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Live.

At least 15 people are dead

after a teenage gunman goes on

school in a shooting spree at his former

school in south-west Germany.

The race to prevent an

environmental disaster as rough

seas damage a tanker spilling

fertiliser and oil into the sea

near Brisbane. A warning that more than half Australia's

small businesses will be forced

to cut jobs in the coming

months, as the economic crisis

hits home. And the NBL grand

final series stretches to game

five, ar

five, ar after the Tigers beat

the Dragons to force the

decider.

Good morning it is Thursday

the 12th of March. I am Joe

O'Brien. I am Tamara Oudyn the O'Brien. I am Tamara Oudyn the Breakfast at least 15 people top story on ABC News

have been killed after a

17-year-old went on a shooting

rampage in the school of a south-west German town of

Winnenden. He killed nine

students and three teachers

before driving off in a stolen

car. He shot himself when

police tracked him down. The

BBC's Steve Rosenberg reports

from just outside Stuttgart. from just outside Stuttgart.

A small sleepy town in

southern Germany, and a

community devastated by today's

bloodshed. At Albertville

Secondary in Winnenden the

school day had hardly begun

when a former student came here

to kill. The gunman had taken

one of the 18 guns own ed by

his parents and then turned it

on pipe ills and on pipe ills and teachers.

TRANSLATION: I thought it had

something that had gone wrong

in chemistry class but then the

police said there are two dead.

At 9:30 local time a man

dressed in black combat gear

entered the Albertville

Highschool and started shooting

at random. He killed nine

students and three feech

teacher before leaving the

person at school. He killed another

person at a nearby clinic. He

drove to the town. Venlingen

the hostage got away and told

the police the gunman was

stalking the streets. Pursued

by police he broke into a car

dealership. There was a

shootout. The attacker killed

two more people before being

shot dead himself. If you

include the gunman, then

altogether 16 people died. The

school has not violence which began at this

school has not only devastated

this community, it has revived

painful memories for the whole

country. In recent years

determine any has suffered a

After each attack there has string of school shootings.

been called for gun laws to be

tightened. Tonight those calls

are being made once again.

TRANSLATION: It is in

comprehensible in seconds

teaches and students are killed

in an appalling in an appalling crime.

Innocent by standers lost their

lives T is hard to put into

words what has happened today

but, of course, our sympathies are with the victims. The

shootout in southern Germany

has left the whole nation in

shock. These students fled the school this morning. This

evening they came back to

honour the memory of those

gunned down here. Police in the US are

the US are investigating while

a gunman killed 10 people,

include ing his mother and

other family members in a shoot

be spree in the southern state

of at bamma. He set fire to

his house with his mother

inside. He fired on other

homes, a petrol station and

shops and cars before killing himself. Queensland

authorities are dealing with a potential environmental

disaster as a damaged

disaster as a damaged cargo

ship as fuel begins to wash up

on beaches just off Brisbane.

The 'Pacific Adventurer' also

lost half its load of ammonium

nitrate yesterday, in heavy

seas stirred up by Tropical

Cyclone Hamish. The three

tonnes of fertiliser could have

a devastating impact on the o

system. The Australian

Retailers Association predicts

more than half Australia's

small businesses will have to

lay off workers due

lay off workers due to the

tough economic climate. A

survey from the group found 65%

of small retailers expect to

cut jobs in the coming months.

The group says changes to

workplace laws, the economic

slow down and a new industry

award will hit the sector hard.

The US President Barack Obama

and his treasury secretary have

called for G-20 Finance

Ministers to use this weekend's

meeting in London to work

together to reform the global

economy. President Obama said

the group must both stimulate

the system and reform

international regulations. It

Alistair Darling warns comes as British Chancellor

Australia has yet to feel the

full impact of the crisis.

Saddam Hussein's former Deputy

Prime Minister Tariq Aziz has

been sentenced to 15 years jail

for crimes against humanity.

the execution Aziz was jailed for his role in

the execution of dozens of

retailers who were accused of

breaching state price controls

in Iraq in 1992. Two of Saddam

Hussein's half brothers were sentenced to death for their

role in the same case.

Returning to the US now where

President Barack Obama has been

urging G-20 lead tors take a

united approach to fighting the

financial crisis in this

weekend's gathering in London.

weekend's gathering in London.

The United States is part of a

integrated global economy. And

so we have to not only think

about what's happening here at

home, but in order for us to

grow businesses, create jobs

here at home, we have have to

be mindful about what's

happening overseas. And that's

why at this G-20 meeting, one

of the things that secretary

about is how Geithner is going to be talking

about is how can we make sure

emerging markets, developing

countries that may be very

hafrd hit as a consequence -

hard hit as a consequence of

the contracting economy, how do

we make sure they remain

stable, that they can still

purchase American goods. For

more ABC correspondent role -

Michael Rowland joins us from

Washington. Thanks for joining

President us. The buzz words from

President Obama seems to be

co-operation and coordination

in the lead-up to the G-20

meeting. That's right. He

believes world economies have

to work together to tackle what

he describes as the worst

financial crisis since the

Great Depression. He also

knows it is quite easy to say

that, but it's quite much more

difficult to get countries to

do that, to cooperate. To

strengthen their financial

systems in a co-ordinate the

way and to also undertake a greater

greater stimulus programs. He

used that appearance in the

oval office overnight to put a

great deal more pressure on the

other G-20 countries, including

Australia, to be more

aggressive in the way they are kick-starting their own

economies, aggressive either

through greater stimulus

efforts through the Federal

budget or even more deeper

interest rates cuts. So he

knows it will be difficult to

get a terrific operation from these G-20

these G-20 countries when they

all gather around the table in

London and he certainly is

putting out the US's ambit

claims in the weeks before

that. There is a growing sense

of unease surrounding Timothy

Geithner at the moment. What's

happening here considering even

just a month ago he was

considered the golden haired

boy. He was gone from that to

whipping boy. It say horrible time to be

time to be Treasurer anywhere.

