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Welcome to the program. a vengeance to the streets of Bali. Chaos and carnage has returned with paradise was teeming with tourists, Just two days ago, the island enjoying the sun and surf. including thousands of Australians it became the holiday from hell On Saturday night three popular restaurants when coordinated bombs ripped apart

in Kuta and Jimbaran Bay, and injuring more than 120. killing more than 26 people are at least two Australians, Among the dead to rise in the next few days. but that death toll is expected evacuated to Singapore and Darwin As the seriously injured were for medical treatment, massive manhunt for the perpetrators Indonesian authorities began a to name anyone, and while they've failed on Jemaah Islamiah. suspicion is already falling

of October 12, 2001 of October 12, 2002 The attacks are a chilling reminder when, for the first time, of Bali's tourist precinct, terrorism ripped through the heart including 88 Australians. killing more than 200 people, Lisa Millar reports from Bali.

In a village not far

In a village not far from the

central tourist hub of Kuta, a

dignified ceremony is under way.

This is the funeral of a wait

wait

waiter. For five years he'd been This is the funeral of a 33-year-old

of the smiling Balinese waiters waiter. For five years he'd been one

working the tables at the busy Raja

restaurant in Kuta. His life ended

in an awful explosive spray of

shrapnel on Saturday night.

shrapnel on Saturday night. Now, as in an awful explosive spray of

Hindu ceremonies like this begin to

echo here and there as other

are laid to rest, the Balinese are echo here and there as other victims

deeply concerned that the suicide

bombers that struck at the weekend

may also have sounded the death

knell for their little island.

Tourism is their lifeblood and and

at Bali airport, all most tourists

home. wanted to do was get out and get

home. I'm just glad we get on a wanted to do was get out and get

flight to go home so we can see

and put their minds at rest that flight to go home so we can see them

we're going home. I mean, I love

Bali but I don't think we'll be

coming back either, so ... yeah,

can't wait to get home. It was an

Australian tourist filming nothing

much in particular on Saturday

who captured the chilling pre-amble much in particular on Saturday night

background, a to death and mayhem. In the

background, a person wearing a to death and mayhem. In the

backpack walks directly, even

purposefully, toward the rear of

Raja restaurant. Within seconds, a purposefully, toward the rear of the

device filled with ball bearings

tears the place apart. (Screaming)

During the next 15 minutes, and

south of Kuta at Jimbaran Bay, two

south of Kuta at Jimbaran Bay, two During the next 15 minutes, and

more bombs would kill and injure

tourists and locals. (Explosion)

(screaming) Authorities had

intensified their surveillance, and

locals had prayed that terror would

not return to shake their world.

in the end, it was for nought. Bali not return to shake their world. But

had been catapulted back in time,

the blood-soaked scenes of 2002, it

seemed, were suddenly on replay.

seemed, were suddenly on replay. the blood-soaked scenes of 2002, it

Emergency crews would begin to

a tragic toll, but not of the scale Emergency crews would begin to count

of 2002. The powerful bombs of that

time had been replaced with

insidious devices packed with ball time had been replaced with portable

bearings and strapped to extremists.

This time, Bali itself was better

prepared. Australian aid

prepared. Australian aid and This time, Bali itself was better

expertise had delivered far more

sophisticated medical facilities,

and the burns unit at Sangulah

hospital may well make a life and

death difference for victims. Among

the many being treated here,

13-year-old Jessica Fitzgerald from

Western Australia. She lies

semiconscious in intensive care,

surrounded by friends and medical

brother and staff, oblivious to fate of her

brother and father. 16-year-old staff, oblivious to fate of her

Brendan Fitzgerald was killed where

he sat in Kuta's Raja restaurant.

Her dad, Terry Fitzgerald, is in a

critical condition. Jessica

Fitzgerald was the last Australian

to be medi vaced home. These were

the scenes late last night the

injured prepared for their journey

shaken, the shock aboard an RAAF Hercules. Scarred and aboard an RAAF Hercules. Scarred

shaken, the shock clear on their aboard an RAAF Hercules. Scarred and

faces. And this is what they're

leaving behind - normally this

be a raucous, bustling centre for leaving behind - normally this would

Bali night-life, filled with

tourists and alive with business.

