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Live. Saudi Arabia struggles to

negotiate the release of an oil

supertanker held by pirates off

the coast of the Somalia, two

more hijacked. Thousands of

homes without power in

Queensland amid fresh flood

warnings, after the worse

storms in 25 years. Tragedy in

NSW, a man and two young

children drown after a fishing

accident near Bega. And

Australia's biggest stars join

Baz Luhrmann for the premiere

of a film many hope will boost

tourists numbers and revive the tourist industry.

Good morning, it's Wednesday,

19 November, I'm Barrie

Cassidy. I'm Virginia Trioli,

the top story on 'ABC News

Breakfast', a Saudi oil

supertanker seized by pirates

has anchored off the coast of

Somalia, the 'The Sirius Star'

and 25 crew was hijacked

Sunday, and more than $100

million of oil. The tankers

capture has highlighted the

vulnerability of ships

transporting goods in the Gulf

of Aden, an estimated 90

vessels are held by pirates in

the area. The brand new tanker

was seized 450 nautical miles

south-east of the city Mombasa,

and 25 crew members taken

hostage. This is taken by the

gunmen, and this is the

farthest incident to happen.

The attack was carried out

despite an international naval

response to protect a big

shipping area. They are very

well armed, tactically they are

very good. Once they get to a

point where they can board,

it's difficult to get them off, because now they hold

hostages. It's believed the

pirates have grenades, machine

guns and rocket launchers,

making it hard for authorities

to take action. It's against

everyone, like terrorism, it's

a disease that has to be eradicated. The US Navy

believes the 'The Sirius Star'

has anchored off the Somali

coast in a haven for the

pirates, who are holding a

number of ships as they

negotiate ransoms. Maritime

experts say say this incident

highlights the vulnerability of

large ships given the surge of

attacks off Somalia. We should

all be concerned, attacks are

up 70%. That is substantial. A

number of shipping companies

are liking at rerouting, going

down around the Cape of Good

hope, adding 12-15 days and

$20,000-$30,000 a day to the

cost of doing business. It will

be passed on to me and

you. NATO ships intervened in

pirate incidents in the past

the the mandate for the NATO ships patrolling the area limits their ability to

respond. A few times NATO ships intervened, after being fired

upon sometimes they use force

to repel attacks. Could they have done something in that

scenario if they'd been there,

it's not impossible. They don't

have the mandate to board ships

that have already been hijacked

to free the crew. That is not

within the NATO mandate, they

can patrol, deter and stop

attacks. They do not then board

a ship that has been hijacked

elsewhere to free it. At the

same time a cargo ship which

managed to escape a pirate

attack earlier this week docked

in Mombasa, it was seriously

damaged after a rocket

propelled grenade set it

alight. The Kenyan navy

increased patrols on the Indian

Ocean, but with 92 attacks, and

36 ships hijacked there's no

easy solution to the

problem. And in other news,

thousands of Brisbane homes are without power following

Sunday's storm. There has been

further rainfall in

Queensland's south-west, police

issuing flood warnings for some

roads. Brisbane's Lord Mayor

Campbell Newman said the

emergency response is super

human, 190 SES volunteers are expected to help this

morning. Three people, two

young children, have died after

being pulled from the sea at

tarth ra on the NSW South

Coast, a 28-year-old man, two

boys, one and four had been

fishing from a wharf before it

happened around 8:00 last

night. Port transport

conditions are hampering United

Nations efforts to distribute

and displace those fighting in

the Congo, tutesie rebels are

withdrawing two main fronts creating humanitarian

corridors. France presented a

draft resolution to the UN

Security Council to bolster

peacekeeping the force in the

investigating safety incidents Congo. Qantas staff are

in the last 24 hours. A

Sunstate plane has been

inspected that had to make an

emergency landing in Brisbane.

It was on its way from Roma in

the State's south-west. The

company is investigating a cole

ights between two collision

between two aircrafts being

towed. Baz Luhrmann's long

awaited epic Australia Prem

yerd in Sydney. The director

was joined by Hugh Jackman, and

Nicole Kidman on the red

carpet. The film was screened

in three key filming locations,

Darwin, WA's Kununurra, and Bowen, in Queensland's

north. One of three welfare

management trials is about to

begin as part of a plan to

extend restrictions to all families on payments whose

children are at risk. The

option is beginning in WA, 70%

of benefits will be controlled

by the Government. Ben Worsley

joiges us from Canberra. This

is part of the -- joins us from

Canberra, this is part of the

welfare quarantining that has

been under way in the Northern

Territory for a year. It is.

Once the new trial begins,

there'll be three, as you

mentioned from which the

Government will choose a

national model, the idea being

to move away from focussing an

indigenous communities, at the

moment there's a blanket

quarantining in the Northern Territory indigenous

communities, isolating 50% of

welfare payments, there's a

trial on the Cape York

community, where a Commission

can haul welfare recipients

before it, advising them on

financial and social issues,

the Western Australian trial,

which will begin next week will

cover certain areas, some of

which are large migrant areas,

so spreading away from purely

indigenous areas. 70% of their

money could be guaranteed. It

can't be spent on tobacco,

alcohol, gambling, things like

that. It seems they'd use a

debit card kind of system in

stores which would cooperate

with the program, so they could

identify what the money is

being spent on. So once that

has had a run, the Government

will consider all the three

trials, and form some sort of

National model to be introduced

some time next year. The

indigenous leader Warren

Mundine said in the last few

hours that this shows the

quarantining option under way

in the Northern Territory is

not race-based, it's something

that needs to be considered for

all families whose kids are at

risk. The Northern Territory

quarantining requires the

suspension of the racial

Discrimination Act, which had a

lot of people concerned. Indigenous leaders are

welcoming this expoges or

suggestion that it will be -- expansion or suggestion it will

be expanded to the broader

community, Tony Abbott is the

spokesman, he takes a hardline.