Just ask Wayne Swan for

instance. At a time when world

markets are in crisis and the

global economy is in recession.

Spare a thought for Timothy

Geithner. He has been

subjected to an almost daily

barrage of criticism about

whether he is up to the job.

He has been criticised for not

providing enough detail, about

three weeks ago when he

unveiled what he described as a sweeping plan to save

sweeping plan to save the US

financial system but a lot of

economists are saying that plan

didn't contain nearly enough

detail about just how he will

rescue America's troubled

banks, taking their debts off

the balance sheets and prevent

be banking from toppling over.

He has also been criticised for

not effectively communicating

team Obama's economic strategy.

Barack Obama himself put on a

public show of confidence in

his embattled Treasury

Secretary overnight. He ib

vited him - invited him in that

oval office before that camera.

Timothy Geithner also spoke

about his optimism about the

world pulling together to tackle the global recession.

We need to bring the world

together to put in place a very substantial sustained program

of support for recovering

growth and we want to bring

together a new consensus

globally on how to strengthen

this global financial system so

a crisis like this never

happens again. It has been a

lot of talk and a lot of ideas

over the last years, it is time

for us to work together and

act. So Michael at this time

when the US administration

should really be trying to, you

know, encourage as much

confidence as possible, what

impact is his performance

having on this young administration?

administration? Well it's

basically raising a lot of

doubts about whether the Obama

economic prescription will in

fact pull the US out of recession. And it's also

leading to increased volatility

on the markets. Something the

US markets certainly don't need

and there is a lot of concern

about whether the

Geithner-Obama plan to save the

banks will actually work given

the extent and depth of the

problems faced by many of

America's leading banks.

Timothy Geithner is urging his

critics to be patient. He

insists the Obama

administration has done more in

the last two months than other

governments have done in six

years in dealing with the

crisis in the past. He is

confident the Obama

administration will be

successful in dragging America

out of recession. The only problem

problem is that he won't

actually say when either of

those events will actually

happen. Michael Rowland in

Washington, thanks very much

for joining us. Back in Australia but still on the

economic crisis and the Finance

Minister Lindsay Tanner says

declining revenue levels won't

deter the government from its

plans to stimulate the economy.

Mr Taner has told the '7:30

Mr Taner has told the '7:30

Report' the government is prepared to manage debt levels. The important thing is

how you get out of those budget

deficit, we have got a three

point plab to move out of

deficit. As soon as normal

growth is resumed and we have got through this current

economic crisis. That is about

tax revenues reviving, about

not having new spending other

than that's off set by savings

and about restricting the

growth in spending to 2% in

real term, we have got a

trajectory out of deficit and a

way of tackling the debt that is mounting unfortunately.

Lindsay Tanner speaking there

on the '7:30 Report' and for

more Ben Worsley joins us from

Canberra. Lindsay Tanner also

said he is having trouble

sleeping at night. That

doesn't instil much confidence

about the position we are N It

does show they are worried and

how difficult it is

how difficult it is framing the

budget in this ever changing

and worsening climate. If you

remember back to last year, and

you know you are an avid

watcher of federal budgets.

All the talk was about a tough

budget and finding tough

savings. It's that - it is

starting to look a bit like the

boy or the Treasurer that cried

wolf. That was all couched in

terms of the war on inflation.

This time it really has to be a

tough budget and it is couched

in terms of the global

financial crisis. The

government has to do two things

- and you can see last night

Lindsay Tanner strt starting

to do that. It has to prepare

people for the inevitable and

current exists budget deficit

and has to explain that part of

it isn't their fault. As in

the massive hit on revenue, because

because of the global financial

and economic slow down and

explain part of the deficit

that is their fault. The

spending that they have been

doing to a large extent over

the last couple of months, will

be worthwhile and temporary.

And that's where we see this

thee-point plan to make the

budget deficit temporary.

Lindsay Tanner's obviously

under a lot of pressure to find

savings. He is again committed

to no new spending that

to no new spending that isn't

offset by new savings. But

there is pressure to cut into

that middle class welfare that

became the norm under the

Howard Government

administration. There is talk of cutting superannuation tax

breaks for the wealthy. Increasing nursing home fees

for the wealthy which would be

unpopular. Even cutting or

changing restricting the use of

frequent flyer point force MPs.

Believe it or not MP

Believe it or not MP s rack up

$15 million a year in

international and domestic

flights and Lindsay Tanner is

keen for them to use their

frequent flyer point, not to

fly to noona or Tuscan for a

holiday but to use them to save

money on future travelling.