Now, it's a ghost town. As we

filmed, the newly eerie streets of

Kuta, a distraught member of the

chamber of commerce confronts us,

telling us to ignore what we

telling us to ignore what we see; chamber of commerce confronts us,

life will return to normal. If you

want to show it to whoever did it,

you know, that did the bombing, you

know you're not afraid of them,

life should move then come back to know you're not afraid of them, that

Bali. She says it won't happen if

the Australian Government continues

to issue travel warnings. Did the

Australian Government issue a

warning to London when they had the Australian Government issue a travel

bomb or to New York? They didn't, right. But

right. But why must it be to bomb or to New York? They didn't,

Indonesia? Why must they issue a

travel warning to Bali? I don't

think that's fair. SONG: * You may

say I'm dreamer * The shocking

events of 2002 halved Bali's

business. The economy will events of 2002 halved Bali's tourism

be shaken again, perhaps to its business. The economy will certainly

knees. In one well-known part of

come to Kuta, a bar in its redevelopment has Kuta, a bar in its redevelopment

come to signify Bali's Kuta, a bar in its redevelopment has

to survive. Paddy's pub was come to signify Bali's determination

destroyed in 2002. It's been

but last night it was a graphic destroyed in 2002. It's been rebuilt

illustration of the immediate

of terrorism. Even the lure of the illustration of the immediate impact

NRL grand final couldn't entice

Australians out in their numbers.

Authorities had warned tourists to

his father stay indoors, but Clinton Polner and stay indoors, but Clinton Polner

his father Gary were among the few stay indoors, but Clinton Polner and

who didn't heed the advice. Never

thought that would happen again

after what happened, a few friends

few years ago were here when the after what happened, a few friends a

last one happened, and it was a big

shock. They've been warned there

could be violence and they've

cancelled their plans for the rest

of the week. The locals are telling

us that they'll retaliate and blow

up mosques and do things like that,

up mosques and do things like that, and ... anything could happen, you

know, like shooting in the streets

and all that sort of thing, so they

just said, "Don't go out." Some

just said, "Don't go out." Some will stay, but many more will go.

I feel very sad to be leaving. I

mean the locals here are such

beautiful people and it's just -

beautiful people and it's just - you know that they're going to be in

know that they're going to be in for a couple of years of hardship

because it will never get back to

what it was. It was hard after 2002 and I don't think

what it was. It was hard after 2002 and I don't think Bali will ever be

the same, which is a tragedy.

The Balinese have seen the exodus

before N a little over a week's

before N a little over a week's time it will be the third anniversary of

the bombings that destroyed Bali's

innocence and took the lives of

innocence and took the lives of more than 200. Over time, these gentle

locals saw travellers return in

sustainable numbers. This time,

though, their confidence has been shaken

though, their confidence has been shaken to the bone, and at Hindu

funerals like those of the waiter

mentioned earlier, friends and

family mourn the loss of a vibrant

life, also for the life of their island. Lisa Millar reporting from Bali. While the nation struggles to come to terms with the weekend bombings, the grief is particularly acute in two communities on either side of the continent. In the picturesque holiday town of Busselton in Western Australia

and in Newcastle on the New South Wales coast,

the impact of the attacks is just beginning. Both communities have had to deal with tragedy in the past and, just as they did then, family and friends are providing support for those most in need and for each other. Geoff Hutchison reports.

