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the victims of the Bali bombings. Three years on the nation remembers Is this the face of evil? over the latest Bali attacks. Indonesian police make an arrest survivors of the Pakistan quake. And the frightening new threat facing Ten News with Natarsha Belling. since terrorists first attacked Bali, It's been three years including 88 Australians. killing 202 people,

pausing to remember the tragedy, Across the country, people are

being held at Sydney's Coogee beach. one of the largest memorials Ten reporter Dan Nolan is there.

of the Australian victims Dan, a large number came from the coastal community.

That's right, 20 people in fact had

connections to the eastern suburbs

of Sydney and who lost their lives connections to the eastern suburbs

that day three years ago in Kuta.

It's been a very emotional morning

here this morning. Hundreds of It's been a very emotional morning

people turned out despite miserable

weather. They came out here this people turned out despite miserable

morning to grieve as one. And they

say that by coming out like this, morning to grieve as one. And they

as a group, it removes the

lonliness from what is lonliness from what is such a as a group, it removes the

horrible day. Everybody here this

morning had a close association to

someone who died there. There were

fathers mourning their sons, fathers mourning their sons,

daughters mourning their mothers. A fathers mourning their sons,

very emotional morning. It

continued on for the opening of a

new statue here that has photos of continued on for the opening of a continued on for the opening of a

all of the 20 victims. And once new statue here that has photos of

again, family and friends made a all of the 20 victims. And once

procession past there to lay again, family and friends made a

flowers and pay their respects. We

heard from one of the victims'

fathers, he lost his 17-year-old

son three years ago ae made

specific mention of the latest

specific mention of the latest

Bali bombings and what the families specific mention of the latest

from Newcastle and WA musting going

through. This is what he had to say. from Newcastle and WA musting going from Newcastle and WA musting going

We know where you are at the moment.

We share your pain. And like you,

we can not comprehen how anyone We share your pain. And like you, we can not comprehen We share your pain. And like you,

could perpetrate such a senseless

act Thank you Dan Nolan. A dawn service in Perth's Kings Park remembered the victims. where about 100 people

laid a wreath, WA Premier Geoff Gallop

with the sun's first rays which is designed to light up

on October 12 each year. as many survivors and family members Attendance was high, for the anniversary, opted to stay in Perth last week's renewed terror attacks. instead of travelling to Bali after

Shock and unbelievable - are just starting their journey. and those poor people

we're coming through ours, We're lucky,

ahead of them. but they've got all the barriers to WA teenager Brendan Fitzgerald, Special tributes were paid

who died in the latest Kuta attack. are being treated in Singapore His father and sister for burns and shrapnel wounds.

in Canberra, And partisan politics were put aside joining a memorial service the PM and Opposition Leader in the gardens of Federal Parliament. to the 2002 bombings both laid wreaths Mr Howard and Mr Beazley silent tribute. with MPs and senators also paying

of the latest Bali bombing, Among those there were survivors Adam Frost, his son Joe, including Newcastle doctor and Dietmar Lederwash, were both injured in the blast. were both injured in the blast. whose daughter and wife across Bali And security has been stepped up to remember the tragedy. as the island prepares their first arrest The anniversary comes as police make two weeks ago. over the second bombings

Ten's Nicole Strahan is in Bali. into custody last night. Nicole, a 45-year-old man was taken That's

That's correct. It is certainly a

step forward for the Indonesian

step forward for the Indonesian

step forward for the Indonesian

police with the arrest over the step forward for the Indonesian

weekend of a man named Hassan. police with the arrest over the

He's believed be a construction

worker. He can be kept for up to

seven days under anti-terror laws worker. He can be kept for up to

in this country and it's believed

he may have rented a house to one

of the suicide bombers and that

house in Denpasar has been raided of the suicide bombers and that

suicide by police. But adding to that, the house in Denpasar has been raided

suicide bombers' identifies have by police. But adding to that, the

suicide bombers' identifies have

still not be revealed. Police still suicide bombers' identifies have

don't know who they are exactly And

don't know who they are exactly And four of the infamous Bali Nine don't know who they are exactly And don't know who they are exactly And

front court today? That's correct.