Bob Catter reckons he saved $4

million over his parliamentary

career on such measures. What

will be in the budget will be a

$30 or $35 a week increase in

the pension. That will cost

the ghost $5 bill - that will

cost the government $5 billion.

And as I mentioned what Lindsay

Tanner thinks about at 2 o'clock in the morning it will

be a couple of months for him

and the Treasurer as well. The

ABS will release the latest job

figures today, a monthly headache for the government and

also a reminder of the reality

also a reminder of the reality

that is hitting home in

Australia. After that sort of

lag affect of the global slow

down. The jog figures are

expect - job figures are

expected to again go up.

No-one really knows to what

extent but it is ever

increasing towards 5%. There

is also a retailers survey out

today by the Retailers

Association which shows 65% of

businesses in that category are

expect to lay off staff

expect to lay off staff or

restructure their roster, which

means cutting hours. Expect

the opposition to jump on both

of those sets of figures or surveys today. What is

interesting is increasingly the

industrial relations reforms

that when they were first put

through parliament by Julia

Gillard, or at least released

it really seemed she dodged the

bullets and got away with

appeasing both sides of the fence. As the

fence. As the economy

deteriorates the IR reforms and

effect on enemployment are

coming into ever sharper phobus

and this is - focus and this is

happening as the government is

trying to get it through to the

Senate. Now to the front pages

of the newspapers. 'The

Australian' reports unions have

agreed to defer pay increases

for thousands of workers in the retail and hospitality sectors

for five years. Australia's

export earnings from coal and

iron could slump by up to $35 billion according to the 'Financial Review'. The snefrld 'Sydney Morning

Herald' says the great

recession is also hitting China

harden than expected.

Something which has severe

consequences for Australia's

economy. Australia will push

for a special G-20 summit in

Asia as part of a global deal

to stem the fall-out from the

economic crisis. The 'Herald

Sun' reports on the

Sun' reports on the school

shooting rampage in Germany.

NSW parents who refuse to

immunise their children have

been blamed for the return of

diseases eradicated in Australia decades ago. The

'Daily Telegraph' says. The

paper also promises the inside

story on the Manly Sea Eagles

crisis. The 'Canberra Times'

reports that public servants

will travel less often under

plans by Finance Minister

Lindsay Tanner to slash the

government's

government's $500 million

travel budget. The Rudd

Government is planning to splug

slug the rich to help pay the

poor in the up coming budget.

The paper has a photo of the

surfer at the Gold Coast taking

advantage of the big swell

whipped up by cyclone

Hamish. The Adelaide

'Advertiser' ads to the

speculation about the budget

labels the PM Robin Hood Rudd.

It says the rich will face

higher medical costs and load

superannuation tax breaks to

fund an increase in pensions. Tasmanian Premier David

Bartlett has told the state's

28,000 public servants to

accept wage freezes or face job

cuts. The America rereports.

- 'Mercury' reports. Two boys

allegedly managed to smuggle

stolen guns, and ammunition through

through the Karratha airport.

And Northern Territory says

hooligans broke into a Top End

construction site and took a

bulldozer for a joyride. And a

picture of a golden tree snake

devouring a free frog in

Government House. You can email us at -

To talk about the show on

line, there is our Twitter

account details. The top

stories on ABC News Breakfast

this morning - a 17-year-old

man in Germany kills 15 people

in a shooting rampage that

began at a high school near

Stuttgart. At least 9 pipe

pupils and three teachers were

among the dead. The former

student trned the gun on himself. Fuel from

himself. Fuel from a damaged

cargo ship begins to wash up on

beaches near Brisbane. The

three tonnes of fertiliser had

had also been washed off the

ship's deck by rough seas whipped up by Tropical Cyclone

Hamish. And the Australian

Retailers Association predicts

that more than half Australia's

small businesses will have to

lay off workers in the coming

months. The group says changes

to workplace laws, the economic

slow down, and a new industry

award will hit the sector hard.

As China's annual law making session nears its end Beijing

is playing host to another

annual tradition. Petitioner s

from the provinces who's

grievances are brutely

dismissed by local officials

have descended on the capital. It's their

It's their last chance to

have their concerns addressed.

Tom Iggulden reports. China's

mighty are gathering this week

to boast of the ways they have

served the people. But this non-disript suburban post

office just a few kilometres

away there's a different story.

Some of China's most

disempowered. Compose

desperate pleas to the central

government to help them overcome corruption

overcome corruption and

intimidation they say they

suffer at the hands of local

party officials. This woman

was beaten and her son put into

a mental asylum after trying to

clear her family's name.

TRANSLATION: I tried legal

procedures for 7 years. There

was no solution. There is no

other way out. So I came to

Beijing. As her letters make

their way into the Chinese

postal system, they take with

them her final hopes of

bringing those, she says, beat

her to justice. She has

written letters before to the

central government, but to no

avail. TRANSLATION: Somebody

must have interfered with them

before they got there. A

policeman shows up to ask what

we are filming. She is so

scared and miss trustful of

uniformed men she immediate ly flees into

flees into a nearby alley. Other petitioners have given up

writing letters at all. These

people are taking their

griefances to the street,

struing complaints around bus

stops in a desperate attempt to

get the stories heard. Again

police quickly arrive to pick

up the petitions before the

public can read them and to

arrest the petitioners. The

Chinese government itself says

there will be more

there will be more protests

this year as the economic

crisis bites. But it seems it

has no plans to change how to

deals with those protests. To

finance news and economists

expect today's official jobs

data to show the unemployment

rate hit 5% last month with

20,000 jobs lost. A year ago

the jobless rate stood at its

lowest in more than 30 years at

3.9%. The unemployment rate hit

hit 8.1% in the US last month.