He's calling before and

continues to call for this

quarantining idea to be

automatic to all welfare

recipients, making people in

his own party comfortable. The

Government rejects that saying

it should be targeted at

parents whose children are

deemed at risk through child

protection agencies. The

Government will have its own

concerns, there'll be people in

the party room, from the

party's left, that are vaguely

un comfortable about the idea

because they perceive a

punitive aspect to this, that

they are punishing people that

are already doing it tough. On another subject it's

interesting that Murn bum, the

Leader of the Opposition, has

stepped up -- Malcolm Turnbull,

the Leader of the Opposition,

has stepped up making

observations into comment made

by John Howard about the consequences of Barack Obama

being elected to the

presidency Malcolm Turnbull has

been reluctant to condemn John Howard's comment, this was last

February, if you remember, John

Howard said, "If I was running

Al-Qaeda I would be praying as

many times as I can that not

only Barack Obama wins the election, but the Democrats as

well". The Government has been

using those comments to throw

back into Malcolm Turnbull's

face when he's been criticising

Kevin Rudd for the leaked phone conversation with George W.

Bush. It appears Malcolm

Turnbull is trying to nullify

thosent comments, he said on

Perth -- those comments. He

said on Perth radio, it was

unfortunate remarks, not

something looked back upon as

best public comments, "I didn't

agree with him then and I

certainly don't agree with him

now itself", it seems me may be

preparing the ground to continue his attack ton Kevin

Rudd and the phone call when parliament resumes next

week. On this side he killed it

stonedead. Thank you, Ben

Worsley, if you'd like to send

us feedback on stories we are

covering. You can email us:

Returning now to the

drownings of a man and two

young children in New South

Wales, a man niche dived in,

trying to save them, was

rescued and revived himself.

Rachel Mealy joins us, what can

you tell us about this? It

happened just last night at

about 8:00 local time. It's

believed that the younger child

was in a pram, he was 15 months

old, and this is the report

that's been put together by a

local journalist. I have to

give that disclaimer that this

is the sequence of events he's

put together. He says that

perhaps the older child was

playing with the pram and

pushing it around on the wharf,

and that he toppled the pram

into the water and was himself

pulled in with the force of the

fall. Their father followed

them in to rescue the children

and a bystander joined the

rescue effort. What time did

all of this happen. It was

about 8:00. The man and his

sons were there fishing at

tarth rah wharf, it appears do

they were pulled from the water

by a local surfe boat and surf-lifesavers, they were

taken from the water

unconscious, the children were

resuscitated on the way back to hospital but died later in

hospital. The father, 28-year-old was pronounced dead

on the scene, and the rescuer

has also been taken to hospital

where he was revived and at

this stage his condition isn't

known. Rachel Mealy, thank you

for that. You are watching 'ABC

News Breakfast', and another

story, Australia's classical

musicians are trying to

understand why the Federal

Government is shifting funding

from an elite training from an

Independent school to the

Melbourne University. The Arts

Minister says the National

Academy of Music wasn't

effective enough to receive a

Budget the $2.5 million

annually. Rafael Epstein

reports. Another lunchtime

concert at the National

Academy. There are no degrees

here, no subjects, just lots of

one on one tuition, and lots of performances. After two

Independent reviews,le school

will close, its funding will go

to a new institution that will be part of be part of the University of

Melbourne. This is a great day

for music students

generalrily. The former singer

attract a probium from

musicians for this decision,

but says the new institution is

an improvement. I want to

deliver an elite classical

training for students which is

effective and efficient. It's

thrown a lot of people's plans

up into the air. Definitely,

yes. Some of our plans have been destroyed because of

this. The students say the

academy or ANAM is the stepping

stone between University and

the provision. The closest they

can get to a musicians work

place. We are not saying that

what ANAM does is better than

what a University does, it's

different. I'm probably going

to leave the country, there's

nothing here other than ANAM

that interests me. What's wrong

with doing something at

Melbourne uni. Where should I

begin. Richard Tognetti has

been talking long and loud,

including at the end of his

concerts, determined to

preserve elite musical training

in its current form. And lets

hope that within the structure

of this Super Nova university,

Melbourne University, that this

elite training school for

musicians will be cocoon ed and

protected rather than swallowed

up and digested by the bodily

fluids of a large bod I, a

university. The man who made

Australia's chamber orchestra

one of the best said the

nation's orchestra's will be

watching. If the training isn't

given to those students, there

won't be students attending the

place, of the level that will

be required to feed into groups

such as the Australian Chamber

orchestra, the Sydney Symphony

Orchestra, Melbourne Symphony

Orchestra, etc. It's a strange

decision, like making the

Australian Institute of Sport

part of a sports

club. Questions asked about the

links between the Prime

Minister and head of the

Melbourne Universitiy, Glyn

Davies that help run the 2020

Summit It makes me want to

explore the relationship

between the Prime Minister's

office and Melbourne

Universitiy in detail. There

wasn't much detail We'll sort

through numbers when we see

what they are. Nor where the

new campus will be. That will

be a decision in terms of

location that will be

determined, so specific

location hasn't been identified

yet. The Government's verdict

on this school comes down to

the way it's run, but although

the Board offered to resign,

the Government wags determined.

