Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Disclaimer: The Parliamentary Library does not warrant the accuracy of closed captions. These are derived automatically from the broadcaster's signal.
ABC News Breakfast -

View in ParlView

(generated from captions) A free trade agreement with China tops the Prime Minister's north Asian tour. This Program Is Captioned

Live.

An unscheduled stopover

in Sydney. No flights to

got a flight to the Gold Coast Brisbane till Saturday, so I've

tomorrow at tomorrow at 3.25. Back in Britain. Clifford Tucker talks

of his anguish over being

kicked out of

Australia. Because of my past

crimes, I've got to be deported

to a country that's completely

strange to me. I don't know

anything about this place. I

was 6 when I left. The NRL

boss raises concerns about the mental state Todd Carney.

Good morning. It's Wednesday,

News 20 April. . Top story on 'ABC

News Breakfast' - improving

business ties with China will

be high on Julia Gillard's agenda during her week-long

tour of north Asia. The Prime

Minister flies out later this

morning. Her first stop will be

Japan where she will see some

of the earthquake and tsunami

South Korea and China. Ms Dev snais. It's then on to

breathe new life into free Gillard

trade negotiations with China

which have dragged on now for

almost six years. For more

cloirk joins us from Canberra. the focus is on China but she Interesting that Julia Gillard

really begins her Asian tour in

Japan? And that's no

coincidence or minor part of scheduling. It's a deliberate

move to visit Japan first to

correct what was a perceived

snub in a previous trip by an Australian Prime Minister,

where China was visited first.

Julia Gillard to stop off in So this is

Japan first before going to South Korea and then China. And South

this this invitation to visit Japan,

this whole trip, was arranged

before the tsunami and

earthquake hit. But that's now

become a central focus of this

trip. Julia Gillard will visit

affected regions in what she

says will be a chance for her

to bring a message of goodwill

and friendship to the Japanese

people and she's also said she

will be raising a full range of

issues with Japan, even some of

the controversial ones like whaling. She back from any of them. But a

and South Korea and China of key part of her trip to Japan

course is the financial aspect.

She's looking to kick-start

some free trade negotiations that have been

dragging on for a long time and

it's seen countries like New

Zealand get in ahead of

Australia in terms of locking

in free trade agreement and also lifting Australian investment in those three

countries and vice versa. In

particular that will be a focus of the South Korean leg of of the South Korean leg of her trip. And then when she's

finished in north Asia she will

the royal wedding. So there's a

lot being packed into this trip

by Julia Gillard. She is also juggling

juggling the expectation back

home to raise human rights

issues? This will be a very

difficult trip for Julia

Gillard. Programs the most difficult overseas trip as

Prime Minister so far. Her trip

to the US recently in

Washington was relationship, but that was much for how she handled the

easier. That's merely easier. That's merely a matter

of reinforcing what's already a

strong relationship. With China

in particular in this trip she

will have to try to repair some

of the relationship damage that

whereas done under Kevin Rudd

as Prime Minister, that

relationship with China became

much more tense over a number

of issues but it also has to with that balance the need to

raise issues such as human

rights which the Australian

public expects from her when

she visits China. Now, what we

have had is the ambassador to Australia his first interview since being ambassador to Australia give

appointed to the position to

ABC News 24's Andrew Green and

Andrew Green had the chance to

ask him about the questions that Julia Gillard ask him about the looming

will raise when she visits

later this week n particular

the issue of Stern Hu which is one Julia Gillard has shade she

will raise. He gave a very

diplomatic answer when he was asked about this by Andrew

Green, which will show just how

difficult this trip will be for Julia China and Australia have a lot

of common points of converging

interests. And also our two

countries share many countries share many similar

positions and views regarding

quite a number of international

and regional issues. At the

same time, our two countries

are different in terms of

political system , culture and

ideology. It's only normal we

sometimes have different views

regarding some issues. We have

the Treasurer Wayne Swan trying pouring the rivers of gold that are

pouring in because of the boom

in China and India are not

really going to help our budget

at all? That's right. Wayne

Swan will address the Queensland Media Club today Queensland Media Club today in what will be what will be his last big

speech before handing down the

budget on that Tuesday in May.

We've had a lot of warning of

the short-term pain that will be fakesed because of the commission situation, but what

Wayne Swan will say in his

speech today is that even

though there is a booming

mining sector the mining boom

Mark 2 on the horizon, he is

to the Howard and Costello saying is won't bring the

years and we can't expect to

see the same amounts of massive

tax revenues pouring in to Commonwealth coffers that we

did last time. So a warning now from the government of both

short-term and perhaps more

medium and long-term pain as well. Melissa Clarke, thank

you. Other news now. More than

2,000 Jetstar passengers had an

unexpected stay at Sydney

Airport last night. A powerful failure yesterday caused a

security breach. 16 passengers

managed to get through a terminal without being passengers in the terminal had

to be screened again, the

subsequent flight delays left

flood peak of just over 8m, but evacuated ahead of an expected Roma. Dozens of people were southern Queensland town of The flood threat has eased in thousands of people stranded.

enough to flood up to 160 however it still would've been high as that. The mayor says the waters didn't rise quite as homes. Security forces have opened fire on a mass rally in Syria. Thousands had gathered in a square at the western city of Homs. Up to eight people Syrian government has lifted its decades old state of emergency but has warned people not not to take part in further demonstrations. British military is sending Libya to train the rebels. They will be based in the rebel stronghold of Benghazi . It's understood the officers will be Parliament of a joint operation with the French and provide logistics and intelligence

training. Britain says that won't be involved in the

fighting and the operation is consistent with the consistent with the UN resolution on Libya. And Fidel

