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ABC News Breakfast -

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(generated from captions) An Australian journalist in

London tests positive for swine

flu, but the World Health

Organisation says the outbreak

may have already peaked. The

Rudd Government puts paid

maternity leave back on the

agenda and vows to stand by its

election commitments in next

week's Budget. Three members of

the same family killed in an

overnight car crash near Melbourne. And Pakistan beats

Australia by seven wickets in

the 5th and final 1-day

international in Abu Dhabi. This Program is Captioned

Live.

Good morning. It's Monday 4

May. I'm Joe O'Brien. I'm Kesha

West. The top story on ABC News Breakfast - the World Health

Organisation says it has no

immediate plans to upgrade its

warning over swine flu and

declare it a pandemic. 19

people are confirmed to have

died in Mexico, but the

country's Government says the

virus is in decline. Outbreak

has prompted an extreme

response in some countries.

China has been detaining

Mexicans in hotels whether they

are sick or not, causing a

diplomatic row with Mexico. And

there were violent protests in

Egypt after the Government said

it was slaughtering all the

country's pigs as a

precautionary measure.

Egyptian riot police fired

rubber bullets and tear gas at

farmers protesting the enforced

pig cull. Most pigs are raised

in the country's most

impoverished areas where they

are often used as walking

organic waste recyclers. They

are primarily eaten by the minority. The World Health

Organisation says there is no

need to slaughter the

animals. This is clear and

necessary to re-emphasise this

is not the food borne disease.

You don't get the disease

through eating pork and,

therefore, there is no reason

to be afraid of consuming pork

or pork products. The WHO also

says it is sticking with the

current threat level and there

is no need for people to fear a

recurrence of the 1918 Spanish

flu pandemic. The organisation

says it would be premature to

start producing a pandemic flu

vaccine. We are also entering

the Southern Hemisphere

seasonal influenza and a lot of

gaps in knowledge still are

away and we need to learn more

about the new virus to make

such a decision. But that

hasn't soothed fears of a

global criticises. There's been

further conflict over the virus

in China where Mexican citizens

have been quarantined in their hotels, even without swine flu

symptoms. The Mexican Foreign

Minister has called China's

action unjustified and has

issued advice for Mexicans to

avoid China's ese travel. In

nexto, the virus's spread

appears to be waining and

authorities are doing their

best to make sure it is under

control. Most of the world is

taking similar 21st century

measures and 2.5 million doses

of anti-viral drugs are being

flown to Mexico and around the

world. Australia's Health

Minister, Nicola Roxon, was

angered by a report some of our

own stockpile might be out of

date. We have 8.7 million

courses of anti-virals in our stockpile. A number of them

have expired and been replaced

over the first half of this

year. They will continue to be

replaced as they expire. 76

recent arrivals to Australia

have been tested for the virus.

So far there have been no

positive results for H1N1.

Although as a result, many

people have been diagnosed with

normal seasonal flu.

Now mis diagnosis has become

an issue. Last week we heard

from Australian journalist Kate

Corbett who was tested in

Britain and told she didn't

have the virus. But antibiotic

speaking to the ABC overnight,

she says she has now tested

positive. I had to call them.

understand they would have had No-one called me. I can

a lot of people to call, but

after a few days that I had

been in contact with the health

authorities they called me to

say that my friend was at risk

and he was getting tested and

waiting for his results. His

girlfriend called me and told

me that he was infected. He was

definitely infected and had

swine flu. The health

authorities didn't get in

contact with me. In other news

a paid parental leave scheme is

likely to feature in next week's Federal Budget,

according to the 'Australian'.

The scheme could be introduced

with a delayed start after the

financial crisis left a $100

billion hole in the Government

revenue. Wayne Swan says the

Government will keep key election commitments including

tax cuts for higher income

earners. Three members of the

same family have died after a

crash near Melbourne last

night. Two others are in a

serious condition, including a

12-year-old girl and her

76-year-old grantmore who were

flown to hospital. The girl's

parents and aunt were killed in

the crash. Four men from the

other car were also taken to

hospital. And the future of

Nepal's first elected

Government is in jeopardy after

a key political party withdrew

from the Maoist-led coalition.