It's jst that no-one here

believes that the unique

culture of this school can be culture of this school can be

transplanted into the heart of

a university. Now to the front

pages of the major newspapers.

'The Australian' leads with the

premiere of a new Baz Luhrmann

film, 'Australia', it says the director hosed down expectations before the screening saying not everyone

will love the screen. We'll

have a review of the movie

later. The same photo leads the

'Daily Telegraph', last night's

premiere was the biggest in

Australia's history. Lead actress Nicole Kidman was

playing down the hype. The

'Sydney Morning Herald'

reporting Nicole Kidman told

reporters, 'Australia' is not

the second coming. The 'The

Canberra Times' says fans

waited hours in the rain in the

streets of Sydney for a glimpse

of the stars, and the paper

askses whether Nicole Kidman's

appearance on the red carpet

could be her last following

speculation she may retire to

spend time with her family. In

other news, the 'Financial

Review' reports on Macquarie

Bank's first profit fall since

1991. Bonuses not staffs will

be cut to insulate the company

from the 43% fall in first half

profit. Melbourne's papers dom

sated by AFL. Ben Cousins

cleared to return to the AFL,

he'll face drug and alcohol

testing. 'The Sun' reports

Cousins may walk away from

football, saying the former

stars manager told the Players'

Association the comeback

conditions are too hard. A

Darwin mother tells 'The

Northern Territory News' she

found a bullet lodged in the

family car. The 'Mercury' says

Paul Lennon, former Premier

launched an attack on Director

of Public Prosecutions before a

Parliamentary Committee. Police

warn the Federal Government's hand-out package may result in

an increase in alcohol-fuelled

violence according to the 'The

West Australian'. Wild weather

continues in Queensland, 'The Courier Mail' says emergency

services are stretched to

breaking point in the clean-up

after the storms. You'd think

we'd never had a movie made in

Australia given the fuss made

about this film. Sandra Hall

will review it for us, we'll

know whether it's

justified. They are now, the

media is permitted to make

their own judgments. Now the

gag has lifted we are allowed

to talk about it. Top stories -

a Saudi supertanker hijacked

with more than $100 million of

oil on board reached the coast

of Northern Somalia, the ship's

operate jars made contact with

the pirates and believe the 25

crew members are safe.

Thousands of Brisbane homes are

without power, emergency

workers struggling to repair

damage from the storms, further rainfall in the south-west,

police issue awing flood

warnings for some roads.

Three people, including two

young children died after being

pulled from the sea at Tartha

on the NSW coast, the victims a

28-year-old man, two boys, one

and four. Police aren't treating the incident as

suspicious. To finance - US

stocks recovered slightly after

losses in early trading on Wall

Street. The falls come after

regard slumps in home builder

confidence and growing concerns

that banks will report further

losses. A ban on short selling

of non-banking stocks will be

lifted today. The practice was

banned in September to protect

the Australian market after

similar restrictions were put

in place around the globe.

Critics of the ban say the

lifting of it should free up

liquidity. The US Treasury

Secretary Henry Paulson told a

congressional hearing that $700

billion bailout program is not

billion bailout program is not

a panacea to cure the country's

economic woes. Henry Paulson,

and Ben Bernanke were called to

testify before the House of

Representatives financial

services committee about TARP. Henry Paulson

acknowledged the crisis was

affecting the economy but the

rescue focus should remain on

the financial sector. Prudent

course is to preserve funds

from the TARP, providing

flexibility for this and the

next administration. Other priorities that need to be

addressed enclud actions to

restore con-- include actions

to restore consumer credit.

Treasury has been working on a

program with the Federal

Reserve to improve

securitisation, this would

involve investing a modest

share of tarp funds and Federal

Reserve liquidity facility, it

could have positive benefits

for consumer lending. We expect

banks to intera lending over

time as a result of these --

increase lending over time as a

result of these efforts and

confidence returns, it won't

materialise fast, but it will

happen faster having used the

TARP to stabilise the

system. There are signs credit

markets while estranged are

improving. Short term funding

rates have fallen since

October, we are seeing greater

stability in money market and

commercial paper market.

Interest rates and higher rated

bonds issued by corporations

and municipalities have fallen,

bond issuance for these

entities rose in recent weeks.

Ongoing capital injections

bring stability to the banking

system reducing pressure on

banks to deleverage. Two

critical steps to starting

flows of credit. Vanessa

O'Hanlon will be here to look

at the weather. And a review of the newspapers today. This

morning we'll be joined by the

editor of crikey, Jonathan

Green. Now it's time for sport.

