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ABC News Breakfast -

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(generated from captions) This Program is Captioned Live. Community fire refuges

and warning sirens just some of

the sweeping changes to be

recommend told the black

Saturday royal commission

today. Iran moves closer to

isolation of disqualifying the

European Union from talks on

its nuclear program. Job

protection and I believe

disadvantage the focus of

today's COAG meeting in Darwin. And Lleyton Hewitt

loses a five set thriller to

Andy Roddick at Wimbledon.

Good morning. It's Thursday 2

July, I'm Virginia Trioli. And

I'm Paul Kennedy. The top story

on News Breakfast - lawyers

assisting the royal commission

into the Black Saturday

bushfires will today recommend

a sweeping overhaul of

Victoria's fire safety systems.

The ABC has obtained a copy of the recommendations which

include heavy criticism for the

chief of the Country Fire Authority. The commission will

also be urged to consider reestablishing community fire

refuge centres and also the

installation of warning sirens

in towns that want them. Jane

Cowan reports. Victoria's

bushfires devastated whole

communities. Now, counsel

assisting the commission want

radical change. Draft documents

obtained by the ABC suggest the

commissioners will be asked to

drastically rework the

contentious stay or go policy.

It's been under question since

it was revealed is 13 of those

who died on black Saturday were

trying to shelter inside

houses. Now alongside the

option to stay and defend

communities under threat will

be told when evacuation is

recommended. But they won't be

forced to go. According to

draft recommendations community

fire refuges should be revived.

They could be in park, shopping

centres or even dams. This is a

chance for a bipartisan

approach by Victoria's fire

services and the political

parties of this State to fix

the problem once and for

all. Also favoured by the

commission's legal team, use of

the alert torn played in

northern Australia to warn of

cyclones and sirens for towns

that want them. Something

that's been resisted by

authorities in the past. The

recommendations are on the

right track but the Government

should be compelled to

implement the recommendations,

not just allowing them to sit

on the shelf like previous

inquests. That's our greatest

fear. They should be compelled.

We owe that to the people who

died in these fires The counsel

assisting the commission also

makes a damning assessment of

Victoria's fire agencies. They

say authorities were not

prepared for Black Saturday,

even as they warned the

community to get ready. The CFA

boss Russell Rhyce is singled

out for criticism, senior

counsel assisting jaush Rush QC

describes his role on the day

has divorced from md aspects of

the responsibilities of chief officer. They included the provision of public warnings

and the protection of life. In

my opinion, anyone involvehead

in emergency services who is

not absolutely up to the task

is a dangerous person and

there's no place for them in

public Administration. In

particular, counsel assisting say Mr Rhyce should have made

himself aware of fire maps that

predicted the path of the fires

hours before they destroyed

homes and claimed lives. Absolutely essential

that that counsel assisting identifies those leaders and emergency services who don't

have his confidence and he must

make a recommendation that they

go and that they go now. This

is like dealing with a surgeon

and if a surgeon is implicated

in a large number of deaths

they remove their licence to

operate. The CFA told the ABC

it has full confidence in the

fire chief. And expects him to

be at the helm again this summer. Whatever changes are

made as it stand numerous the

same management team that

presided over the system which

failed the cope on Black

Saturday will be required to

implement the new regime. Some

say that's a problem. We still

have people running these

organisations who are pro

dominantly devoted to

firefighting technology that is no longer in vogue, let alone

being atune to the needs of

behavioural management and

leadership. In other proposed

recommendations the Weather

Bureau will be encouraged to

tell the public about the

forecast forest fire danger

index, something normally only

circulated within the ranks of

energy services. And the ABC

might lose its monopoly as the

emergency broadcaster,

commercial operators could be

invited into similar

arrangements. Jane Cowan with

nah report. In other news, Iran

one on the brink of furs

ieltionlation. The country says

lit no longer negotiate with

the European Union about its

nuclear program. EU States say they're considers withdrawing their ambassadors in response

and Iranian Government militia

has called called for the

Opposition Leader Mir Hossein

Mousavi to be prosecuted for

his role in the post election

protests. The PM Kevin Rudd

says today's COAG meeting in

Darwin will focus on reducing

indigenous disadvantage. Lobby

xwroup groups say a national

plan will only work if that's done in sultation with

Aboriginal communities. Federal

State and Territory leaders at

the meet willing unveil a new

measure to tackle U. -

unemployment. Victorian health

authorities have still yet to

release details about the death

of a 3-year-old boy with swine

flu. At least nine Australians

suffering from the virus have

died, the WHO says nor man

77,000 people worldwide have

the flew flu. 3330 people have

died. The sole survivor from a

plane which crashed into the

Indian ocean has spoken of her

ordeal. The teenage girl told

her father she clung to a piece

of debris. It's believed she

was in the water for is # 1 #

hours before picked up by a

passing boat. Michael Jackson's

will has been filed in a Los

Angeles court. The pop star has

left his entire estate to his

family, with his mother

nominated as the garden of his

three children. Singer Diana

Ross is named as an every

garden. Debbie Rowe has been

left out, a public viewing of

Michael Jackson's body at his

Neverland ranch could be held

as early as tomorrow. Returning

to today's meeting between the

PM and State and Territory

leaders in Darwin. Kirrin

McKechnie joins us now live

from Canberra. What can you

tell about this plan to tackle unemployment? Well, Paul,

there's a range of issues on

the agenda at coagency. Among

them is hopes to tackle

indigenous disadvantage,

closing the gap. Economic

issues too will be front and

centre as always, but there's

this new plan to tackle rising unemployment because of course

unemployment is forecast to

grow this year. The government

is unveiling a plan to get

retrenched work endorse

vocational education. You may

remember earlier this year they

announced a plan to help people

under the age of 25 who were

unemployed get them either

earning or learning. It's a

similar plan. Basically anyone

who has lost their job this

year will be provided with a vocational education training

place and the Government

expects to help about 120,000

people through this program

that they're announcing

today. And the States are going

to ask for more compensation on

the eventual ETS plan that

comes up. How are they likely

to go there? Well in is an

interesting one. This has come

from the Australia institute,

the public policy think tank.