It's the second day of the trial front court today? That's correct.

but today will be slightly

different. There will be three of

the accused who will appear in different. There will be three of

court today. the accused who will appear in court today. They will appear the accused who will appear in

together in court to hear the case court today. They will appear

against them read to the court. All

against them read to the court. All

of them arrested at the hottel in against them read to the court. All

Kuta back in April where it is alleged preparations were being alleged preparations were being

made for the drugs shipment and all alleged preparations were being

are facing the death pement while made for the drugs shipment and all

they're appear willing in court

together. The other person in court, they're appear willing in court

Martin Stephens will

Martin Stephens will face court together. The other person in court,

alone. He allegedly had heroin Martin Stephens will face court

strapped to his body but he also

strapped to his body but he also

has made Victorian legal history, Terror suspect Joseph Thomas faces the death penalty. strapped to his body but he also

the small hours of this morning a court sitting through into evidence at his pre-trial hearing. so prisoners in America could give are heading to bed or already there, At a time when most people arrived at court. Joseph Thomas and his father, Ian,

We're all tired, aren't we? Looks, thanks for your intention. until 1:30 the following morning, From 11:00pm was the scene of an unusual first - Victoria's Supreme Court a late night sitting to accommodate witnesses overseas. The hearing delayed so three prisoners in American custody could give evidence via videolink. Referred to in court as Mr A, Mr B and Mr C, the trio can't be named because of a judge's order. Mr Thomas is accused of supporting and receiving money from al-Qa'ida, as well as possessing a false passport. Previously, in another court, prosecutors have claimed the 32-year-old trained at an al-Qa'ida terror camp in Afghanistan

and volunteered to be Osama bin Laden's man in Australia.

The current legal argument is leading up to Mr Thomas's trial, expected to start next month. It's the first terror case conducted under Australia's new National Security Information Act which controls if and how sensitive evidence is released in court. Under the act, the court must be closed whenever any information affecting national security, ASIO staff and methods or ongoing investigations are discussed. Christopher Still, Ten News.

Maverick Nationals Senator Barnaby Joyce has finally delivered on his threat to cross the floor, voting against government attempts to change merger laws. The Opposition now hopes his resolve will flow to more significant legislation. He's made headlines for his threats, but last night Barnaby Joyce finally acted. He voted against a government bill

which would have taken away the ACCC's powers to approve retail mergers. Senator Joyce says it would make mergers easier. It was very important that we protect small business and the ACCC is one of the fundamental protectors of small business. His decision meant the bill failed and he knew it was a significant move. A little bit nervous, as you'd expect. It comes after the Nationals senator backed down from threats

to cross the floor on Telstra. Well, back-down Barnaby is now come-back Barnaby, and hopefully the events of last night show the Senate isn't prepared to simply be a rubber stamp

for extreme policy proposals. And that gives hope to those opposing the Government's industrial relations legislation. Senator Joyce is still undecided about those changes, and his move last night gives credibility to his promise not to automatically approve Coalition policy. I've always said that if you take away from your choices the ability to cross the floor, then you need only send a proxy into the chamber because there's no real purpose to you being there. He's already vowing to oppose the Government's voluntary student unionism legislation

unless changes are made. The legislation in its current form has unnecessary collateral damage against sporting facilities and other vital parts of university infrastructure. Education Minister Brendan Nelson still wants the bill passed this year, but his office admits it is a lower priority than industrial relations, and there may not be time. The Opposition says the Minister knows the bill is looking shaky. It's a great victory for everybody today that we see Brendan Nelson completely humiliated. Laurel Irving, Ten News. The new threat facing survivors of the Pakistan earthquake -

that story when Ten's morning news returns. And the unlikely centrefolds - the fundraising event that's got these aging farmers taking their gear off.

Freezing torrential rain is making life even more miserable for the injured and starving victims of the Asian earthquake. And there seems to be little relief in sight, with claims the rescue effort is badly organised.

As if nature hasn't been cruel enough to the earthquake victims, now there's heavy rain. Winter is approaching and the people of Muzaffarabad walk the streets with nowhere to go, desperate for shelter and food. We need tents, houses, you know? There is no washrooms, bathrooms, water. Hungry survivors couldn't wait for Pakistani relief trucks to unload cartons of supplies. Instead they mobbed the vehicles, grabbing whatever they can, fighting with each other in desperation. The army is unable to take control. Everyone needs supplies, yet just a few are lucky enough to receive them. Little assistance has been offered to those in need of medical attention. Some lie hopelessly and wait for the inevitable.

A father tries to get his 8-year-old daughter treatment.

She's suffering from head and limb injuries but the army helicopter, headed to hospital, is too full and they're turned away. The search for survivors never stops. At this boarding school, girls may still be alive under the rubble. Hello! Rescue team here. Can you hear us? Make a noise.