Castro has made appearance at Cuba's communist party

progress. He was a little

unsteady to his feet as he took

to the stage greeted to the stage greeted by thunderous applause. It's the

first time he and his

have been seen together in

public since Raul Castro took

over the presidency five years

ago. Back to the top story. A

power failure at Sydney Airport

has caused a security

malfunction delaying dozens of

flights. Last night 2,000

Jetstar passengers were told

they wouldn't get on their flights till trying to get me on a 6am flight to Melbourne. I was supposed to leave at

supposed to leave at 8 o'clock

tonight. Pretty annoyed. I was hoping to get down there to see Bob Dylan tomorrow night. We've

been here since 3 o'clock this

afternoon. We're going to Adelaide but our flight is

cancelled. Well are going

cancelled. Well are going

tomorrow. We are living in Sydney Sydney so we have to get back

to home. No flights to Brisbane till Saturday. So I

have a flight to the Gold Coast

tomorrow at 3.25. Our reporter will be there live this morning. Nothing worse than

being stuck at

being stuck at an airport,

especially with kids. You can't

underestimate the difficulties

there, the woman feeding her

story. Clifford Tucker is back out of Australia because of his criminal record. The

41-year-old has to make a new

life for himself in a country

he hasn't seen for nearly 40 years. Clifford Tucker's been

flown back into a world now completely foreign to him.

Australia's his home, where he

has lived nor 41 years. Because

of my past crimes, I have to be

deported for a country that's completely strange about me. I don't know anything about England. I was 6 when I left. I

can never come back to

Australia to walk my daughter

down the aisle, to be with my

sick mother who's 73 and needs my help

my help and to see my help and to see my family, never, is devastating. On

return from a recent Bali

holiday he ticked "yes" to the

box regarding prior

convictions. It's earned him a

year in Sydney's Villawood

detention centre hand now

deportation to Britain. He

admits he is no angel but says

he has done his time for shooting a police officer when he was 19. He said

talk of deportation then. Nor

after a subsequent assault

charge. But it was enough for

him to fail the character test

after his after his first overseas trip. The law needs to change to bring it in line with international standards and

that is that we don't deport

people who came out here as

children or we don't deport long-term residents. Now his

life is three bags and a hotel

room for six weeks after which time he

time he is on his own and

separated from his his three children indefinitely. Hey, how

are you doing? I'd love to be

able to hug my daughter and

tell them I love them and kiss

them goodnight and play soccer with my son. I can't do any of

that. He says he has never thought about applying for

thought about applying for citizenship because he always felt Australian. Australia's Minister for Immigration and

Citizenship says Mr Tucker's convictions outweigh any family

says he will continue to

challenge Australia's law covering

covering the expulsion of

long-term residents. Mr Tucker

says he feels more lost here

than most of these tourists. He says he asked guards to carry

him onto the plane because he couldn't bring himself to walk on. Australia has

on. Australia has spent $25,000

on his deportation, which he

will be billed for if he ever

makes it home. The Queensland

flood inquiry has heard a

triple-0 operator chastised a

woman and her son shortly

before they were swept to their deaths

made by Donna and Jordan Rice were played to

were played to the inquiry as

their family wept quietly in

their family wept quietly in

the courtroom. A work to

viewers, this story contains some distress ing content.

Survivor Blake Rice and his

father John Tyson were

surrounded by family as they

prepared themselves to hear the

final recordings of their lost

ones. The calls were made on 10

January, as floodwaters swept

away their car in Toowoomba's

CBD. In the first call the

police operator demanded three times "Why

times "Why did you drive shouldn't have driven throughed into waters in the first

place." The family of Donna

and Jordan Rice wiped away

tears as they listened to the rising panic in the second

emergency call. In the

background Donna Rice could be

heard yelling at her sons to

jump on the roof. While Jordan

Rice pleaded with the operator

to hurry up because they were

about to drown. The female

operator shouted "If you don't

tell me where you are we can't

tell me where you are we can't

help you. Tell the woman beside you

you to stop elg yelling."

Donna Rice's widower John Tyson

read a statement to the court

about the impact the tragedy has had on his family's lives.

In response to the triple-0

calls, Mr Tyson said "I fail calls, Mr Tyson said "I fail to

see what part of the call

wasn't panic. What gave someone

the right to decide that I have

to bury half my family." Earlier the court heard from

the Chief Executive Officer and mayor of Toowoomba Regional

mayor of Toowoomba Regional

Council about whether an SMS

alert to residents before the flash flooding hit would've

helped. Both told the helped. Both told the inquiry

that given the waters rose so

quickly an SMS may have created

more panic. Would that have

made it more dangerous? We want

to hear all the good ideas that

come out of come out of such a commission of

of inquiry. The inquiry now

heads to Dalby. To the front

pages of today's major

newspapers from around the country. The 'Age' says Tony

Mokbel has admitted he was the

mastermind of a massive drug empire. The 'Herald' sun dedicate

dedicate ing 10 pages to Mokbel. Mokbel has pleaded commercial quantities of

ecstasy and speed. The

'Mercury' also covering Mokbel's

Mokbel's story. He has struck a

deal that may see him serve 20

years in jail. The 'Sydney Morning Herald' says the

Treasurer will warn that the

new mining boom won't deliver

the rivers of gold in revenue

that the previous boom produced. Wayne Swan says the

produced. Wayne Swan says the resources boom will divisions between winners and

divisions between winners and

losers. The PM and her senior ministers have launched an attack the Business Council of Australia about its criticism of the carbon tax. The

