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(generated from captions) Tropical Cyclone Lua will

intensify as it moves closer to

the coast. It's likely to make

landfall on Saturday. Heavy rain will fall about rain will fall about the

tropics into next week and a

low pressure trough and cold

front triggering storms in the

east. Today until Saturday,

combined rainfalls are likely

New South Wales and Victoria's to be between 30 and 50mm in

flood-affected regions,

tomorrow around the capital

cities:

Thank you, Vanessa. If you would like to have your say on

any of the stories we're

following today, you can get in

touch via:

Now, let's cross live to

Parliament House in Canberra, the Lower House chamber where

Question Time is about to get

under way. Live. I call the honourable, the Prime Minister. I move the House records its deep the Prime Minister. I move that

regret at the death on 12 March

2012 of the honourable 2012 of the honourable Douglas Barr Scott, a former from New South Wales. Firstly Barr Scott, a former senator

in 1970 and then from 1974 to 1985. Former Deputy President

of the Senate from 1978 to 1979

and former minister for special trade representations from 1979

appreciation of his long and to 1980. Places on record its

meritorious public service and

tenders its profound sympathy

to his family in their

bereavement. Douglas was born

on 12 May 1920 inned a laid,

educated at scotch college in

Adelaide and graduated with a

bachelor of arts from the

University of Sydney before

entering politics. He was a

farmer and grazier before

entering politics. In 1942 he

served as a member of the Australian naval volunteer

reserve from 1941 to 1945 being

discharged at the rank of lieutenant. He was initially

elected to the Senate for a period of three-and-a-half months in 1970 and re-entered

the Senate in 1974 where he

served until 1985. He held the positions of Deputy President

of the Senate and chairman of

committees from 1978 to 1979.

Minister for special trade

representations from 1979 to

1980 and minister assisting the

minister for trade and

resources from 1979 to 1980 in

the Fraser Government. During

his time in the Senate he

served on numerous committees. These included the joint committee on

committee on foreign affairs

committee and defence, the Senate select

committee on animal welfare and

the Senate standing committee

on publications to name just a

few. Douglas led parliamentary

delegations to south-east Asia,

a resources mission to the

European economic community

countries and attended Commonwealth parliamentary

association conferences in

Mauritius and Nairobi. He also

held parliamentary positions of leader and Deputy Leader of the

National Party of Australia,

formerly the national party in the Senate. Douglas formerly the national contrary

Barr Scott was a person held in affection and respect on affection and respect on both

sides of the chamber sides of the chamber in which

he served. In his Val dikt try

from the Senate he - Val from the Senate he - Val he

dick try he recalled that two

Labor senators wrote to him

after a week or so when he

acted as President saying had determined to support acted as President saying they

had determined to support him

because they liked the way he

read the prayers. To have Button gently tease you is one read the prayers. To have John

of the highest honours my party

could bestow in those days. We

can take that as a mark of

respect and bipartisan support.

On behalf of the Government I offer condolences to his wife

Pamela, to his children Dianne

and Andrew and to their extended family and friends. I

thank the thank the honourable Prime

Minister for that moving

contribution. I now give the

call to the honourable, the

Leader of the Opposition . Mr

Speaker, I rise briefly to support the Prime Minister's

words to. The senator words to. The senator was

responsible for one of the immortal career summation when

I said, "I have done some good

things in my life but none of

them for very long." Perhaps I

should take that to heart and

now defer to my friend and

colleague the leader of National Party and offer on colleague the leader of the

behalf of the Liberal Party condolences

condolences to his family and

friends. I now give the call

to the honourable leader of the nationals. I thank the Leader of the Opposition forgiving me this opportunity to pay this opportunity to pay tribute

to one of the leaders of the

Nationals in a bygone era. The former Deputy Prime Minister

and nationals leader Doug Anthony yesterday described

Doug Scott as a author Doug Scott as a author ro

gentleman who was all

dependable and riebl. That sums

up Doug Scott very well -

solid, fair minded and decent.

