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(generated from captions) Welcome to the program. of a terrorist attack on Melbourne, First tonight, the threat an al-Qaeda video - purported to be a flurry of warnings a threat that's prompted and reassurances from authorities. threat to an Australian city, In what amounts to the first direct the video - al-Qaeda recruit - featuring an American

and Melbourne as new targets identifies Los Angeles

in Madrid and London. in the wake of the bombings Whether the video represents a clear and present danger evidence of unsettling propaganda or just a piece of of September 11 for the fourth anniversary investigation by security agencies. is now a matter of intense for Victorians - There's a particular focus coming up in March, the Commonwealth Games still doesn't have a security chief. which, as we reported recently, Mick Bunworth reports.

Yesterday, London and Madrid.

Tomorrow - Los Angeles and

Melbourne. Allah willing. This time,

don't count on us demonstrating

restraint or compassion. With these

words, Australians were provided

with their most specific and public

terrorist threat yet. We love peace,

but when the enemy vie violates

peace or prevents us from achieving but when the enemy vie violates that

it, then we love nothing better

the heat of battle, the echo of it, then we love nothing better than

explosions and splitting the

of infidels. This tells us that we explosions and splitting the throats

remain very much in the sights of

al-Qaeda and the Islamic radicals

who would seek to perpetrate a

terrorist attack here. The tape,

terrorist attack here. The tape, who would seek to perpetrate a

obtained by a US television network

in Pakistan is thought to feature a

Adam Gadahn, a Californian borm

self-proclaimed member of al-Qaeda.

It's not the first time time he has

been identified as the like le

source of such threats and he is on

the FBI wanted list. What took

on September 11 was but the opening the FBI wanted list. What took place

salvo of the global war on America.

But even if the tape is a complete

hoax, its chilling, hateful

rhetoric still prompted a response

from Prime Minister John Howard in

New York. It under

New York. It underlines

the need for a further New York. It underlines emphatically

of the domestic law in Australia to the need for a further strengthening

make certain that we have all of

tools available to do the best we make certain that we have all of the

can to protect our country against

terrorist attack. The videotape has can to protect our country against a

surfaced on the fourth anniversary

of al-Qaeda's most brazen and

devastating attack on the West.

And our beloved brother Michael

Samuel Fachs, we miss you very much.

As New York city honoured its dead,

Melbourne was dealing with its new

prominence as a stated target.

prominence as a stated target. Melbourne was dealing with its new

Victoria's premier sought to exude

calm. The intent is to spread fear.

Obviously, we'd urge all Victorians

to treat this in the manner in

it should be treated, that is, we to treat this in the manner in which

about our business. But while it should be treated, that is, we go

Melburnians continued to do just

that, they expressed concern about

the latest threat. Just having

conversation with people, there is

slight edginess or untoward that conversation with people, there is a

something might happen. I travel by

plane, I fly into Melbourne and I

travel on the train so it's a worry.

It's not the best. I would hate to

think that something like September

11 could happen in our own country.

I suppose I'm sick of it, it's all

you hear on the radio or the telly.

You have to live your life as it is.

You can't say "Can't do this or

can't do that" because you won't go

out of the house. With public

confidence such a crucial factor in

the war on terror, the Victorian

Government's tardiness in

a security chief for the Government's tardiness in appointing

Commonwealth Games stands in stark

contrast to the terrorists'

well-stated intentions. When do you

intend to announce the security

chief for the Commonwealth Games?