Courier-Mail says a harrowing

triple-0 call from flood victim Donna Rice silenceed a

Toowoomba courtroom. The Canberra Airport is claiming a

final victory in the nine year struggle over

struggle over the proposed Tralee housing estate. The

'Advertiser' says support for

Labor in South Australia has

slumped to its lowest level

since the 1993 State disaster. A teacher is under investigation for allegedly

tying a 5-year-old boy to a chair as punishment for

misbehaving in class. And the

Northern Territory 'News' says

a woman almost stepped on a crocodile after it wandered up

to her front door in Darwin's northern suburbs.

northern suburbs. The hazards

of living in the Top End! I

wonder if it walked up on its

hind legs? A picture I have

from that heading

going to talk about Tony

Mokbel. We'll talk a bit about

that, just an extraordinary revelation revelation now that he

revelation now that he has done this plea deal but

fascinate ed what you think

about Wayne Swan's comments

around the two-speed economy,

that the mining boom that we are enjoying in some parts of

the country is going to create

deep divisions between deep divisions between those that are winning from it and

earning loads of money and

those that are losing. It's

all about preparing people for

the budget and trying to

control the message, I

guess. But I think that's very real.

that's very real. Because you

get the feeling that some

people are really doing it

tough. Really finding it hard

financially and others that are just living the

because they have - they're in the right professions that are

part of that boom. So love to

hear from you, if you are

experiencing one side or the

other.

The top stories - Julia

Gillard hopes to make some

progress on a free trade

agreement when she visits China

early next week.

north Asia tour later this

morning. Her first stop will be

Japan. A security glitch at

Sydney Airport left thousands of Jetstar passengers overnight. A terminal full of

overnight. A terminal full of

passengers had to be rescreened

after a power failure. The airline is expecting further

delays today as they try to

clear the backlog. A man

kicked out of Australia because

of his criminal record has

arrived pack in Britain.

Clifford Tucker spent almost 40

years living in Australia

before being he still feels numb and doesn't

know how he will survive in

London. Syria that's government

has lifted the country's decades old emergency law. The

repeal of the emergency law was

a key demand of protesters as

Ben Knight reports.

Ben Knight reports. The Syrian regime has been trying everything it can crashed over the country. These

gunshots are believed to be

from Syrian security forces, dispersing protesters in dispersing protesters in the

city of Homs. State television

had just described these

demonstrations as an armed

revolt by Islamic fundamentalists and warned that no further protests would be

no further protests would be tolerated. The crackdown

appeared to be on. But then

later the same day the regime

announced it was immediately

lifting the country's It's a stunning It's a stunning turnaround.

Back in January, the President

boasted that his country was

immune to the crisis then

sweeping the Aran world but he

is now following a strikingly

similar path to the leaders of Egypt

Egypt and Tunisia before they

were overthrown. They too stood

firm until forced to promise

concessions. When that didn't

stop the protests actually

giving in to some of the demonstrators demands. Of course, that didn't work

either. If anything, it gave

the demonstrators more hope.

And it does seem that Syrian

protesters have now protesters have now also broken the barrier of fear. The

President still has a fearsome Secret Police at his command

and does enjoy popular

and does enjoy popular support

in Syria. But how much

impossible to tell. Egypt has

been urged to Quon front its

past by holding a full inquiry

into human rights abuses in the

country. A new report documents

the severe human rights abuses

committed under former President Hosni Mubarak. Amnesty International researcher

researcher Saeed Hadadi compiled joins us now from Paris via webcam. Thanks for your time

this morning. Can you start by

telling us what shocked you

about those human rights abuses

that you're reporting on? It's

the fact that in spite of

people having been detain

people having been detain ed on

the mere suspicion that they

constitute a threat to public security, in spite of the fact

that they've got a number of

release orders by the court establish under the emergency

law. They continue to be held in detention regardless of

these court decisions. Some

people have been held for more than 20 years. Others for 18

years. Others for 15. Others

for five. And the list is for five. And the list is long. So what's shock something that the total disregard of the Ministry of the Interior's officials to this court's decisions and the fact that they haven't even emergency legislation themselves. Did your report go into looking at the moment of individuals individuals in those circumstances you're

describing? They are facing gross human rights violations. They get tortured, held in sil plens for a couple of months by State security investigations

officers and then torture and

ill treated and then their

families are not informed of

where they are or given idea of what's happened to their loved

ones. They are just kept in detention regardless of whatever the court says about

them or whatever the judges say about them. The ministry of the

interior is the one who decide

whose will go in and who will whose will go in and who will

go out when they are

period they have been tortured, ill treated, denied medical

care, denied visits, moved to remote prisons remote prisons far away from their families and that makes it even harder for them because

they have to feel again, they

see they are more of a heavy

burden for their family. Their family has to family has to move family has to move 700

kilometres away from where the

family is to go to visit them

in prison. So it's been such a horrible least of these detainees when

they were in detention. When

they find cases before the

they find cases before the courts, cases for compensation,

that compensation is

insignificant in comparison to what happened to them in

detention. The key calls for Amnesty International in this

report is not only we welcome the step that the Ministry of

the Interior decided to release

a lot of them in recent months

but the question remains is

that those who were responsible

for the abuses must be held to

account and those who were

detained must get detained must get proper reparation. This is with the future in mind. You have