Doug Anthony's comments

coincide suck sently with those

made on Doug Scott's retirement

from the Senate almost 27 years

ago on 31 May 1985 when the

leader of the Government at the

time, Senator John Button said

senator Scott has always been a

gentleman in dealing with everybody in the everybody in the Senate,

including us. That has been a

very nice quality about his

presence here. It always

coincides with the words of the

then leader of the Senate who

in the same debate described

Doug Scott as one of the great

constants in the Senate and a

Whan whom he always found utterly reliable. Paul Davies

the Nationals historian says

Doug Scott was dedicated to his

party, to the processes of the

parliament and to his responsibilities, particularly as a Senator representing predominantly regional New

the Prime Minister mentioned, South Wales. Even though, as

he was born in Adelaide, I

Kated at Scotts college and

received a degree in Sydney he

grazier from the Grenfell was a successful farmer and

district. He will be respected

throughout the states throughout the states regional districts and he understand districts and he understand the

bush. During World War II he served in the naval volunteer reserve. In 1948 he married Pam

McLean and the couple have a son Andrew and a daughter

Dianna. As his grazing

interests grew so did his

interest in rural politics and

in the hence the New South Wales Country Party that he

joined in June 1948. He served

on the state executive from

1968 to 1974. As the Prime

Minister mentioned, he won the

party's preselection to fill party's preselection to fill a casual vacancy caused by the

death in April 1970 of Colin

McKeller and he took up that

seat in August 1970 but failed

to win re-election in the half

Senate election in November

that year. He was not deterred.

In fact, in the double

dissolution of May 1974 he

stood again and remained a

Senator until June 1985 on Senator until June 1985 on his retirement. As we have already

heard he was Deputy President

and chairman of committees in

the Senate and also served acting President on the Senate

on a number of occasions. He

had a particular interest had a particular interest in

the Senate standing committee

on foreign affairs. He was a

member in total for eight years

including four as its chairman.

He was deputy leader of the

country National Party in the

Senate fwrr from 1986 to 1980

when he was elected the party

Senate leader, a position Senate leader, a position he held until his retirement. held until his retirement. He

served in the Fraser Anthony

ministry for just a brief

period and his comment that the Leader of the Leader of the Opposition

referred to about him having

done a lot in life but none of it for very long is it for very long is a

reflection also of his parliamentary

parliamentary career. Doug

Scott was a keen sportsman and

particularly enjoyed cricket

and golf and squach. Fred

Cheney remembered encountering

his prowess on the squash court

when he was absolutely whipped

by a man 20 years his senior

who at the time was suffer

fromming a very bad hip. -

Fromme a very bad hip. His life

came to an end at the Gennelong

residential village at Forbes

after almost 92 years. He

should be remembered as a true gentleman of this parliament

while it was a different era,

he was certainly a fine he was certainly a fine example

to us all. The question is

that the motion moved by the honourable the Prime Minister be

be agreed to as a mark of

respect I ask all present to

signify their approval by rising in their places. I thank the House.

Questions without notice,

are there any questions? I call

the honourable the Leader of

the Opposition. My question is

to the Prime Minister. I remind

the Prime Minister that 11,900

shops in Westfield centres

around Australia are now subject

subject to a carbon subject to a carbon or greenhouse gas emissions charge

embedded in their leases. How

can the Prime Minister continue to assert that only 500

businesses will pay her Carbon Tax

Tax when that is now so

obviously and patently untrue?