Britain has begun to roll out

more than ?75 billion worth of

new money to try to bring the

country out of recession. The

Bank of England brought ?2

billion of government bonds

from financial institution s.

It is hoped the plan will

stimulate spending and lending.

China's exporting dropped by

more than a quarter in February

as the impact of the economic

crisis worsened. Demand for

Chinese products plunged by

9.7% compared to a year

earlier. Exports dropped to

almost $65 billion US and

imports fell to US$60 billion. The markets are

trading with mixed results.

The Dow is slightly down by

four point, the NASDAQ was up

almost 1% and the S&P 500 was

down 0.5%. In Europe the FTSE

down 0.5%. In Europe the FTSE

was down 21 point, oil was

selling for $43.46 and gold at $908 US. Businesses have until the end

of the tax year to cash in on

their cut of the government's

stimulus package. The small

and general business tax break

offers firms a 30% tax

offers firms a 30% tax deduction for equipment

purchased before July. It is

designed to kick-start business

investment. But will is

concern many companies are

unaware of their entitlements.

Neal Woolrich reports. Business investment has been a

key part of Australia's recent

economic prosperity. But there

are fear s it could contract sharply and push Australia into

a deeper downturn. As part of

its plan to cushion the

its plan to cushion the economy, the Federal Government

announced a tax break for

businesses that purchase

equipment this calendar year.

That will give a very significant boost to our

economy. The legislation when

passed would let businesses

claim a tax deduction equal to

30% of the cost of capital

equipment acquired before July,

or 10% for purchases made

between July and December.

That's on top of any

That's on top of any depreciation claims the

business could make against the

items. The full deduction

translates to an extra $900 tax

saving for every $10,000 spent.

The measure is really a free

kick from the government to

stimulate investment. To

encourage business to bring

forward investment decisions or

at least not postpone them.

Which tends to happen

Which tends to happen when the

economic conditions are down.

Notwithstanding those tax

incentives businesses still need to make a commercial case

for the investment. And that

could be the sticking point in

this troubled environment.

It's tough in terms of getting

finance. You have got to look

at your cash flow, your

budgeting, all things to see

that your business is in good

shape. Because you may well have to finance it and

have to finance it and front

the banks. And the banks are

looking at things with greater

scrutiny these days. National

Australia Bank's general

manager of agribusiness KanHorn

says it is a worthwhile attempt

to limit the downturn. This

package there help. No doubt.

30% is attractive. It will

bring decisions forward. Don't

forget just after 30 June it is still 10%.

still 10%. So it will be a

stimulus will definitely

assist. The government expects

the measure will cost $2.7

billion over four years. But

like so many other parts of the

economic stimulus debate there

will be no way to accurately

assess how effective the

measure has in fact been. In a few minutes Vanessa O'Hanlon

will be here with a look at the national weather.

national weather. And also

ahead we will have a review of

some of today's newspapers and

this morning we will be joined

by the editor of the the

'Sunday Age'. Gay Alcorn. Now with sport here is Paul

Kennedy. Thanks, good morning.

The NBL grand final series will

go to game five after the

Tigers beat the Dragons 108-95

last night. Star centre Chris

Anstey beat the opposition up

on the score board this time. Shooting 31 points

Shooting 31 points and grabbing

14 rebounds. The Dragons pull

it out again and there you are.

He knocks down a three. We

have got a show. We have

Barlow to get going. Show him

the on ball. He is going on

his back. The contact. And

the score. Chris Anstey.

Loose ball going in.

Crosswell. Kicks it in. The

lay-up is good. Great hustle

by the Melbourne Tigers.

Barlow will take that. One

more point. Chris Anstey. His

fall away jump shot. That is

nothing but net. Can't get to

go and that's it. After four

games, that's right. We are

going to game five withed decider no matter what.

Melbourne Tigers with a

crushing game win here.

Central coast tied nil all

with the Pohang steelers in the Asian Champions League last

night. The mariner has the pitch advantage but really

pitch advantage but really didn't create too many chances.

Their Korean opponent looked

more likely to score all night.

In the end central coast was

relieved to pick up a point

from the game. Australia's

baseballers will have to

overcome Mexico again if they

are to progress to round two of

the world classic. They looked

like pulling another upset by

beating Cuba yesterday but had

their hearts broken. Here are

a couple of big hits. Base in

the left field. One runner is

in. Here comes a throw to the

plate and he is safe. It is a

4-2 Australia lead. He is

run, a fly ball to the left.

It is deep and it's gone.

It is deep and it's gone. A

pinch hit home run. Peraza

has given the Cubans a 5-4

lead.

And the Gold Coast will long

remember the day surfer Joel

Parkinson triumphed Coolangatta

Parkinson triumphed Coolangatta

by riding a perfect 10 barrel

courtesy of Tropical Cyclone

Hamish. This is what happened

yesterday. Pretty good off the

takeoff.

Go. Go. Go.

Straight into the barrel.