The UML Party quit the

Government after the PM sacked

his Army chief for refusing to

admit former Maoist rebels into

the military. The Maoists

fought the Army in a 10-year

civil wan that ended in 2006.

The wife of Italian PM Silvio

Berlusconi says he wants a

divorce after 20 years of

marriage. The media mogul's

second wife, Veronica Lario,

made the announcement after a series of public arguments

between the two. They have

three children, all in their

20s. Silvio Berlusconi is

Italy's second richest man and

has refused to comment. And

Rebecca Gibney has been awarded

the Gold Logie. The actress had

won a Silver Logie also for her

role in Packed To The Rafters.

The ABC picked up three awards

including Most Outstanding News

Coverage for the China

earthquake and Most Outstanding Public Affairs Broadcast for 'Foreign Correspondent'.

Underbelly won three awards, including Most Outstanding

Drama Series. Returning to

Federal politics and the Rudd

Government's Budget plans.

Hayden Cooper joins us from

Canberra. Good morning. Wayne

Swan was sending out mixed

messages yesterday. Has it

become any clearer today? It's

become a little clearer and the

past few days have really

demonstrated what a difficult

sell Wayne Swan faces. It is

likely to be a Budget of

contradictions. We saw that

with talk about the tax cuts

yesterday. It now appears that

the tax cuts for the well off

will go ahead. There will also

be a pay rise for pensioners

and there is talk now that the

paid maternity leave scheme is

back in the frame, although it

could come with a delayed start

date. Yet, on the other hand,

the Treasurer is still pointing

out what tough choices need to

be made and the fact that

spending needs to be cut back

in future years. So it's a

difficult Budget for him to

sell because he has competing

interests there and needs to

convince Australians that

spending in the short-term is

necessary. But in the

long-term, savings will have to

be found. That is a mixed

message that the great

challenge for him will be

selling the Budget and

explaining why it has competing

interests. You can see the

Opposition were so quick to

pounce on any suggestion that

there would be scrapped

election promises? That's

right. That's the chief

motivation with the Government

going ahead with the tax cuts.

It's terrified of abandoning

any promise it made at the

election. The problem is tax

cuts are not short-term

spending. They are long-term.

In the current economic

climate, whether a long-term measure, a tax cut for the well-off, for people between

$80,000 and $180,000 a year,

whether that is the best way to

go is arguable at the

least. Hayden, the other big

issue of the weekend was the

release of the defence white

paper. We hadn't heard much of

a Chinese response to what

Australia has proposed. We're

starting to hear that

now. You're right. We haven't

heard anything from the

Government in Beijing. When

that comes it will likely be

predictably diplomatic. But we

are starting to see the opinion

of some Chinese academics. For

example, this morning Fairfax

newspapers have spoken to some

military strategists and they

are scathing. They suggest

Australia's build-up in the

Navy could lead to a regional

arms race. That it will start a

new China-threat thesis and

they are refreshingly

undiplomatic in the way they describe the white paper

generally in calling it a

crazy, stupid idea. So we are

seeing some criticism coming

from abroad given it is a very

substantial build-up of the Australian military and

regional neighbours will be

asking why. And some

suggestions now that the

Opposition may vote against

some legislation if it is put

up? That's right. It goes back

to the Budget. There has been a

lot of criticism about the fact

that in this white paper there

is a great deal of spending,

billions of dollars, up to $100

and more and the question is

how is that affordable? In the

white paper there is 1.5 pages

devoted to talk of how the

Government will pay for all

this new equipment. And the

Opposition says that that is

nowhere near enough. More of

the detail will come on Budget

night, but the critics say that

really for such a substantial

document which outlines

Australia's military spending

for 30 years to come, a lot

more work should have gone into

explaining how the equipment

should be paid for. We'll find

out more about that in the Budget. Hayden Cooper in

Canberra, thanks very

much. Returning to Italy where

the wife of Italian PM Silvio

Berlusconi says she is filing

for divorce after 19 years of

marriage. The BBC's David

Willey has the story. Silvio

Berlusconi and Veronica Lario

have been together for nearly

30 years. They have three

children. Now in their early

20s. The break-up of their

marriage comes as no surprise.