The security chief? Yeah. The

responsible for security. The security chief? Yeah. The person

responsible for security. Well, the The security chief? Yeah. The person

responsibility for security rests

with Victoria police and the chief

commissioner of police. As to the

details underneath that, that will

be announced when prop eat. But the

Games are six months away. Yep,

yeah. Going extremely well and the

... Who does the buck stop with

with? The chief commissioner of

police is responsible for the

security arrangements an of course

federal authorities we're in continual liaison with the

federal authorities on that and we're in continual liaison with the

going well. The Commonwealth Games federal authorities on that and it's

suspect is what led to Melbourne's going well. The Commonwealth Games I

inclusion in the list and the

Victorian Government, the Bracks

Government, has got a very, very

job in front of it. Security Government, has got a very, very big

Allan Behm ran anti-terrorism job in front of it. Security analyst

in the federal Attorney-General's Allan Behm ran anti-terrorism policy

Department in the early 90s. He

believes preparing a response to an

attack is just as important as talk

is of preventing one. I think that it

is really, really important to look of preventing one. I think that it

at the coordination arrangements

between the response capacities,

because that is really where the

State gosts have their role. The

prevention side of it is largely in

the hands of the Commonwealth,

through the intelligence agencies

and through the border protection through the intelligence agencies

capacity, managed largely by

customs. Where the States come in

ensuring that the police are able customs. Where the States come in is

deal with the situation quickly, ensuring that the police are able to deal with ensuring that the police are able to

that ambulances and other emergency

crews can get in and deal with a

situation should it occur. We've

upgraded the chemical, biological

and radiological equipment for our

ambulance services, for our

hospitals, and both in mobile and

stationary units and we also have

some more emergency beds and other

arrangements in place. Part of the

$120 million for counter terrorism

activities has upgraded those

facilities. This afternoon in

question time, the Attorney-General

said Australia's threat level would

remain unchanged. Relevant agencies

are currently assessing the

statements made in the video but at

this stage, indications are that it is authentic.

is authentic. But that does not this stage, indications are that it

that the statements in it are is authentic. But that does not mean

anything more than rhetoric. The

information contained in the video

does not provide any basis to

the threat levels to Australia, or does not provide any basis to change

Australian interests overseas.

It's unclear if this latest tape

It's unclear if this latest tape is an exercise in hollow propaganda or

a realistic warning about an

impending attack on Australian soil. But that

impending attack on Australian soil. But that matters little to those

But that matters little to those who watch the terrorists. I don't think

it matters whether it's a hoax. It

is a very timely reminder that we

are very much subject to terrorist

threat, and although the threat

level probably hasn't risen, it level probably hasn't risen, it does remain constant. That report from Mick Bunworth.

It took the best part of a week, but early tonight a Victorian Supreme Court jury acquitted the man charged with killing former Test cricketer David Hookes. Hookes died after an altercation with bouncer Zdravko Micevic, who was attempting to evict the Victorian cricket coach and media commentator

from a Melbourne hotel in January 2004. The jury had to weigh up two versions of that night's events -

the prosecution's claim

that Micevic deliberately targeted Hookes and the defence claim that the bouncer was simply defending himself in a chaotic brawl. Mary Gearin reports.

I'm very relieved. I'm just glad

it's all over. Um ... I can get on

with my life. I think this has been

a really compelling endorsement for

our system of justice and it's a

system of justice that I am really

proud to serve. David Hookes's widow, Robin, left

widow, Robin, left the court

widow, Robin, left the court without a word for the cameras. It was left

to his brother, Terry Cranage, to

express the family's emotions.

There have been no winners through

this process, only losers. Families

have suffered immeasurably. We are bitter

bittery disappointed at the verdict,

obviously. Exactly what happened

obviously. Exactly what happened the night David Hookes died? At around

midnight, Hookes was badly injured

during what witnesses described as

during what witnesses described as a brawl. My memory of that night is

like a slide show. Then we heard

like a slide show. Then we heard the thud and that was when David had

been hit. I hot footed down there

and I just seen David on the ground.

I'm calling from St Kilda, next

I'm calling from St Kilda, next door to the booek pub. There is a bit of

an at case ... Certainly there was

pushing, shoving and loud, angry

voices. But two vastly different

versions of what happened that

versions of what happened that night emerged in court evidence. In one,

Hookes was a defenceless,

intoxicated 48-year-old, targetted

for being a smart Alex. In the

other, Micevic was part of a

dangerous, violent, volatile

dangerous, violent, volatile rolling maul, just one of three or four

security guards outnumbered by an

aggressive group of big, strong men.

security guards outnumbered by an aggressive group of big, strong men.