You know the waves really

turned on today. I mean, I

would like to thank Tropical

Cyclone Hamish for some

devastation up the coast but he

definitely brang joy to the

Gold Coast. Thanks to Tropical

Cyclone Hamish. They love a cyclone those

cyclone those surfers. It was great. Fantastic pictures

there and those waves weren't

the same wave. That

commentator sounded like he was

about to bust something with

excitement. It does get any

better than the local boy

dominating at Coolangatta and

dominating the world's best.

Fidel Castro's son is

Fidel Castro's son is the Cuban

team's doctor. He sent a

message to Fidel to make sure

their base running improves. I

can't get over the shot of the

batter lumbering around the

bases. They don't need much

pace if they hit it out of the

park. ABC News Breakfast can

be watched anywhere from live in the world. here

here is Vanessa O'Hanlon with

the weather. And Hamish is no

more. No, it's now a tropical

low and that low is combining

with a large high pressure

system over the western

Tasmanian sea. That's producing strong winds and

large waves still about the

South East Queensland and cap

are cornea coast. Showers are

still expected over South East

Queensland and north east NSW.

As all this cloud remains Hamish. Cloud around ex-Tropical Cyclone

Hamish. Cloud is also bringing

the odd storm to inland

Queensland, NSW and SA. Hamish

overnight became a tropical

low. That's the old cyclone.

It is still causing the large

sea swells and showers for the

southern Queensland coast. A

trough will trigger further

storms over the south east.

And easterly wind also maintain

showers over the north-east of

NSW. As we take a look around the states -

looking ahead to tomorrow -

showers expected in Brisbane

with a top of 27. Mostly

cloudy over Sydney, 25, and a

top of 31 in Adelaide. I will see new half an hour. the top

the top story on ABC News Breakfast - at least 15 people

have been killed after a

17-year-old wrent went on a

shooting rampage in the school

in the south west German town

of Winnenden. He killed nine

students and three teachers

before driving off in a stolen

car. He shot himself during a

shootout with police. Steve

Rosenberg reports. A

Rosenberg reports. A small

sleepy town in southern

Germany, and a community

devastated by today's

bloodshed. At Albertville

Secondary in Winnenden the

school day had hardly begun

when a former student came here

to kill. The gunman had taken

one of the 18 guns owned by his

partners and then turned it on

pupils and tuchers.

TRANSLATION: In the beginning

I didn't realise what was happening. I thought it

happening. I thought it was

something that had gone wrong

in chemistry class. But then

the police said there are two

dead. At 9:30 local time a man

dressed in black combat gear

entered the Albertville

secondary school and started

shooting at random. He killed

nine students and three

teachers before leaving the

school. He killed another

person at a nearby clinic.

Before fleeing with a hostage

in a car. He drove to

in a car. He drove to the

nearby town of Wenvingen. The

hot Taj got away - hostage got

away and told the police the

gunman was stalking the

streets. He broke into a car

dealer ship. There was a

shootout. He killed two more

people before being shot dead

himself. Altogether 16 people

died, including the gunman.

The violence which began at

this school has not only

devastated this community it

revived painful memories for

the whole country. In recent

years Germany has suffered a

string of school shootings.

Tonight calls are being made

for gun laws to be

tightens. TRANSLATION: It is in

comprehensible in seconds

school children and teachers

were killed and an appalling

lost their crime that innocent by standers

lost their lives. It is hard to

put into words what has happened today. But, of course, our sympathies are with

the families of the victims.

The shootout in southern

Germany has left the whole

nation in shock. These

students fled the school this

morning. This evening they

came back to honour the memory

of those gunned down here. In

other news police in the US are investigating why a gunman killed 10 people,

killed 10 people, including his

mother and other family

members, in a shooting spree in

the southern state of Alabama.

The bloodshed began when the

gunman set fire to his house

with his mother inside. He

then fired on other homes, a

petrol station, shops and

vehicles. Before killing

himself. Queensland

authorities are dealing with a potential environmental

disaster as a damaged cargo

ship's fuel begins to wash up on beaches just

on beaches just off Brisbane.

The 'Pacific Adventurer' also

lost half its load of ammonium

nitrate yesterday, in heavy seas stirred up by Tropical Cyclone Hamish. The three

tonnes of fertiliser could have

a devastating impact on the

ecosystem. The Australian

Retailers Association predicts

that more than half Australia's small businesses will have to

lay off workers due to the

tough economic climate. A

survey from the group found 65% of

of small retailers expect to

cut jobs in the coming months.

