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(generated from captions) Granted bail but still not

free. Sweden appeals against a

British court's decision to release Julian Assange. The

Swedes won't abide by the

umpire's decision and they want

to put Mr Assange through yet

more hurdles. more trouble, more expense,

Violent protests in Rome as Silvio Berlusconi narrowly wins a vote of confidence. The New South Wales Government presses

ahead with its plans privatise electricity. And a

new era beckons as Australia prepares for the WACA Test. This Program Is Captioned

Live.

Good morning. The top been granted bail but he's far on 'ABC News Breakfast' - he's

from walking free. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange remains

behind bars this evening Swedish authorities Swedish authorities appeal

against the decision by a

London judge to grant him

bail. He is fighting extradition to Sweden to face

sexual assault allegations. His

lawyer says the case is turning

into a show trial. Finally

after two hours we've heard that the Swedes won't want to put want to put Mr Assange through

yet more trouble, more yet more trouble, more expense,

more hurdles. They clearly will not spare any expense but to

keep Mr Assange in jail. This

is really turning into a is really turning into a show

trial. And we will be in court

again within the next 48 hours. again within the next 48

They haven't done us the courtesy of yet telling us when

we will be in court. As soon as we do, that information undoubtedly be put we do, that information will

the wires so that you can be

abreast of it. But it's an

unfortunate state of affairs , given that we were obviously

very relieved for Mr Assange a

few hours ago, that the Swedes

given their history of have taken this action, but

persecution of Mr Assange, it's

perhaps not surprising. A clearly infuriated Mark Steve veps there. Another member of Julian Assange's legal team Jennifer Robinson who joins

now from London. Take us through what actually happened in the senior district judge in the courtroom today? Well,

came to in our senior district judge Riddell

came to in our view the correct

decision in granting bail for Mr Assange. He was confident,

he reiterated the reasons he

gave last week and determined

that in fact as we had

submitted all along, that

Julian is not a flight risk. He

was satisfied with the sureties

and the security that we were

And decided he is best placed able to provide to the

outside of prison so so he can

properly defend this case. We agree with that decision and we

think it shows that the British

- the confidence has placed in the British - the confidence that Julian

justice system as having

justice system as having a

tradition of liberty and in the

common law was proven to be

correct. What we've seen is the

Swedish authorities appeal the

decision and it just goes to

show that this is a continuing

persecution. What were the grounds given by the Swedes for that only been given very brief

grounds. They say the judge

erred in his conclusion that Assange would surrender himself

to the court and have even said

satisfy them on bail. So this that no conditions would

is outrageous. Mr Assange has

complied all along with both the Swedish authorities and the English authorities. I notified

the English police more than

six weeks ago that Mr Assange

was here and that he was

willing to cooperate if and

when any arrest warrant was communicated, when it was

cooperated, we voluntarily communicated they told us, we

surrender and numerous conditions. The fact

somehow abscond is absolutely that they think he would

outrageous and was accepted by the judge today. What we're seeing is the seeing is the Swedish

authorities refusing to accept the decision of an umpire.

Where does it go from here? We

heard Mark Stephens referring to Julian Assange staying

behind bars for at least

another 48 hours. Has another

court hearing been scheduled as

yet? Not yet. We're still

waiting to hear from the court

exactly when it will be determined but any appeal has

we're waiting to hear back from to be heard within 48

the court as to exactly when it

will be scheduled. I would say

it's likely tomorrow afternoon

or the following morning. Was there some trouble about raising the $200,000 there some trouble expressed

surety that the judge demanded for stage Assange's bail? Of

course WikiLeaks and Julian

himself is in significant difficulties. We had a legal

defence fund set up in a Swiss bank account which was frozen

taken into arrest there is a just the day before he was

real difficulty with because of the pressure put on real difficulty with funds

WikiLeaks and our donation funds through MasterCard and

Visa and PayPal, all of those accounts have been including his own personal

account in Switzerland. So

we're having a real difficulty

getting those funds getting those funds together.

You've obviously seen Julian

Assange close-up. How he is

holding up? He was obviously

very pleased by the judge's decision which we believe was decision which we believe was

the correct one, that he has always submitted to the jurisdiction of this court and he is

his name. He was pleased he'd be able to start to address the

very defamatory allegations

circulating since he has in prison and to get to bottom circulating since he has been

of these allegations. He is frustrated by the frustrated

frustrated by the decision of

the prosecutor to appeal but is

not surprised. This matter has been outrageous from beginning

to end, and we see this as just

another breach of his human

rights. The Swedish prosecutor

confinement without charge seeks to keep him in solitary seeks to keep him

ongoing. What conditions is he

facing in jail? What sort of

contact do you have with them,

does his friends and relatives

have with him? Well, we've had

great difficulty organising

visits with him. I've end had

two about one hour long visits

with him since he was taken

into custody last Tuesday.

Which is of course appallingly

inadequate in order to prepare

for the bail application today

and for the appeal tomorrow and for the appeal tomorrow or

the next day. He hasn't had

social visits yet. He has had

several visits from consular

officials. But otherwise he is completely cut off from the outside world. He has restricted access to restricted access to the telephone. He telephone. He has only managed

to make I think two very short

phone calls since going into prison. His mail is censored.

It was raised in court today,

'Time' magazine who he has been

leading the polls for Time

person of the year, they sent

him a copy of a cover with his

face on it and the face on it and the prison

wouldn't let him have that

magazine. He is under surveillance. There is a CCTV

camera in his cell. camera in his cell. It's incredibly uncomfortable. This

is a man who has committed no

crime. The allegations in

Sweden are false there has been

no formal charges against him

yet he is being held in solitary confinement. To make

it absolutely clear, you have

given assurances that Julian

Assange has no intention of

fleeing, that he is quite prepared to hand over his

passport if he is granted bail

in a couple of days' time? Absolutely. forward significant sureties.