concerns that the power that

exists with the military in

Egypt might still be unaccounted

unaccounted for? We have seen the disestablishment of the

state security unit. We state security unit. We have to

realise that regardless of the

establishment of this unit, we

don't know what happens to

these police officers, whether

they will be in a system to

integrate them back into the

police force and we realise from

from our monitoring of the

country the human rights violations continue. We still hear hear of torture in detention

with the military barracks. We

still hear of use of silent

detention and we continue to

hear of unfair trials civilians before Military

Courts. The lessons haven't

been learned. The key elements

for this, for any for this, for any serious

reform in Egypt to happen is for the

for the Egyptian authorities to

first abolish the state of

emergency and lift - and repeal

all the the provisions of the

emergency law. The state of

emergency continues to hold Egypt and the emergency law is

still in force. Once these two

haven't been abolished, the

violations will continue to

violations will continue to

happen. I think that the rest of the security forces, whether

it's military or normal police,

will still think that they can

act above the law. Thanks for

your time this

your time this morning.

Amnesty International's report

that Saeed has authored will be

out today. He revolution is the least

scrutinised revolution in

history because of all the

focus on Japan's problems and

of course other problems. There

is all the rebuilding to do.

That focus will not even try to

come together and try to find

some way forward rather than

focusing on the past. A big challenge ahead. A

challenge ahead. A look at the

markets.

A first look this morning at sport with Amy Bainbridge. The

age old problem of what to do in a troubled superstar? Indeed. It's Todd Carney we're

Carney we're speaking about.

The Sydney Roosters are

expected to receive medical

advice today on what action they should take on the

rehabilitation of Carney. Club officials say they will be

guided by medical professionals

to determine how to deal with

Carney's alcohol problem and

when he might return to play.

The club has suspended Carney and fellow team-mate Anthony

Watts indefinitely. Watts is

Watts indefinitely. Watts is

charged with assaulting his

ex-girlfriend and has ex-girlfriend and has to front the Roosters board within five

days. In relation to Anthony

Watts they've commenced action

under the playing contract. We

need to let that process play

out, but clearly they're taking

that matter very seriously N

relation to Todd Carney, things are a

This is a guy with a history, a

guy who gave some pretty big

undertakings to the world a

couple of weeks ago. And

think it's his reckless

disregard for those

undertakings that's perhaps the

most alarming aspect of where

he's at. They've suspended he's at. They've suspended him

indefinitely. They're going to

step up the medical help that they

they believe he needs. And that

the preliminary medical advice

they've got indicates he needs. And at this stage, we're

comfortable with that. It's an important part of important part of that decision

that he may not be playing

football at the moment. A look at AFL news now. Collingwood's

Chris Dawes will be free to

play in the Anzac Day clash against Essendon on Monday.

Dawes successfully appealed

against his one match suspension

suspension at the AFL suspension at the AFL tribunal

last night. And briefly in

other news from last night, the tribunal, Fremantle's Matthew

Pavlich is eligible to win the striking charge downgraded.

Overseas now. Samantha Stosur

has booked her place in the

second round of Stuttgart's WTA

tournament. Stosur had a

straight sets win over Spain's

Jose Martinez Sanchez. The

Jose Martinez Sanchez. The

26-year-old fifth seed who

reached last year's final

needed just 80 minutes to see

off the Spaniard for a win. Stosur now faces Slovakia's

Daniela Hantuchova in the second

second round. Sydney FY have had a

high in China. Here is a look

at the goals.

Later in sport we'll hear

more from David Gallop on the

Todd kor nee situation. He made

some interesting comments about the mental

the mental health of Todd Carney. More on that later. Now

to Vanessa O'Hanlon with the weather. Good morning.

Following a wet couple of days in southern and central Queensland, a the east is weakening. Another

trough is bringing a cooler

change and a few showers to

South Australia and also

through Victoria. A low over

the Coral Sea is weakening the Coral Sea is weakening as

it drifts away, the showers

will ease in Queensland. A

front will approach Tasmania maintaining showers

maintaining showers mainly in

the west. As we head into

tomorrow, second cold front

will push towards Tasmania and

Victoria. It will increase

winds and showers mainly over

the western parts of both

States. Another trough will

trigger isolated showers and

storms over north east New

South Wales and south-east Queensland.

Thousands of passengers were left stranded at Sydney Airport

overnight. For more on the security breached which caused

the chaos, we'll speak to our

reporter who's at the airport

and also ahead a review of some

of the newspapers. This morning we're joined by Jane Dullard

the general manager of a public relations company. The Prime Minister Julia Gillard leaves

on her week-long Asian tour later

stop will be Japan then it's

on to South Korea and then China where she

China where she hopes to kick along negotiations trade agreement. Those rivers

of gold from the mining pool

just aren't flowing like they

used to. Federal Treasurer

Wayne Swan will deliver a

pre-budget speech in Brisbane

today. And he will be warning of

of leaner times ahead. He of leaner times ahead. He says

mining investment expected to double next financial year but

it won't come with a tax

windfall. More than 2,000 Jetstar passengers were stranded in Sydney

stranded in Sydney overnight. through a terminal without

being screened because of a

power failure that meant all the passengers in the terminal

had to be screened again. More delays are expected the airline clears the

backlog. The flood threat has

eased in Roma. Dozens were

evacuated ahead of an expected

flood peak of just over 8m but

the waters only got over 7.5m

overnight. Still the mayor says

that would've been enough to

flood up to 160 international conference called

to raise money for new safety measures at Chernobyl has

fallen short of its target.

