The

problem with having a regional

processing centre in east

tombor is the locals are saying

we don't get any benefit from

it whatsoever. Then there was

a UN centre in East Timor.

They got no benefit, all the workers came from local employment at all? Well, I'm sure there must have been. But they But they say it was so little

that it just didn't make value.

When it finished, they packed

it and took it all away. You

would expect there would be local contractors, but East

Timor did not get the benefit.

Now there are reports that

East Timor are making more

encouraging noises about this,

do you think there's faith that

should be placed in that by the Australian Government or is

that just dip loamcy? There

could be. Ramos-Horta was put

up to be doing the negotiation

s. In this case

have to be some good sign s

from Gusmao they are looking at

it. One of the quotes he has

was that the reaction by my MPs could be

overcome. That's a pretty big statement. It sounds "could",

"maybes qutionz "and all of

that. He wouldn't say that.

He's not a silly man. He's not a silly man. He

wouldn't say that unless there

were a possibility of saying

it. He described it. He described it as irasal Irrational. He didn't

have to say that. He didn't

have to smack out his own He says there's still a chance, providing it is

entirely paid for by others, he

said by others, which means Australia, perhaps Indonesia,

whatever comes out of process. Canberra Times. Yes,

life after politics, this is

Bob McMullan. Kevin Rudd is no

longer Prime Minister, of

course, but he is Foreign

Minister. One of the things

that he loved or he really

wanted when he was Prime

Minister was to get us a

temporary seat on the UN

security council. This would be from

two years. Now he, he has appointed Bob McMullan as appointed Bob McMullan as a special envoy in Africa and special envoy in Africa and in

Africa he's going to try to get

votes for us Africa place where this could be

decided? Certainly. There's a

former diplomat at too that

Kevin Rudd has appointed to deal with French-speaking

nations. We'll see what

happens. This is certainly, as

foreign minister, he has been

given complete control over

trying to get a temporary seat

for us on the US security council Herald sun? council Herald sun? On this day

There is a story in there about

the sequel to phantom of the

opera, love never dies. It

will be announced today by

satellite with

they'll be doing it. They will

be having it on in Melbourne. I saw it when he was in London.

It has a way to go yet. It's

set in kony island. The

phantom gets into a bar fight

with Raul, which I don't think is very phantomish. This bizarre. I know, it is, it is

quite - it's based on a book.

The script was written

partially by Ben Elton,

it or not. We'll see how it

comes out. It will be on in Melbourne next year, in June. Good to see you again,

thanks so much, Phil.

International tributes are

rolling in for Dame Joan

Sutherland, and we'll read some

of them out to you in the next

hour. If you'd like to offer your observation if you were

lucky enough to see her sing in

person, even though of

her out there, send us an

email. we'll share some of

those observations of the great

Dame Joan Sutherland in just little bit. Here's little bit. Here's Paul Kennedy with the sport headlines We'll look at the

Commonwealth Games medal tally

at the moment. Australia is

still on tonne, of course. Sally Pearson had a resounding

win in the 100 metres hurdle

last night, putting the dis qualification of a false start

in the 100 metres flat and she broke the Commonwealth

record as well. Steve Hooker won won also last night. won also last night. The world

champion and Olympic champion did just enough before stepping

aside with a soar knee and

weight lifter Damon Kelly won gold in just about half an hour

we'll show you highlights of

that. So stay tuned if you're

interested in seeing Sally

Pearson's emotional reaction to

winning that gold medal. To

the cricket now, and India batted through batted through yesterday

bat through the entire day.

He's on 191 not out. That's

him going from 93 to 99 and him

going from 99 to going from 99 to 105. Nathan Hauritz was 0/150. Sachin Tendulkar was doing what he liked. Murali Vijay also made

a century. This was his first

in Test cricket. Then Australia fought back slightly

to take three wickets there.

To the AFL football, and trade

week wrapped up yesterday and

the most interesting one was

that Chris Tarrant, the former Magpie, and went from the forward line

to the backline to save his

career has now gone back to

Collingwood to bolster the

premiership team's defence so

he is a big pick-up there. Sam

Jacobs from Carlton has gone to

Adelaide and Justin Sherman has gone

gone to the Bull dog, the Richmond player, Andrew

Collins, has gone to Carlton.

Andrew Walker is staying at Carlton, good news for the

blues. That's it for sport for

now. In just over 20, 25 minutes, we'll show highlights of the Commonwealth

Games. Vanessa joins us now

with the weather. What a

couple of days it's been for

south-east Queensland. Let's look at some of look at some of the pictures. The The storms started rolling in

on Friday and continued right

across the weekend and into

yesterday. This morning there's a few scattered

showers, most falling near the

coast and a band of rain around

gladston, nothing like what we've seen. With dams overflowing, authorities

predict drinking water supplies

will be guaranteed until will be guaranteed until the

2021. Let's look at some of the rain total s over the past few days, few days, 315mm at upper spring

- Brisbane airport since

Friday 241, 201 at albany creek

and deegan 187mm. The showers

will main ly fall over eastern

districts today, while easing

over the south east, afternoon

thunder storms about the

tropics and showers over the

interior. 23 degrees in

Brisbane and 19 in Toowoomba. New South Wales, New South Wales, ice laid showers about the far

north-east, later in the day west and spread across the

south. For Victoria this

morning, scattered showers over

the north and near the south-west coast, spreading

across the State during the afternoon and into the evening.

Tasmania, morning drizzle in

the north, rain will develop

this morning in the west and will reach the south around

midday, before it extends Statewide. South Australia,

rain across the west and south with with a south-westerly change

late in the day, 23 in Adelaide. Western Australia,

dry and sunny day in the south

west, rain and storms for the

east and interior, rain coming towards the east of the

interior and across the

Northern Territory. Ahead to

tomorrow we can expect rain in Melbourne and rain to clear in Hobart, 18 degrees Thanks so

much. Stay tuned to us on ABC

News brek fast, lots more ahead

after this short break.

La Stupenda leaves the stage,

Dame Joan Sutherland dies in Switzerland at the age of 83.

Pleading the case, to discuss processing asylum seekers in

seekers in Timor. Certainly it

will be a good two-way conversation exchanging views on what might on what might be possible. Merciless savagery,

an inquest into the July 7

bombings begins in London. And

hurdler Sally Pearson wins

redemptive gold in Delhi. Good

morning, it's Tuesday the 12th

of October, I'm of October, I'm Waleed. I'm

Virginia Trioli. She was known

the world over as stup stup. At the age of 83, Dame Joan

Sutherland has died As well as

being hailed as one of the greatest opera singers, the

Australian was credited with

putting opera on the map in her own country. Anne-Marie