The divorce is front page news

in today's Italian papers. Mr

Berlusconi has so far made no

comment. Veronica Lario, a

former actress, complained in

public two years ago about her

husband's flirtations. Silvio

Berlusconi offered a similarly

public apology. Veronica rarely

appeared with her husband at

official functions. According

to Italian newspapers, the PM's

latest indiscretion, having fun

at the 18th birthday party of a

young woman, seems to have been

the last straw. Mrs Berlusconi

complained she couldn't stay

together with someone who

consorted with minors. The

settlement will be complicated.

Mr Berlusconi has two older

children from his first wife

and they run his business

empire. While he runs Italy.

Mr Berlusconi's personal

fortune is estimated at over $6

billion.

A website has accused the Sri

Lankan military of bombing a

makeshift hospital, killing 64

people. The Government has

denied the allegations saying

it is still doing all it can to

help people in the conflict

zone get out. These photographs allegedly

show the bodies of people

killed in two separate shelling

attacks. They also show the

destruction to the makeshift

hospital inside a Government

designated safe zone. On a pro-

rebel website, claims have been

made the Army is responsible

for the attack. An allegation

the Government has vehemently

denied. We have given our word to the international community

because that is what the

correction position is in Sri

Lanka. There is no need for us

to shell the no-fly zone. That

is where people are

trapped. Amateur video captured

by Tamil vision Canada also

shows the aftermath of the

attacks. The footage has not been verified, but the hospital

is located in the south of the

Tamil Tigers area. Sri Lankan

troops have been advancing from

the north with a small pocket

of land still under the control

of rebels. The Government has

refused to halt its offensive

against the rebels, but has

promised to stop launching

artillery and air strikes into

the area. The Foreign Minister

says they are still doing all they can to get people out of

the conflict zone. We are doing

everything possible to help get

their release and we found

120,000 of them coming over to

the Government side. There has

already been a max exodus of

nearly 115,000 people from the region in the past two weeks.

The Government has come under increasing international

pressure to halt its offensive

against the rebel s to protect

nearly 50,000 ethnic Tamil civilians trapped by the

fighting.

Now to the front pages of the

major newspapers around the

country. The 'Australian'

reports Treasurer Wayne Swan

will delay the worst of the

Budget pain by holding off on

deep cuts to some benefits. The

'Courier Mail' reassures readers their tax cuts are

safe, although it says the

Government is set to introduce

a barrage of mean's testing in

the Budget. The 'West

Australian' reports Wayne Swan

has promised to honour the

Federal Government's pledge to

increase pensions, despite

tough Budget plans. The 'Herald

Sun' says there will be relief

at last for Victorian commuters

with the State Government

committing $4 billion to fix

the transport system. The 'Age'

takes a different tack -

reporting Victoria may lose its

AAA credit rating due to

funding new infrastructure projects like the transport scheme. The 'Australian

Financial Review' says the Australian Securities Exchange

is proposing new rules to help small companies raise capital

on the share market. The

'Adelaide Advertiser' says laws governing South Australian

pokie venues will be reviewed

as some operators are

reportedly abusing them. In the

'Mercury', gunman Martin Bryant's mother says material

she provided is being used

without permission in a book

about her son. The 'Northern

Territory News' says a leading

seismologist has warned the

Territory could be in for an

earthquake as bad as the recent tremors that devastated Italy. A Chinese military

strategist has warned the Rudd

Government's defence white

paper may cause a regional arms race according to the 'Sydney

Morning Herald'. And the 'Daily

Telegraph' reports on a Post

Office clerk who has been

charged with masterminding a

fake passport scheme. And there

is a Logie's smattering

throughout it all. If you would

like to send feedback, contact us here:

The top stories on ABC News

Breakfast - the World Health Organisation says the global swine flu outbreak may have

already peaked. Meanwhile

Australian journalist Kate

Corbett has become the third

Australian living in London to test positive for swine flu.