It's 25 years since the world's

worst nuclear disaster. The

Ukranianan wants to build a new

sarcophagus around the damaged

reactor. Clifford Tucker is

back in Britain after the

Commonwealth deported him because of his criminal record.

Now the 47-year-old has to make

a new life for himself in a

country he hasn't seen for nearly four decades. Clifford Tucker has just arrived in

London and unpacked his life

and for someone who was born

here he may as dropped inside the area. Can

you tell me about the types of

things you have to think about

now that other people take for granted? Everything is new to

me here. Like you said, it's

like being dropped in Siberia.

I have to learn the transport system. How system. How to survive. How to

find housing. How to - everything

everything is just so strange

now. Have you had to use English money before? No, I haven't. Even that was strange,

exchanging the Australian

dollars for pound notes. I

still have to get used to the

amount and how much to use and

the price of things. The price of things is a lot more

expensive in England than they are in Australia. Is getting are in Australia. Is getting

back to Australia when, not an

fingers crossed. At the moment

it's an if. At the moment it's

definite no. As the law states

I can never go back to

Australia. Until the law is

changed, which is a slight

possibility, that's the only

way I can go back to Australia, if the laws change. Your

lawyer says there are a lot of

ratbags already in Australia. How How does that make you feel

that you've paid for your sins

and you were no angel but you

have paid for your sins and

done your time and now you've been been ripped away from your family? That's correct. There

are people a lot worse off than

I am in Australia. I've tried to rehabilitate myself, successful, over the last 10

years, except for a relapse in 2008 after the death of my

father, I haven't committed any violent violent crimes for 10 years. Yet there are people doing armed robberies, committing murders and they're still in Australia. I don't understand it at all. What's the plan for you? Will you be talking to authorities here? There is a number of pool I have to get in contact with, lawyers, human

rights organisations and some self-help groups that I can speak to to try to find out what to do next. All the best to you. Thanks for talking to

us. Preparations way for next Friday's royal wedding. They're taking no chances. Every fixture, every

drain and everything in between along the route is being

checked and rechecked. And will

be until the big day. Even Westminster Abbey will be scan

t. It's all aimed at ensuring

the unthinkable remains just

that. We want to make sure that nothing compromises this event. We have to We have to be mindful of people

in the crowd who do want

disrupt it. Be have a robust

policing plan in place. It's

not just terrorist groups that

worry the police. Anarchists

too are expected to attempt make their presence felt as

they have during several recent

demonstrations. And while 5,000

police will watch from the

ground, police helicopters will

be scaning from above. On the be scaning from above. On the

day of the big event he will be listening to the command

channel, so we will be listening to all of the officers in charge of the police

to a central control room. Our

job is to respond job is to respond to their

needs and requests. The type of

groups that would like to carry

out a strike on London would

obviously be looking

obviously be looking to

capitalise on any publicity and

with the media focused on the

wedding this is a good occasion

to do so. And while it may not

offer much more than social protection, Kate Middleton's

family now has its own coat of

arms for arms for the happy occasion.

There are three acorn sprigs representing each of the

Middletons' children. The oak

tree, a traditional symbol of

tree, a traditional symbol of England. I understand that her

particular input was the sprigs

of oaks. She was very involved in the decision. Opposite

Buckingham Palace a multistorey

media castle has been built

with a view hundreds of

millions around the world will

share. If all goes according to plan? In just over

will be about a million people

here cheering as the royal

couple wave from the balcony

couple wave from the balcony

and a new era will have begun. Prime Minister Julia Gillard

flies out to Japan later today as part of a week-long visit

which will also include her

first official visit to

China. Ahead of a historic

tour, China's new ambassador to

Australia has told the ABC is

country is happy to talk about

human rights as well as

economic development. The ambassador

ambassador spoke to Andrew

Green in his interview since being appointed

China's top diplomat to

Australia. Thank you for

joining ABC News 24. Thank you . Julia Gillard is leaving for

her first official trip to

China. What does China want to hear from the Australian Prime Minister? During the

Minister? During the visit, the

leaders of the two countries,

we'll make comments on the

recent development between our two countries. The

leaders will set the direction

and objectives for the development of this

relationship in the next stage.

We will touch upon the

difficulties we are faceing in the current the current development. We

won't dodge these

won't dodge these difficulty

and challenges. We will work together with Australia to face

up and to meet these challenges. We can work

together to take up these confidence that the relations

between these two countries will achieve further development in the future. The

Chinese side is ready to

further strengthen our already

very strong cooperation with

Australia and to lay a new

solid foundation for the

development of our bilateral

relations in the economic,

social and cultural areas and

also we're ready to work together with Australia to

jointly tackle international and regional challenges. to work together and strengthen our cooperation in multilateral and

and regional settings. What

messages will Julia Gillard be

hearing from the Chinese leadership in Beijing? During

the visit, the leaders of the

two countries will make

positive comments on the recent

development of relations

between our two countries and

also the leaders will set the

direction and

direction and objectives for development of this relationship in the next stage. Is China happy with the

way Australia is approaching a carbon tax before an emissions

trading scheme? China is a

responsible big country in the

world. We have a very sense of responsibility for

protecting the environment and reducing emissions globally.