It's basically saying that the

States and Territories are

going to be one of the hardest

hit by the Emissions Trading

Scheme, basically the Australia

institute is saying that

because an ETS will push up the

price of electricity it's

really going to hit State-run

schools, hospitals and the

like, it's going to push up the

electricity bills there and it

could go into billion of dollars, so it's suggesting

that the States should be

compensated when the ETS is

eventually up and running,

that's something that has been

been back by bob Brown. He's

suggesting that he'll be

pushing the Government to

basically legislate to

compensate the States on an ETS

and while he is had it, Bob

Brown is a little bit cranky

with the Government over the

way that that's been handling

negotiating on the ETS.

Basically bosh Brown's not

feeling the love, let's have a

little listen to him on

Lateline last night? Politic

social security a two way

street. Don't take us for

fronted. Kevin Rudd's been

doing that. He's committed to a

number of things which he

hasn't carried through with,

out comes a forest statement

which is going to make climate

change manifestly worse and

which got written through it

"further public spending into

the industry which is destroying the nation's forests

and woodlands." No "let's enter

a dialogue here." He knows the

sporns of that issue but here

but has been completely

dismissive. The Greens are not

a faction and we expect fair

dealing from PM Rudd and he's

not showing it. Not feeling the

love there and I guess the

State and Territory leaders

will be making the statement

point in talking about that

compensation but Penny Wong has already said that the Federal

Government will try and

compensate householders and not

the States and Territories. Do

you think there'll be a fierce

debate today? Look, I'm sure

the State also try and put that

on the agenda. I'm not sure if

it's an official agenda item

but Bob Brown is basically

saying if the Government is

happy to compensate heavy

polluters, then the least it

can do is compensate the States

for rising electricity bills in our schools and our

hospitals. What do you know

about I believe affairs and

what they're likely to talk

about there today. It is in

Darwin and Kevin Rudd has said

that it will be foremost at

that meeting? Look, yeah, as

you say, he has put indigenous

disadvantage on the agenda.

Trying to close the gap in a

number of key areas like

health. We haven't seen any

details of anything that they

Ma be announcing today. I

wouldn't be surprised if Kevin

Rudd did visit an indigenous

community while he's in the

Northern Territory though

sometime today. And Malcolm

Turnbull is due back today

after his trip to Afghanistan.

How do you think that went for

him? Finally we know why he

went to ground and where he went. I don't think you've got

a betterer excuse for

disappearing after a week like

the week that he had by going

to visit troops in a war-torn

country. Paul, I think it's a

good tactic. There's nothing

worse for an Opposition Leader

when they're facing leadership

speculation than day after day

having to answer questions about whether their leadership

is safe. Instead, he's gone to Afghanistan, showing I guess

he's a leader by heading to a

war-torn country and also

showing that he's a man of the

people by sort of getting in

and mucking in with the troops

so a good decision there by Malcolm Turnbull but certainly

explains why he's been missing

in action for the last few

days. OK thank you for that

Kirrin McKechnie live in

Canberra. I think that was a

trip that was planned last

November It was. We should say

because otherwise it looks like

it's a bit too politically

convenient but clearly a less

dangerous place, Afghanistan,

for him than Australia is right

now At least a good break for

him. Moving on now, the great

train robber Ronnie Biggs is to

remain in prison because he's

never shown remorse for his

crime. Britain's justice

secretary Jack Straw denied the

79-year-old patrol despite a

recommendation to set him free.

Philip Williams reports from London. Ronnie Biggs enjoying

better days as a fugitive in

Brazil. He'd also spent time on

the run in Australia. But as

the money ran out and his

health disappeared with it, he

returned to Britain and to jail

eight years ago. And while the

parole board recommended his

release after three strokes

left him crippled and unable to

talk, the 79-year-old's bid for

freedom in his own country was

thwarted because he'd refused

to show remorse. I don't reyet

the fact that I was involved in

a train robbery and as a matter

of a fact I am pleased with the

idea that I was involved in it.

Because it's given me a little

place in history. I've made a

mark for myself. That attitude

led to the British Justice

secretary rejecting wig big

release. He'd escape affidavit

sevening one year of a 30 year

sentence for his part in the

great train robbery which

netted the gang the 2.6 million

pounds in used bank notes in

1963 but his lawyer says the

decision to keep him in prison

is cruel. This is an

80-year-old man, in August,

shall we have some compassion

for a man that may have laughed

at justice but has come back

and said sorry? Ronnie Biggs remains under guard in a nor witch hospital after breaking

his hip. His son says his

health the failing badly but

with his latest bid for release

quashed there seems little hope

he'll ever enjoy another

moment's freedom again. Now the

front pages of the major

newspapers around the country.