Here is Paul Kennedy. The

Socceroos may have injury

concerns, it won't stop coach

Pim Verbeek attacking in the World Cup qualifier, Australia

will have no less than four

attacking option, Josh Kennedy

leading the strike force with

Tim Cahill tucked in behind and

Cuil and Marc Bresciano on

either side. A win in the --

Harry Kewell and bresh on

either side. A win won't get

Australia to the finals, but

close. There's another storm

brewing over Ben Cousins

playing future the message

clear - you can play, under

strict supervision. The

Brownlow Medallist was told if

he returns he'll be one of the

most drug tested athletes in

the world, up to three times a

week. The AFL players union

says it has a problem, it may

mean a rethink the drugs

policy. The AFL boss Andrew

Demetriou used the Cousins

announcement to reinforce the

leagues attitude to drug use

and this is how he explained

things Our illicit drug policy

is all about intervention and

changing people's behaviour,

and in the main it's proven

successful, and effective. What

we were dealing with here is a

situation where a player has an

illness, he's self-confessed

addict. It's a long haul. It's

difficult. It's not without

risk. But, he has subjected

himself to some stringent

testing, he's presented himself

to all the medical practitioners, physicians. They

have indicated, and on our best

medical advice and reports

we've seen, that he's made real

progress, he wants to progress, he wants to play

football again, and he's been

given the green light to play

football subject to the

conditions which will be

stringent and we wish him

well. The Kangaroos have had an almost perfect Rugby League

World Cup but with the final

days away they are taking no

chance, Cameron Smith says he believes the New Zealand team

poses a threat. It's a

statement to drum of excitement

for the game, and

for the game, and a warning to

his players that they should

not be complacent. Brent Tate

and Paul Gallen are the injury

concerns. The cricket news - I

guess we'll hear more from

Vanessa, the weather is closing

in on Brisbane again They've

had three wet days, they won't know what to expect when they

pum the covers off. Predicting

storms, they may not pull the

covers off This time of the

year, if they say it will rain,

for the cricket, it rains. That

would Jason Krejza won't play,

why go with a spinner on a

wicket like that, you'd go with

the quicks. There'll be no part

for him to play at the 'Gabba,

he'll bowl a few, the only

thinging is if they take Jason

Krejza in, Krejza in, it's in preparation

for the Sav ka series to get

game time under his belt. I got

the impression you like the

look of the Socceroos strike

force up front. Yes. It's a

strike force, and World Cup

qualifiers is crucial. We say

that. It's an interesting game,

2:00am it starts, tomorrow,

Bahrain need to get a win. They

can't afford to have a draw.

They'll be playing attacking

brand of football as well. I

think it will be good to watch.

Australia could capitalise on

that. Bahrain's form is not

great. They were beaten by

Saudi Arabia in a friendly a

few days ago 4-0, losing to

Japan 3-2 and tied with Qatar

1-1, they need a win to get off

the bottom of the World Cup pool. Do you think Andrew Demetriou wishes Ben Cousins

well when he says tham I think

so, I think Andrew Demetriou

would like the whole matter to

go away. In my opinion they

didn't handle it brilliantly,

coming out making it clear he's

under strict guidelines, he's

causing a fight with the AFL

players union and the AFL would

have been better served to use

its discretion its target test

and go about the measures

anyway when nobody would have known spent Ben Cousins

epd Rather than formally put

it in place. Rather than make a

big announcement. The whole

thing wreaks of hypocracy to a

degree. The AFL said it has one

of the strictest drug testing

codes in the world. If so, why

do they need to put Ben Cousins

under further testing. They

need to target test him, to say

it out loud causes a they don't

need. It will test the

determination of Ben Cousins to

make a comeback, if he's

serious he'll adhere and get on

with it. I have no problem with

Ben Cousins being the most

tested player or one of the

most tested athletes in the

world. They could have gone

about it in a discrete fashion,

saving themselves a stoush. The

AFL's players union is saying,

"Hang on a second, nobody

alters the policy without our

say so, we'll weigh into this",

they'll meet with Ricky Nixon,

Cousin's manager. The whole

thing is stretched out another couple of days before a club

decides to recruit him. Thank

you Paul. Now returning to last

night's premiere of 'Australia'

in Sydney last night in a

moment we'll hear director Baz Luhrmann's reflections of the

influences. Here is a glimpse

of what cinema-goers can

expect.

Welcome to Australia. (Siren

sounds). I will come and find

you, whatever happens, whatever

it takes. You have to be

strong, can you do that?

strong, can you do that? We

can't let them win. There you

are, that's the movie, it's

open now, and, of course, it

was released last night the the

film's director Baz Luhrmann

says although the landscape

inspired the film, it was

historical events that shaped

it. It is not the outback I

knew, the well-known outback,

it's a dramatic landscape, it's

a surprising landscape, and in

a way it's a frontier still.

Visually this seemed like a

great place to play the story,

actually it was historical

events that decided it for me,

two key once, one was the bombing of

bombing of Darwin, which I knew

nothing about. (Siren sounds).

I was staggered to find, for

example, that the same attack

force that hit Pearl Harbour steamed straight down and

completely wiped out the

northern city of Darwin,

bombing it 64 times, the

details covered up, the amount

of people that died being not

very accurate. Then the other

issue is the issue of the

stolen generation, and the

whole process and reality of that. Baz Luhrmann speaking on

the '7.30 Report' last night.

Now, you have - you have

critical things to say about

the Australian film industry

and the movies we make, will

you see this one. Of course I

will, I have to do my patriotic

duty, save the Australian film industry, boost

tourism. Restore national

pride. Treat it as a donation,

will you enjoy it. We'll see

when I get there. Vanessa

O'Hanlon joins us with the

weather. There's wild weather

about the country, storms on

the way for south-east

Queensland. Until Thursday

night the rain will be heavy

enough at times to deliver

50-100mm of rain. 50-100mm of

Looking at the satellite imagine, I

imagine, I can't wait to see

'Australia', let's look at the satellite, there's thick cloud

over south-east Queensland. We

have a few technical issues,

but I can tell you there is

thick cloud affecting eastern

NSW and Victoria. This will

move offshore with a trough,

taking most of the rain with it. Heavy severe thunderstorms

are expected over the eastern

interror inland, South

Australia and the Northern

low pressure Territory. A broad region of

low pressure eventualing east.

