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(generated from captions) on Saturday. and possible thunderstorms will become established on Sunday Another ridge of high pressure for the early part of next week. with fine weather expected Virginia. of our top stories tonight. Before we go a brief recap will be recalled on Thursday The NSW Parliament giving police greater powers to rush through new laws racial violence. to deal with Sydney's And that's the news to this minute. The '7:30 Report' is next with a news update at 8:30pm. and I'll be back From me, goodnight. International Pty Ltd Captioning and Subtitling Closed Captions provided by

It's not a threat. It's just a

warning. Do not fight us on racial

grounds. We will defend on racial

grounds. Tonight - after a second

night of hay hem on the streets,

major efforts to bridge Sydney's

ethnic divide, but will tough new

laws be enough to end the cycle of

violence? They no longer abide by

the rule of law in a lot of cases.

They no longer respect the police

courts or authority and they just They no longer respect the police or

seem to think they can run their

race. This is a fight that will seem to think they can run their own

continue and we will not be found

wanting in the use of force to meet

this, what is effectively a

declaration of war. This program is captioned live. I'm Tracy Bowden. Welcome to the program. riots were isolated incidents Any hope that Sydney's weekend race of violence last night. was shattered by a second wave

In an apparent act of retaliation,

crowbars and baseball bats scores of youths armed with terrorised an already shaken public beachside suburbs, by driving through homes and cars. smashing windows of shops, south-western suburb of Lakemba, And in the mainly Muslim near the mosque about 500 young people blocked roads with some pelting rocks at police. and arrested Dozens of people have been injured

on Sunday. since the violence erupted Now the Premier of NSW Morris Iemma from their Christmas holidays has recalled parliamentarians

to deal with troublemakers. to give police extra powers

to curb the cycle of violence? But will these measures be enough NSW Police Commissioner Ken Moroney In a moment I'll be joined by the Jonathan Harley. but, first, this report from

This is a fight that will continue

and we will not be found wanting in

the use of force to meet this, what

is effectively a declaration of war.

We're proposing at this stage to

have at least 450 police out on the

streets tonight, specifically

dedicated to this event. We are

defend k ourselves. Have we

them because they are white? We are defend k ourselves. Have we attacked

not racist. They are racist. They

are firing flares at the helicopter

at the moment. Anyone that held out

hope that the hot heads would cool

among the divide of Sydney's

south-east and west would be

disappointed. Such was the

of the weekend outrage that mobs disappointed. Such was the suspicion

were jumping at shadows. This is

staggering scene last night around were jumping at shadows. This is the

Lakemba Mosque, the symbolic centre

of Sidny's Lebanese Muslim community. Hundreds of young men

were drawn by whisper, SMS and gut

instinct. This place would be a

target for reprisal. This was a

volatile mix of people feeling that target for reprisal. This was a very

somehow they had to defend their

territory against fellow

Australians. Almost as a wind shift

defence at Lakemba swung to attack

and the hoards returned to Maroubra

to pick up where they left off the

night before. Apparently hoodlums

corrugating there near the service

station. Middle Eastern appearance

in the other car. Listening to the

growing frenzy of police responses

as the night unfolded, an Egyptian

naun the heart of the shire. Out of

place if the sentiment of the past

few days is anything to go by.

Just up there 100m there were two

gunshots just up there. I'm afraid

it was a frightening scene. But the

Reverend George Capsis is no

outsider. He's been working with

Cronulla's abused and drug addicted

for years. His family settled here

in 1950. He is shocked by what he's

scene. The whole street, we had

at random and damage like this. The scene. The whole street, we had cars

neighbours were terrified in their

houses. Too scared to come out. Who

could blame them? If community

workers like George are struggling

to comprehend what has taken place

in their own backyard, so too the

hard men of the coast. These are

Bra Boys, Maroubra's infamous surf hard men of the coast. These are the

gang. They're nowhere tore use for

thumbing their nose at the law and

yet today they were wagging their

fingers at the Sunday rioters

they've dubbed "Cronulla's cowards"

We don't support any of the actions they've dubbed "Cronulla's cowards".