A paid parental leave scheme

is likely to feature in next week's Federal Budget according

to today's the 'Australian'. It

comes as the Treasurer, Wayne

Swan, says the Government will

keep key election commitments

including tax cuts for higher

income earners. And three

members of one family have died after a crash near Melbourne

last night. Two others are in a

serious condition, including a

12-year-old girl and her 76-year-old grandmother who

were flown to hospital. The

girl's parents and aunt were

killed in the crash.

The founder of the people

smuggle in Thailand has accused

the military of an assassination attempt on his

life. Sondhi Limthongkul was

attacked last month in his car.

More than 80 bullet casings

were found. The media tycoon

used his empire to help

organise anti-Thaksin

Shinawatra protests which led

to the closure of the airports.

Protests resulted in anti-Thaksin demonstrators

occupying the Prime Minister's

Office. The mass protests

lasted several months. In April

Mr Limthongkul was ambushed

while on his way to work. His

car riddled with bullets.

TRANSLATION: I am certain that

it is the military behind this

assassination attempt. It was

done by certain military officers. Police say they found

at least 84 bullet casings. His

supporters have accused the

Thai military of being

involved, but have not offered

any proof. While the Army chief

has not confirmed the bullets

used in the attack were issued

to a special military division,

he says the investigation had

not determined where they came

from. But Mr Limthongkul is

convinced it was a professional hit. TRANSLATION: This is not

just an act by a group of

ordinary gunmen. But an act by

a team of professional

assassins. This kind of

operation is not an act by an

individual, but a team who

receive training to kill from

places where such training is

given out. The attack happened

after fierce anti-Government

protests against the PM,

Abhisit Vejjajiva by the so

called Red Shirts. They are

supporters of ousted former PM

Thaksin Shinawatra who they say

is ruling illegally.

SA has become the first state

in the country to enforce a ban

on plastic bags in all retail

outlets. From today shoppers

will have to carry reusable

bags or pay for biodegradable when making purchases.

The day's of packing the weekly shopping in plastic bags

like this are now over. It's a

big day. We've been talk being

this for a couple of years. It

will be illegal for retailers

to provide the lightweight

bags. Instead they will have to

offer for sale reusable fabric,

paper or compostable

alternatives. It is not a cheap

exercise for retailer s or

customers, but there is

inconvenience and cost and we

accept that. Shoppers have

embraced the changes. Clean living. I don't think we need the plastic bags. Reason behind

the ban is the 400 million

plastic bags that go into SA's

waste every year. And when

households do the wrong thing

and mix plastic with green

waste, everyone suffers. There

is a cost of pulling the

material out and the

dispossessable cost. The

biggest one is the devalue in

those compostproducts. The

State Government's not giving

up on its push to lead the

nation on environmental issues.

Next on its agenda is to lobby

manufacturers about the

unnecessary packaging of goods.

I think there is too much of

it. Anyone that buys anything

from a shop will realise they

have to plough their way

through lairs and layers of

packaging to get to the idea

they want. Incidentally, South

Australians won't be the only

ones to benefit from the ban.

Most reusable bags from

shoppers will have to buy are

made in China.

To finance news and Holden

will switch to a single shift

at its assembly operations in

Adelaide to help survive the global economic downturn. They

will slash production to 310

vehicles a day, but has not cut

jobs. The carmaker and its

parent company General Motors,

have been hit by a sharp fall

in sales. With four out of five

people considering their first

home purchase say the Federal

Government's homebuyer's scheme

is an important factor. The

report from an independent

analyst, Datamonitor, consider

comes when the Government is

considering whether to extend

the scheme. 13 South-East Asian

countries have agreed to set up

a fund. The fund was announced

at the Asian Development Bank

annual meeting in bally. It is

the first independent move by

Asia to shield itself from

financial crisis. To the figures now.