This will cause rain and storms

from the top end and interior,

all the way to the East Coast.

Bringing another wave of heavy

rain falls to Queensland and

NSW. Let's see what is ahead

for Queensland. A broad rainband with embedded

thunderstorms is forming in the

west. This is forming eastwards

through the state. Expect more

heavy falls with very wet

conditions there. Also in NSW -

lots of rain for most of the state. Severe thunderstorms

warning for the northern

interror. Victoria - scattered

showers in the east with rain late today, isolated

thunderstorms developing in the

north and east. Tasmania - has

showers about most of the

state. South Australia - isolated thunderstorms north of

about Renmark to Kimber,

contracting east, isolated

showers west of Ceduna. Over

to WA - storms about the

south-west region, cloudy, fine

around Eucla and Esperance

after a couple of days of rain.

Up to the nor, in Alice Springs

the Todd River causeways have

been closed because of heavy

flows coming down the river,

more storms expected. Storms in

Darwin. Ahead to tomorrow:

Rain in the northern for the

start of the Test. Not looking

good there.

See you in half an hour.

The top story in 'ABC News

Breakfast', a Saudi oil

supertanker seized by pirates

anchors off the coast of

Somalia, the 'The Sirius Star'

was hijacked Sunday with 25

crew and more than $100 million

in US oil on board. It high

lights the vulnerability of

ships transporting cargo along

the Gulf of Aden, two more

vessels have been seized and

total of 90 vessels are being

held by pirates in the

area. The brand new tanker was

seized more than 450 nautical

miles south-east of the Kenyan

city of Mombasa, and it's 25 crew members taken

hostage. This is the largest

taken by the gunmen, and the

farthest incident to happen in

this region. The attack was

carried out despite

international naval responses

to protect one the world's

biggest shipping areas. They

are well armed, tactically they

are very good. Once they get to

a point where they can board,

it's difficult to get them off.

Clearly now they hold

hostages. It's believed the

pirates are armed with

grenades, machine guns and

rocket launchers, making it

hard for authorities to take

action. Piracy is against everybody, like terrorism, it

is a disease that has to be

eradicated. The US navy

believes the 'The Sirius Star'

has now anchored off the Somali

coast in a haven for the

pirates who are holding a

number of ships there as they

negotiate ransoms. Maritime

experts say this incident

highlights the vulnerability of

large ships particularly given

the surge of attacks off some

articlia. We should all be

concerned. Attacks are up 70%,

and that is substantial, a number of shipping companies

are looking at re-routing from

going through the Gulf, going

down around the Cape of Good

Hope, adding 12-15 days, and

about 20-30,000 a day to the

cost of doing business, which

will be passed on to me and

you. NATO ships intervened in

pirate incidents in the past.

The current mandate for the

NATO ships limits their ability

to respond. A few times NATO

ships intervened, sometimes after being fired upon they

have used force to repel

attacks by pirates, could they have done something in that

scenario had they been there,

it's not impossible. What they

don't have the mandate to do is

to board ships that have

already been hijacked to free

the crew. That is not within

the NATO mandate. They can

patrol, deter, stop attacks

happening, they do not then

board a ship that has been

hijacked elsewhere to try and

free it. At the same time a

cargo ship which managed to

escape a pirate attack earlier

this week docked in Mombasa, it

was seriously damaged after a

rocket propelled grenade set it

alight. The Kenyan navy

increased patrols on the Indian

Ocean, but with 92 attacks off

Somalia, and 36 ships hijacked

there's no easy solution to the

problem. And here is how you

can contribute to 'ABC News

Breakfast'. You can send an

email: In other news this

morning thousands of Brisbane homes are without power

following Sunday's storm,

there's been further rainfall

in Queensland's south-west,

police issuing flood warnings

for some of the State's roads. Brisbane's Lord Mayor Campbell

Newman says the emergency

response has been superhuman,

190 SES volunteers are expected

to join the recovery effort

this morning. Three people, two young children have died after

being pulled from the sea at

Tathra on the NSW South Coast.

They were said to be a

28-year-old man, and two boys,

1 and 4. Bystanders saw a pram

in the water near where it

happened.Lies say they are not

treating the incident as --

police are not treating it as

police are not treating it as

suspicious. Efforts to

distribute aid is being

hampered. Tutsi rebels are

withdrawing from two corridors.

France presents a draft

resolution to the UN Security

Council to bolster the

peacekeeping force force in the

Congo. Almost 300 family

members of the crew of Sydney

will attend a commemoration

service. They are on board the

HMAS Manoora, making a 19 hour

journey to the ship's gravesite

200km off the coast of

Geraldton. Ceremonies to take

place around the country.