of the Cronulla people. We don't

support any of them and never have

and none of us have been involved

any of that stuff. I think that and none of us have been involved in

is the start, the boys have agreed any of that stuff. I think that this

to come down and talk to us, to

start some dialect between the

groups, you know, to try and ease

some tension, so we really #

appreciate - it's a big thing for

them to come down to the beach and

open up conversation with us. I

think this is a start and this is

how we have to go to ease these

tensions and calming the racial

violence that can never be

in Australia. We've never ever violence that can never be tolerated

backed these things against the

Lebanese community. Never. We never

have and we never will. To

underscore that sentiment an

extraordinary rolling set piece for

the cameras. An olive branch

extended across the divide, Bra

style. We are glad it is over. extended across the divide, Bra Boys

This should send the message out

there to the people of Cronulla and

Australians and Middle Eastern

background, to everyone that

reconciliation is the way forward.

The violence that we saw, the

vicious cycle of violence we've

seeing over the last few days is vicious cycle of violence we've been

totally unnecessary. A lot of angry

young men. I think it's like this:

take your young Middle Eastern men

who are angry, I can see part of

their problem is they're caught

between two cultures, if you know

what I am saying. They are part of

culture they were born into and what I am saying. They are part of a

they're trying to become part of a

culture that we enjoy in this

country. I don't think you could

have put enough money on a bet that

Middle Eastern groups of men would

retaliate after Cronulla. It was

showing the red rag to a bull that

the Cronulla protests in the first

place. For former NSW detective Tim

Priest a witness to the riots, this

has been a firestorm waiting to

happen. The warnings have been

building for years, but the NSW

Police force failed to quarterise

the problem. We've had this

escalation of Lebanese Muslim males

who've just got out of control. no long

who've just got out of control. They no longer abide by the rule of law

in a lot of cases. They no longer

respect the police. They no longer

respect the courts or authority.

They just seem to think they can

They just seem to think they can run their own race. Now, that's

transformed now into taking over

certain sections of Sydney. We know

that there is a chance for us to

change. This will always be a work

in progress. What we are going to

in progress. What we are going to do is meet what we would perceive as

the need with the appropriate and

adequate force to deal with them.

We've never really seen anything I

don't think in the country along

don't think in the country along the coast that equates to what has

coast that equates to what has again on in these terrible events in the

last couple of days. Sure there,

have been troubled squirmishes.

Locals like to get access to their

waves. But this is of a very

different and much more serious

order. There's no doubt whatsoever

and I think it's a a terrible thing,

but we've got to be honest about it

and recognise there's a racial

component over what's happened in

the last couple of days. Peter

Garrett has seen the reactions of

youth and booze first as a rock

youth and booze first as a rock star and now as a local member. His seat

of Kingsford Smith takes in

of Kingsford Smith takes in Maroubra and edges up to Cronulla. He should

have had a reason.able family patch

to represent, but now the

battleground is his explosive

neighbourhood problem. We reself

difficult issues in the country by

placing the highest priority on

peaceful communication, on true die

log, on communities responding both

within communities and between

communities where necessary. We

absolutely renounce in this country

for what we have to offer to our

for what we have to offer to our own people and to the rest of the world,

violence of any kind. There's a

violence of any kind. There's a line been drawn in the sand by both

been drawn in the sand by both sides and you can't change the attitude

and you can't change the attitude of a generation of Muslim males and

a generation of Muslim males and you can't wipe over the frustrations of

Anglo-Saxons. Look, we're in

unchartered waters and I'd hate to

predict what's ahead of us but I

feel it's something this city has

never seen before, probably this

country has never seen before, and

it's not a good look. I won't allow

Sydney's reputation to be tarnished

by these ratbags and criminals who

want to engage in the sort of

behaviour we've seen in the last 48

hours. They think they can get away

with this. Well, they will not.

There are troublemakers in every

community. No-one can disagree with

that. No government, no Prime

Minister, no no-one. There will

elements in every community that

elements in every community that are troublemakers - full stop. We are

just defending ourselves. We're

independent racist. In the heart of

the Lebanese community, these men

are talking about last night's mob

call and the riling in Cronulla.