The group says changes to

workplace laws, the economic

slow down and a new industry

award will hit the sector hard. The US President Barack Obama

and his Treasury Secretary have

called for G-20 Finance Ministers to use this weekend's

meeting in London to work

together to reform the global

economy. President Obama said

the group must both stimulate

the system and reform

the system and reform

international regulations. It

Alistair Darling warns comes as British Chancellor

Australia has yet to feel the

full impact of the crisis. And

thousands of people in Northern

Ireland have attended a series

of peace rallies to protest

against the murders of two

soldiers and a policeman. Two

dissident Republican groups,

the Continuity IRA and Real IRA

have claimed responsibility for

the murders. The killings

threaten to reignite

threaten to reignite sectarian

tensions in the region after a

decade of relative calm. The

world always top climate change

scientists are meet anything

Denmark, one of them is

Professor Will Steffan the

executive director of the

climate change institute at the

He will be briefing politicians Australian National University.

when he returns to Canberra

next week but told 'Lateline'

he will have little good news

for them. There isn't much good news on the

good news on the science of the

climate system. We have talked

about sea level rise and the

big ice sheets but in addition

to that there isn't much good

news on the carbon cycle and

vulnerables on the carbon

sinks. There isn't much good

news on the potential impacts

and the fact we are revising

downwards now. It is going to

come sooner than we would have

estimated 10 years or so ago. That's not

That's not good news. The good

news is I think there's a real

surge now in new ideas, new

approaches, new techniques for

getting a handle on the

problem. Professor Will

Steffan speaking there on

'Lateline' last night. Here is

how you can contribute to ABC News Breakfast -

A new national body

representing indigenous people

is unlikely to have any power

or veto of decisions by the

Federal Government. Indigenous

leaders from around Australia

have begun three days of talks

on a proposed model that will

effectively replace ATSIC.

Jason Om joins us from the

Adelaide news room. What's the

aim of the talks? Good

morning, well the talks began

yesterday and they are trying

to get a proposed model for

this new body that will effectively replace ATSIC.

There are three days of talks,

and they are discussing ideas

about how this body should take

shape and what its role would

be. And whether or not it

should be nominated or elected

or how those s members should

be appoint ed to

be appoint ed to that body. The

Tom Calmer is in charge of

taking those ideas to the

government and proposing a

recommended model by June and

he has an idea of getting an

interim body up by July and a

permanent body by the end of

the year. What's the feeling

about learning from the

mistakes of ATSIC? There's a

lot of sensitivity about not

repeating the mistakes of ATSIC

repeating the mistakes of ATSIC

and that's mainly to do with

governance issues. I notice

that in the paper today one of

the former ATSIC chairpersons

Lowitja odon ohue has criticised for 'supporting the

greedy not the needy". She

described ATSIC as a joke and

that many of the male leaders

were preoccupied with drinking,

gambling and womanising. She

is obviously referring to some

of the allegations that came

against some of the members of

ATSIC, namely to do with rape

allegations and gambling

allegations. She made those

comments in closed talked

yesterday. I talked to her

yesterday but she wasn't

willing to comment outside of

the talks. But she made a speech there which was closed

to the media and it

to the media and it seems that

she made those comments to the

paper yesterday after those

closed talks. And Jason, what

sort of powers is the new body

likely to have ? Well, all

indications suggest that this

body is likely to be service

delivery body or a political

lobby group. Tom Calma had

mentioned that it won't have

any legal powers to

any legal powers to make laws.

Obviously because that's the

parliament's role. But his

word that he used yesterday,

the message was he wanted a

premiership with the government

- a partnership with the

government but he did rule out

the body won't be able to veto

any Federal Government

decisions about Aboriginal and

Torres Strait islander

issues. Jason Om in Adelaide.

Questions are Than you for joining us.

Questions are being raised

about the effectiveness of

airport security in WA after a

cache of guns, knives and

ammunition was found in a

flight from Perth to Cairns.

The bagged allegedly belong ed

to two young boys aged 11 and

14 years old. They travelled

unaccompanied on a Qantas

flight. Andrew O'Connor joins

us from the ABC's Perth news

room. These guns add knives

were actually found once the room. These guns add knives

flight finished? That's right.

One of the unusual suspects of

this case. - aspects of this

case from time to time we hear

stories from passengers who

found their nail clippers or

scissors or Swiss Army knife

has been inadvertedly failed to

be detected on carry on baggage

but these weapons were found in

the check baggage carried in

the cargo hold of the aircraft.

It was found in the baggage of

very young boys, 11 and 14, who

were travelling as unaccompanied minors, which

means they didn't have an adult

with them on the flight. They

were essentially in the care of

airline staff from the time

they left Karratha. It is the

size of the this cache of

weapon, two handgun, at least a

dozen knives and up to

dozen knives and up to 3,000

rounds of ammunition. I

suspect the security at Cairns

airport would have been left

wide eyed and scratching their

head what they found, Are there

any clues about how this came

to be in the luggage? It has been alleged by police the

weapons and ammunition were

stolen from a sports store in

Karratha. We understand

Queensland police have charged

the 14-year-old boy and he will

be appear ing in

be appear ing in the children's

court in Weipa next week.

Cairns police have been quoted

as says the boy declined to be

interviewed. They had very

little indication how this very unusual situation had

developed. That's now a matter

for the courts to examine and

determine and that process will

start next week, Has there been

any explanation as to how this

got through security in WA?

Well not surprisingly no-one's been particularly keen to talk

been particularly keen to talk

about this one. Qantas issued

a statement yesterday, wouldn't

comment spfkly on the

circumstances - specifically en

on the circumstances of this

incident but did confirmed the

boys had had travelled on

Qantas flights from Karratha to

Perth and then on to Cairns.

They made it clear in their

view flight safety had never

been compromised. Presumably

because these weapons were in

accessed. the cargo hold so they could be

accessed. And passenger screening and security

screening complied with all

relevant regulations at a

federal level. The agency

responsible for that is the

department of infrastructure

transport and regional

development. It issues a

statement saying at each of

these airports there are

supposed to be check baggage screens using special X-ray

commitment designed to detect explosives. Again the

department wouldn't comment on

the specifics of the

the specifics of the case but

clearly this equipment doesn't

detect 2 begun gun - 2 guns or

12 knives or ammunition.