In a few minutes, Australia's best weather presenter Vanessa O'Hanlon will

be here with a look at the

national weather. Also ahead

we'll have a review of the newspapers. This morning we'll

be joined by Nicole Brady,

editor of Green Guide. Now with

sport here is Luke

Waters. Cricket first and

Australia has lost its final

over against Pakistan in Abu

Dhabi. A century from Shane

Watson wasn't enough for the

Aussies to take the match, but

they clinched the series, 3-2.

COMMENTATOR: Fetch that! Oh,

that's a lovely shot off his

legs. That might go for four.

No, yes, no, confusion!

well, what has happened there.

And a century to Pakistan Jiangun Kamran Akmal steered

them to a win. Geelong and St

Kilda remain the only

undefeated teams after

convincing wins yesterday. The

Cats were too good for

Melbourne, but the Saints have

announced themselves as real contenders disposing the

Western Bulldogs. Geelong were

hot favourites in an MCG

mis-match. Few regarded the

Demons a chance and they made

it harder for themselves. But

soon the opportunities started

to pay off. This is a goal!

stop the clock the Ds are in

front! The Ds were competitive,

but wasteful. Geelong is the

last side to hand out a free

ride and kicked seven of the

next nine goals. Johnson can

run on and kick a goal and he does. Russell Robertson managed

a major in his first game in 12

months. But Steve Johnson was

centimetre perfect and the

contest looked over by

half-time. Geelong had the

majority of the second-half

chances. Coach Geoff Thompson

wouldn't have been happy with

his side's lack of accuracy.

Gary Ablett came off late

with a join injury. The Cats

still got the points with their

48th win in the past 51 games.

Like Geelong, St Kilda were

hoping to keep its unbeaten

start to the season in tact.

Both the Bulldogs and Saints

took their time to settle.

Goddard did his bit to calm St

Kilda nerves. Goddard sends it

a long way forward and a

goal! The Dogs were desperate

not to lose its third game in a

row. It looked to its combinations to break through the Saints' pressure.

Brilliant play. Unselfish. The

Dogs seemed to have the

momentum, but the Saints

finished with a rush, including

a double from Riewoldt. After

the early arm wrestle, the

third quarter turned into a

shoot-out. The Saints' pressure

set them up for its 6th

straight victory. To rugby

league now and the Dragons have

secured a thrilling 12-11 win

over the Warriors. Despite a

number of injuries, the Dragons

now sit second on the NRL

ladder. The first points are

on the board. The Warriors

through a penalty goal.

charged down by Price! Here

comes the chase from Morris.

Morris has got him. A wonderful

tackle. 12m out from the line!

Here they come. Hornby,

trooper on the outside. The

pass over the top. Morris!

pass over the top. Morris! A

good win for the Dragons. Wayne

Bennett was praiseworthy given

they suffered some injuries

through the game. It's a good

start for both Saints in both codes. How strong was St Kilda

last year? They did finish in

the top four. They won a final

against Collingwood. But they

were beaten by Hawthorn. The eventual Premiers. They are a

different side. There is more

depth. Their coach said at the

start of the year they intend

to score more, rather than

being defensive, which was the accusation against them last

year. They are doing that with

the likes of Nick Delsanto.

Goddard is having his best

season after being drafted as a

number one pick and then doing

his knee. The top of the leader

board now, it is only early in

the season, but does it mean

anything for the rest of the

season? It is a good question.

They are six rounds in. They

talk of it as being a marathon,

not a sprint. There is a long

way to go. When you say that,

injuries come into play and

last weekend one of their

better players for the

affiliate club, Clark, did his

knee. Depth will be tested as

the season goes on. Geelong has

Ablett with problems as

well? It will be interesting to

see. The season he's had is

remarkable. Only six games in,

but he has been extremely good.