Opinion is divided. There's a lot

Opinion is divided. There's a lot of young ignorant people out there,

young ignorant people out there, but I'd like to tell them that they are

not doing anybody any favours and

they're certainly not dough Islam

any favours or representing Islam.

They are only representing their

selfish desires by reacting and

responding according to their own

womens. Here you don't have to wait

long for an alarming prediction.

I can only say if they do not

I can only say if they do not desist it will keep going. We won't stop.

My people will not stop. I'm not

talking about me personally, I'm

talking about my people. They won't

stop. It's not a threat. It's just

stop. It's not a threat. It's just a warning. I'm telling you now, if

they don't stop it will get worse

and worse and worse. I am telling

you now, stop, as a warning. Do not

fight us on racial grounds. We will

defend on racial grounds. That report from Jonathan Harley. The NSW Police Commissioner Ken Moroney is charged with marshalling his forces to control the ongoing violence on Sydney's streets. But will increased police numbers in troubles spots and the new police powers be enough? I spoke to the Commissioner a short time ago. of order and allow us to proceed down that particular path. I

down that particular path. I welcome that as an opportunity to bring

about not only the restoration of

water in particularly Sydney and

this state, but equally as

this state, but equally as important the restoration of public

confidence. You've said that events

in recent days have unleashed a

beast. What do you mean by that and

can you control that beast? Well,

can you control that beast? Well, in one sense euphemism such as

one sense euphemism such as "unleash the beast" , "let genie out of the

bottle," those are relevant. There

was a form of legitimate protest in

Cronulla on Sunday. People

exercising a legitimate right of

protest, a legitimate expression of

a point of view. I think some of

a point of view. I think some of the group there, however, were captured.

They were captured by alcohol. They

were captured by the emotion of the

day. They were captured by people

who form part of a rent-a-crowd and

I think the rest in one sense is

I think the rest in one sense is but history and that emotion, the

infusion of alcohol, the legitimate

right to protest, was all blurred

and we saw that level of heightened

protest. I saw in my 40 years of

police service some of the most

disgraceful behaviour and conduct

disgraceful behaviour and conduct by adults I'd ever seen. What we seem

to be seeing is this free-for-all,

unpredictable moving melee, sort of

thing we haven't seen in Sydney

before. How do you control that?

In one sense that was the beast

In one sense that was the beast that was unleashed. I don't think people

who exercised a legitimate right to

protest and did so lawfully last

Sunday, realised what was going to

happen and I was concerned about

happen and I was concerned about the issue of backlash and reprisal.

Indeed, to some extent that's what

we've seen happen in ensuing days

since the protest. Now it's a case

of people of goodwill and I do

believe, Tracey, they do exist,

complimented by the work of the

police, complimented by these new

increased police powers and responsibilities we'll bring about

the restoration of order and public

confidence that's so important.

You people in the front line are no

doubt reporting back to you. What

are they saying about the role that

race is playing in what is

happening? Clearly it is my view

that race did play a role in not

only the events of Sunday, but the

events leading up to Sunday. In my

criticism of the mob mentality last

Sunday, I have to acknowledge certainly within the community over

a number of years there's been a

build-up of concern within the

community, of frustration within

community, of frustration within the community about the behaviour and

attitude of some young men and some

of those young men are from

of those young men are from Lebanese backgrounds. So when you've got

scenes of people wrapping

scenes of people wrapping themselves in Australian flags and targetting

in Australian flags and targetting a particular ethnic group, does that

require a particular kind of

policing and a particular political

approach? I think there are a

approach? I think there are a number of solutions here, Tracey.

of solutions here, Tracey. Certainly solutions are required at

solutions are required at Government level and I've said at national,

state and local Government level it

requires the infusion of ideas and

goodwill on the part of the general

community. But I've also said today

when I was asked who are the most

influential people in this whole

area, they are called parents, and

the issue of parental

responsibility, the exercise of

parental responsibility, the role

parental responsibility, the role we have to play in the acceptance of

personal accountability is an

important part of where we find a

solution to this. Laws are

important. The application of those

laws by the police are important.

But nothing can surpass that in the

sense of goodwill and people

sense of goodwill and people sitting down and exercising common sense

down and exercising common sense and good judgment. Are you happy with

the political response and the

political support you are getting?