China is working hard with all countries including Australia

and making arduous efforts and making arduous efforts to

protect the environment of the world. China positively

comments on the efforts made by

countries in the world in this

respect. We hope and believe

that Australia will be able to achieve

achieve its emissions

reductions targets in accordance with its international obligations.

China is ready to work together

with Australia and make joint

efforts in fulfilling our

respective responsibility and

to make to make common contributions to

the common efforts in reducing

carbon emissions. Would you

expect Julia Gillard to raise such expect Julia Gillard to raise

such human rights concerns as the treatment of Stern Hu

during her visit? We all know

that China and Australia have a

lot of common points of

converging interests. And also, our two countries here similar position and views regarding

quite a number of international

and regional issues. At same time our two countries are different in terms of different in terms of political

system, culture and ideology.

It's only normal we sometimes

have different views regarding some particular issues. Has

the Australian Government

expressed any concerns to China

about reports of spying on email - government email - government email systems? Personally I'm not

aware of the situation you have

mentioned but personally I also

believe that there are some misunderstandings regarding

these matters. I believe that these misunderstandings will soon be clarified. soon be clarified. The Chinese

Government, its companies and

the people of China are relying

on their own capabilities and wisdom to pursue

wisdom to pursue development.

It's impossible for the companies and the people of

China to have development

through such kind of means. The

Chinese companies and the Chinese side Chinese side are carrying out

their operations in strict

accordance with the laws. They

are using the correct ways are using the correct ways to pursue development. I'm sure

that those allegations will be

proved wrong by the realitys that people will see. Thank

you very much for your

you very much for your time.

Julia Gillard off to China. On

her way she is going to Japan

and South Korea but off to China today on a big trip. That's our top story this

morning. You're watching 'ABC

News Breakfast'. Business ties

will be dominant theme of Julia Gillard's trip

Gillard's trip to China. hopes to make progress on the

free trade agreement while she

is there. Jetstar passengers

are facing further delays this morning after a security glitch

in Sydney yesterday. A terminal full of passengers had to be rescreened after a power

failure that left about 2,000 people stranded in Sydney overnight. Syria hasn't

stopped the violence in its

country. Several people are

reported to have died when security forces opened a large rally in the western

city of Homs. A look at what's

making news across the national

papers. We're joined by the general manager of CPR Communication and public

relations Jane Dullard. You couldn't avoid Tony Mokbel's face across the papers. The

most surprising thing for me

was the extent of the coverage nationally.

nationally. Three papers in

Western Australia, Sydney and

Canberra didn't run the story

on the front page but on the front page but covered

the story. Why do you think

that this particular crime story reaches so far? It's

because of the Underbelly

series? It must be that paradox of the big

paradox of the big drug story

is that even though we're

appalled by the impact of drugs

on our society we find these characters compelling and

fascinating. It's a shame,

really. 'Cause the story becomes one that's almost a Keystone Copsish in nature.

Tony Mokbel was nobody as the

general, the girl, Fat general, the girl, Fat Tony, the octopus. The 'Herald Sun'

has made the front running on

this story right throughout.

They've dedicateed about 10

pages to this today? Yes. $100 million drugs million drugs empire exposed.

That's the story That's the story in a nutshell. One of the pertinent

issues picked up here, if you

take a look for example at

6 of the Age newspaper,

Parliament of their spill

inside the paper which talks

about the silence ending, there

was something like 24

suppression orders in place on

this case. The 'Australian' and

one other newspaper had journos

in court every single day

throughout this story.

related mostly to the murder of

Lewis Moran. Which he has now

been found not guilty of? Do

we actually need to look some

kind of judicial reform so that we don't get stuck in the

situation where so much of what

is in the public interest has

to be concealed in order to

enable fair trials ? He

continued to make $4 million

from drug dealing. That small

issue aside the issue aside the fact these suppression orders are there

allowed these cases to be held.

At least it's all part of the

reportage today. That's why I

think it's so large. That's a

good point. Has justice been

done, 20 years? I know articles have last few years about the

suppression orders and how much

they have strangled coverage of

a fairly important story. There

was discussion about using the

Roy Morgan research to see how

many people knew Mokbel and

whether he'd be able to get a

fair trial. 83% knew him. To

your point, it's more about the

trial actually being covered

but I guess when you do read

the stories you realise how complex business was. Therefore all

these other crimes and

misdemeanours, they had misdemeanours, they had to come to some negotiation which is

what it boiled down to in the end. The other interesting

point is what does this say

about the status of drugs in

our society? It was not

reported anywhere how much the

operations have cost the public

purse. We had that story week where there's a $50

billion illegal economy

operating largely because of

Australia's love of party

drugs. This is one. How many more are operating in terms of

that shiz in the economy where this is big business? That's

right. His empire has been with amphetamines or speed or ecstasy, party drugs. It's a

huge drain on policing

resources apart from anything

else. Do you get the feeling with the coverage today that

this was one last big splash

that to the underworld war that

started so many years ago, the

Mokbel story was really the untold part of that? That's

exactly right. It is a most unedifying story in totality. Has been more many years. I

will be glad not to have to

read about it too much any

more! The picture we had was dead, dead, dead, tells the whole story. PM's

carbon test for business Julia Gillard has laid down the gauntlet, asking the CEO gauntlet, asking the CEO there, do you support a 5% reduction in emissions? I think at last a strategic clever move in this terribly poisonous battle for public will. When she returns from her tour of north Asia or she won't which will be just as

telling, she will have something quite definitive with which she will be able to go out to the public and say we have agreement on the principle of this matter, or they don't support us at all. As a public relations expert, what have you made of the Prime Minister's handling primarily, in say the last couple of weeks? Talking about for about for example emissions reduction and carbon rather than pollution way back when was probably a was probably a mistake.