I call the honourable the

Prime Minister to answer the question. Thank you very much,

Mr Speaker. The Leader of the

Opposition is referring to a

press report this morning that

raised this issue. I would like to refer the Leader of the

Opposition to the news letter

of the shopping centre council

of Australia, Shop Talk that has gone out today and says the

following, "Some newspapers are

today carrying an exclusive

report quoting a retailer

claiming that some shopping centre landlords are including

a new lease provision patsing

on the effects of the new

Carbon Tax to retailers." It

goes on to say - this is the news letter of the news letter of the shopping council chamber of Australia council chamber of Australia -

that, "The fact that this

clause is several years old is

clearly not referred to in that

article." It goes on to explain

the fact that it is several

years old is why it does not

directly refer to a Carbon directly refer to a Carbon Tax

and it goes on to say that it

was included in leases was included in leases once debate began about the need for

legislative action to combat

greenhouse gas emissions. Mr

Speaker, the truth of this

matter is - the truth of this

matter is, this clause has been

in leases for several years,

obviously in the public obviously in the public policy

debate there has been over many

years a reference to dealing

with greenhouse gases, none

clearer or stronger than when

the Howard Government, of which the Leader of the Opposition

was a senior member, went to

the 2007 election on a platform

of an emissions trading scheme

and putting a price on carbon.

I would say to the Leader of the Opposition, if he genuinely

has some concern about people

who lease shops in shopping

centres and run small

businesses, maybe he'd like to

support a tax cut for them

because we do and the Leader of

the Opposition does not. Maybe

he'd like to support an instant

asset write off for them

because we do and the Leader of

the Opposition does not. Maybe

he'd like to support a $5,000

benefit if they choose benefit if they choose to

purchase a motor vehicle. No

he's too busy doing what Clive

Palmer tells him to instead. The Leader of the The Leader of the Opposition on a supplementary. Yes, Mr Speaker. This is supplementary

to the Prime Minister. Does the Prime Minister regret misleading the Australian

people when she said that only

500 businesses would pay her

Carbon Tax and will she now

apologise for saying before election there will be no

Carbon Tax under the Carbon Tax under the Government

I lead. The Prime Minister to

answer the supplementary

question. Thank you very much.

As the Leader of the Opposition

is well aware and no amount of shouting in

shouting in question time is

going to change this truth, going to change this truth, no amount of shouting in Question

Time is going to change this

truth, the Carbon Pricing

legislation which went the Parliament has a direct Carbon Price paid by around 500

of the businesses that generate

the most carbon pollution. The

Leader of the Opposition knows

that. What he also knows is that the scheme he peddles,

like snake oil to anyone who

would listen, has an effective

Carbon Price of $62 a tonne and

he might like to contemplate

how those small businesses who

are leaseholders in shopping

centres would go by the time he'd ripped off the tax cuts,

family payments and pension increases imposed on them a

bill of $1,300 a year and made

sure that those small businesses paid more tax. The The Leader of the Opposition is obviously seeking the call for something. I seek leave to table the leave to table the lease, carbon or greenhouse tax emission charges to which

11,900 businesses are now subject. Is leave granted? Scared of it, are

you? Leave is not granted the

Leader of the Opposition will

resume his seat.I ask myself

who is going to be first today.

It won't be the Honourable

Member for Page but she has the

call. I'm pleased about that.

My question is to the Prime Minister. Prime Minister how Minister. Prime Minister how is cutting company tax and

spreading the benefits of the

mining boom essential for building the future Australian

economy? I call the honourable, the Prime Minister. I the Prime Minister. I thank the

Member for Page for her

question and I am glad she

received the reassurance from

the Speaker she has. That is

very good news. As a Government, as a Labor

Government, we are no cussed on

running the economy in the

interests of working people

interests of working people and

making sure we build the

economy this nation will need

in the future so working people

can have prosperity, that they

can have jobs and that if, as they choose, their aspiration is to open a small they choose, their highest

business that they can do that too. Mr Speaker, in pursuit of

to that objective, at this time

in our nation's history when we

are seeing the mineral wealth

in our ground sold at very high prices, when we are seeing a

resources boom with hundreds of

billions of dollars of invest

in. The pipeline, it is the

right time to take a share of

that resources boom and to make

sure that businesses around the

nation benefit large and small.