Silence is a sound no-one wants to hear. But amid the devastation comes signs of life.

A frightened 4-year-old boy waits to be freed from the ruins - he and another child have been caught in an air pocket.

This time, success. CHEERING But for so may others it will be a different story. Ebbeny Faranda, Ten News.

And Australians are being urged to

dig deep to help the earthquake survivors.

Joining us this morning from

Melbourne is Tim Costello from World

Vision. Can I ask firstly, are

Australians responding to your call for help?

Yes, but not in overwhelming numbers

and not with huge amounts of money.

The truth is, it's been a despairing

year with tsunami, with Bali bombings, I think year with tsunami, with Bali bombings, I think there is

compassion fatigue.

Australians are saying, "Oh, not

this again" and of course,

thankfully there were no Australian

dead. So in terms of, I guess the

human interests and identification,

this has been a much slower appeal.

But might I say, it is just as

urgent and I really hope Australians

won't lock up their hearts and their

wallets.

And just on that point, if you could explain to

And just on that point, if you could explain to us, why is it so urgent?

I guess much more devastation is

going on behind the scenes than we actually see?

We've got 500,000 people who are

injured. Probably 30,000 dead. 3 or

4 million people are now affected.

That means they need tents and

blankets and food just to survive.

These are extraordinary numbers.

Most Australians I'm sure were

touched seeing school children, just

starting their school day like

Australian kids do every day here.

Suddenly, they don't have another

day. The earthquake just took out

their lives and took out their

schools. So that's the level of

devastation and suffering.

Thanks for joining us this morning

Tim Costello from World Vision in Melbourne. Thank you. Most politicians enjoy the rough and tumble of parliament. But it got of hand in Taiwan when a debate over a bill to setup a new media watchdog degenerated into a brawl. One opposition politician ended up with a bloodied eye

when he was hit in the head by a flying mobile phone. The ocean has given up another piece of treasure. 460 years after she sank, the anchor from Henry VIII's flagship the 'Mary Rose' has been raised from the sea bed.

Another piece of an archaeological jigsaw - the anchor of Henry VIII's favourite warship, rising to the surface four centuries later. The 'Mary Rose' had already proved herself in battle when she sailed to face the French in 1545. No-one knows for sure why she sank,

but she took hundreds of men with her. In 1982, she emerged from her resting place, half of her still intact, preserved under clay and silt.

Since then, 20,000 items from cups to canon have been recovered from the sea bed. If you could make your way up. But there were more mysteries to solve. And navy funding has enabled more detective work. One find has intrigued the dive team. A 10-metre hull section, now revealed as one of the most significant discoveries to date.

At last, the archeologists have what they need to reconstruct the 'Mary Rose's missing bow.

A fitting finale to this part of the project and another step towards the restoration that truly will bring the 'Mary Rose' back to life. And a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame Music greats have sung the praises of Sir Elton John

at a special awards ceremony in Hollywood. The stars lined up to honour the legendary singer-songwriter for his contribution to music and humanitarian aid.

(Sings) # How onderful life is while you're in the world. He humbly accepted the award and laughed off Barry Manilow's joke that the fellow star had always wanted to marry him. I couldn't have married you, Barry, because there would have been too much fuss in front of the mirror. The award from the American Society of Singers comes 38 years after Sir Elton John first moved to the US. Move over 'Calendar Girls' - make way for the naked farmers. 12 men from America's heartland have taken their gear off to help raise money to save their local environment. The men of the land using well placed props to protect their modesty. Organisers say they're very pleased with the calendar sales so far.

The all-important barrier draw for the Caulfield Cup. That's when Ten's Morning News returns. And a glamorous night in Sydney for the stars of world cricket.

In finance news - the Australian share market has opened stronger.

Jacqui Maddock at Commonwealth Securities - some good news from the RBA.

Good morning, a speech last night

from the Reserve Bank deputy

governor put to rest market fears

about the effects on inflation of

about the effects on inflation of

about the effects on inflation of higher energy costs. So on one hand,

motorists are feeling the

higher energy costs. So on one hand, motorists are feeling the pifrplg

motorists are feeling the pifrplg at the petrol pumps but we're also

feeling the cost of clothes coming

down. So we can all breathe a

little bit easier that interest

little bit easier that interest rates are remaining on hold. And

rates are remaining on hold. And another fall in consumer

another fall in consumer confidence? Yes, weave anticipate

seen the biggest fall in consumer

seen the biggest fall in consumer seen the biggest fall in consumer

seen the biggest fall in consumer sentiment in two and a half years.