We'd had high profile figures like Michael Moore the documentary documentary film-maker, Jemima Khan, Bianca Jagger, John

Pilger in court today. We

offered hundreds

of pound worth of sureties plus

we have the history that Mr

Assange has completely cooperated with the authoritys from start

from start to finish, from start to finish, and we suggested a number of bail

conditions which were in fact quite strange gent, including

reporting to the police twice a day, electronic tagging,

everything, but the everything, but the Swedish

prosecutor said today in absolutely no condition would satisfy them that he wouldn't flee. The judge obviously

disagreed but we will have to go to the High Court go to the High Court to

determine that. But this is a

man in solitary confinement

without charge. It's outrageous. Thanks for your time this morning. You're welcome. In other news today, violent protests have broken

out in Rome after Prime

Minister Silvio Berlusconi narrowly won a vote of confidence. Tens of thousands of demonstrators set cars

alight and threw rocks at

police. At least 50 officers were injured Silvio Berlusconi is halfway

through a five-year term, but a string

string of scandals has shaken his hold on power. The New South Wales Government has

completed the first phase of its electricity privatisation

plans. TRUenergy and origin

energy will take over three

state owned electricity

retailers and the retailers and the gen trading

rights to power from rights to power from two

stations. Board members of two

State owned electricity companies

resigned in pro test at the sale. Australia's Nurses Union say the Federal Government will

says a crippling shortage of aged care workers if it doesn't raise wages in the Minister for Ageing Mark Butler is meeting his State

counterparts in Melbourne

today. He says he will wait for Fair Work Australia's response

before making a decision on any increase, but the Australian

Nursing Federation says the government

government needs to act now. Non-bank lenders have stepped up their attack up their attack on the

Treasurer's plan to boost

mortgage market competition.

Wayne Swan wants to ban exit fees year. But small lenders and

home loan brokers say that

would force them to raise rates. Big bank chiefs Ralph

Norris and Mike Smith will

front a Senate inquiry into

banks today. And the deadly

malaria disease could be

eradicateed in just five years

according to a new study. The world malaria report shows

deaths from the mosquito borne disease dropped from 1 million

at the turn of the century to

under 800,000 last year. The report says treated with insecticide have made a big impact. The UN

Special Envoy for malaria says the disease could be wiped out

by 2015. The Foreign Minister Kevin Rudd Kevin Rudd has wrapped up a visit to the Middle East by

telling Israel it should allow

UN inspectors into its nuclear

facilities. He's also called for the country to join for the country to join the nuclear non-proliferation

treaty. Kevin Rudd was back at

school yesterday, in the

Palestinian refugee camp of Kalandia near Jerusalem. Kalandia near Jerusalem. The

Foreign Minister has been

careful not to lecture either

side publicly on this trip. But

his comments on Israel's nuclear program have given Israeli officials an unpleasant surprise. In an interview with the Australian newspaper, Kevin

Rudd not only called on Israel

to join the nuclear

non-proliferation treaty, but to open all its nuclear facilities to United Nations

inspectors. This is the key

one. At Demona in Israel's believed to have developed an arsenal of nuclear weapons here. And a stockpile estimated at between 2 and 300 warheads.

For more than 40 Israel's official policy has

been to neither confirm been to neither confirm nor deny if it has nuclear weapons.

But as concern over Iranian nuclear

nuclear ambitions grows, Israel is coming under growing

international pressure to open up its own program. Kevin Rudd

says Australia's position is not

not new. The position of the

Australian Government has long

reiterated by governments of

both political persuasions in Australia that all States

including Israel should become

accessories to the NPT and its associated associated obligations. But

it's certainly been noted in

Israel, including by the

Israeli media. At a joint press conference, Israel's Foreign

Minister ducked the question of

whether he would adopt Kevin

Rudd's suggestion to open Rudd's suggestion to open the nuclear plants. I think that we

have a position and we're a very responsible country, a responsible government. And we prove this many, many years.

Thank you. Thank you. Thank you

very much. The United States

has already said that it wants to see to see a completely nuclear-free Middle East. But that was before Barack Obama

took a hit in the US mid term elections and before the White

House backed off the pressure

on Israel over its West Bank settlements. For settlements. For Washington,

trying to bring Israel into the

nuclear fold may well be a

bridge too far.

The chiefs of the ANZ, Commonwealth and Bendigo Banks will front a Senate inquiry

into competition in the banking sector today. For more, Melissa Clarke joins us Clarke joins us now from

Canberra. Good morning. Some

big guns will appear in front

of that Senate inquiry? They

can expect to face some big

questions, because this is whom

the senators have been waiting

to get before them so they can

question them about their

decisions. Not only the ANZ and Commonwealth as two of the big

four who have moved outside of the Reserve Bank interest rate Bendigo and Adelaide Bank, which also moved outside the

Reserve Bank movements. But is also considered a mid-tier

player who might be able to

help bring some competition into the sector.