They will know later on today

the extent of his injury. ABC

news news can be watched live

on the web. Just visit us

here:

Now with the weather, here's

Vanessa O'Hanlon. It's been hot

in Perth and it will continue

to be. Good morning. Isn't that

right. A few days into May and

it's already looking like May's

longest warm spell in 46 years.

The sunshine is expected to

shine for another week as warm

easterlies persist across WA.

In the south - a high in the

Bight will hang around for the

next week that. Will move into

the Bight and it will bring

cold morning and sunny days to

most of the south. Further into

the week it will dry fresh

winds over the east causing an

increase in showers while

maintaining gusty south

easterly winds across the

Territory. A cold front will

move through the Bass Strait

today while a high moves over

Tasmania tonight. Another cold

front is expected to move through the south-east around

the middle of the week. We have

cloud over the northern NSW and

southern Queensland coasts. It

will cause showers along the

coast looun and the odd storm

inland. The odd shower is

expected over southern Victoria

and Tasmania with cloud along a

weak front. There is no rain,

despite that cloud crossing WA.

Queensland - showers east of

Charleville. Scattered showers

for the east coast and

thunderstorms about the

south-east and northern Cape

York Peninsula. NSW - a

southerly change around midday

may cause showers in the far

south-east. Showers over the

northern coast and adjacent

ranges N Victoria - a cool

morning with frost patches in

the north-east and morning fog inland. Showers about the coast

extending to the ranges. They

should clear tonight. Tasmania

- the scattered showers about

the west and south should clear

early in the afternoon. A

cooler south-west change is due

throughout the morning. In SA isolated showers about the

southern peninsula is moving

across Kangaroos island. In WA,

apart from morning drizzle

along the Eucla, conditions will remain sunny across the

south until Thursday. Up in the

north it will be a windy day.

The Top End can expect frequent

showers about the north-east

coast. It will dry around the

Alice. Ahead for tomorrow:

See you in half an hour.

The top story on ABC News

Breakfast - the World Health

Organisation says it has no

immediate plans to upgrade its

warning over swine flu. Gregory

Hartle said the current round

of flu activity may have peaked. We cannot lower our

guard. There is the high

possibility that this virus

will come back, especially in

colder periods. Mexico and the

northern hemisphere are

entering the summer months where normally influenza

activity is low. So I think we

would want to weight a while

before making a definitive

decision. This current round of

activity may have peaked, but

really we are only ten days

into this outbreak so we must

wait and see. And here's how

you can contribute to ABC News

Breakfast.

In other news this morning,

a paid maternity leave is skill

likely to feature in the

Federal Budget according to

today's the 'Australian'. The

scheme will be introduced with

a delayed start because the

financial crisis has left an

estimated $100 billion hole in

Government revenue. The

Treasurer, Wayne Swan, says the Government will keep key

election commitments, including those tax cuts for higher

income earners. Three members

of the one family have died

after a car crash near

Melbourne last night. Two

others are in a serious condition, including a

12-year-old girl and her 76-year-old grandmother who

were flown to hospital. The

girl's parents and aunt were

killed in the crash. Four men

from the other car were also

taken to hospital. Six people

have been killed in an

avalanche in the Austrian alps.

Five Czech hikers and a Slovak

were trying to scale Mount

Schalfkogel when they were

buried under snow. The

avalanche hit the group of

climbers about 800m from the

summit on Saturday. Poor

weather has delayed the rescue

effort. The wife of the Italian

PM Silvio Berlusconi says she

wants to divorce him after 20

years of marriage. The media

mogul's second wife, Veronica

Lario, made the announcement

after a series of public

arguments between the two. They

have three children, all in

their 20s. Silvio Berlusconi is

Italy's second richest man. He

has refused to comment. And

Rebecca Gibney has taken out

the Gold Logie. The actress won

a Silver Logie for her role in

Packed To The Rafters. The ABC

picked up three awards, including Most Outstanding News

Coverage for the China

earthquake and Most Outstanding

Public Affairs Broadcast for

'Foreign Correspondent'.