From the coastal city of Newcastle

in New South Wales, right

From the coastal city of Newcastle in New South Wales, right across

in New South Wales, right across the country to Busselton in Western

Australia, an enveloping sadness at

the brutal and indiscriminate

killing of Australians on holiday

killing of Australians on holiday in Bali. It's always that sense of

horror, isn't it, that, you know,

one human being does this to

another. An that's the - I think

everybody feels that. Oh I think a

lot of sadness, for us

everybody feels that. Oh I think a lot of sadness, for us as a school

community, both staff and teachers,

particularly following on from the

first Bali tragedy, where the

first Bali tragedy, where the school was very much affected by two

teachers being one killed, win

injured. 48-year-old Jennifer

Williamson of Newcastle and

16-year-old Brendan Fitzgerald from

Busselton died in the blasts on

Saturday night and it's likely

another Newcastle couple, Fiona

Saturday night and it's likely another Newcastle couple, Fiona and

Colin Zwalinski, are among the dead.

I'm very concerned about the fact

that we have children in this

community now that don't have

parents any longer. That's very,

very sad. You just ask yourself: do

these things need to happen? And

these things need to happen? And I'm just very, very concerned about the

welfare of those people, and we'll

do the best we can to make it as

bearable as possible. Nine

do the best we can to make it as bearable as possible. Nine

bearable as possible. Nine Newcastle families had made the trip to Bali.

Their love of the surf at home

inspired them to chase a holiday

wave together. But on Saturday

night, it took just seconds to tear

that dream to pieces. On the night,

there were 18 people, I believe,

sitting in the one vicinity. They

all knew each other. They were all

there because of their connections through children.

there because of their connections through children. Jennifer

Williamson's injured husband Bruce

is in hospital in Singapore. Back

home, friends of

home, friends at the south

home, friends at the south Newcastle junior rugby league club are

struggling to make sense of it all.

What sort of person was Jennifer?

She was a great person, warm,

vivacious, friendly, extremely

helpful and always smiling and always happy, a great Bern

helpful and always smiling and always happy, a great Bern to be

around. When you heard the news of

what had happened in Bali, what

what had happened in Bali, what went through your mind? Oh, I mean

obviously it's devastating. Um

obviously it's devastating. Um ... for all concerned. And devastating

for not just the Williamsons, for

all the people involved and all the

families around there, and, you

know, we were basically just in

shock like everyone else. On the

other side of the country, the

people of Busselton are dealing

people of Busselton are dealing with the death of Brendan Fitzgerald,

people of Busselton are dealing with the death of Brendan Fitzgerald, a

student at the senior high school

and described by his uncle as a

beautiful boy. My teachers tell me

that Brendan was a wonderful

that Brendan was a wonderful student and a wonderful young man, well

liked. Heavily into sport, both

cricket and football. But very much

liked by his peers and by the staff.

A tall gangly boy that really came

good into the last three years, and

was our opening bowl

was our opening bowler in country

week for the last two years.

week for the last two years. Brendan died when the first bomb went off

died when the first bomb went off at Raja's restaurant where he was

eating dinner with his father and

sister. They remain in hospital in

Singapore and Brendan's mother has

flown to be with them. This is the

second time a Bali shockwave has

been felt in this peaceful seaside

town. In 2002, high

been felt in this peaceful seaside town. In 2002, high school teacher

Carol Johnston was one of 88

Australians who died in the

nightclub bombings. I think there

will be shock. A lot of questions

about: why us again? I think that

question has come up from staff.

question has come up from staff. You wouldn't think in a small

wouldn't think in a small south-west town, that the first Bali bombing

would've affected us so greatly and

now again. Fellow teacher Connie Watson sustained

now again. Fellow teacher Connie Watson sustained severe injuries

that night, but is now back at

school, as a vocational adviser.

Today, dreadful personal memories

were stirred. Obviously it's very

difficult. It brings back lots of

memories. The only thing I would

hope is that maybe I can help some

people who ... who need some help.

Yeah, I don't - it's just a really

difficult time, obviously and I

difficult time, obviously and I just feel incredibly sad for the feel incredibly sad for the families that have

feel incredibly sad for the families that have been affected, and the

people that are waiting back home.

In Newcastle tonight, a church

service for the dead and injured at

Christchurch Cathedral. For Dean

Graeme Lawrence, there are now the

emotional aftershocks to deal with.