Mike Hurst the head of the

Bendigo and Adelaide bank has

spoken to the ABC's AM program

this morning and has already

said that banks are doing it

tough, that for all the commentary about how big their

profits are and how successful

they are, a lot of them are

still only not getting a great deal of return in deal of return in terms of what

they're putting in He says their rate of return on capital is around 9% and capital is around 9% and that the majors are around 12, 13%. And And that when you compare that

to, say, a return on a bond rate, rate, the banks aren't making the mega profits that they're

perceived to be, but I have no

doubt that the senators from

both the government and the

opposition and the crossbench s as well will no doubt be questioning them very heavily

about their profit margins and

how they then consequently deal with their customers in terms of fees and charges and

interest rates. Then once we hear from inquiry got to run? They will still continue to have - to go

through the submissions. There

may well be more public

hearings. They tend to do them in stages. This has been a run

of the last two days in Sydney

and now today's in Canberra. and now today's in Canberra. So

it will be a while before it

wraps up. It's not tied, wraps up. It's not tied, bought

it's a Senate inquiry and one

set up by the Senate and not by the Lower House, it's not one

the government has control

over. So it won't necessarily

fall into line with the government's legislative agenda. government move to legislate some of its reforms before we get the final recommendations

from the Senate inquiry, so

they're happening in parallel, but not necessarily in concert. Melissa Clarke, to talk to you. Thanks so much

. A look at the front . A look at the front pages. Major newspapers around the

country now. The 'Age' has the

latest WikiLeaks which show a

secret Australian intelligence

assessment has declared al-Qaeda al-Qaeda a failure. The 'Sydney Morning Herald' says the assessment also claims

al-Qaeda's regional offshot Jemaah Jemaah Islamiah has been broken in Indonesia. The Resources Minister has accused the Greens of seeking to derail mining approval approval processes. The 'Herald

Sun' says death threats have

forced one of Victoria's top

cops to carry a gun for protection. Weekend anglers

would be slugged up to $90 to

fish for snapper under a Queensland

Queensland Government plan to

save the popular fish. Emergency authorities

have told the ACT Government to

brace for a summer of flood

events. The big three mobile phone commit billions of dollars by

early next year to renew their spectrum licences or risk

losing vital assets. The New

South Wales Government's approximately electricity sell-off came close to collapse

before a late-night deal was reached. The 'Advertiser' says

the average household will now

have to find an extra $310 to pay

pay for basic pay for basic utilities next year. The West Australian says

the social dividend from the

State's mining pool will see

schools turned into one stop parenting shops to help WA's

most vulnerable children. The Mark ree reports the long

awaited 565 million dollar redevelopment of the Royal Hobart Hospital has finally begun. The Northern Territory

'News' says a 'News' says a fortune teller has been blamed for the torture

of a teenage girl. If you want to join the conversation on 'ABC News Breakfast' this morning, perhaps you have a

view on what's happened in the view on what's happened in the

fairly dramatic turn of events overnight in London, Julian

Assange being granted bail by

the British judge but that the British judge but that bail application put on hold pending

an appeal by the Swedes. I

thought you were going about Hugh Jackman's cut below

the eye on Oprah yesterday afternoon. The leading point of discussion today. Oprah was the big talking point

yesterday. Our email system

Like the good showman that Hugh Jackman is, he recovered, got the eye patched up and duly went on to the Oprah special.

We'd love to hear anything you

would like to say this morning. The top stories on 'ABC News Breakfast' now - Breakfast' now - Swedish prosecute ors have appealed against a British court's

decision to grant bail to WikiLeaks founder Julian

Assange. Mr Assange is fighting extradition

extradition to Sweden where he

is facing allegations of sexual

assault. His lawyer has just told 'ABC News Breakfast' the

allegations are false shouldn't be held in custody. Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi has survived a vote of no Parliament. Violent protests broke out across Rome after that decision. 90 people were

injured when protesters set

fire to cars and threw stones at police. And the New South

Wales Government has completed

the first part of its electricity privatisation

plans. TRUenergy and origin energy will take over three

State-owned electricity

retailers and the gen retailers and the gen trading rights to power from two billion.

A key person of interest has denied being denied being involved in a

thrill kill of Sunshine Coast

teenager Daniel Morcombe. The

man known as P 2 claimed he man known as P 2 claimed he was beinged used as a scapegoat by

others because of the reward

money on offer. It's alleged he

killed the 13-year-old while

under the influence of drugs.

P 2 testified to the Brisbane

Coroners Court that he was

using drugs with his then

girlfriend on the day that Daniel waiting for a bus on the Sunshine Coast in December

2003. The court heard that P

2's brother, ex-girlfriend and person of interest 1 had already implicated already implicated him in the boy's abduction and suspected

murder. Allegations included

that P 2 gave Daniel Morcombe a fatal heroin overdose and

buried the boy at Beerburrum. P

2 said there's been a lot of people trying to implicate me,

or make me look like I had some

kind of involvement. When P 2

was asked why P 1 would

nominate him to police person of interest in the case, P 2 said he was simply being

used as a scapegoat and that he

had no involvement in Daniel Morcombe's disappearance. Earlier, P 1,

time for manslaughter, was

re-examined in court about notes he'd written on

conversations in jail in which

fellow inmate P3 3 allegedly

made a confession. Counsel

assisting the inquest put it to

P 1 that the notes were a

fabrication, saying "On your own

the I've been a lie ya yar all

your life." The Morcombe

family says it's not pinning its hopes on a confession. If

there is, that's still not the be-all and end-all. There needs

to be proof, and weigh up all motivations for that

confession. Sunshine Coast sergeant David White detailed

to the court the police brief on other persons of interest.