The 'Sydney Morning Herald'

says former Federal MPs have

claimed 20,000 taxpayer-funded

flights since 2001. The free

thriegts have cost taxpayers

more than $8.3 million

according to the 'West Australian'. The 'Age' also

reports on taxpayers footing

the bill for high flying ex-politicians. The 'Australian' says the Rudd

Government has called on unions

to exercise wage restraint. The

'Financial Review' says the

Federal Government has bowed to

pressure to restore tax

concessions for most employee

share schemes. The 'Daily

Telegraph' says Julia Gillard

has criticised the NSW State

Opposition for opposing school

league tables and the paper

also reports on the impending

berth of Sydney's biggest baby

and that's the elephant. The

'Canberra Times' reports the

ACT Government has been

criticised for its decision to

replace members of a local

company board. The 'Courier-Mail' reports the debt

of one of Queensland's biggest

developers has plunged the

state's property market into

crisis. The 'Northern Territory

News' reports workers at a

juvenile detention centre have

won a payout because they were

not allowed meal breaks. The paymenter also reports on

yesterday's Territory Day

celebrations. Tasmanian police

have appealed for information about the death of a Chinese

student according to the 'Mercury'. The Adelaide

'Advertiser' says South

Australian police have

impounded a record number of

hoon cars in the past year. And

the 'Herald Sun' reports on

Melbourne football club President Jim Stynes's health

fight. What do we know about

that? They're going to make an

announcement. There'll be some

sort of press conference this

morning but beyond that we

don't know what the health

problem itself is, but that Jim

Stynes will probably be

stepping down as President of

member football club and it is

shock and he's only been in

that job for a year and a

half It would be a huge loss

their controversials from time because as the code's battle

to time Jim Stynes is one of

the genuine all time good

guys. We can talk more about

his career with Luke Waters in

the sports section but let's

hope he's not too unwell.. If

you'd like to send us your

feedback on any news stories

today/or -

The top stories on News

Breakfast - lawyers acting for

the royal commission into the

Victoria's bushfires are expected to recommend an

overhaul of the State's fire

safety systems. Draft documents

suggest the stay or go policy

should be revised while the

reib statement of fire refuges

should also be considered. Iran

draws further condemnation from

the international community

after saying it will no longer negotiate with the European

Union about its nuclear

program. An Iranian Government

militia has also called for the

Opposition Leader Mir Hossein

Mousavi to be prosecuted for

his alleged role in the post

election protests. The PM Kevin

Rudd says today's COAG meeting

in Darwin will focus on

reducing indigenous disadvantage. Federal State and

Territory leaders are also

expected to unveil a new

measure to tackle unemployment. The Federal

Government has released more crucial details about Australia's big spending

defence acquisition plan. The

$60 billion shopping spree will

sustain an entire industry

according to Defence Minister

but the Opposition claims the

new plan is too vague. Hayden

Cooper reports. He's being

conspicuous which by his recent

absense but now we know why -

Malcolm Turnbull is on

assignment.. Here where

Australian troops are on the

front line in the battle

against terror. He left for the

secret Afghanistan mission on

Sunday. After a week after

dodging political bullets at

home. Notwithstanding all the

disagreement in Canberra the

one thing we all agree on is

you deserve parliament's

support, the Government's

support, the Opposition's

support because you have the

support of the Australian

people. So let's have a good

barb kie. As he and Julie

Bishop experienced it. Develop

this land here... Back in

Australia the new Minister was

casting an eye to the future in

the weapons of war the defence

force demands. Our commitment

to supporting the men and women

of the ADF is unwaivering. The

defence capability plan sets

out the big equipment shopping

list for the army, navy and air

force. And it doesn't come cheaply. 110 capability

projects or phases with a total

Budget of some $60 billion. The

plan for Australia's military future was laid out earlier

this year in the white paper.

New submarines, warship,

missiles, and joint strike

fighters form the centre

piece. This document gives the

defence industry the detail of

how the vision will be

achieved. It's a mixture of the

good and perhaps the qualified

but it is a step forward. Paul

Dibb is a former deputy

secretary of defence. He's

disappointed that unlike

previous reports this plan

covers only the next four

years. It is a pity it doesn't

in detail go forward ten years

or indeed to 2030 which is what

the defence budget in the white

paper allegedly was based on

but 220 pages of detail and $60

billion is good enough for me

as a start. I wanted to satisfy

myself that we wore delivering

this certainty in planning that

we had promised. And while John

Faulkner saws the big spend

will create 5,000 jobs in the

industry, he's still driving

his department to save $20

billion . That is serious

money. Tomorrow, the attention

will shift north to Darwin for

the latest meeting between the

PM and the Premiers. COAG will

cover familiar terrain like

unemployment, and training, as

well as indigenous life

expectancy. Making a difference

in areas like welfare n

education, in health outcomes

and employment. That's what

we're on about. Just another

stop in the PM's hard hat tour

of the nation. Australia's unemployment figures are

released today and there are

concerns we're about to see a

significant rise but even if

the jobless rate goes up

Australia is still in much

better shape than most other

western economies. Morgan Stanley's Chairman in Asia,

Stephen Roach, says the United

States in particular will

experience a very slow

recovery. I think this will be

about the weakest recovery from

a major recession in the modern

post World War II history of

the United States. The consumer

right now is 72% of the GDP, no

nation has ever relied that

much on internal private

consumption has a major source

of economic growth and

consumers are tapped out. They

have record levels of debt,

they've been hit with a

property shock, the bursts of a

credit bubble, an equity shock,

and a labour market shock which

has taken the unemployment rate

very close to 10% right now, on

its way possibly even higher

toward 11% so consumers are

pulling back as never

before. The US car manufacturer

Ford has released better than

expected sales figures for

June. The company said it's

American car sales were don by

only 10.7%. Compared to June

last year. And still on the US

economy, where the

manufacturing sector slowed in

June, the institute for supply

management says its index of

national factorory edged up to

44.8 in June from 42.8 in May.