Let's not let someone from outside

or some thing from outside cause us to bear

or some thing from outside cause us to bear the scars of bitterness and

hate and pain. Let's be people who

can find something positive out of

this. Hard to find something

positive but let's see if we can't

renew our own sense of community,

care for one another, and that's a positive thing. Geoff Hutchison with that report. Australian and Indonesian officials claim there were no specific warnings about the weekend bombings despite some Australian tourists in Bali claiming to have heard rumours of an imminent attack.

Investigators believe the three suicide bombers did not act alone but were recruited, trained and equipped by a back-up team, and the most likely source of the expertise required is the al-Qaeda linked group Jemaah Islamiah or its operatives. Tracy Bowden reports and we warn there are some confronting images in this story.

When you've got three young people

who are determined to kill

themselves in a place that's as

themselves in a place that's as open and friendly to tourists as Bali,

that there's very little you can do to stop it.

You can't cordon off Bali. You can

step up vigilance, but these kinds

of things are simply

step up vigilance, but these kinds of things are simply not

of things are simply not preventable in the sense that we would like to

think they are. As terrorism once

again strikes Indonesia, those

behind the bloodshed are again

thought to be members of the group

described as the surrogate of

al-Qaeda in South East Asia, Jemaah

Islamiah. The problem is we're not

quite sure what JI is any more.

quite sure what JI is any more. It's probably not the same organisation

that it was three, four years ago,

but certainly at this stage it's

safer to assume that there have

but certainly at this stage it's safer to assume that there have

safer to assume that there have been some elements of JI involved. I

don't see any other group that

don't see any other group that could be responsible for deploying and

recruiting suicide bombers. South

East Asian director of the

International Crisis Group, Sidney

Jones, believes the attacks were

almost certainly orchestrated by

Asia's most wanted extremist,

Malaysians Doctor Azahari and

Noordin Muhammad Top, thought to be

behind at least two previous terrorist attacks in

behind at least two previous terrorist attacks in the region.

For a while there's been a faction

within JI that has wanted to go

ahead with bombings of western

targets. We also think there's been

a faction that's probably larger,

that's actually opposed to this

that's actually opposed to this kind of activity and has distanced

of activity and has distanced itself from Top and Azahari. Those two

however we think

from Top and Azahari. Those two however we think have consolidated

however we think have consolidated a group around them that's focused on

recruiting younger members, in

recruiting younger members, in their 20s. Doctor Azahari on the left is

known as the demolition man for his

knowledge of explosives. Noordin

Muhammad Top is the money man. The

three suicide bombers are likely to

be recruits of the pair. By

sacrificing themselves for the

faith, they're performing an

exemplary task in religious terms,

exemplary task in religious terms, so we're unlikely to find that

so we're unlikely to find that these are people who were hopeless or

suicidal or desperately poor or

whatever. It's much more an active

orientation toward sacrificing

themselves for an Islamic cause.

The attack on the weekend follows

The attack on the weekend follows a series of terrorist bombings around

this time of year in Indonesia.

this time of year in Indonesia. Just over three years ago,

this time of year in Indonesia. Just over three years ago, 202 people

were killed in the twin bombings in

Bali. In August 2003, a blast

outside Jakarta's Marriott Hotel

killed 12. In September last year,

10 people died when a suicide car

bomb exploded outside the

bomb exploded outside the Australian Embassy in Jakarta. It's about 12

months for JI to plan this sort of

an operation and by chance the last

operation was during that time, so it's more

operation was during that time, so it's more of a cyclical thing.

This time, it was not car bombs

This time, it was not car bombs but vests packed with explosives.

vests packed with explosives. Police have located the severed heads of

three suicide bombers. Clearly

three suicide bombers. Clearly , we've seen a variety of detonators

being used in the course of the

bombings over the last couple of

years, with mobile phones being

used, remote detonation devices and

devices that are activated by

suicide bombers and it just shows

you the difficult nature of trying

to police these things, when you

to police these things, when you see the video clip of that person

walking into the restaurant, how is

that person different to any other

person who was in restaurant and

person who was in restaurant and who would be drawn to the attention of

that person? I mean, it is a very

difficult task. In recent years,

there have been a series of arrests

of key JI operatives and suspects.

there have been a series of arrests of key JI operatives and suspects.