They included a man who lived

in a caravan park near the abduction site who'd bragged

about his involvement. And

another, a convicted sex

offender, who rode past

a bicycle on the afternoon Daniel Morcombe disappeared but they were ruled out as potential suspects. The Australian Human Rights Commission says asylum

seekers's children are self-harming in Northern Territory Territory detention facilities. It's calling for

the immediate end to mandatory

detention and the closure of at

least one of the facilities least one of the facilities in Darwin which is deems completely inappropriate. Riots

broke out at the Darwin immigration year. Days later 90 asylum seekers broke out of the pass

toilet draw attention to their plight. In September, the Human Rights Commission decided to inspect all of inspect all of the detention facilities in Darwin. We were

concerned simply about the

numbers of people who are being

held in immigration detention, approximately 780 people in

Darwin, of which nearly 250 are

children. The commission found

a significant number of asylum

seekers had been seekers had been in detention for more people had been held for more than nine months. It says it met with a number of detainees,

including children, who'd attempted to self-harm that time. I'm talking that time. I'm talking to people in the Darwin Airport

lodge and the ASTI who are

absolutely at the end of their

tether. There's over 330 people

who have been found to be refugees, and who are still in detention, because they're

waiting for the security checks. The commission checks. The commission has condemned the condemned the use of the Asti

motel in the city as a

detention facility and is

calling for those there to be moved immediately. There

unaccompanied minors who'd never left the campus of the

motel. It's small, cramped, it doesn't have recreation facilities. The Federal Government says it's Government says it's increased excursions for asylum seekers

detained at the Asti Motel. It

says it is a short-term

arrangement and the Immigration

Department is working to move many accommodation.

The Dow reached its highest point in two years overnight off the back of retail business growth. With the sport, here's Paul Kennedy. Good morning. Let's

take a look at cricket preparations. Just a day to go before Australia takes before Australia takes on

England at Perth. And there's the

the old and the new. Ricky Ponting and Phillip Hughes

batting in the nets. Time for a change for got Phil Hughes and Steven

Smith in the team to brighten

things up, get some youth in

the side. Mitchell Johnson is

back. That's causing some criticism. It appears Peter Siddle might be on the outer.

Yesterday he did very little but stand around and chat while the other bowlers all did

network and bowled in the

middle. So there's some criticism of that, but let's concentrate on the youngsters for now. Let's hear from Phil Hughes I've always enjoyed opening the

batting. I have always done it. It's

It's exciting T gets the blood

flowing. If you bat Firth or second whatever it is, it's exciting to go out there, but

I'm sure they've - they're going to come out firing

against me. I'm ready for

anything that they throw at me.

I just can't wait for that. I'm

not too concerned about it.

Look I lost my spot on the

Australian side in England the

last Ashes series that was series. That's obviously disappointing. I have come in and I'm all smiles at the

moment. I'm happy to be round the guys again. What I have

learned over the last 18 months

is a couple of big things, but

mentally I feel as good as

anything. As good as I have ever been. For me it's about

playing with freedom and giving

myself the best chance to score

runs. I don't think I need to change too much from what I've been doing in State cricket.

I'm really looking forward to I'm really looking forward to

the challenge of England's

bowlers coming pretty hard at

me. The English team has had to deal with the last week or so. Stuart Broad's gone, so Chris Tremlett

looks like being the inclusion.

And Jim yes Anderson had to go home for the birth of his child. He's back now. I didn't

get into a sleep routine in

England, I didn't try to

acclimatise back to English conditions. Tried to, you know,

stay on Australian time so to

speak. I had a good night's sleep last night. of preparation now before the

first Test. I don't see why

they're not going to go well. I feel fresh and probably happy

for the rest from bowling after

a tough first two Tests. the guys have got to deal with

it at some stage or another,

I'm sure many people in

whatever jobs they do have got

to deal with stuff like this.

It's just another thing that I have to cope with. I'm have to cope with. I'm sure it

will be fine. Internationally, there's been a big upset in the

football world this morning.

Mezambi the African champion has taken on Internationale the Brazilian

club champion in the club champion in the FIFA Woodside Petroleum Club

Challenge and the African team

has done what no other African team has done and beaten that

Brazilian side 2-0. It was Brazilian side 2-0. It was 1-0 just after the half-time and

then let's take a look now at the second

the second goal and then of

course the celebration which has become

It's most astonishing score

line in the history of the line in the history of the Club World Cup. We're all imitating

him now. There you go. Some of our funniest jokes were offair

then. then. Virginia's advocating the whole team doing it. I wanted

to see an to see an entire flight of bum-dancers. We might do that on our Christmas Eve program. A

trainer or ... He looked trainer or ... He looked to be the coach. But he couldn't do

it very well. Kitiaba is the

name of the goalkeeper who has done that through the

tournament. Now they go into

the final. White men really

can't bum-dance. He needs

coaching! He does. Peter

Siddle no, bum-dancing or no

smiles yesterday. We have to with the Australian cricket

team, but ... I have lost

track. It appears he is on the

outer now and Mitchell Johnson

is back into the fold. We is back into the fold. We know that but Ben Hilfenhaus might be the guy to bowl into the breeze and Ryan Harris was

fairly good in Adelaide. That

would leave Peter Siddle, he

took a hat trick and a 6-fer in

the first Test, all of a sudden

out of the team for the third Test. Very, very unusual there. Brad Hodges made some more

comments about that. He appears

to be the go-to man on

selection matters from now on. The on. The mediator. Thanks, Paul. 'ABC News Breakfast' can

be watched live on the web from

anywhere. Just visit the

ABC News web site. You will

find a link to news 24. It's

streamed live every day as it

should be. Paul Higgins joins

us now with the weather. Good

morning. We have a couple morning. We have a couple of active weather systems in play

for your Wednesday. A for your Wednesday. A cold front the are currently sweeping through

the south-east of the nation.

And a developing monsoon trough

right across right across the north. The

front in the east will bring front in the east will bring a

cool change and a few showers and thunderstorms while the low in the west will bring some instability to the instability to the northern half of WA. You're watching 'ABC News Breakfast'. Still to come Breakfast'. Still to come - as the digital revolution continues, we will be speaking

to Andy Townsend from the

Federal Government's digital

switchover task force and also

ahead we'll have a review we're joined by Scott Burchill senior lecturer in international relations at Deakin University. Leading the news

news this morning, news this morning, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange remains behind bars as Swedish authorities appeal against authorities appeal against a

decision by a London judge to

grant him bail. Mr Assange is fighting extradition to Sweden

to face sexual assault

allegations. His lawyer Mark

Stephens said the case was

turning into a show trial.