Analysts say it's a positive

sign. Iraq has signed off on a

deal with Britain's energy

company BP and China national

petroleum to develop its

massive Rumaila oil field. It

was the only day to come out of

the first international oil

tender in 30 years. Iraq

rejected a slew of form offers

to develop its oil and gas reserves. To the figures now -

Vanessa O'Hanlon will be here

with a look at the national

weather for you. And also ahe'd

we'll have a ve u of some of the newspapers. This morning

we'll be joined by Gay Alcorn,

the editor of the 'Sunday Age'.

Now for the sport, and some news from Wimbledon here is

Luke Waters. Thank you Paul. Good morning. Lleyton Hewitt

has bowed out of the Wimbledon

quarterfinals losing in five

sets to American Andy Roddick.

It was a typically brave

performance from the South

Australian who fought back

twice in the match but just

couldn'tover come the power of Roddick. APPLAUSE

COMMENTATOR: Toughest thing to

do. How good is he get - is to

close out matches of this type.

And Roddick stopped at 30-love,

it's now 30-30.

In the other matches number

one seed Roger Federer Germany

Tommy Haas and Andy Murray also

made it through to the semis.

Let's take a look at those

games. APPLAUSE

Gait, set, match, Federer.

6-3, 7-5, swim. - 6-6. Game and

third set. Thank you. Game,

set, match Haas. Three sets to

one. 7-5, 6-64-6...

To rugby now and Lote Tuqiri

is taking legal action against

the Australian Rugby Union for

it decision to terminate

husband contract. His agent

says tutu has spoken with

lawyers who will commence

proceedings against the ARU.

The governing bod gi released a

statement saying it's a

standard employment matter. The former Bronco, Origin and

Kangaroos will be the target of

rugby league clubs egg

foresecure his signature. To

cricket and Australia has

narrowly taken the honourablors

in its tour match against the

English Lions notching up 337

runs. Mike Hussey was the star

returning to form with 143 not

out, Katich made 95. But the

rest of the Australia you top

order failed. Let's take a

look. Edged and gone. Sharp

chance, well taken by him.

That's beaten mid wicket and

Katich goes lunch with another

boundary under his belt. Just

challenged the fielder out like

he didn't even really bother to

look. He just said, "I'm going

for two." And that's out.

Straight away. It's the end of

Clarke. It's right in the slot

for a left-handed

batsmen. Looked like some old

highlights in there. Might have

been Geoff Marsh there. It

might have been Mark Taylor.

Wouldn't bit good to have Mark

Taylor at the start of his

career. On the cricket the

England side are also playing a

practice match and Cook made a

century for them and the

English batting looks to be in

good nick and later we'll

discuss the situation in more

depth about Jim Stynes who has

some mystery illness and it

appears he'll be resigning at

some stage today. How did you

read Lleyton Hewitt's

performance. Your take on the

match For a guy that doesn't

have a real weapon in tennis, a

big serve or anything like

that, it's uncompromising

tenacity, just chases balls

down. To come up with a guy

like Roddick with a weapon of a

serve and to have done as well

as he did, it's a great effort

from Lleyton Hewitt. Hod

Roddick has 43 aces. He served

at his best. He virtually

didn't make a mistake on his

backhand for more than three

hours Which makes it all the

more amazing that Lleyton

Hewitt took him as far as he

did. Must be disenchanting to

watch them whistle past your

ears when receiving. News

Breakfast can be watching live

anywhere on the web - And now

Vanessa O'Hanlon joins us for

the weather. Good morning Paul.

It's much warmer here in St

too. After a guy t couple of

weeks on the snow fields, gale

force winds have triggered snow

falls, 15 centimetre at mt

Hotham. From the satellite more

fwusy showers for the

south-east with cloud and a

series of troughs, cloud

onshore winds and a few light

showers for the southern coasts and cloud sweeping into Western

Australia. This will cause a

few showers along the north

coast. A trough moving over the

south-east and a low just off

Tasmania is producing a

vigorous north-west air flow

giving a burst of strong colder

winds, showers and more snow

across the alps, ahead of a

series of front also start

crossing the the region this

afternoon. After a warm warmer

than usual few days, a cooler

change is the on way for the

southern parts of Queensland

while a high in the west will

clear the showers from southern

Western Australia and also the

Pilbara.