Cleric Abu Bakar Bashir is behind

bars. Hambali, the former JI

operations chief, is in the hands

operations chief, is in the hands of the CIA. And those responsible for

the 2002 Bali bombings have been

arrested and most convicted. In a

speech just last week, President of

the international

the International Crisis Group,

former Foreign Minister Gareth

Evans, declared that JI has all but

dead.

Evans, declared that JI has all but dead. My organisation's perception

is that the Jemaah Islamiah

is that the Jemaah Islamiah regional division that covered Australia has

been now effectively smashed, and

that JI as such no longer

constitutes the serious threat to

Australia an Australian interests

that it previously did. Part of

that it previously did. Part of that might actually be wishful thinking,

but also part of it might be part

but also part of it might be part of of an agenda to basically sort of

ununderstate the threat of ununderstate the threat of terrorism as opposed to

ununderstate the threat of terrorism as opposed to some people think the

government's overstating. A report

co-authored by terrorism specialist

Aldo Borgu from the up a Strategic Policy Institute warns of the

ongoing threat of terrorism in the

region. The fact is that it doesn't

take many people to undertake an

operation like this. All you

literally need is a dozen or so

people who are committed enough and

have the know-how to actually

undertake this sort of an attack.

I don't think there's any question

but that JI is a

I don't think there's any question but that JI is a weaker

but that JI is a weaker organisation than it was three years ago. We've

seen much of its top leadership put

behind bars. And we've seen a

growing sense within the

organisation that this is not the

right thing to do, that you don't

want to go around bombing western

targets in Indonesia, because what

it results in is damage to the

organisation. So I do think we're

organisation. So I do think we're in a much better position. I do think

that the police have stepped up

security in Indonesia. I do think

the government is more committed to

eliminating these kinds of

eliminating these kinds of terrorist cells than they were, for example,

even two years ago or one year ago.

But as police continue their

investigation into these latest

investigation into these latest acts of terrorism, and those affected

begin the long road to recovery,

it's hard not to wonder what or where next. That report from Tracy Bowden. Shortly after being informed of the blasts, Australia's Ambassador to Indonesia, David Ritchie, flew from Jakarta to Bali. He's spent the past 24 hours visiting the bomb sites and the scores of injured Australians receiving medical care at local hospitals, and it's a task that he's all too familiar with. Since taking up his post, David Ritchie has had to deal with the aftermath of both the Marriott Hotel and embassy bombings. In the case of the latter, the bomb ripped away the walls of the Ambassador's office. I spoke to David Ritchie a short time ago. Ambassador Ritchie, you arrived in Bali yesterday. What's the sentiment among people you've spoken to? Are people simply stunned that this has happened to Bali yet again? Yes, I think that's exactly the sentiment, Maxine. We're all a bit stunned and shocked that this sort of thing has happened again. We've grown very familiar with it over the last three years since 12th October, 2002 and two other major bombings in between and I think people are just shocked and appalled that the thing has happened again. Just everyone is stunned. We're obviously all very sad about what's happened. I've visited the bomb sites today

and people have come up to me in tears. It's very, very sad. Tell us, first of all, about the medical effort, if you would, Ambassador. Just how effectively and how quickly were the injured treated? Well, they were treated very quickly and, again, my regard goes out to the Indonesian authorities. Unfortunately they've become here in Bali very used to it. We've also put a lot of effort, of course since the Bali bombing, into assisting the Balinese to rebuild the Sangulah Hospital and various other things and that's proved very valuable on this occasion. But I think the initial medical care from the Indonesians and volunteer doctors was excellent

and by last night - which, let's face it, was only about 24 hours from the bombing - all Australians who had been injured and were in hospital had left the country, had been evacuated, and I think that's pretty wonderful. Tell me, what were the doctors saying about the kinds of injuries they were seeing Can you give us an update on the death toll? Two confirmed deaths.