Violent protests have broken

out in Rome after Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi narrowly survived a

confidence. Tens of thousands

of demonstrators set cars

alight and threw rocks at police. At least police. At least 50 officers were injured. A were injured. A string of scandals has shaken Mr Berlusconi's hold on power. Foreign Affairs Minister Kevin

Rudd has called on Israel to

allow international inspectors

into its nuclear facility. He

also said Israel should stop building settlements in the West Bank and east Jerusalem. Riz rail refuses to confirm it has nuclear weapons

but foreign analysts say there are 200 in the country's south. in the country's south. The New South Wales Government has

completed the first phase of its electricity privatisation

plans. TRUenergy and origin energy will take over state owned electricity

retailers and the rights to power from two other stations.

The deal is worth more than $5 billion. And Australia's Nurses Union say the Federal

Government will face a

crippling shortage of aged care

workers if it doesn't raise

wages in the sector. The

Minister for Ageing is meeting his State will wait for Fair Work

Australia's response before making a decision on any increase. Swedish authorities have appealed against a

decision to grant bail to WikiLeaks founder Julian

Assange. He was granted bail a very short time ago. He is fighting extradition to Sweden to face sexual assault to face sexual assault al

allegations there. His lawyer

told us this morning those

allegations are false and he

shouldn't still be in custody. He is under He is under censorship,

under 24 hour surveillance.

It's incredibly uncomfortable. We have to remember that this

is a man who has committed no crime. The allegations in Sweden are false. There have

been no formal charges against

him yet he is being held in

solitary confinement. It's entirely unsatisfactory. We

have put forward significant

sureties. High profile figures

like Michael Moore, Jemima

Khan, Bianca Jagger, John Pilger in of pounds worth of sureties plus we have the history plus we have the history that Mr Assange has completely

cooperated with the authorities

from start to finish, and we suggested

conditions which were in fact

quite stringent including

reporting to the police twice a day, electronic tagging, everything, but everything, but the Swedish

prosecutor has said today in

their appeal submission that

absolutely no condition would satisfy them that they satisfy them that they would not flee. The judge obviously

disagreed but we will have to

go to the High Court to

determine that. But the

This is a man who is in

solitary confinement without

charge. Italy's Silvio has held Italy's Silvio Berlusconi

Ministership by the skin of his

teeth. He survived votes of no

confidence in both houses of the Italian

Parliament. Opponents who are

sick of his flamboyant life

some time and lack of policy

have been calling for his resignation. He has resignation. He has retained

his nickname of the teflon man. The billionaire media tycoon

with a canny ability political and personal but his

public have had enough. His

narrow vote of confidence win

has sparked violent protests the streets of Rome. Police have clashed have clashed with protesters hurling eggs, stones, firecrackers firecrackers and paint. Their

fury mirrors that of the opposition MPs who sparked the overnight confidence vote. Those tiring of the PM's

dalliances and party lifestyle, his regular gaffes, his barroom

humour likements about President Obama's tan. Especially outside the

country, the reputation of Mr Berlusconi because of his Berlusconi because of his way of life is declining and we

need in Italian and even abroad

a stronger image of our institutions.

Hand they feel he Hand they feel he has been

treading water for the past two years, not offering years, not offering anything

substantial in the way of

pensions, health and education

reform. Overnight came the showdown. As expected, Mr Berlusconi survived a with a comfortable majority.

Then attention turned to the Lower House. The vote was delayed after delayed after Italian passions led to scuffles on the

And there were claims the PM

had lobbied for Lower House votes to ensure his votes to ensure his survival

but he kept his post by a nose.

The vote count, 314 in favour, 311 against.

Commentators say his Commentators say his scare

tactics worked. His warnings

that changing Italy's leader

now would only result in

political instability that

would lead the Eurozone's third

largest economy into a Greek or

Irish-style economic crisis.

Ai. He should remain in power

because he is good for because he is good for this

country especially now during

the global financial crisis.

Italy is showing the world the

best way to get out of it. He

will now govern with a tiny

majority and critics say he's early election next year. Indonesian police allege that radical cleric Abu Bakar Bashir was the figurehead of a new al-Qaeda style terror network. The 72-year-old

preacher was assembling a new network featuring some of the region's most wanted militants. Just a day after

Abu Bakar Bashir was indicted

on terrorism charges that the death sentence, police made public fresh claims against the

radical cleric. The director of

the national anti-terror agency says Bashir and other senior

members of his group were involved in financing and

organising a secret extremist

network dubbed al-Qaeda in

Aceh, which was discovered

running a training camp in Aceh

Province in February. Another

senior member of the group was

Abu Talut considered one of the

most dangerous extremists in

Indonesia whose arrest has just 10 and 11 we arrested this man

in central Java. After a in central Java. After a series

of intensive activities to hunt

down the suspects by the

national police, anti-terror

units and the national agency

of terror handling. He is with

a group of three others who've

just been moved from the city

of Solo in Central Java to of Solo in Central Java to the capital Jakarta. This is with

the third time Abu Bakar Bashir

has been arrested on related charges since 2002. But police have failed to make any

of the allegations stick. He

has served more than two years

in jail for conspiracy over in jail for conspiracy over the Bali bombings before being

cleared and released in cleared and released in 2006.

Bashir's new trial on terrorism

charges is expected to begin early in the new year.