Pollution is something we can

see and smell. We know it's

bad, we don't like it. This has

been much discussed, the

leadership role

strong and saying we have to do

this, we will do it. The

drip-feeding fg information,

would you be advising that? I would you be advising that? I don't know that that is particularly useful. You have

these other multimillion

campaigns to oppose her. It's a

tough position. I'm working in PR and had defend the industry.

I think it's a good way of

getting better policy outcomes.

We had it for the mining tax. The

The launch of these massive don't try to find a compromise

position, it's just I'm going

to slam you until you give in,

it's not good for public policy

in Australia, indon't think.

Great to see you. Thanks for

coming in. A look now at the sport with Amy Bainbridge.

Good morning again. Sydney FC

has twice come from behind to

grab a 3-2 win in its Asian Champions

Champions League match last

night in China. The win moves

Sydney within one point of the qualification spot. Sydney's

next match is against South

Korean leaders Su Korean leaders Su Wong early

next month. Samantha Stosur has

booked her place in the second

round of Stuttgart's WTA

round of Stuttgart's WTA tournament. She won over Jose

Martinez Sanchez. Stosur, Martinez Sanchez. Stosur, who

reached last year's final,

needed just 80 minutes to see

off the Spaniard for a straight

sets win. Stosur now faces Slovakia's Daniela Hantuchova in the second round A medical

review will be conducted to determine the playing future of Sydney Roosters star Todd

Carney. Club officials say they

will be guided by medical

professionals to determine how

to deal with Carney's alcohol problem and when he might

return to play. The club has

suspended Carney and team-mate Anthony Watts indefinitely. The

NRL Chief Executive says it's

clear Carney needs all like to help him get back on track. Sometimes footy is

the only routine in these guys'

lives that keeps them from completely going off the rails.

His actions on Saturday night

with such a disregard for what he promised seems to indicate

that he is in need of special

help and to be dealt with a

little bit

little bit uniquely. We speculating whether he'd be

suspended or dismissed from the

club. It appears the Roosters and the league want to give

Todd Carney another chance and the support he needs. They

could critically look to Ben Cousins' recovery as a guiding

help. He does need to be treated I think rather treated I think rather

uniquely. The language has changed now. He has been talked

about as a victim as

about as a victim as well, which some people don't like.

They don't like - would he be

treated uniquely if he wasn't

the reigning Dally M medal

are trying to get over some

form of major addiction need a

distraction a focus to take

their focus away from that addiction. All the experts will

tell you that. They need to be

able to turn up for training,

having something they can pour their energies and focus Vanessa O'Hanlon. Following a

wet couple of days in southern and central Queensland, a and central Queensland, a trough in the east is weakening. Another trough is

bringing a cooler change and a

few showers to South Australia

and Victoria. A low and Victoria. A low over the Coral Sea is weakening as it

drifts away, the showers will

ease in Queensland. A front is approaching Tasmania, maintaining showers mainly over the west.

Still ahead we will be

talking to Andrew Rule, he has

done most of the running in the

reporting of the Mokbel story

which has splashed across all

the pages this morning.

Trade Trade talks top the agenda on Julia Gillard's three-nation Asian tour.

A power failure leaves Jetstar flight schedules in chaos. No

flights to Brisbane until

Saturday. So I've got a flight

to the Gold Coast tomorrow at

3.25. Deported and despondent. Convicted criminal Clifford

Tucker arrives back in Tucker arrives back in Britain. Because of my past crimes, I've got to be deported to a strange to me. I don't know

anything about Britain. I was 6

when I left. Concerns about the

mental state of wayward Rooster

Todd Carney.

Good morning. The top story

on 'ABC News Breakfast' - trade

is high on Julia is high on Julia Gillard's

topics for discussion when she

jets off for a week-long north

Asian tour this morning. The

Prime Minister will be the

first world leader to visit

Japan since last month's tsunami and earthquake. She

will then move on to South Korea and China where she hopes

to push along negotiations for a free trade deal with both countries. China that's new ambassador to Australia has

told the ABC his country is

also happy to talk about human

rights even rights even though

disagreements exist. For more

on this tricky path, the Prime

Minister is going to travel,

Melissa Clarke joins us from Canberra.

Canberra. And importantly in

some of the repair work the

Prime Minister is doing, she is

starting her trip in Japan? I

auto that's right. It's a

deliberate move, designed assure the Japanese that Australia does value its

relationship with China or on a

level of that with China, there

doesn't want to be any sort of

perceived snub by Julia Gillard

by visiting China first. So

Japan is the first stop-off on

her trip before going to South

Korea and then into China hand then eventually on to London for the royal wedding. But this

week she will be spending in

north Asia really will be

focused on financial matters. It was set up before the

Japan. And although that will

now be a focus of her trip she

will be visiting some of those affected region, it's the

financial elements she will be

putting as a priority, moving along free trade agreement

negotiations with South Korea

and China and looking at

increasing investment, going

both ways between Australia and

those three countries. She will

also be negotiating fairly difficult issues, because while

she's trying to make sure we do

business and we keep those business and we keep those

business ties strong, there are

human rights issues on the

agenda as well? She has made

it clear she will be raising those issues. She says that she

has a robust relationship with

all these other nations and she

will raise the full range of issues during her trip, including the issue of human rights in China. She has