The stop story on News

Breakfast - lawyers assisting

the royal commission into the

Black Saturday bushfires will

today recommend a sweeping

overhaul of Victoria's fire

safe tiff systems. The ABC's

obtained a copy of the

recommendations which include

heavy criticism for the chief

of the Country Fire

Authority. The commission will

also be urged to consider

reestablishing community fire

refuge centres and the

installation of warning sirens

in towns that want them. Jane

jaeb reports. It's a dramatic

response to a devastating

catastrophe. Draft documents

obtained by the ABC suggest counsel assisting the commission will recommend the

contentious stay or go policy

will comprehensively reworked

making room for selective

voluntary evak acheses and the

reinstatement of community fire

refuges. Also favoured by the

commissions legal team - the

use of the alert tone played in

northern Australia to warn of

cyclones and sirens for towns

that want them. The

recommendations are on the

right track, but the Government

should be compelled to

implement the recommendations. The counsel assisting the commission has

found the fire agencies were

ill prepared for Black Saturday

TC FA boss Russell Rhyce is

singled out for criticism.

Counsel assisting jack Rush QC

describes his role as divorce

from fundamental aspects of the

responsibilities he had as

chief officer including the

provision of pluck warnings and

the protection of life. Anyone

involved in emergency services

who was not absolutely up to

the task is a dangerous person

and there's no place for them

in public Administration. The

finding assert Mr Rhyce should

have made himself aware of

predictions forecasting the

path of the fires. Whatever

changes are made as it stands

now the same management team

that presided over the system

with write failed to cope on Black Saturday will be required

to implement the new regime.

Some say that's a problem. We

still have people running these

organisations who are

predominantly devoted to

firefighting technology that is

no longer in vogue. Let alone

being atuned to the needs of behavioural management and

leadership. The CFA says it has

full confidence in the fire

chief and expects him to be at

the helm again this summer. You can bet of course there's going

to be some heated debate and

discussion about the recommend

acheses made to the royal commission when they're

revealed today. We'd love to

hear your earl iviews on what

we've been reporting this

morning, you can send email to

us at:

In other news Iran could be

on the brimpg of further

isolation, the country says it

will no longer negotiate with

European Union about its

nuclear program. EU states say they're considering withdrawing their ambassadors in response

and an Iranian xwufrt militia

has also called for the Opposition Leader Mir Hossein

Mousavi to be prosecuted over

his role in the post election

protests. The PM Kevin Rudd

says today's COAG meeting in

Darwin will focus on reducing

indigenous disadvantage, lobby

groups say a national plan will

only work if it's done in

consultation with Aboriginal communities. Federal State and Territory leaders at the

meeting will also unveil a new

measure to tackle unemployment.

The scheme will guarantee

skills training places for all

retrenched workers. Honduras

interim Government says there

is no chance of the country's

ousted President returning to

power. The country's Foreign

Minister said President Manuel

Zelaya would be arrested if he returned. Manuel Zelaya says he

is determined to return to

Honduras this weekend. He was

thoun out of the council in a

coup on Sunday. The sole

survivor from a plan which

crashed into the Indian ocean

has spoken of her ordeal. The

teenage girl told her father

she clung to a piece of debris.

It's believed she was in the

water for 12 hours before being

picked up by a passing boat.

Both the EU and France say

they'd flagged safety concerns

about Yemenia planes. And

Michael Jackson's will has been

filed in a Los Angeles court.

The pop star has left his

entire estate to his family

with his mother nominated as

the guardian of his three

children. Singer Diana Ross is

named as an every guardian,

Jackson's ex-wife Debbie Rowe

has been left out. A public

viewing of his body at his

Neverland ranch could be held

as early as tomorrow. Lebanese

authorities claim to have

cracked a web of spy ription

set up by Israel to infillerate

the country's south N recent

weeks nearly 40 people have

been ape rised op suspicion of

euponage or collaboration with

the Jewish state. Among them

former army officerses and

police. Middle East correspond

Anne Barker reports. A

Lebanese man is accused of

spying for Israel. A crime that

can earn the death penalty.

Security forces snow mercy as

they arrest him and pundled him

into the boot of a car. The

arrest of another spy suspect

in this quiet town in Lebanon's

valley was slightly more vooifl

ised but no less public. This

photograph was taken six years

or seven years ago. Army

officers came in the dead of

night to arrest Ziad Al Homsi,

one of the most high profile

suspects captured so far by

Lebanese forces. His arrest has

shocked the small town, not

just because he's a form mayor

but he has an impressive past

fighting against Israel for the

Lebanese. In 196 # he was

photographed with PLO leader

Yasser Arafat. So loyal was

Ziad Al Homsi to the Arab cause

his family can't accept he's an

Israeli agent. He spent a lot

of time, years, out of the town, fighting and protecting

the country. He killed them. He

killed them. How can he spy for

them?? For weeks suspects like

Ziad Al Homsi have dominated

the news in Lebanon. Nearly 40

suspects have been arrested in

a campaign that's gripped the

nation. They come from all

walks of life. Men and women,

Christian and Muslim, rich and

poor. One is a retired general,

along with his life and son.

Those found guilty are believed

to have been coerced or

blackmailed into collaboration,

many others by money. They've

been paid 15,000 dollars or

more for the first month,

that's a lot of money with a

country where the minimum wage

is around p00. However, I think

that these people when they are

easily Ma anybodinatulate ed by

financial - manipulated by

financial benefits, they're not

also not very tiflt to track

down. Under cover security officers recently displayed a

range of espionage equipment

found in the possession of

those arrested. Seemingly

ordinary household goods

concealing hilden recorders or

cameras to conduct surveillance

for Israel. High-tech

electronic equipment, maps,

camera, even a water cooler

with surveillance equipment

hidden inside the lid.