Tributes are pouring in for Richard Holbrooke. He died in hospital after hospital after undergoing heart

surgery. In almost 40 years of public service, Richard

Holbrooke was involved in every

democratic administration since President Jimmy as a tough negotiator, he

brokered the 1995 brokered the 1995 peace agreement that ended the

Balkans War. We are in the

middle of a period of immense

historical importance. In Yugoslavia. The people have

voted resoundingly for a democratic future. Last year Barack Obama appointed him as the administration Special Envoy to Envoy to Afghanistan and Pakistan. The people who demand

that the foreign troops leave

Afghanistan before they talk about peace are actually asking

for surrender. Let us not be

naive about this. The former Nations had been in a critical condition since surgery on

Saturday to repair a tear in

his aorta. Richard Holbrooke

had been in a meeting at the US State department on Friday when

he became ill, just hours

before his death, the US

President, Barack Obama, paid tribute to the diplomat's work. And I know that everyone

here joins me when I say that

America is more secure and the

world is a safer place because of the work Richard Holbrooke. Australia's Defence Minister, Steven Smith, Defence Minister, Steven Smith, says Richard Holbrooke was a friend of Australia who will be sadly missed. I worked closely with him in respect of Afghanistan and Pakistan. Afghanistan and Pakistan. He was a first-class United States official. He was highly regarded by regarded by his Foreign Ministeral and Defence Ministeral colleagues. Richard

Holbrooke had been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize seven times. While his hard nosed diplomatic skills may be missed analysts say his death is unlikely unlikely to have much impact on a report on the American this week.

Cotton growers in central

Queensland have appealed to the

federal and State Governments

for help after recent daijing

floods. The federal and State ministers toured the region.

They were told growers face a

grim future if they don't get disaster

row of water logged cotton. The

crops encrusted with mud. The federal Agriculture Minister

and his Queensland counterpart toured the flood ravaged

central highlands, hearing from

growers hard hit by the

disaster. We had 160 acres go

under. We've lost probably at

least half that completely. A

few days ago, this shed was

awash with floodwaters. Today,

it was the meeting place for

farmers to share their stories of

of pain. We've lost with our cotton area here 350

acres. Trevor Elsden estimates he will lose $1.5 million in crops and infrastructure

damage. It's been a bit dis hard -- dishearten ing. Growers hope they've convinced the Federal

Government and State

Governments they desperately need access to floods assistance. They say without

help they'll struggle to get

back on their feet. We're all in dire those things, we don't know whether to carry whether to carry on or whether

the banks are gonna stand by us without any government

assistance. Today the minister was non-committal. People are

doing it tough. I recognise

that. And there is more call on government to provide assistance not only to assistance not only to primary

producers but to other small businesses. He says a, whoing

party will be set up to report on what government assistance should be made available. Conservationists say last

Monday that's flooding is having a devastating impact on one of the country's native animals. A small army of

volunteers is doing what it can

to prevent entire of southern hairy of southern hairy nosed wombats

from being wiped out. This

land is normally dry but recent flooding has trapped populations of southern populations of southern hairy nosed wombats in their

burrows. You see just under the

water there is burrow systems that are still obviously covered. It's wombat habitat, but over the past few

past few days, conservationist Bridget Stephens says her team

has pulled out at least 60 dead

animals from the water and she believes hundreds believes hundreds more have been killed. For the wild population it's population it's a catastrophic event. I haven't seen anything

like this before,

never. Volunteers are doing

what they can to pump water

out. If we can try to free some

of that water from there, hopefully there air pockets that the wombats

will at least get oxygen. The rescue effort is being made all the more difficult in areas

like this where the water

hasn't receded since Monday's

flooding. It means rescuers

can't get to the burrows as

there's simply too much water

to pump away. Rangers from the department

department of environment and

natural resources have checked

burrows here Blanchtown. They

believe wombats here are not

affected as they are on higher

ground. Downstream though time

is ticking to save animals. We have seen them come

out after 11 days but we

haven't seen it this bad.

Volunteer also continue to work

over coming days. You're watching 'ABC News These are the top stories today - Swedish prosecutors have appealed against a British court's decision today to grant bail to WikiLeaks founder

Julian Assange. Mr Assange is

fighting extradition to Sweden

where he is facing allegations

of sexual assault. Is lawyer

has told 'ABC News Breakfast' the case will go all the way the High Court. Silvio

Berlusconi has survived a vote

off in confidence in Parliament. Violent protests

broke out across Rome after the decision. 09 people were

injured when protesters set

fire to cars and threw stones

at police. The New South Wales

Government has completed the

first part of the its

electricity privatisation plans. TRUenergy and origin

energy will take over three

state owned electricity

retailers and the rights power from retailers and the rights to

power from two other stations.

The deal is worth almost $5.5 billion. We're joined now by

We're joined now by senior

lecturer in international

relations at Deakin University Scott Burchill. As someone who

is closely involved in Mr Assange's situation over in

London, you would've been

watching very carefully

developments this morning. He

was granted became and Swedish authorities have now appealed? Yes, on grounds that

are clearly very difficult to sustain. It's basically that

they don't trust him to stay in

London while that court case

isn't pending. He is a bit of a wanderer? He is although it's

hard for him to hide anywhere at at the moment. The conditions

of his bail were onerous. He

would have to wear an

electronic device around his ankle, surrender his ankle, surrender his passport,

have $200,000 in surety paid.