And that was what he told police in

this interview following Hookes's

death. When I approached him again,

told him to settle down, he hit me

in the guts. He grabbed me by my

shirt, he pulled me down, he hit me

again, that's where I took a swing

back at him. No-one else said they

saw Hookes punch Micevic, but

crucially for the defence, former cricketer

crucially for the defence, former cricketer Wayne Phillips did

corroborate that Hookes had been

aggressive, and that when he was

hit, he was in a compressed group

that were still pushing an shoving,

not standing alone and defenceless.

Throughout the case, Micevic

presented as a quiet and reserved

man, but the pressure he was

man, but the pressure he was feeling was evident when he talked to

police. I wish I was dead. It got

worse for both him and his family.

Such a case, involving such an

iconic sporting figure, was always

going to attract interest, both

healthy and otherwise. After

healthy and otherwise. After Zdravko Micevic was charged, he and his

loved ones had to withstand

vilification and even attack.

Shocked neighbours who were woken

Shocked neighbours who were woken by fire sirens say the family has been

receiving death threats. And down

the ground it goes. A great shot.

David Hookes was never known for

holding back. Dry statistics can't

David Hookes was never known for holding back. Dry statistics can't

reflect the colour and dash of his

playing days. Swiping the

playing days. Swiping the spotlight in the sen 10 tree Test, at just 21

in his debut with five famous

consecutive boundaries off English

captain Tony Greig. He continued as

the brash maverick, his

the brash maverick, his contribution far outweighing his career average.

In retirement, as coach of the

Victorian side, he inspired the

State's first four-day title in 13 years. Just 10

State's first four-day title in 13 years. Just 10 months later, he had

died, and Micevic was facing court.

Then I just remember the ambulance

saying we've got a pulse, and I

thought everything was gonna be

alright. From the time I'd left the

hotel, where everyone was happy,

having a good time, to half-hour

later, someone was fighting for

their life. I

later, someone was fighting for their life. I was just rubbing his

back and speaking to him to make

sure he was okay. Christine

sure he was okay. Christine Padfield emerged into the spotlight after

Hookes's death, revealing a glimpse

into a complicated private life.

Other women would also claim a

relationship with the former

cricketer. Defence counsel made the

uncontestable point that Hookes did

not deserve to die. Micevic's case

did need to convince the jury that

after an evening at the hotel,

Hookes and his friends had been

belligerent and aggressive. As it

happens, it's an image that gels

with Hookes

with Hookesy's public, persona.

Forge ed in a life of outspokenness

both during and after his playing

days. He admitted to indiscretions

as a young mant in this interview,

pointing to Ian Chappell's

influence. There are probably some

things we do that he probably

regrets now that I followed in

regrets now that I followed in those days, and I wouldn't do it again.

What did you do? Oh ... just

behaving not as well as I should've

at certain times publicly.

Controversy dogged him. Sometimes

triggered by avoidable comments, such as

such as his description of a South

African woman making allegations

about Shane Warne. Some dopey hairy

backed sheila has dobbed him in

across the other side of the world.

Controversial to some but beloved

by the Cricking world and those he

left behind who are hoping to draw

what comfort they can from the end

of the unhappy affair. We must now

make the most of our lives without

David. As difficult as this may be,

but indeed, as David would like.

Thank you very much. Basically, I

haven't had a chance to Shea this

before, but um ... I'd like to

express my condolences to the

express my condolences to the Hookes family and I'm sorry this ever had to happen. Mary Gearin with that report. At a time when Telstra can ill afford more bad news, its subsidiary, Sensis, has caught the attention of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission following complaints about its Internet classified advertising business known as the 'Trading Post'. A number of the company's Internet competitors claim it has been engaging in misleading and deceptive conduct by redirecting online traffic from their sites to the 'Trading Post'.

Surprisingly, it's not the first time

Telstra has been hauled over the coals for this practice. Just three months ago, the ACCC stopped short of prosecuting the company after it agreed not to continue using its rivals' trademarks for its own gain. evidence that it has done just that, But the 7.30 Report has found reports. as finance editor Emma Alberici

Dad? Guy's sellin' a pair of

jousting sticks. Jousting stoiks?