We've known that for some time. But I gather there's still this outstanding question of two missing Australians. That's correct. We confirmed two deaths and there are two more that we have grave fears about. We have to go through - we've learnt our lessons all too grimly since the Bali bombing - we have to go through a very long and very formal identification process before we can say to people, you know, "We confirm a death" and two other Australians we're very concerned about. But at this stage we only have two confirmed deaths.

Ambassador, if I could ask you about the police effort. At this stage where are police concentrating their investigation?

Well, we have I think upwards of around 20 or 30 Australian Federal Police here assisting the Indonesian police. As you know, we've been assisting them since 12th October, 2002 and the two police forces are working very well together and within minutes of the bomb going off here, the Indonesian police requested our assistance

and we were more than happy to provide it. But they are working very well together. It's mainly been a forensic effort and focussing on the two bomb sites and plus we're also helping the Indonesian National Police with their investigations and various leads. We're also gathering evidence, including any recollections or films or anything that Australians who might have been in the area

or anybody else might have. I was able to say hello to and wish well

General Made Pastika this morning who after all was the man who headed the Bali bomb investigation is now the police chief here in Bali. We work very well with them. We admire the work of the Indonesian police and the concentration is mainly at this stage on forensic work.

Ambassador, what about the perpetrators? Do you believe this is the work of JI? And, if so, what about the theory we are hearing about at the moment that JI is a split organisation with one arm still wanting to pursue the kind of attacks we've just seen? Well, Jemaah Islamiah I think is probably responsible for it, although that's one of the things that we need to show in the investigations. But Jemaah Islamiah as an entity is a whole disparate series of people that have been brought together. I think you'll appreciate it's not a card-carrying organisation - it's not like belonging to a service club or something like that. There are all sorts of little factions and cells all over the place.

So there are splits within Jemaah Islamiah, but I think what this shows is that Jemaah Islamiah and various other terrorist organisations are perfectly capable of still mounting attacks. We've made some inroads into them and we've helped the Indonesians to arrest a very large number of people and I'm delighted to say many of them have appeared in court, been found guilty and hopefully will be put in jail for a very long time. Yet to what extent - I mean, there's certainly the view that, really, JI is all about In terms of who was targetted, I mean, there's certainly the view that, really, JI is all about purging Indonesia of Western and anti-Islamic influences. To that extent, one would have to say that Australians were targetted. Well, I think Jemaah Islamiah wants to establish a new order and organisations like Jemaah Islamiah

want to establish a new order. They want to establish a strict Islamic state in Indonesia and elsewhere and there are various ways of doing that. One of the ways of doing that, as far as they are concerned in their kind of twisted ideology, is to get all of the foreigners out, all signs of the kinds of decadence that they don't like,

but it is also very much to target the Indonesian government. They want a different government here. They want to kill Indonesians. They are perfectly happy to comtemplate killing Indonesians who they would regard as traitors to their cause. So it's an attack not just on Westerners, but the Indonesian Government

and both of those are means towards achieving their end. With regard to Islam, Ambassador, just a final question. I know you've witnessed one of these major attacks every year since you've been posted to Indonesia. Yes. I am wondering how do you keep your emotions in check when you see what these bombs do to people? Well, it's very difficult. It's very difficult. We've been the subject of it directly of a bomb that was aimed at killing us - killing me, killing my staff, killing people associated with us. It's very hard to keep your emotions in check, but we are making progress. One of the things that sustained me is firstly we're making progress, but, secondly, that so many people here in Indonesia share our view that this sort of behaviour is unacceptable. These bombings have brought our two countries much closer together. We're much better friends. We're much better colleagues. We work better together as a result of these bombings and horrible though they are, that's at least one tiny silver lining. And a sad irony. David Ritchie, thank you for your time tonight.

Thank you very much, indeed. Thank you very much, Maxine. That ends our special edition on Bali 2. We'll be back at the same time tomorrow, but for now, goodnight. Captions by Captioning and Subtitling International