There is a lot of conditions

attached to attached to those bail

conditions and I don't think preached. How do you see it

playing out, will he get playing out, will he get bail when he fronts up to court when he fronts up to court naen

in a couple of days? I'm no haur but I suspect that the

High Court would be

to overturn the decision of the

magistrate who's fronted magistrate who's fronted him

pail. I think that would be a

slap in the face in the British

legal system. He has already

opinion in custody now for five

or six days. It's a pretty

difficult regime. He is in solitary

twos phone calls a day of five

minutes' duration. He has had

limited access to his legal team. It's almost impossible to

get visitors in to see him. He that's not doing it easely. For

someone who is effectively

being held pending charges that

are not criminal offences in

the UK, it's a pretty remarkable

remarkable situation that he

finds himself in. What I found

remark sbl that Sweden is

actually able to appear against

a magistrates decision in

Britain when it's a foreign

appealing a decision made in a

British court. The reason to

keep him out of Sweden is

clear. It's not that he has

less of a chance to being extradited to the United States

from Sweden, or that is the

major concern, but that his

legal team would find it much

easier to deal with case law

and documents, court documents

that are in English rather in Swedish. But there's no threat of extradition to threat of extradition to the US. No charges have been laid. No

laid. No charges have been

laid, but there are suggestions

that the grand jury has been

secretly empanelled to file

charges relating to the 1917 espionage Act in the United

States. If that's true it could be announced at very short

notice once he was out on bail.

So his lawyers do suspect that steps are being taken in the US to lay charges doesn't that have to play out then? If a grand jury then? If a grand jury is empanelled and it finds there

are grounds and issues that someone has to answer, he will

have to answer them? He will have to fight extradition

the US, if he's successful in

fighting ... Or go and fight

the charges? Yes, although I

suspect given some of the statements made by senior US

politicians over the last week

or 10 days, it's not a place he

would like to be while fighting

those particular cases. But

that's the political side of

it. We largely have the American justice system. Do

we? Do you? Um ... in this

case I'm not sure. Some of it is motivated by political embarrassment rather than due legal process. Is that going to muddy the mind of judges? It

might, but also I don't think

he wants to spend his time in

the next few months fighting

protracted legal cases in the

US. He'd far rather onno be out releasing these cables over time to the newspapers. There

is a new batch in the 'Age'

this morning? Yes, the next

batch of releases are in two

stages on the front page of the

is an admission by Australia's security organisations that

al-Qaeda effectively has been

if not defeated perm innocently damaged by counter terrorism activity since 2001 and that

perhaps the threat that the politicians would like to remind really skew with the

assessments of the intelligence organisations. But organisations. But it's turned

into something else. It might

not sort of be an not sort of be an entirely holistic al-Qaeda, holistic al-Qaeda, hasn't it sort of the splintered into individuals and radicals who are doing their own

thing? There are a lot

franchises. And there have been Jemaah Islamiah in South East

Asia has been sort of a

franchise of al-Qaeda. But in terms of their ability to

inflict damage and pain, I

think it's been highly damaged leadership in many of these organisations and counter

intelligence and surveillance of likely terrorists. You can see what's happened

Bakar Bashir in the last couple of days

of days which suggests the

Indonesians are tightening their grip on their own

internal terrorist problem and

this is reflected around the

world. I think al-Qaeda or jihadis generally are under a

great deal of threat and

therefore unable to do a lot of the activities that they'd

normally be doing. There are Look at the case of Look at the case of the

Stockholm bombing in the last

few days? A very curious few days? A very curious one.

You can't obviously relax your guard, but guard, but that operation seems

to have been amateurish in its

execution, thankfully. But it

also - it's not clear exactly

what the motive is in this in

that particular case, where

it's Sweden's support for the

war in Afghanistan or what the actual motive is. actual motive is. The Swedes have probably got other issues

on their platter at the moment and thing that occurred to me

reading a number of these

cables in particular, the Australian media's or Australian media's or the Fairfax Media's coverage of the Australian angle of it, is that

to a large extent it actually

reassured my faith in the

judgment of our various judgment of our various bods

around the world and those in power. The judgments seemed to

be largely quite sound when it

comes to the global threats

facing various communities and Australia in

realistic than the politicians would have us believe which is

a strong argue minute for

supporting their disclosure.

The public by reading these documents and documents and reading the

accounts of them are getting a much more accurate picture of

the kind of threat posed by

terrorism around the world.

Whereas what we're getting is a sort manipulated political

version which is often has other other motives and other other motives and other related issues, and that's why I think

one of the reasons why WikiLeaks should be supported. WikiLeaks should be supported. Is that in many ways it's

making the public much informed about what government really thinks and therefore other governments around the

world have a more accurate understanding of our position. What about the

argument it's making the job of discreet and careful surveillance in support of

safety harder? Don't think

that's true. Most of this is

diplomatic gossip. Most of it

is discussions. We shouldn't forget, diplomatic cables are

public documents. I was a trainee diplomat. The first

thing I was told when was anything I wrote in a cable

would at some point in time be releaseed to the public,

whether it be for an FOI search

or from archives or 30 Cabinet rule Cabinet rule so these are not private correspondence. It's

just that instead of finding

out from Paul Kelly in 10

years' time or from ... On New

Year's Day. Yes, what

Year's Day. Yes, what actually

was said, we're getting it in real time. The 'Australian' has Kevin Rudd in Israel trying to usher in Middle East peace? Mr Rudd has caused a

few problems. Israel refuses to

either Quon firm or deny its

200 nuclear weapons which is a

rather quaint but

anachronistic position to take.