Mr Speaker, this cut in company

tax is not only good news tax is not only good news for

businesses, it is good news for

the Australian economy because

as OECD research shows, company

tax has the biggest adverse

effect on economic growth and

so it follows, Mr Speaker, if

you cut company tax, you are helping economic growth. If you

are helping economic growth

then you are helping the then you are helping the wages

of working people and modelling

done at the time of the Henry

in Tax Review showed that a 1% cut

in company tax means around

$330 a year extra for a worker

on an average income. Good, Mr

Speaker, for businesses, good

for growth, good for jobs and

good for wages that. Is what a

cut in company tax is. There

cut in company tax is. There is

a very stark choice that the

nation faces on policies on

company tax in this Parliament.

We on this side of the

Parliament stand for a rate of

29 cents and delivering the

benefit of that cut rate to small businesses first. The

Opposition stands for a rate of

31.5 cents as a result of their

paid parental leave levy. That

is a 2.5 cents difference and that matters in the international comparison. international comparison. Under

Labor we will move up two spots

in the OECD ranking on in the OECD ranking on company

tax. Lower rate than the US,

Japan, France, Belgium, Mexico

and Spain. Under them we would

have the fifth highest rate in

the OECD. We cannot afford to

hold Australia back. We cannot

afford to have Australia standstill. We need to build

the economy of the future. We

owe that to working families

who are seeking to make a

living and make their way. We

owe that to people in owe that to people in business

who are creating the jobs for

their fellow Australians and as

a Government we are determined

to deliver it. I call the

Honourable Member for Ryan. My

question is to the Prime Minister. I remind the Prime

Minister that the bus industry

will face a $50 million will face a $50 million hit

each year because of her Carbon

Tax. Prime Minister, why should

children who catch the school

bus have to pay your Carbon Tax

why those who are dropped off

in cars will not, or at least

not yet? I call the call to the

honourable Prime

Minister. Thank you very much.

Of course the fear campaign

continues and as part of the fear campaign we get fear campaign we get the

recycling of the same old

questions. To the member who

has asked the question, I say

this, how will the families and

children that she's worried

about react to the Leader of

the Opposition's Coles and woollies tax. How will woollies tax. How will they

feel about that when prices are

up in the shops as a result of the Leader of the Opposition increasing company tax to 31.5

cents. On Carbon Pricing and public transport Mr Opposition Business on a point Speaker. The Manager of

of order. The Prime Minister is

already off the subject of the

question. She was simply asked

why children who catch the bus

children who catch cars to have to pay a Carbon Tax and

school do not? That is the

question she has to answer. The

manager will resume his seat. The Prime Minister was diverting.

diverting. I'm sure she's

anxious to get back to the

substance of the question. I am

very anxious to get back to the

question, Mr Speaker. On the

Carbon Pricing regime and bus

prices and children catching

buses, of course all of this

has been factored in and

factored in to the factored in to the compensation

that families will receive. So

to the member who was asked the

question, she should recognise

that under the Government's

plans the mums and dads of the

children watching that public

transport, very likely to have

got a tax cut. The mums and

dads are very likely to have

seen an increase in their

family payments. family payments. The grandparents of those children

will have seen a pension increase. increase. Under the Leader of

the Opposition' plan what they

would have got is all of that

money taken out of their hands

and then a bill for $1,300 on top. That is what would have

happened. If their mums and

dads actually operate a small

business they will be paying

more tax as well. When it

coming to running the economy,

in the interests families, children catching in the interests of working

buses, children going to

quality schools, schools that

haven't had to face haven't had to face cutbacks, the member better endorse the

policies and plans of this side

because the policies and plans of the Leader of the Opposition are a disgrace for those working working families because they are all about placating billionaires. I call the Honourable Member for