What's he want for 'em. Make us an

offer. Give him a call snl Yeah.

In the 1997 Australian film 'The

Castle', 'The Trading Post' was

cast as the bargain hunter's bible,

the Kerrigan family its devout

users. Dad? 450. For jousting

sticks? Tell him he's dreamin'!

'The Trading Post' of today is no

longer simply that fat weekly

publication. Its on-line version is

now a much bigger deal, an enormous

range of new and used items for

and just a click away. Last year, range of new and used items for sale

when Telstra picked up 'The Trading

Post', everyone thought it was

dreaming. It paid $636 million, and

folded it into the Sensis

directories business. Would the

investment pay off? Well, maybe

game. depends on how you play the on-line investment pay off? Well, maybe that

Michael owns Stickybeek, an on-line

classifieds business that employs

three people and is run from a

backyard shed in Newcastle. We're

not even a threat to 'The Trading

Post'. It's totally beyond me why

they would even contemplate going

down the road that they did, to try

and destroy us in the way that they

did. It's comparatively small but

the Hunter region it's one of 'The did. It's comparatively small but in

Trading Post' biggest competitors,

especially in the highly lucrative

ought motive --ought motive market.

In the October last year, Michael

became suspicious. His Internet

customers seemed to be turning up

somewhere else - 'The Trading Post'.

We just could not believe it.

Michael Garnham investigation. A

simple test, punch the Stickybeek

name into a search engine and click

on the result and he quickly

discovered the destination was not

Stickybeek but the 'The Trading

Post''s auto trader web site.

I have no doubt that with people

being able to access the Stickybeek

word on Google, we would've without

a doubt lost business. Here is

Telstra's explanation. 'The Trading

Post' pays Google, Yahoo and other

search engines for the right to use

40,000 so-called sponsored links,

links tripped by specific words and

phrases that direct Internet

to its own site. In this case, phrases that direct Internet traffic

spicky beak was one of those words

but curiously Michael's trademark

felt with a EE and still it tossed but curiously Michael's trademark is

up redirection. Google for one

claims not to permit the use of

trademarks as key words. Trouble is,

the own

the owner needs to find out first

and Michael did not for six months

There are real questions about the

legality there. Is a misleading

deceptive conduct to it. It's a legality there. Is a misleading and

David and Goliath story, the

of course is Telstra, the David is David and Goliath story, the Goliath

three-person company in my of course is Telstra, the David is a

electorate called Stickybeek.

Newcastle MP Sharon Grierson take

up her constituent's complaint in

parliament, and with the

competition an consumer commission. parliament, and with the Australian

I think they think that they

certainly can get away with it,

there will be no penalty, no full certainly can get away with it, that

ACCC court decision, that they are

certainly above the law in many

respects. The ACCC investigated the

matter and determined 'The Trading

Post''s conduct may have contra tra

veened two sections of the Trade

Practices Act. Section 52 prohibits

misleading and deceptive conduct

section 53 D says a company can't misleading and deceptive conduct and

represent that it has a sponsorship,

approval or affiliation it doesn't

have. The regulator decided not to

take the issue any further, because

'The Trading Post' agreed to stop

using its competitors' names an

trademarks as sponsored links.

It's wrong. They should have been

held accountable, it should have

gone before the full commission and

it should have been taken to court.

'The Trading Post' is no longer

using the Stickybeek name, but

three months after giving the ACCC using the Stickybeek name, but just

an undertaking that it would not

its competitors' names and an undertaking that it would not use

trademarks in sponsored links on

Internet, it's at it again. When trademarks in sponsored links on the

get Kloster Ford up, here is Internet, it's at it again. When you

Ford at the top of the screen. get Kloster Ford up, here is Kloster

If you click on Kloster Ford, what

happens? You click on Kloster Ford,

you will actually go straight to

'The Trading Post'. Newcastle's

Kloster Ford is one of the

top 10 Ford dealerships. It sells Kloster Ford is one of the country's

cars on its own web site but the

very first result on a Google

takes you to 'The Trading Post'. very first result on a Google search

It's the same on Yahoo, only there,

the link is even more brazen. It

cries out new and used Ford Kloster

cars but you won't find any of them

there when you click on it. Your

cars are not advertised on 'The

Trading Post'? No, that's right.