No-one seriously believes they

haven't got them but he's also

I think made some statements about Israel's occupation of

the West Bank and the building

in east Jerusalem, which have not gone down all that not gone down all that well with his interlocutors in

Tel-Aviv. Strangely he is leading a delegation of many

MPs and journalists part of MPs and journalists part of the Australia/Israel leadership forum in the next days. forum in the next couple of days. So some of days. So some of the

discussions behind closed doors with Chatham House rules might

be more robust than they

otherwise might've been. Could we

we very, very quickly mention we very, very quickly please mention my favourite man in

Europe, Silvio Berlusconi? I

love him! A man who has done a remarkable lot for both the

media and for hair transplants prnd the world. He narrowly survived a no-confidence motion

in the Parliament. He is the

gift that keeps going. It would be terrible and very dull if he were to leave were to leave the political

stage. He has two more years of

Prime Ministership to serve. We

should hope he survives it just for the amusement value alone. I said that ironically,

you know that, don't you know that, don't you? I know! Nice to see you. Paul Kennedy's back with all the sport headlines. Good sport headlines. Good morning. The Australian cricket team preparing for the WACA Test, the third Test against Phil Hughes and Steve Smith are

back in the team. It's hoped their youthful enthusiasm might

lift Australia out of its lift Australia out of its glum predicament at the moment.

Mitchell Johnson has come back in.

in. They're hoping he might pull one out of his hat as

well. The English team training yesterday. Jimmy Anderson is

back with them. He went home

between the second Test and now to oversee the birth of his child. He says he never child. He says he never got on

to English time. He will probably play a probably play a big part in that Test. To the soccer. Mozambie is a club from Africa.

This is the World Cup Club

Challenge for FIFA. The African team from champions, stunned them 2-0 and celebrated wholeheartedly. They

go into the final now against

perhaps Inter Milan and maybe another upset there. And some

more dancing in the penalty box. Michael? Gets funnier

every time you see it. Get used to it. I will probably show it six more show it six more times this

morning. Then we'll all do it!

Speak for yourself! Here's Paul

Higgins with the weather. Good morning. A cool change is moving through the south-east storms will be active in the north, especially north, especially this afternoon. Queensland should

stay mostly dry in the south but afternoon showers and storms elsewhere.

Still ahead on 'ABC News Breakfast'

revolution rolls on, as the analog TV signal gradually gets

switched off around the country. Today it's in parts of South South Australia. We'll speak to a representative from the Federal Federal Government's digital

switchover task force for details. The government's been very careful to warn people to

buy the set top boxes before

the ... You can't get it. V if

you don't have a digital set

top box? Yes or a special new digital TV digital TV channel with an in-built scanner, your

television goes black. Back with you shortly.

Granted bail but still not

free. Sweden appeals against a

British court's decision to release Julian Assange. The

Swedes won't abide by Swedes won't abide by the umpire's decision. And they

want to put Mr Assange through

yet more trouble, more expense for hurdles.

Violent protests in Rome Violent protests in Rome as Silvio Berlusconi narrowly

survives a confidence vote. The New South Wales presses ahead with its plans to

privatise electricity. And a

new era beckons as Australia

prepares for the WACA Test.

Good morning. The top story on 'ABC News Breakfast' - he's been granted bail, but he's far

from walking free. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange remains behind bars as Swedish

authorities now appeal against the decision just granted by the decision just granted by a London judge to give him bail. Mr Assange is fighting extradition to Sweden to face

sexual assault allegations. His lawyer Breakfast' the appeal is a persecution of her client. Finally after two

hours, we've heard the Swedes

won't abide by the umpire's decision. They want to put Mr

Assange through yet more trouble, more expense,

hurdles. They clearly hurdles. They clearly will not spare any expense but to keep

Mr Assange in jail. This is

really turning into a show

trial. And we will be in court

again within the next 48 hours.

They haven't done us the

courtesy of yet telling us when we will be in court we will be in court and as soon as we do, that information will undoubtedly be put out across

the wires so that you can be abreast of it. But it's an unfortunate state of affairs

given that we were given that we were obviously very relieved for Mr Assange a

few showers ago, that the

Swedes have taken this action, but given their history of

persecution of Mr Assange, it's

perhaps not surprising. Just a

short time ago we spoke to another member of Julian

Assange's legal team Jennifer Robinson. Senior district judge

Riddle came to in our view the

correct decision in correct decision in granting bail for Mr Assange. He was

confident, he reiterated the

reasons he gave last week and

determined that in fact as we

had submitted all along, that

Julian is not a flight risk. He

was satisfied with the sureties

and the security that we were

able to provide to the court, and decided that he is best

placed outside of prison so he

can properly defend this case.

We agree with that decision. We

think it shows that confidence that Julian has

placed in the British justice system

system as having a tradition system as having a tradition of liberty and in the common law

was proven to be was proven to be correct. What we've seen is the we've seen is the Swedish

authorities appeal the decision

and it just goes to show that

this is a this is a continuing persecution. What were the

grounds given by the Swedes for

that appeal? They say - we've

only been given very brief

grounds. They say the judge

erred in his conclusion that Mr Assange would surrender himself

that no conditions would satisfy them on bail. So this

is outrageous. Mr Assange has

complied all along with both

the Swedish authorities and the

English authorities. I notified

the English police more than

six weeks ago that Mr Assange

was here and that he was willing to cooperate if and

when any arrest warrant was

communicated. When it was

communicated they told us, we cooperated, we voluntarily

surrender and we have offered

numerous conditions. The fact they think he abscond is outrageous and accepted by the judge today.

We're seeing the Swedish authorities refusing to accept

the decision of an umpire. Where does it go from here? We heard Mark heard Mark Stephens referring to to saing saeng saipg staying

behind bars for at least

another 48 hours. Has another

court hearing been scheduled as

yet? Not yet. Any appeal has to

be heard within 48 hours. We're

waiting to hear back from the court as to exactly when it will be scheduled. It's likely

tomorrow afternoon

following morning. Was there

some trouble expressed about

raising the $200,000 shur tee

that the judge demanded for

Julian Assange's bail? Wick lee

leaks and Julian himself is in significant difficulties. We