confirmed the issue of Stern Hu is one she will raise with

Chinese officials when she is

there. The Chinese ambassador

to Australia has spoken for the

first time since his

appointment with ABC News 24's

Andrew Green. He was asked how

China might react to that. This

was his very diplomatic

response. We all know that

China and Australia have a lot

of common points

interests and also our two interests and also our two countries share many similar

positions and views regarding

quite a number of international

and regional issues. At the

same time, our two countries

are different in terms of

political system, culture and

ideology. So it is only normal

that we sometimes have different views regarding

particular issues. Wayne Swan

continues to work on the

budget, letting us know that

the mining boom won't

necessarily be any good to the

economy? I auto it's the last

speech that Wayne Swan will

hand down before the budget in

May. It's his last chance to

formally shape expectations. To

this point we've heard a lot

from Wayne Swan about how it will be a tough budget

will be a tough budget and

particularly the next few

years. situation, even though the mining boom Mark 2 is on the

horizon. What he will say in his speech to the Queensland

Media Club today is that that

boom won't be like the first mining boom. He is warning there won'ting the rivers of

gold flowing into Commonwealth

coffers that we saw in the

Howard and Costello years. Although things will pick up

and there

and there will be a big push in

that sector of the economy, it

won't necessarily mean the same

sorts of revenue flows and it won't necessarily the rest of the economy as

well. A broader warning this

time about not only the

short-term impact we're facing

but perhaps dampening

expectations for the longer term as well. Thanks

Talk to you later. Other news

now. Jetstar's trying to get its its flight schedules back on

track after a power failure

track after a power failure hat Sydney Airport yesterday. Several passengers went through the terminal without being

screened, which forced the

airline to screen all its

passengers again. That caused

chaos, flights were delayed and

about 2,000 passengers were

forced to spend the night in

Sydney. Security forces have

opened fire on a mass rally in

Syria. Thousands have gathered in the in the western city of to eight people were reportedly

killed. The Syrian government

has lifted its decades old

state of emergency but has

warned people not to take part in

in further demonstrations. It's

It's understood Syrian officers

will be part of a joint

operation with the French and intelligence train. Britain says they won't be involved in says they won't be involved in the fighting and the operation is consistent with the UN

resolution on Libya. Fidel

Castro has made a appearance at Cuba's Communist Party Congress. He was unsteady

on his feet as he took to the

stage greeted by thunderous applause. It's first time he

and his brother have been seen

together in public since Raul

Castro took over the presidency five years five years ago. And an international conference called to raise money for new safety

measures at Chernobyl has

fallen short It's 25 years since the world's worst nuclear disaster at Chernobyl. The Ukranianan

government wants to build a new

sarcophagus around the damaged reactor. Clifford Tucker is

back in Britain after being

kicked out of Australia because

of his criminal record. The

47-year-old

47-year-old has to come to

terms with a new life in a terms with a new life in a

country he hasn't seen for 40

years. Clifd tucker has been

thrown back into a world now

completely foreign to him.

has lived for 41 years. Raised

a family and built a

life. Because of my past crimes I have to I have to be deported to a country that's completely strange to

strange to me. I don't know

anything about it. I was 6 anything about it. I was 6 when

I left. To say I can never come

back to Australia to walk my

daughter down the aisle, to be

with my sick mother who's 73

and needs my help and to see my family, never is devastating. On return from a

recent Bali holiday he ticked

yes to the box regarding convictions. It's earned him a

year in Sydney's Villawood

detention centre and now deportation to

deportation to Britain. He admits he's no angel but says

he has done his team for shooting a police officer at

19. He says there was no talk

of deportation then, nor after a subsequent assault charge but it was enough for him to fail

the character test after his

first overseas trip. The first overseas trip. The law need to change. We don't deport people

people who came out here as children or long-term three bags and a hotel room for six weeks after which time he's

on his own. And separated from

his three children indefinitely. Hi are you doing? I'd love to be

able to hug my daughter and

tell them I love them and kiss them

them goodnight. I can't do any of that. He has never thought

about applying for Australian. Australia's Minister for Immigration says Mr Tucker's convictions

outweigh any family ties to Australia. But Australia. But there Mr Tucker says he will continue to challenge Australia's law

covering the expulsion of long-term

long-term residents. Mr Tucker

says he feels more lost here

than most of these tourists. He

says he asked guards to carry

him onto the plane because he

couldn't bring himself to walk

on. Australia has spent $25,000

on his deportation, which he

will be billed for

makes it home. Thousands of passengers have been stranded at Sydney

at Sydney Airport after a

failure yesterday caused a

security breach. Ursula ma

lope joins us from Sydney Airport. What can you tell bugs

the situation there this

morning? We have some good news

for you at Terminal Two, the

domestic terminal at Sydney

Airport. I don't know if you

can see behind me but just half an hour ago there were very

long queues, snaking right around

largely cleared now. There are

just probably a normal amount

of people waiting to board

flights. This morning, it is Easter time, it is holiday time. There were a lot of

passengers. A lot of that will

be normal holiday traffic but

we did find some people, quite

a few people, who were stranded

here overnight. Some of them

had gone home. Some had been

sent to hotels or had stayed with friends. Some were

travelling with small children. Some

Some looked pretty tired and

harried. And we spoke to them about the delays they experienced. This of them told us a bit earlier.

We checked