Thats for that Andrew. An

Australian man accused of money

laundering an defrauding the

Commonwealth has avoided

extradition yet again from the

island of Jersey in the British

channel islands, Phillip De island of Jersey in the British

Figueiredo is accused of

helping wealthy Australians

avoid hundreds of millions of

dollars in tax. He was

arrested in dus as part - in

December as part of operation

Wickenby and a court in Jersey

has moved his extra - hearing

to June, First it was the

Jersey cows that put this

island on the map. These days

it's the cash cows. The banks

are the life blood of the town.

Jersey's take haven status

means the banking sector now

represents 60% of its economy.

It's here in this bayside

house with views to France that

authorities found the man they allege master-minded hundreds

of millions of dollars worth of

tax avoidance schemes for

wealthy Australians. This is

the fourth time Phillip De

Figueiredo has come to Jersey's

Magistrates Court seeking to

avoid extradition to Australia. Magistrates Court seeking to

In an overnight hearing, he

was granted another three month

reprieve. Were you pleased

with the outcome? I have got

no comment to make. I'm not -

I have told you it is not

appropriate for knee to make -

me to make my comment at this

stage, What do you say to the

charges that you helped

Australians avoid hundreds of

millions of dollars worth of

tax? I have got in comment to

make. Sorry. I have

make. Sorry. I have been told

it's not appropriate to make

any comment at this stage.

Since operation Wickenby was

launched five years ago, 40

people have been arrested, but

just one has gone to jail.

Music promoter Glen Wheatley. The extradition process is

being handled by the island's

Attorney-General, on behalf of

the Australian government.

Over the years we have built

up a very

up a very good professional relationship with the

global financial crisis has Australian authorities. The

focussed increasing government

attention on tax havens like

this one. The British PM

Gordon Brown has vowed to make

offshore banking a key agenda

item at next month's G-20

summit in London.

You are watching ABC News Breakfast. The

Breakfast. The top stories

this morning - a 1-year-old man

- 17-year-old man in Germany

kills 15 people in a shooting

rampage that began a-at a high

school near Stuttgart. At

least nine pupils and three

teachers were among the dead.

The former student turned the

gun on himself during a

shootout with police. Fuel from

a damaged cargo ship begins to

wash up on beaches near Brisbane. The 3

Brisbane. The 3 tonnes of

fertiliser has been washed off

the ship's deck from Tropical

Retailers Association predicts Cyclone Hamish. The Australian

more than half Australia's

small businesses will have to

lay off workers in the coming

months. The group says changes

to workplace laws, the economic

slow down, and a new industry

award will hit the sector hard.

Now for a look at the national papers today we are

joined by the editor of 'Sunday

Age', Gay Alcorn. Welcome Gay.

Thank you, good morning. What

have you got for us? I

actually thought the papers

were a little quiet today. But

my first - a little bit

inhouse, the media being banned

from the royal commission's first community consultations at the

at the bushfiresful that's

going to start next week.

There is about 13 consultations

plans and the idea that the

royal commission has said, is

this is an opportunity for

people to give their own stories to tell what happened

to them and they don't want the

media or the public to be

present. That's unusual. A

royal commission, as we all

know, is a huge inquiry. It's

the most serious inquiry any

government can call and for

them to say essentially no

them to say essentially no

public access to that is a

serious thing and certainly the

press council has come out and

se said they don't agree with

that. So has the journalists

union. The media entertainment

and alliance. I guess the

issue there is, is it right to

have no public access to this

event? Or is that - I guess is

that not allowing people to see

what they should be allowed

what they should be allowed to

see? Presumably it's in

relation to traumatised people

from the horrific stuff that

they went through, only being

able to say what they really

want to say when they are not

confronted by the media That's

true. They could have had a arrangement of a pool arrange

the. No-one would like 10

television crews and radio crews everywhere

crews everywhere putting

microphones in people's faces.

It is going to be traumatic

enough. It is, but there is a

principal. I am interested in

what you think, a royal

commission is by deaf nation

open. - definition open.

Everyone has an interest in its

results. Everyone has an

interest in what it finds out

to try to prevent this in the

future. So to not allow it to

be open to the public has

worrying implipcations. Is

worrying implipcations. Is it

just in relation to victims?

Or like CFA vol volunteers as

well? My understanding what

the papers are saying this

morning it is the community consultations. It is the people

being able to tell their own

stories which may be quite dramatic and the royal

commission with the best

intentions has said, in

sympathy... What about they ask people individually would you

be comfortable if the media was

here to report on

here to report on this or not. According to 'The Australian'

it is not as if the commission

is responding to requests from

prif privacy from members of

the community. I was going to

ask you who is actually driving

this? It seems to be the

commission. As I said from the pairs this morning with the

best of intentions. The

inquiry after these initial

consultations with community

members will be totally open to

the media, open to the public

to have a look at. Which is a critical

critical principal if a royal commission is going to be seen

to be doing its job and being

transparent as possible. It is

these first community

consultations which has caused

the controversy in today's

papers. 'The Age''s editorlised

sphwrees with it from -

disagreeing with it, from the

media's point of view that is

predictable enough. I haven't known an equivalent situation.