TRANSLATION: So far we have

been able to attack 15 networks

which means this is not a

limited mission and not a

partial mission and it will god

willing hit the whole structure

of spy nshs Lebanon. Many of

those arrested for spying are

suspected of helping Israel

identify potential pomming that

targets here in Lebanon whether

they're buildings or people.

One prime target is Omar

Nashabe, head of the militant

groub Hezbollah. He's rarely

seen in public these days and

speaks to the faithful from a

huge screen.

TRANSLATION: I demand that the

death penalty be handed down to

the agents who provide

information that leads to all

these things. Well Hezbollah is

the key target. Israel wants to

know what's going on in

Hezbollah. Not in order to kill

them, but in order to disrupt

their plans to know what they

are up to, where are their

positions alock the Israeli

border. Do they plant to kidnap

more Israeli soldiers? Lebanese police believe there's evidence

against all the suspects now in

custody. In the case of Ziad Al

Homsi, various devices were

found in his home and at a

nearby library he set up in

this restored train. But his

family will always protest his

innocence. I know he's not a

spy and everyone does. Time

will tell whether Ziad Al Homsi

or his fellow accused are found

guilty. Returning now to our

story on Lote Tuqiri, he's

taking legal action against the Australian Rugby Union for its

decision to trmate husband

contract. For more we're joined from Australian Rugby Union

hairs in Sydney. What's the

latest? Good morning. ABC News

has spoken to Lote Tuqiri agent

Les Ross who has actually named

the legal counsel for this

action against ARU. Lote

Tuqiri's only saying that he's

going to take this a action

against the ARU. All we know

from this situation is that the

ARU released a three line

statement statement yesterday,

in it described its decision to

terminate the contract as a

standard employment matter. It

went on to say it couldn't make

any further comment because it

may be the subject of legal

proceedings, so at our end

here, there's certainly mystery

surrounding exactly what has

happened to Lote Tuqiri.

There's been a lot of

speculation, none of which we

can confirm at this stage.

Later on this morning the rugby

union CEO John O'Neill and of

course coach Robbie Deans will

front the media. They'll be

announcing the squad for the

upcoming Tri Nations tour and

they'll be under a lot of

pressure to release some

details as to exactly what

happened. And I guess while we

wait for those details we'll

probably hear a lot of rugby league people bobbing up today

and saying that he'd be welcome

back in league circles, do you

expect clubs to be after him? I

spoke to Parramatta Eels who

are being quoted this morning

as saying that they'd be happy

to accept him. We spoke to hem

a short time ago. They certainly can't confirm that

they would be making that move

at this stage but obviously the

last time we have such a high

profile case in rugby union

which was Wendell Sailor after

a two year suspension he ended

up going to rugby league. Just

to put not too fine a point on

it, Lote Tuqiri when there was

a mount bling speck lakes

because he hasn't playing in

identify the Wallabies tests of

late he wrote in a newspaper column that switching to rugby

league "is not an option, it's

laughable and I'm happy in

rugby." So we'll have to wait

and see whether that's a view

that he retains in the

future. Thank you for that this

morning. If he wants to stay

in rugby he might have to go to

Japan or somewhere overseas

that is willing to pay him the

same amount of money. Rl he

would have knocked back offers

over his career to go overseas.

He earns something up to a

million dollars a year and that

may be another reason if he's

not playing that the Australian

Rugby Union probably doesn't

want him on the books but we'll

find out later what the matter

is that he's been stood down

for. Nmpbilities East Timor,

business leader have defended

the PM against accusations of

corruption and nepotism. Last

week the ABC obtained documents

showing that a company part

owned by the PM's daughter was

awarded a lucrative contract to

import rice into East Timor. Alison Caldwell reports.

Speaking in Dili leading East Timorese businessman rejected

the reporting of claims of

corruption and nepotism,

involving the PM and his

daughter. We condemn those who

disseminated and contributed to

the misinformation to the

media. We reject the

international media's reporting

of this and misleading information.

TRANSLATION: We don't need any

foreigners to come here to

point out any wrong doing. We

are the one who will resol our

internal matters. All Timorese

people still have confidence in

our main leaders, Xanana

Gusmao, Ramos Horta and others

who have able to stop

corruption and nepotism in the

near future. The ABC recently

obtained documents which

revealed za nilda companieses

Prima Foods was awarded a

contract to import price into

East Timor. It's believed the

contract worth $3 point of view

million US was signed by her

father, PM Xanana Gusmao in

June last year. But it's now

claimed za nilda sold her

shares before the contract was signed.

TRANSLATION: When the company

was set up specifies part of it

but after she got information

from the Government which said

that organise to the procedures

the daugt over the PM should

not get any contracts she

submitted a letter of

resignation to her colleagues

in the same company in order

for her to resign as the owner

of the company. When asked for

evidence to support the claims,

the businessman abruptly terminated the press

conference. Last week in

response to the revelations,

East Timor's Opposition called

for Xanana Gusmao to resign. I

think he should resign. It is

very very serious. I mean, I

can't believe that someone can

sign a contract multimillions

contract with a companies that

his daughters or

daughter-in-law are part

of. The PM is yet to respond to

the ABC's request for an

interview. You're watching News

Breakfast - the top stories

this morning - lawyers

assisting the royal commission

into the Victoria's bushfires

are to recommend an overhaul of

the State's fire safety

systems. Draft documents

suggest the stay or go policy

should be revised while the re

instalment of fire refuges

should also be considered. Iran

draws further condemnation from the international community

negotiate with the European after saying it will no longer

Union about its nuclear program. And Iranian Government

militia has also called for the Opposition Leader Mir Hossein

Mousavi to be prosecuted for

his alleged role in the post

election protests. The PM Kevin

Rudd says today's COAG meeting

in Darwin will focus on

reducing indigenous

disadvantage, Federal, State

and Territory leaders are also

expected to unveil a new

measure to tackle unemployment.