Yes,I am happy. I've been given

enormous support by the Premier and

Minister for Police in the state.

Equally important I've been

Equally important I've been provided with strong support by various

ethnic community leaders. I think

that's the goodwill I see

demonstrated. This is an issue

beyond politics, an issue in one

sense that can only be resolved by

the community coming together in

the community coming together in all of its form. We need grass roots

solutions. The laws and the

application of the laws by the

police is an important part of the

restoration of order. Beyond that

restoration of order, what we now

need is those people of good will

who will find the lasting solutions

that I know are there. New, people

out there are frightened about what

might happen next, what might

might happen next, what might happen tonight. Are you gearing up to deal

with whatever might happen? Yes.

with whatever might happen? Yes.There are two phenomena I think

existing at the moment, Tracey. But

dominant amongst those is the

dominant amongst those is the rumour mill W esee many, many rumours

circulating in not only Sydney,

throughout NSW and other states of

Australia that are simply that -

they are rumours. They have no

basis in fact. But as police we

can't afford to ignore the rumours.

We have to move through a strong

intelligence base to substantiate

intelligence base to substantiate or otherwise those rumours. But in

terms of if policing response over

the next couple of nights, that

the next couple of nights, that will be appropriate and numerically it

will be appropriate. Greater

numbers? Greater numbers to

compliment the police that are out

there on normal and general patrol

and we will increase our numbers

even further over the coming

weekend. And come these new laws,

you'll be able to take certain

actions you haven't been able to do

so far that you are confident will

make a real difference? Yes,

make a real difference? Yes, amongst the specific provisions and subtd

the specific provisions and subtd to their passing through Parliament

this Thursday in the special recall,

the ability for a deputy

Commissioner of Police or the

Commissioner of Police to lock down

an area. Simply lock it down. This

there that's not a new phenomena.

there that's not a new phenomena. It was a power exercise during the

Olympics 2000, albeit in a sporting

complex, but it was designed to

ensure safety and security. It has

ensure safety and security. It has a similar application on this

occasion. The ability to close down

hotels and other licence ?premises

where we feel that alcohol is a

significant contributor to the

behaviour of the crowd on any

particular occasion. These are

specific powers, Tracey, that

amongst other new powers will be

carefully exercised and their

application is at the highest level

of our organisation. Do you have

of our organisation. Do you have any view on the media's involvement

because some have blamed the media

for building things up? It's one of

the are regrettable aspects of the

event since last Sunday of the

event since last Sunday of the blame game. The blame game is going

around. Finger pointing is going on

all over the place. I don't know na

there is much value in that.

there is much value in that. Clearly a range of people in a range of

occupations and professions need to

have a good hard look at their

involvement or perceived

involvement or perceived involvement and principal amongst that group

and principal amongst that group are the group who participated last

Sunday. I think we all need to sit

down, consider what we could have

done, what we should have done and

how we need to make it better

because what we are talking about,

ultimately, is the future of this

state. Ken Moroney, thanks for

speaking to us. Thank you, Tracey. #6 Now to the continuing fallout from the collapse of the telephone company One.Tel back in 2001. After 10 days of sometimes gruelling cross-examination, media magnate James Packer spent his last session in the witness stand fending off accusations that he'd lied about his knowledge of the company's cashflow in its final days. The Corporate Regulator has brought civil charges against former executives Jodee Rich and Mark Silbermann for allegedly trading while insolvent and is seeking $92 million in damages. Today, James Packer said the relationship with his father, Kerry Packer, remained strong, despite One.Tel's demise. He denied trying to pin the blame for the company's failure on others to escape prosecution himself. Finance editor Emma Alberici reports.

Hello, Mr Packer. How has the One.

Hello, Mr Packer. How has the One.Tel experience affected your

relationship with your father?

I've got a fantastic relationship

with my father. And always have, Emma.