Blair. Thank you Mr Speaker. My

question is to the Treasurer. Why is it important to have

widespread support for policies

that spread the benefits of the

mining boom to all corners of

Treasurer to answer the the economy? I call the

question. I thank the Member

for Blair for his very

important question. Tonight in

the Senate will will be a very important debate, a debate that

goes to the very core of Mac micing prosper ity in and spreading the benefits of micing prosper ity in Australia

the mining boom to every corner

of our country. We will see in

the Senate through this debate,

who is prepared to stand up to fight for a boost to superannuation savings for 8.4

million working Australians. We

will see who is prepared to

stand up and fight for small

businesses - 2.7 small businesses - who will businesses - who will benefit

from the 6,500 dollar instant

asset write off. We will see

who is prepared to stand up and for vital for vital investment,

particularly in our particularly in our mining regions, particularly in infrastructure, because we on

this side of the house are

about owe luteally determine to

ensure that all Australians

benefit from the resources boom. We are determined to ensure that the opportunities

of that boom are spread right

around our country. We believe

that the benefits shouldn't to a fortunate few, Mr that the benefits shouldn't go

to a fortunate few, Mr Speaker.

We believe that the should not just go to those We believe that the benefits

that are in the fast lane of

our economy. We do need to

spread the benefits around the

economy. We on this side of the House understand there is a

patchwork economy but not

everybody is in the fast lane

of the mining boom. That is why

cuts to business taxation are so important, Mr Speaker. They

will drive investment, make

business more competitive and

support jobs, Mr Speaker. We on

this side of the house are absolutely determined to

maximise employment in this

country, to support jobs in

this country, which is why we

acted so decisively at the

height of the global financial

crisis. We also understand that there are sectors of the

economy impacted by the economy impacted by the higher

dollar, impacted by the

cautious consumer. That is why we

we believe in providing tax

cuts to many companies that

need those tax cuts to be more

competitive in environment. Unlike those competitive in this

opposite we won't stick our

head in the sand and won't

is leave those people behind. That

is why we are so determined to

put through these cuts to

taxation, Mr Speaker. We know what those opposite will what those opposite will do, Mr

Speaker. Those opposite will

kneel at the feet of vested

interests like Clive Palmer and

Gina Rinehart. That is exactly what they will do. The Treasurer

Treasurer will return to the substance of the figure. They

will give an eleven figure

cheque to the likes of Clive

Palmer and Gina Rinehart. The

Treasurer will resume his Treasurer will resume his seat. The call is withdrawn from the

Treasurer. The Honourable

Member for Blair. My question

is to the Treasurer you talked

about the benefits flowing from

tax cuts arising out of Minerals Resource Rent Tax can

you provide more details on

what people in the community

like mine in Blair can expect out of the tax cuts. There out of the tax cuts. There will

be many benefits, 10,700 small

businesses in the electorate of

Blair will benefit from these initiatives, Mr Speaker. There

will be a boost to the superannuation accounts of

43,000 workers in the

electorate of Blair, Mr Speaker. Of course there

be investment in critical economic infrastructure. economic infrastructure. $54 million into the black million into the black soil

interchange will be in the

Blair electorate, a critical part of the economic infrastructure. infrastructure. So the Member

for Blair understands and

everybody on this side of the house understands how important

it is we do get a fair return

for our mineral resources that

can only be mined once, can only be mined once, which

are owned by all of the Australian people. We will use

the revenue from the MRRT when

it passes the Senate to put in

place these vital reforms for all Australians, Mr Speaker. Unlike those opposite we

believe the benefits should

flow to the whole of flow to the whole of the

country, not just to a select

few. I call the Honourable

Member for Casey. My question

is to the Prime Minister. I remind the Prime Minister that

garden city plastics, Australia's premier manufacturer of plastic pots,

just like this, and which

employs 300 people, will pay at

least an additional least an additional $120,000 every year on their electricity

bill because of her Carbon Tax. Will the Prime Minister guarantee to those guarantee to those 300 workers

in my electorate of Casey that

not one of them will lose their

job because of her toxic Carbon

Tax. Before I call the Prime Minister I do remind... Minister I do remind...the Attorney-General will be