Finally Baz Luhrmann's

long-awaited epic Australia

premiered in Sydney. He was

joined by Hugh Jackman, and

Nicole Kidman on the Redcar

pet. It was filmed in three

filming locations, Darwin, WA's

Kununurra, and Bowen in

Queensland's north. Now more on

Ben Cousins return or possible

return to the AFL. The former

Brownlow Medallist has been

told if he returns to the sport

he'll be one of the most

drug-tested athletes in the

world. It could mean a rethink

of the entire AFL drug policies, Sarah Farnsworth

joins us from outside the St

Kilda Football Club, the

favourite to take Ben Cousins

if he makes a comeback, tell us

about the conditions imposed on

Ben Cousins by the AFL. They

came out yesterday saying

they'd be strict terms and

conditions for Ben Cousins

return to the game. He

effectively has to give up to

three urine samples a week,

four hair samples a year and

fully comply with the AFL

medics at all times, if he

fails to comply, refuses to

take a test or returns a

positive drug test me can face

immediate suspension whilst

investigations get under way

into those tests. Now that

means he's singled out from the

rest of the players, who

effectively are still governed

by the AFL's drug policy of

three strikes before they are

publicly named or suspended

from the game. So what is the problem with the Players'

Association, that it has with

all of this? Well, the Players'

Association have come out and

said that they are concerned

about the precedent this will

set for other players, as I

said it singles him out. He'll

be the only person that has to

comply with these rules, in

effect, if he returns to the

game next year, it means he'll have to give

have to give 120 urine samples

during the season. Now, his

manager also came out and this

is pretty clear what he's

saying. Front of the 'The

Herald Sun', he don't come back

under those terms, suggesting

that he'll walk away from the

game, it will make his career

comeback too hard. Ricky Nixon,

bowsin's manager will meet with

the -- bowsin's manager will

meet with the AFL's players

asougs to see what they'll

do. Thank you for that. New

research indicates that despite

high education levels many

Muslims in Australia face

social disadvantages when

compared to non-Muslims, the

finding showing Muslim men are

more likely than non-Muslim men

to have a university degree,

they have high unemployment and

the rate of home ownership is

half the average. The research

is conducted by Professor Riaz

Hassan, sociologist from

Flinders University, he

presents his finding at a

conference in Melbourne. What's

the nature of your research or

what figures or data did you

look at. The 2006 Australian

census, and we analysed the

Muslim community in Australia

in 2006, and compared them with

non-Muslims. You found they are

significantly disadvantaged.

Are they impoverished compared

to the rest of Australia? Not

quite that. I think given the

great asset they represent,

they are highly educated

community in terms of

educational achievement. When

we look at their other

indicators of social

disadvantage, such as income,

children and poverty, home

ownership, unemployment,

employment rates, they were

considerably more disadvantaged

than the rest of Australia. Why

is that happening? It could be

a number of reasons, one that

they are recent migrants and

that is an experience of most

recent immigrant communities

English proficiency, competence

in English language, and also

it could be just discrimination

and prejudice. What is puz ling

is that is the figures for

teenagers, majority are born in

Australia, if you look at the

unemployment rates, teenage

unemployment rates are about

26% compared to non-Muslim Australians, 13%. So that

makes it difficult. It's almost

double. Almost double What

happens to unemployment rates,

every age group, the ratio

between Muslim and non-Muslim

increases. The teenage years,

for every non-Muslim Australian, two Muslim

Australians are unemployed, and

at the age of 60, four Muslim Australians are unemployed,

unemployed as compared with

non-Muslim Australians the

disadvantage is cumulative. My

concern is that poverty can be

endemic, that can produce its

own consequences which probably

are something that we need to

look at Is there any way of establishing whether

discrimination is a key factor

in all of this? I think there

are studies done now in

Australia which appear to show

that there is - there is

discrimination, but at the

moment as far as I know, there

is no study which actually

establishes it beyond

reasonable doubt. So we

probably do need to undertake

focussed and targeted studies in order to investigate these

issues. Do you see key

differences, if you look at or

if in the future you decide to

look at a comparison between

other ethnic groups, other

migrant groups to Australia as

well. The history of migration

here has been quite successful,

the first generation and second

generation come and experience

difficulty to begin with, but

get on with it, work hard, get

jobs and do well for their children. If there's a

significant difference for the

Muslim groups, I wonder if there is key comparisons

there. I think there's two

factors, one is the previous

group to come in large number

are Vietnamese, and Vietnamese

were one of the most educated

refugees to come to Australia,

they have over a period of time

established themselves very

well. They experience similar

kind of outcomes. In the case

of Muslim Australians, they are

also very highly educated. What

is interesting those that are

born in Australia being educated well. They are

participating in the

institutions of Australian

societies, education, and those

institution, but what is

interesting is that the outcome

of the participation in local

institutions such as education,

the attainments are not reward

ed as one would expect to be

rewarded with the educational

attainment they have. That is

the puzzle because in most - in

the case of Vietnamese and

other groups, the young people

probably did not experience the

same level of disadvantage as

the young Muslims are. Now, it

could be circumstances which

now prevail after 9/11, it's

difficult to really establish, certainly there is a certain

element of Islama phobia, and I

would think that with time,

this will decline, and the

circumstances will change, but

if we take the snap shot of

Muslim community, comparing

them with non-Muslim

Australians in 2006, I think we

have some - we need to be

concerned about the outcomes. Prove tore Riaz

Hassan, thank you for joining

us, Professor Riaz Hassan thank

you for joining us. For more an

the commemorations of the HMAS

'Sydney' we are join ed in the

ABC Newsroom: This is the

first anniversary since the

discovery of the wreck of the

Sydney and the 'Kormoran' in

March in deep water off the

Western Australian coast. The

discovery solved the mystery of

where the Sydney ended up. We

have an inquiry establishing

how and why the ship was lost. The ceremony goes beyond

questions and answers, it's a

day of remembrance for the

families, women, children,

descendants of fam lace that

lost. They'll have three ceremonies.

Tell us about the

ceremonies. The first of the

ceremony is the burial of the

unknown soldier, exkumed off

Christmas il. The navy --

exhumed off Christmas Island.