For a man whose family has made

For a man whose family has made much of its fortune from the prying

lenses of the paparazzi, James

Packer has been none too obliging

for the waiting press at the NSW

Supreme Court. In his 10th and

Supreme Court. In his 10th and final day in the witness stand, James

Packer denied giving an exaggerated

and untruthful account of just how

much he knew about the financial

health of One.Tel before its

collapse. It's simply 17.5 cents

collapse. It's simply 17.5 cents for all of your local calls. One.Tel

the brainchild of Jodee

the brainchild of Jodee Rich, James all of your local calls. One.Tel was

Packer's close mate since

N making his decision to invest in Packer's close mate since schooldays

the fledgling Telco in 1994, James

Packer said he looked at Telstra,

Optus and Vodafone and came to the

conclusion that they were worth

around $50 billion. It stood to

reason in his mind that a fourth

player in the market would also be

highly valued. He had a

with I think Mr Rich, Jodee Rich at highly valued. He had a conversation

his Palm Beach house where he

apparently said to - Mr Rich

recalled him saying, "I want to be

independent. I want to be a

billionaire and I can't seem to get

that independence. My father is

around. I think he said he dies and

he comes back and he dies and comes

back and he has nine lives. Words

that effect. But Mr James Packer back and he has nine lives. Words to

denies that conversation took place.

Journalist Anne Lampe has been

covering the One.Tel trial for 'The

Age' and the 'Sydney Morning

since it began in September last Age' and the 'Sydney Morning Herald'

Investments Commission is claiming year. The Australian Securities and

former One.Tel managing director

Jodee Rich and finance director

Silbermann continued to trade for Jodee Rich and finance director Mark

three months while they knew the

company was insolvent. The corp

regulator is seeking $92 million in company was insolvent. The corp race

civil penalties from the two. In

court, James Packer plain takened

played no part in the company's court, James Packer plain takened he

demise and was profoundly misled by

the management. If he read all of

the information and all of the

reports he'd got and done their job

appropriately he shouldn't have

profoundly misled, but right on top appropriately he shouldn't have been

of it. He may not have read all of

the information, he may not have

retained it or left it to other

people, but had he done his job as

director and watched the fntionz people, but had he done his job as a

position from all of that

information he should not have been

profoundly misled. As far back as

octd 2000, seven months before One.

One.Tel folded, James Packer's octd 2000, seven months before company publish

company Publishing and Broadcasting

sent its chief financial officer

Geoff Kleemann in to One.Tel the

analyse the company's accounts. In

April of the following year, two

more PBL finance executives were

installed at the One.Tel officers

review its finances. PBL and One. installed at the One.Tel officers to

also shared the same auditors in review its finances. PBL and One.Tel

Ernst & Young. James Packer was

executive chairman of PBL and at

same time a director on the One.Tel executive chairman of PBL and at the

board. So it was always going to be

difficult for him to prove he

know what was going on. Today, difficult for him to prove he didn't

council for the defence David

Williams alleged James Packer tried

to make the One.Tel financial

position seem a lot worse than it

was to get him out of an agreement

if 2001 to back an issue of more

shares with his own money. It's a shares with his own money. shares with his own money. It's

He was a shareholder and a director

right from the early stages and it

was his responsibility, along with

his colleagues on the board, to

satisfy themselves that the company

had proper control mechanisms and

proper information flows that would

allow the board to be satisfied.

Henry Bosch was head of the

Companies and Securities Commission, Henry Bosch was head of the National

the predecessor of ASIC. He's also

written a number of books on

corporate governance and has been a

curious observer of the One.Tel

trial. He believes ASIC should have

pursued all of the directors

for the company's troubles. I felt pursued all of the directors equally

that the directors collectively had

a responsibility to satisfy

themselves that the company was

being managed properly.