extremely cautious. Before I

call the Prime Minister I do remind the Honourable Member

for Casey that props are

undesirable. The Prime Minister

has the call. Thank you very

much, Mr Speaker. I say much, Mr Speaker. I say to the Member for Casey, if he Member for Casey, if he is

concerned about the jobs of these workers within his

electorate, I accept that he

is, if he is concerned about

their jobs why does he want to

deny that business a tax cut. A

tax cut would do that business

a lot of good. Why is he going

to vote against that business

getting a tax cut? Why is getting a tax cut? Why is he going to make sure that

business pays more tax? That is what the Member for what the Member for Casey

stands for in this parliament.

That business employing 300

workers will pay more tax. That

is what he stands for. I ask

the Member for Casey to remain

silent, he did not. He will

leave.The Prime Minister has the call. Thank you very much.

On the question of Carbon Pricing, of course what the

Member for Casey has not spoken

about and wouldn't speak about

is the support for jobs. What

he hasn't spoken about is the

support for families. What he

hasn't spoken about is the tax

cuts involved. What he hasn't

spoken about is the money going

into the hands of pensioners

and that people who live in his electorate, people who might

well go and shop at the

business that he has referred

to in this parliament. But, Mr

Speaker, at base there is no

getting away from the fact that

as we end this parliamentary

week on all of these week on all of these questions

about businesses and business prosperity, on all of these

questions about jobs there is a

very simple choice in this parliament, under Labor those businesses will pay less

company tax. Under the Liberals

they will pay more.

The call is now given to the

Honourable Member for O'Connor

. My question is to the

minister for health and ageing.

I refer to the 97 GP vacancies

currently in regional Western Australia rising from 62

vacancies in August last year. Further I refer to the fact

that 83 of these that 83 of these current vacancies are classified vacancies are classified as

being the area of high need. I

simply ask what is the

Government doing to address the

dire GP shortage in regional

Western Australia. I call the minister for health and ageing. I

ageing. I want to thank the

Member for O'Connor for his question. We've had some very productive discussions productive discussions about workforce issues in not just

his electorate but the whole of

the state of Western Australia.

I know he is concerned beyond

the boundaries of his

electorate for Western Australia more broadly. Mr Speaker, the Government is

putting a great deal of effort

into both attracting and

retaining a regional workforce in not just Western Australia

but other parts of the country.

It is difficult. We have had

shortages for many years because the previous Government, when the Leader of

the Opposition was the the Opposition was the health

minister, capped the number of

GPs that were trained and that

led to shortages right around

Australia. Of course it takes a

while to train a GP in

Australia and we have substantially increased substantially increased GP

training places and we have substantially substantially increased investment in post-medical school places

school places to train GPs but those students take a while to

come through the system. We

will see improvements as will see improvements as those Australian GPs come through the system. Of course in the

meanwhile we continue to work constructively with overseas

trained doctors to fill areas

of workforce shortage. It is

worth putting on the record

that some $895 million will be

invested into rural workforce

education and training programs

over the period of the last

budget. $34.1 million for

nursing and allied health rural

lo couple schemes that provide 3,000 nurse lo Cumbes placements and 400 placements and 400 allied health locum health locum placements in

allied health over four years

to support our rural nurses and allied health workers. allied health workers. $6.5

million to provide 400 clinical

place ment for allied health

students and $43 million for expanded medical specialist

outreach assistance programs.

$386.8 million poor the rural health multidisciplinary

training program. That includes

dental training and university

departments of rural health

program and the John Flynn placement program and capital funding to support that through

the rural education infrastructure development

pool. In March 2010 $345 was

set a - $$345 million was set

aid side for rural training. That investment will deliver an

additional 5,500 new GPs by

2020. But it goes back to the

point that I made earlier that

it does take a while for these

new students after the years of constriction to make their way

through the system. I know that

the Member for O'Connor is very

dedicated to its constituents

and I look forward to working constructively

constructively with him on the

issues of workforce shortage.