The navy spent time and money

to positively identify this

sailor, they've been unable to

do so, but believe he was a

member of the Sydney crew, one

of 645, washed up ashore in a

life raft on Christmas Island.

He'll be the representative of

all those sailors, it will be

an emotional moment at the

Geraldton wharf ceremony when

he's the first Sydney sailor to

be buried on Australian soil. I

understand there'll be a

service at sea over the site of

the wreckage of 'Sydney'. 233

family members set sail on HMAS

Manoora, they sailed to the

site. They'll participate in a

commem rattive service at sea.

One man yesterday, Bob Honour,

whose father was lost said it

was the greatest thing the navy

and the Gough could do. He said

it would be the closest he had

been to his father for many

years. A pair of brothers will

scatter the Ashes of their

father over the wreckage, they

lost their uncle in the

disaster in 1941 and said their

father never got over his

brother's loss, and they

promised his father they'd

scatter his Ashes near the

Sydney. It hadn't been found at

that stage. The commemorative

services will wrap with a sun

set service at the Geraldton

memorial, that will be attended

by a number of dignitaries,

including the Governor-General. A really

important morning, with the discoveriry of the resting

place, and we are talking about

that later, and some

interesting theories about what

the Captain of the 'Sydney 'may

have been doing, he's been much

criticised for putting his boat

in peril It's a controversy

that hasn't been settled about

how much responsibility he

should take for what occur. A

fascinating conversation coming

up. Top stories, Saudi

supertanker hijacked with more

than $100 million on board

reaches the coast of Northern

Somalia, ship's operators have

made contact with the pirates

and believe 25 crew members are

safe. Thousands of Brisbane

home are without power,

emergency workers distruging to

repair damage from the storm.

There's been rainfall in

Queensland's south-west. Police

issue flood warnings for the

State's roads. Three people,

including two young children

die after being pulled from the

sea at Tathra NSW South Coast.

A man and two boys appear to

have fallen off a wharf just

after 8:00 last night. For a

look at the National papers, we

are joined by the editor of

crikey, Jonathan Green.

Greetings, what a great day

this is. It's amazing when it

comes to sport. I know you'll

focus on that. The AFL world

is in turmoil, the Ben Cousins

code. This man, who is having

his career restrained by the

AFL due to an adolescent

miscalculation with drugs, he

will, if he makes the AFL final

series in 2009 have been urine

tested up to 120 times. In an

even more heinous restraint, he

will have hair samples taken up

to four times a year. They are

not only concerned about drugs,

but the use of hair product by AFL footballers, that's what

this is about. This is where it

gets to the chase, this Cousins

thing. The big yarn, and who

would have thought 'Australia',

the movie was a Fox production,

something to do with the Rupert

Murdoch empire, you wouldn't

have guessed that from the

front pages. 'Daily Telegraph'

or of 'The Herald Sun', an

Independent reviewer,

'Australia' is not a bad film,

it's far from a great one. We

are getting a real picture of

it. We had the premiere last

night. The restraint of

commentary issue is an odd one,

asked to sign this vow which

clearly News Limited reviewers

felt free to break, that you

would not write about it until

today is rich David stakan 'The

Australian' said it looked

nice, it wasn't spectacular but

felt obliged to give it four

stores. The Premier featuring

Hugh Jackman and exoskeleton

Nicole Kidman. It's unkind but

fair. 'The Herald Sun', page 7,

looks at the RBA, what they'll

do in December. This is the way

in which RBA rate cuts play for

the tabloid and the broadsheet

readership. For the broadsheet,

RBA rate cut is a sign of

economic uncertainy and the RBA

is trying to act. Not in the

tabloids, it's $50 a week more

for you. They say an early

Christmas present for

households. Make the most of

it, by Easter you won't have a

job. Yesterday in Canberra,

Kevin Rudd said, "Go out and

spend, as quickly as you can",

it feels like Christmas, not gloomy times. They are

desperate. What is the time

limit. This had to have it done

by June next year Or it will go

away, disagree. It's like the

stock market. $2 billion wiped

off the value of Australian

companies. Where did it go. I

want to give a late Buicka to

the wonderful cartoonist in the

Australian, Mike Cadelka, a

great cartoon of a father and

son, and the son says, "Daddy,

where does money go when it

dice?", the fther says, "Nobody

knows, son, nobody

knows". Where does it go when

it comes back. Not to us. Can anything

anything get better for NSW

Premier Nathan Rees. We don't

know how big a story this will

turn into. A new difficulty If 'The Australian' has anything

to do with it, who are

campaigning on Mr Rees, they

think the NSW Government should

be nationalised. It's

reasonable. The 'Daily

Telegraph' is putting out a -

something for you to sign, a

petition to sign. Demanding

that he resign and call an

election. The election is too

far away. Hold this up. Have a

look at that. I'll read the

top, another NSW Cabinet

Minister under a cloud with a

senior lobbyist making a

complaint against the Police

Minister over an alleged intimidation. They were having

a discussion apparently, this

is a chap working for the Insurance Council of Australia,

at the end of a robust

discussion over the use of

levies on premiums to fund emergency services the Police Minister threatened to shoot

him with a taser. I wish I had

a taser here, I'd use it on you

- that's the allegation. The

bigger problem is he took away

the free travel for school

students on public transport,

and now caucus demands a special meeting to overturn

that before it gets to the

Parliament. When it's that

situation, the Premier makes a

decision, Cabinet, caucus won't

wear it, it's over How does he

dig himself out of this He

doesn't. Barrie O'Farrell sits

and says, "Let it come to

me". Yes. Now, the counterpoint

to the 'The Herald Sun' early

Christmas present story is

perhaps on page 3 of the

'Financial Review', where it

says General Motors are halving

car production in their Elizabeth plant in South

Australia. The next quarter,

first quarter of next year

they'll have 28 production

days, 25 non-production days.