This survey is conducted over the

This survey is conducted over the

This survey is conducted over the last few days of the month and

people surveyed would have been

people surveyed would have been unhappy with higher fuel costs, but

unhappy with higher fuel costs, but also would have been unhappy with

falls on the share market. In the

last few days of September, we saw

last few days of September, we saw the eighth largest fall in the

share market in 30 years and it is

share market in 30 years and it is important to see the figures in

important to see the figures in context, because elsewhere we are

anticipate enjoying a construction

boom and we're also seeing Thanks. Jacqui Maddock at CommSec.

unemployment at generational lows. Sport - and no joy for the Aussie cricketers at the International Cricket Council awards in Sydney.

The International Cricketer of the Year shared jointly by England's Andrew Flintoff and South Africa's Jacques Kallis as world stars took out the top awards. Swapping creams for evening wear, the world's cricketers on show to honour their best. But a surprise when the top award was announced. The ICC Players of the Year...

Oh! ..are Jacques Kallis and Andrew Flintoff. CHEERING With six Test centuries, including five in a row, the South African favourite, Kallis, didn't mind sharing the spotlight. To win the award with a guy like Freddie, a fellow all-rounder, it's great to see the all-rounders are coming through and producing the goods.

England's Ashes hero Flintoff could barely hide his surprise. Two or three years ago,

to be standing on a stage with Jacques Kallis and receive an award like this, I would have thought you were joking. At the start of the night he didn't even rate his chances. Nah. I just came for the food. LAUGHTER Both players were named to the Test team of the year. Flintoff also made the one-day squad with Kallis 12th man. And a pair of gongs for the rising superstar of the sport -

the obvious emerging player of the year, Kevin Pietersen also bagged the top one-day player prize. I thought I had a pretty good go with the first one, the emerging player of the year, but the one-day player of the year, that totally got me. I'd taken my blazer off and I was ready to just carry on drinking. Australia's cricketers were not ignored - Ricky Ponting chosen as captain for the Test team of the year. Adam Gilchrist, Shane Warne and Glenn McGrath joined him while Gilchrist, McGrath, Brett Lee and Andrew Symonds made the one-day side. Anthony Goodridge, Ten News. Caulfield Cup favourite El Segundo is expected to shorten even further for Saturday's $2.5 million classic after receiving a dream barrier draw this morning. A short-priced favourite after a brilliant win in the Yalumba Stakes, El Segundo has drawn barrier four. His main rivals fared badly -

Victoria Derby winner Plastered drew 16, the lightweight chance Leica Falcon 13, former winner Mummify 20 and Vouvray 14. The spring now appears to be over for-one time cups contender Count Ricardo. An injury sustained following yesterday's track gallop has ruled it out of both the Caulfield and Melbourne cups. Next in Ten News, a look at the weather around the nation.

Now for a look at the national weather, and for the rest of the day: It seems Old Melbourne Gaol still has some secrets in its cells.

The building's ghostly past coming back to haunt visitors amid speculation Ned Kelly still roams the corridors.

Welcome to Old Melbourne Gaol - home to secrets of our criminal past and, some would say, sleepless spirits. This eerie image captured by some modern-day ghostbusters. I couldn't believe it.

To me it doesn't look like a person and yet at the same time I thought, "What could this be?" In a spooky coincidence,

the prison poltergeist, complete with glowing evil eyes,

was snapped lurking in the doorway of cell 13. The ghostly find discovered among more than 400 photos taken in the early hours of the morning. We actually had some strange occurrences in the cell - a drop in temperature, which was measured by laser thermometer, and also we had two candles go out out of a number of six. It's really hard to explain. That's why it's taken a bit of while to release it. Ghost-like figures have been seen in the past,

staff and visitors reporting voices, the sounds of keys and chains, some even claiming to have been pushed and shoved. If there was ever a place that was to be haunted, this would have to be it. More than a 130 people hanged during the jail's 82-year operation, including Australia's most famous bushranger, Ned Kelly.

Some say they still hear him clank along the corridors. At least we know old Ned won't be lonely. While he caused a few headaches in life,

he may have met his match in death. Allan Raskall, Ten News.

That brings you up to date with all the news. Stay with Ten for updates throughout the day and the full details in Ten's news hour tonight. I'm Natarsha Belling. Good afternoon. Supertext Captions by the Australian Caption Centre. www.auscap.com.au