We've given no authority for 'The

Trading Post' to do that. Do you

consider 'The Trading Post' a

competitor? Absolutely. If people

are searching on Kloster cars, we

want them to go to Kloster cars and

see Kloster cars. We found the same

thing was happening to no fewer

eight other motor dealerships in thing was happening to no fewer than

Newcastle area. We typed their eight other motor dealerships in the

into the Google search engine to Newcastle area. We typed their names

find that in every case, the

take you to 'The Trading Post'. find that in every case, the results

Barnier from Jesmond Light take you to 'The Trading Post'. Mark

Commercials has also complained to

the ACC. We're not happy with T we

don't think that 'The Trading Post'

should be trying to cash in on our

name. In response to our request

answers about the practice, a name. In response to our request for

representative sent us a statement answers about the practice, a Sensis

claiming that 'The Trading Post' is

eager to ensure search engines are

fair and accessible playground for eager to ensure search engines are a

all marketers. The ACCC told us it

was aware that 'The Trading Post'

had again begun using its

competitors' names in sponsored

links and was looking into it. John

Kench, one of the country's leading

competition and consumer protection

lawyers, believes the regulator

be less kind to Telstra this time lawyers, believes the regulator will

around I'd expect the commission

will really investigate this one,

especially from the point of view

looking at what harm might be done especially from the point of view of

to a lot of rivals of a

Telstra-owned business. That's the

heart of it. That they kept doing

after a warning from ACCC is just heart of it. That they kept doing it

scandalous, and totally

unacceptable. Erring nom Mick

chairs, four of 'em. What's he want?

180. He's dreamin'! Maybe we've

dreaming because 48 hours after we 180. He's dreamin'! Maybe we've been approached 'The Trading Post' the

discuss the complaints the links

steering competitors' customers to

its own site no longer exist. Finance editor Emma Alberici. The Government's message that we should all expect to extend our working lives to help make up the growing shortfall of younger workers may not have got through yet to corporate Australia, but there's a postman in Victoria who didn't need any urging. Bill Cantlin is 72 and has been delivering the mail for more than half a century, earning him the honour of being Australia's longest-serving postie. And, as Natasha Johnson reports,

he's showing no sign of hanging up his mail bag.

With the moon still high over the

Victorian town of Euroa, most of

Victorian town of Euroa, most of its senior citizens are tucked up in

bed, dreaming of golf or bowls or

bridge. But 72-year-old Bill

bridge. But 72-year-old Bill Cantlin is on his way to work.

Bill, it's 4.30am, it's 4 degrees

and you're 72. Why are you still

doing this? Oh I just like doing it.

I've been doing it for years and it's norm

it's normal. Aren't you sick of

these early start, though? No. I

rather like getting up early. I

rather like getting up early. I like getting up early in the morning. I

always have. 5am starts, five days

always have. 5am starts, five days a week for 53 years. He started

sorting and delivering the mail at

the age of 19. Although some in

the age of 19. Although some in town thought it a poor career choice.

I remember one of the old doctors

said "For God's sake get off that

flamin' old bike, pushin' that bike

around, what are you doin' pushing

an old bike?" I said "I don't mind.

I like it". Did you expect you'd be

a postman for 53 years? No, I

a postman for 53 years? No, I didn't but I never, ever thought of

actually doing anything else.

As the post office opens for

business, Bill Cantlin is on his

bike. He cycles 35 kilometres a

day, delivering mail to 600

addresses. How many miles do you

reckon you've done, Bill? A few

million? Oh ... I think it was

million? Oh ... I think it was about 365,000 kilometres or something, I

worked out one day. In the early

days, he used to compete in bike

races. So it was the exercise on

races. So it was the exercise on the job that he loved most. But in the

years since, it's been the

years since, it's been the residents on his round. Good morning, Bill.