You can say there is no

equivalent situation to these bushfires

bushfires but I haven't known

that before in had previous

inquiries, unless there is a

real legal reason where an

inquiry needs to be closed it's

a very uncommon thing. It is quite common to be able to

separate the media from that

actual process but they can

still listen in had. For

example in Victoria the OPI

hearings there was a room set

up just for the media and

nobody had to be exposed to them. Yes or you can

them. Yes or you can have a pool arrangement where you have

a limited number of media

there. It's like a court case

in the sense of the principal

of it being open to the public

is critical to it actually

working and to close it is a

serious step. When as I said

even those these people's

experiences have been so hor

horrific the interest in the commission is beyond the

communities and Victoria, it is Australia-wide in what this

commission will find. You are

commission will find. You are taking a look 'The Australian'

too? I am. The Australian

story today is an ongoing story

about the government's attempts

to change WorkChoices or get

rid of WorkChoices to introduce

the Fair Work bill I think it's

called. 'The Australian' has

running on this for several

days very hard. What they have

said today is hospitality

unions, retail unions are

willing perhaps - it's a

willing perhaps - it's a

suggestion of a story really -

but are willing to perhaps

defer wamg wage increases for

up to five years if it might

mean - if really what this is

about is that the GFC's come

upon us, the global financial

crisis and they are

acknowledging the change to the

workplace laws might mean there

may be some job losses. That's

certainly what the retail

people are saying. So the

people are saying. So the government is in this situation

where they have gone to the

election and said - no doubt do

have a manduate for to get rid

of woifs but they are -

WorkChoices but they are

bumping up now not just with

the strelss laws but -

industrial relations laws but

with the environment laws to

this big recession as

everyone's calling it and

what's that the going to do to

jobs? Just another

jobs? Just another example of

how extraordinary this

situation is if unions are willing to put off wage rises

for that kind of period of

time. Defer it. They are not

saying we are going to cancel

them but up to five years they

are saying they are willing to

at least discuss that. As I

said, similar with the

Emmissions Trading Scheme, this

huge issue and these issues

that the government's got

mandates for are bumping up

mandates for are bumping up

what seems to be a rapidly

deteriorating economy. The

'Financial Review' as well. I

have chosen the story, an

opinion piece by Louise Dodson

on another ongoing never ending

issue which is whether or not

Costello is going to quit or

whether or not he will

challenge Malcolm Turnbull.

And Louise today writes about

the discomfort among the Coalition but

Coalition but also how Labor is

enjoying it, but they have

memories of their own

leadership challenges through

the years. It was Kim beesly

and Mark Latham and Simon Crean

and through the years of the

Howard Government they had had

their own leadership tensions

too. This is some ways do you

think this is so ongoing do

ordinary voters take much interest

interest in it? Are people

tired of it I don't know. I think there is no doubt people

are tired of it. They are but

the Costello-Turnbull show is

sort of compelling viewing at

the moment though. It is, 'The

Australian' in their little cut

and paste. They do a think

every day which is a cut and

paste they and usually have a

go at someone and they are

pointing out too, Peter Harcher

from the 'Sydney Morning

Herald' over the months has said there is no

said there is no chance at all Costello will challenge and he

is not the only person who has

been saying that at all. And

now the political commentators

are shifting a little bit. It

all seems to have started this time with 'The Australian''s

opinion poll earlier this week.

Before then my paper published

John Hewson's comment piece a

couple of weeks ago which said

"please leave Peter, we are

over you, no-one wants you at

over you, no-one wants you at

all" and an opinion poll say s

Costello is doing better than

Turnbull and it is suddenly on

again. Just very briefly the

'The Age'. A little light

story. I was trying to find

one. A survey the university

of Newcastle published saying

expensive running shoes are not

at that good for your feet and

they could even damage your

feet and e

feet and e better off with the

cheap and cheerful which I

thought was a small piece of

good news. How cheap and

cheerful? They are no better

on your feet to spend several hundred dollars on running

shoes. A reminder you can

watch all of ABC News Breakfast

streamed live every morning.

Now with sport here is Paul

Kennedy. Thanks Joe. The NBL

grand final series will go to game five this

game five this Friday. The

Tigers beat the Dragons.

108-95 last night at the cage.

To tie the championship at

2-all. The hero from game four

was the villain from game

three. Chris Anstey shot 31

points for the defending

champs. Central coast tied nil

all with the Pohang steelers in

the Asian Champions League last

night. The mariners had the home pitch advantage but really

didn't create too many chances. The

The opponent looked more likely

to score in the end central

coast was relieved to pick up a

point from the game. And

Australia's baseballers will

have to overcome Mexico again

if they are to progress to

round two of the world classic.

The Aussies looked like pulling

off another upset yesterday

after going 4-2 up against Cuba

with one inning to play. But

they had their hearts broken by

a pinch hit. That just kept

going. That was in the

going. That was in the 8 the

innings, we will have a look at

that now. Cuba now progresses

and the home team will take

some beating the second time round. Here we go.

4-2 up and then they were 5-4

down. That was the end score.

The big man. The Australians

are up against the Mexicans

again who threw nuts and bolts at them

at them last time when the