For a look at the national

papers today we're joined by

Gay Alcorn the editor of the

'Sunday Age'. Good

morning. Good morning. What's

snub caught your attention first

The bushfires are first up. I

know you've been running this

story this morning but the ABC

broke a really great story last

night which said that they had

a copy of the draft

recommendations they speak the

- the key issues there were

that - some of these things

aren't all that surprising -

the commission has been hearing

things - evidence - for the past eight weeks or so - about

to finish that part of its

investigation - and the stay or

go policy has come under an

awful lot of scrutiny. The stay

or go policy means that you

either defend your house or

leave eerie and the ABC was

reporting that that policy was

essentially dead as it was now

practiced and it also recommended that refer yoodges

which Victoria used to have

many years ago after another

recommendation from an inquiry

they've all fallen into

desrepear or no longer used

except in a couple of

communities they should be

reenticed in some form as well,

so the commission, it's been

really fascinating. The big

questions there are was there

such a catastrophic series of

events on the day, the weather

and the heat and the dryness,

that really nothing much could

have been done and that is sort

of how it came out in the early

days. It was an ho lendously

hot day, or were there things

that should have been done Bert

and that some lives could have been saved, possibly if that

was the case. The communuation

was poor As the commissioners

or the yeah has gone on, that's

way that the discussion or the

analysis has turned and it's

turned in a rather unpleasant

way you could say for the CFA

and in some of the faults that

they've been found to have

committed? I think so. Our

understanding from the

newspaper is that some members

of the CFA feel like they've

been made a bit of a scapegoat

here. They've come under a lot

of scrut nooi about the way it

was coordinated on the day.

Issues not all CFA issues but

the failure of - when people

were ringing up the help line,

people couldn't get through -

the lack of warnings being

passed on in a timely way to

communities - people knew that

the fires were coming through,

that people wouldn't hear for

hours later. It's been quite

horrific to listen to a lot of

of it given that 173 people

died. There are really serious

questions that the commission

has been asking.

If the blame is going anywhere

now it's at those volunteers

employer's for want of a better

word, the full-time bosses and

the bureaucracisy in and around

the CFA. I think it's under the

microscope at the moment. They

feel a little bit unfairly.

They'd say that we asked for

more money and deny get it from

the Government. - and didn't

get it. There's been evidence

about asking for improved

communication systems which

hasn't been done. Early warning

systems which weren't in place

for the time but will be in

place for this bushfire season,

so Geelong you can put all the

blame on them. Disglsh so I

don't think you can put all the

blame on them. The 'Age' has

picked up that ABC story and

clearly will run probably even

bigger tomorrow when the

recommendations are reveal dad

and we get to see a little more

of it. The issue of

professionalism versus

volunteerism I think will also

end up being one of the big

discussion points out of this

commission today? I haven't

read a lot of evidence on

that. I think that old turf

war, this commission breaks

that open and actually brings

that to the fore now and I

think we'll be hearing from

people dug the week, the

firefighters union in

particular who for years have

been saying that the volunteers

are a kind of dad's army. The

tra tition of firefightering in

Australia has been based on volunteers, in their

communities fighting for the

communities and their own

houses and that has worked very

well. The oesh issue is the

refer yoodges issue. The

difficulty of having a refuge

properly maintained. Legal

liability. What about to be a

good refuge. Well maintained. Been using the

middle of football grounds for

the last few years. You go to

the meddle of an oval or have a

place where people can go Can

we move on now to the future of

newspapers? John Hartigan the

head of News Limited,

publisher, did a speech to the

press club yesterday, he spoke

about the future of newspapers

or fascinating to all your

viewers, the future of

journalism too but particularly

newspapers and he was talking

in quite opt missic terms

saying that Australian

newspapers are doing better

than those in the UK, better

than those in the US. This -

there's the headline. I know

John Hartigan well and he won't

mind me quoting Mandy Rice

Davies back to him saying, "he

would say that, wouldn't

he?" The 'Australian' would put

that headline on it, wouldn't

it? The whole future of how

we're going to get news,

whether it's newspapers, the

Internet, what's happening to

free to air television which is

also under pressure, it's a very interesting time we're

going through. He says that

we're doing better than UK and

the US but also that what

newspapers need to do to

survive, they've got to change,

how will we change Into what?Le

he says more sell - He says

more relevant. The days of the

generalist journalist are over.