Lovely day. It is! It's a beautiful

day. Oh thank you, very much, Bill.

As he's got to know every resident

in the neighbourhood, he as also

got to know every dog. (Barking)

Hello, boy. But there's one

particular four-legged friend he

remembers most fondly. Over in a

backstreet, they had a dog called

Bartlett, probably after Kevin

Bartlett, the footballer. It was in

the winter and I was really going

hard and the dog went straight in

front of me and I hit him

front of me and I hit him ... (laughs) .... Well,

front of me and I hit him ... (laughs) .... Well, I flew through

the air, here to there. I just hit

the ground. I went back to work and

I said "I got a short-front from

Bartlett." (Laughs)

In a town with a predominantly

In a town with a predominantly older population, reluctant retirees are

common. Working along said Bill at

the post office are 68-year-old

parcel delivery man Henry Billman

and 60-year-old postman Terry

Brodie. They've worked side by side

all their loves and most people in

the town, we're down to third

generation and most would only know

Terry and Bill as being the Euroa

posties. They've been so long in

service, they remember telegrams, posties. They've been so long in the

twice-daily and Saturday deliveries.

They prefer the bicycle over the

motorbike, but are glad to have

the back of the whistle. I reckon motorbike, but are glad to have seen

brought the dogs. Oh it did. I they the back of the whistle. I reckon it

used to wait. They would be waitin',

they'd hear it and they'd be wait

wait yoip for you. Through rain and

hail and heat, Bill and the others

have been dedicateed to getting the

mail through. But peddling over

nature strips without footpaths can

be a hazardous business.

While he's taken many a tumble over

the years, Bill is a firm believer

in simply getting back on the back

and on with the job, no matter what

the injury. Hit a bump! One

Christmas time, a stick went

the front wheel and lifted within a Christmas time, a stick went through

split second and I hit around here

and popped the bone out of there,

I got a big tight bandage, wound it and popped the bone out of there, so

round real tight, as tight as I

could, and I put it all back

together. You continued delivering

the mail with a broken wrist? Mmm.

Didn't think to go to the doctor?

No. Over Christmas was a bit busy

anyhow. We didn't have time! But

it's his willingness to go beyond

the call of duty that's endeared

Bill Cantlin to this community. Ist

last time I saw you had the broken

wrist. That's recovered very well.

Glad to hear that. Back into

croquet now. I found a person lying Glad to hear that. Back into playing

out in the lawn, in the gutter.

Well, she was really sick,

collapsed. And, yeah, it gave me a

fright, too. I thought she was dead.

But she was - but we got her to

hospital and that and she was

alright. Such dedication this year

earned Bill Cantlin an Order of

Australia medal for services to the

post. He was nominated a couple of

years ago, when resident Robin

Neville realised he'd reigned in

Euroa as long as the Queen had been

on the throne. They were raving on

about the Queen, what a good job

she's been doing and here passing

gate every day was someone else she's been doing and here passing my

who'd been on the job for 50 year

and he wasn't going to get anything

for it. I just thought "No, I have

to do something about that." You're

Australia's longest serving postman.

Are you proud of that achievement?

I probably am now. (Laughs) Gee

whiz! Who would ever think of that!

Do you think you will still be

delivering the mail when you're 80?

Oh no, no way! No way! (Laughs) I delivering the mail when you're 80?

wouldn't think so. (Laughs) But he

has an expensive hobby to support.

This eternal optimist started

breeding racehorses four years ago

at the age of 68. So until he

produces a champion, he'll just

pedalling along. Somebody's got to produces a champion, he'll just keep

be postman. We'll Geoff you an

update on gee whiz Bill Cantlin in

another decade or so. Natasha Johnson reporting there. That's the program for tonight. cricketers at the Oval tonight. And fingers crossed for Australia's they can get. They'll need all the help International. Captioning and Subtitling Captions by