Obviously this is negotiated in

the enterprise bargains in the

auto industry, it's not

behaviour unaccustomed. I think

the car manufacturers are the

bellweather of the - if I can

use that hideous expression,

whatever that means, what is a

bellweather. Like a handcart in

which one goes to hell. It's

the weather, the sheep that

used to wear the bell and lead

the team. The car

industry... This is 28 on and

28 off. 28 on, 25 off. You are looking at the same

time. That's what the navy

does. Maritime warfare is

seasonal. I hope we checked

this, they are taking Christmas

off. That story, twins nicely

with GM Holden. If you want an

indicator of how sick things

are, you needn't look further

than the auto industry here and

the US where it's in dire

straits. No Christmas present

there. No, no Christmas there

at all. The follow on effect

for that for the components

industry and the other small

manufacturers, that's the big

problem. This is where it's

significant. The job in the

auto industry as such are not

huge around the country, there's discussion when large

amounts of money are given by

the Federal Government to automanufacturers, it's not

many jobs, but the encompassing

effect, ripple is huge. Thank

you Jonathan Green. A reminder

about the web site.

Abc.net.au/breakfast. There you

can watch the entire program

streamed live every morning.

Whether you are at home or in

the office you can stay across

day. Now Vanessa O'Hanlon joins the main news stories of the

us for a look at the national

weather. Alice Springs, the

Todd River causeways are closed

with heavy flows coming down

the river with showers and

storms on the way. On the satellite satellite -

Thick cloud over south-east

Queensland, eastern NSW and

Victoria, moving offshore with

a trough taking most rain with

it. Heavy severe thunderstorms

inspected over the eastern

interror, Australia and

Northern Territory. On the

synoptic, low pressure edging

east causing rain and storms

from the top end, interror to

the East Coast, rain falls

likely in Queensland and NSW.

To Queensland - broad rain

bands and embedded

thunderstorms forming in the

west moving eastwards. Expect

heavy falls, New South Wales -

rain for most of the stake,

thunderstorm warning for the

Northern interror. In Victoria

- scattered showers in the

east. Rain, isolated

thunderstorms developing in the

north and east: Tasmania -

showers about most of the

state, 18 expected. A top of 20

in Hobart. In South Australia - isolated thunderstorms north of

about Renmark to Kimber,

contracting east. Isolated

showers west of Ceduna. In WA -

still storms about the

south-west region around Perth.

After a couple of rainy days,

overcast and fine in Esperance.

Isolated storms in the north

around Kimberley, storms in

Darwin. Let's take a quick look

at tomorrow: Not looking good

for tomorrow's cricket for tomorrow's cricket match.

You are watching 'ABC News

Breakfast', after a break we'll

talk about Australia's greatest

naval tragedy with Professor

Tom Frame. Stay with us.

Saudi Arabia struggles to net

the release of an oil tanker

held by pirates off the coast

of Somalia, two more vessels

hijacked. Thousands much homes

without power in Queensland

amid fresh flood warnings after

the State's worst storm in 25

years. Tragedy in NSW last

night after a man and two young

children drowned near Bega. And

Australia's biggest stars join

Baz Luhrmann for the premier of

a film many hope will boost

tourist numbers and refive vive

the country's film industry. --

revive the country's film

industry.

Good morning, again, it's

Wednesday, 19 November, I'm

Barrie Cassidy. I'm Virginia

Trioli, the top story on 'ABC

News Breakfast', a Saudi oil supertanker seized by pirates

anchors off the coast of

Somalia, the 'The Sirius Star'

was hijacked Sunday with 25

crew and more than $100 million

in US oil on board. The capture

highlights the vulnerability of

ships transporting cargo along

the Gulf of Aden, two more

vessels have been seized and

it's estimated a tote of 90

vessels are held by -- attempt

of 90 vessels are held by

pirates in the area. The brand

new tanker seized 450 nautical

miles south-east of the city of

Mombasa, 25 crew members taken

hostage. This is the largest

taken by it gun fun and the farthest incident to have

happened. In this region. The

attack was carried out despite

an international naval response

to protect one of the world's

biggest shipping areas. They

are very well armed tactically

they are very good. Once they

goat to a point where they can

board, it -- get to a point

where they can board it's

difficult to get them off. Now

they hold hostages. It's

believed the pirates are armed

with grenades, machine guns and

rocket launchers, making it

hard for authorities to take

action. Piracy is against

everybody. Like terrorism it is

a disease that has to be eradicated. The US Navy

believes the 'The Sirius Star'

has now anchored off the Somali

coast in a well-known haven for

the pirates who are holding a

number of ships to negotiate

ransoms. Maritime experts say

this incident highlights the

vulnerability of large ships

particularly given the surge of

attacks off Somalia. We should

all be concerned. Attacks are

up 70%, that is substantial, a

number of shipping companies

are looking at re-routing from

going through the Gulf and

going down around the Cape of

Good Hope, adding 12-15 days

and $20,000-$30,000 a day to

the cost of doing business,

passed on to me and you. NATO

ships intervened in pirate

incidents in the past, the