People want things of high

quality. He also say s in term

of relevance, he's ra bit

critical of the press gallery

and says he is bored, he thinks

a lot of our readers are bored

with the politics of politics,

who is up and down in the

polls, leadership speck lakes,

he think that's done to most

people. - leadership speculation, less conflict

politics, crime, stories, a bit

more I think he's saying, I'm putting words into his mouth

now. A bit more understanding,

a little less heat. I agree,

generally. If newspapers are

going to survive, quality

newspapers are going to

survive, more depth, more

quality, less just noise. Isn't

the central thing here online versus newspapers, people who

are getting their news free

online, particularly in the

unite, that's what's killing

the papers over there. Any

debate about whether we should

be getting people to pay for

their news online? We'll move

to paying for online. It's not

free. The newspapers

essentially are funding it and

it costs a lot of money. Do we

have time for a little more sex

this morning? Of course. Very

good news for men in

particular. And hopefully good

news for women as well which is

a study out of an Australian

IVF clinic which says the old

advice used to be that if you

were trying to have a baby,

don't have sex too much because

it would affect mean's sterm

count. You have to store it

up. Instead let the riversers

run free.

The quality of the sperm

doesn't decline. Every day

Paul. This is the best news

that men have ever had. In

football they'd say that

practice doesn't make perfect.

Perfect practice makes

persphekt. Before all games, is

the advice you're not supposed

to have sex before a

game. That's right, bums to

mum. Dawn Fraser always said

sex made her swim faster next

day. Love our Council. Good to

see you. You can watch all of

ABC News breakfast streamed

live every morning.

Here is Luke Waters? Thank you. Good morning. Lleyton

Hewitt's brave Wimbledon bid is

over after bowing out in five

sets to American Andy Roddick.

The thrilling match lasted five

sets and almost four hours but

Hewitt couldn't overcome the

power of his American opponent.

It was a typically courageos

effort from the South

Australian though who looked to

have drained Roddick who's big

serve eventally not him over

the line. Roddick now meets

Andy Murray if the semifinal

while Roger Federer will play

Haas in the other semi. An

unbeaten 100 to Mike Hussey has

helped Australia for 8 for 337

on day one of the tour match

against the English Lions. The

Aussies were in trouble early

with Steve Harmison and Graeme

Onions ripping through the top

order, but Hussey and Katich and Mitchell Johnson spaedied

the ship. Those three were the

only batsmen to make it to

double figures. The form of

Australia's top order might be

a slight concern heading into

next week's first Test. We'll

be back with much more sport

next hoir. Now Vanessa O'Hanlon

with the weather. Thank you.

More gusty showers on the way

as we take a look at the

satellite down in theest is

with a lot of cloud hanging

around that region still and a

series of troughs. A few light

showers for the southern coasts

and we also have cloud that's sweeping into Western

Australia, that's causing a few

showers along the north coast.

A trough moving over the

south-east and a low just off

Tasmania is producing a big

vigorous north-west air flow

give us a burst of strong

colder wrn winds ahead of a

series of fronts that will

start crossing the region this

afternoon. After a warmer than

usual few day, a cool gusty

change is on the way for

northern parts of NSW and also

southern parts of Queensland.

Paul? Thank you. Still ahead

on News Breakfast - we'll speak

to former AFL player Charlie

gardener ahead of this

weekend's AFL block buster

between Geelong and settle.

There's not much love - Geelong

and St Kilda.. And he's lived

to tell the tale. He can gives some insight into why they hate

each other so much. Lots more

coming up for you after this

shore break lewd including some

politics for you as well, so

don't go away.

Fire refuges and warning

signs just some of the sweeping changes to be recommended to

the Black Saturday Royal

Commission today. Iran moves

closer to isolation after disqualifying the European

Union from talks on its nuclear program. Job protection and indigenous disadvantage, the

focus of today's COAG meeting

in Darwin. And Lleyton Hewitt

loses a five set thriller to

Andy Roddick at Wimbledon.

Good morning. It's Thursday 2

July. I'm Virginia Trioli. And

I'm Paul Kennedy. The top stir

on News Breakfast - lawyers

assisting the royal commission

into the Black Saturday

bushfires will today recommend

a sweeping overhaul of

Victoria's fire safety systems.

The ABC has obtained a copy of

the recommendations which

include heavy criticism for the chief of the Country Fire

Authority. The commission will

also be urged to consider

reestablishing community fire

refuge centres and also the

installation of warning sirens

in towns that want them. Jane

Cowan reports. Victoria's

bushfires devastated whole communities. Now counsel

assisting the commission want

radical change. Draft documents

obtained by the ABC suggest the

commissioners will be asked to

drastically rework the

contentious stay or go policy.

It's been under question since

it was revealed 113 of those

who died on black Saturday were

trying to shelter inside

houses. Now alongside the

option to stay and defend, communities under threat will

be told when evacuation is

recommended, but they won't be

forced to go. According to draft recommendations, community fire refuges should

be revived. They could be in

parks, shopping centres or even

dams. This is a chance for a

bipartisan approach by

Victoria's fire services and

the political party of this

state to fix the problem once

and for all. Also favoured by

the commission's legal team -

use of the alert tone played in

northern Australia to warn of

psycholobes and sirens for

towns that want want them.

Something that's been resisted

by authorities in the past. The recommendations are on the

right track, but the Government

should be compelled to

implement the recommendations,

not just allow them to sit on

the shelf like previous

inquests. That's our greater

fear, they should be compelled.

We owe that to the empoo who

have perished. The counsel

assisting the commission also

makes a damning assessment of

Victoria's fire agencies. They

say authorities were not

prepared for Black Saturday, ve

vep as they warped the

community to get ready. The CFA