being managed properly and to put

place control mechanisms and being managed properly and to put in

that would enable them to know what place control mechanisms and systems

was really going on. Today in the

witness stand James Packer denied

making any deal with ASIC to escape

prosecution himself. Much of James

Packer's cross-examination centred

around the relationship with his

father and just how involved James

Packer was in One.Tel. But when it

came to Packer Senior's role, James

Packer's memory was hazy even about

a meeting held at Kerry Packer's

hospital bed. I must say if I was

called to a bedside meeting where

father was seriously ill and there called to a bedside meeting where my

were business matters discussed, I

think I'd remember it. But he had

very little recollection. In the

week that the Telco collapsed,

Packer admitted he was wandering week that the Telco collapsed, James

around shocked and dazed. When he

was asked if he add lost

he said it wasn't a boost to his was asked if he add lost credibility

credibility but the relationship

with his father hadn't suffered

it. with his father hadn't suffered over

He's very little rebtdion of any

time that they were in a meet

time that they were in a meeting

together or spoke together about

One.Tel. Mostly questioned about,

"Were you at this meeting? Was your

father there, was it discussed?"He

said, "I don't recall." In the

overall sense you get that it

a very comfortable relationship. overall sense you get that it wasn't

After 10 sometimes heated days of

cross-examination James Packer will

be happy to put this chapter of the

One.Tel debacle behind him. But the

case which was expected to last

three months has now run for 15 and case which was expected to last just

is expected to continue well into

the new year. Emma Alberici reporting there. And that's the program for tonight. tomorrow, but for now, goodnight. We'll be back at the same time International Pty Ltd Captioning and Subtitling Closed Captions produced by

This program is not subtitled Just crazy. Gotti's gone wild. Oh, no, honey! It really is big. for saying this too. He's gonna get mad at me They don't show that on the clip. She kept calling me Gloria. Oh, yeah. (Mock gasp) and girls and girls and girls. There's just girls and girls

(Laughs) (Stutters) M-M-Mrs G. They can call me Hotti Gotti any day of the week. BEEP! (Laughs) My mouth just dropped. I have nightmares about Ed. My whole body was shaking.

Give me a little piece of him. He's a jerk-off.

At the end of the day it is reality. Gotti Gab. and this is the Victoria Gotti Show. WOMAN: I'm Lil Kim Gotti, you've got something for me SONG: # You keep saying but confess # Something you call love, shouldn't have been messing # You've been messing where you is getting all your bets # And now someone else # These boots were made for walking # And that's just what they'll do # One of these days these boots are gonna walk all over you (Lil' Kim raps) # Walk with me, y'all, walk with me. #

Where are you guys?

You know that we're leaving here in 20 minutes, right?

You know that, right? So what are you still doing at the mall? Brian, catch this. Nice! We're getting ready to go to Miami. Trying to fit 22lb of clothing in a 12lb bag. Along with the luggage, I'm taking my three sons. I know it's crazy, but I'm also taking five of their friends. And a few of my own. I got two chaperones to help me keep an eye on the boys. There's our old family friend Brian, aka Quack Quack. We met him through a club and he wouldn't stop talking. He never stops talking. So, my brother started calling him Quack Quack 'cause he just wouldn't shut his mouth. You have no idea what this is going to be like. Complete chaos and pandemonium with these kids. You need to babysitters to baby-sit Brian when he's trying to baby-sit us. The other is our driver - Jeff. Jeff is a very laid-back character, so I'm not sure... ..I mean, I think he's... he's not all there. And Jeff's a little slow in the head. I mean, it takes him 15 minutes to comprehend a thing sometimes. As far as the kids getting out of hand, I have to keep them in control, I guess. Brian and Jeff are as immature as my little brother. Somebody come up and help me with this luggage piece, please. Come on, Mom, let's go. Guys, somebody come up here and get these two pieces of luggage, please. You want to stop acting like a 2-year-old for five seconds?

He's 35 years old, 36 years old. He'll lie about his age and say he's 20. He's gonna get mad at me for saying this too. But, er... Nine men downstairs and not one can help a woman down with her luggage. On top of all this, I still have work to do for my column in Star Magazine. Hi, Jay Horowitz, please. We have a scoop that Mike Piazza either is engaged, or getting engaged. You going to be ready soon, Carmine? I'm getting dressed! Do you have any comment on that? We're waiting for you. The limo's waiting. You're holding us all up. Thank you. Bye-bye. Let's go! What are you talking about? We're gonna miss the flight. I don't care! I'll need a vacation from the family vacation. Guys, guys, come on, let's get into these cars. Let's all be on our best behaviour, alright? Act our ages instead of acting two years old. Tell Brian that, will you? You know, when I was a kid, your grandfather took me to Miami.