Underbelly won three awards, including Most Outstanding

Drama Series. A severe heat

wave is gripping large parts of

northern India. The country is

also experiencing a serious

drought which has seen rivers

and wells which have been in

use for centuries run dry.

Brian Abbott reports. The

searing heat has arrived ahead

of the official start of summer

in India. The subcontinent is

baking as the mercury rises to record levels for early record levels for early May. Temperatures in excess of

40 to 45 have become common

over wide areas. The

conditions are likely to

continue for coming hours. At

present there is not any

likelihood of rain. Anyone who

has to go out in the sun is covering up as much as

possible. But that provides

only temporary relief. People,

especially the very old and

very young are suffering worst

of all. But it is not only

humans trying to quench their

thifrts and keep cool. Animals

in captivity are doing it

particularly tough with relief

taking many forms. This river

is usually the source of life

for millions of people. But it

is now bone dry. This man, a

Government official in Padampur, says there has not

been a drop of rain since

September last year and his

town is being supplied by

tankers taking water from deep

bore wells. The water tankers

provided by the Government

departments have given us some

relief or else there would be

no water anywhere. People are quarrelling over water.

Sometimes we don't get water at

all. There is a lot of

trouble. Rajasthan is known as

India's desert state. It is

usual for high temperatures,

but not 46 degrees day after

day before summer officially

gets under way. This Rajasthan

local is praying to his God

that rain should come so that

it will bring relief from the

heat. Forecasters though say

India is in for a long, hot

summer before there is any real

relief from the heat wave.

Shoppers in SA will no longer

be able to use plastic bags

when a ban comes into place

today. It is the first State in

the country to introduce the

laws. Pete McDonald joins us

from the ABC's Adelaide

newsroom. Thanks for joining

us. A lot of us would have been

using the recycle bags. What

has the reaction been like

among the public in SA? Well,

since January 1 we've been

conditioned to get used to the

bags, bringing along reusable

bags to the supermarket. People

over here are getting used to it. Initially there were

concerns. People forgetting the

bags and getting angry,

prompting signs to go up in

supermarkets around the state,

encouraging people not to take

it out on the retailers there.

They are simply working there.

It's not a lot to do with them.

People are getting used to it

now and bringing along reusable

bags. How will the rules be

monitored? Are there

penalties? For retailers found

to be offering the single use

supermarket-style bags you can

be fined up to $5,000. Our

Environment Minister has been

pretty strong in that he will

have people out there enforcing

the rules. How that happens I'm

not sure, but he's also

indicated that any retailers found to be profiteering from

the sale of reusable bags will

also have come under severe

penalties. What sort of impact

can we expect this to have on

the environment? Well, the

environmental groups are saying

this will remove up to around

about 400 million of the single

use supermarket-style bags from

landfill in SA alone. The waste

disposal industry is saying it

are remove contaminants meaning

material can be mulched and

there will be a lot less

plastic material goes into

waterways and oceans, meaning

there will be less impact on

the marine life. Thanks for

that. In the tough economic

times, many businesses are

adopting novel approaches to

keep customers coming through

the door. Not many go as far as

one restaurant in Latvia, which

has taken the concept of theme

Scott Bevan reports from dining to a whole new level.

Riga. It is the kind of

initially leaves you restaurant where the decor

breathless. Hello. But at

least the staff look as though

they could resuscitate you.

The thought of entering a

hospital usually puts people

off their food. But this

restaurant in Latvia's capital

in Riga has adopted a medical

theme to attract customers,

particularly at a time when the

economy is sick. Everything

reminds you of hospital. It is

very original. The restaurant

was set up by three partners

who have worked in the medical field. They've brought more

than their experience into the

restaurant. They had a lot of

expeditions to the local

hospital to find these kind of

old equipment. Some of the

dishes are more eye-popping

than mouth watering. Oh, my

goodness. And it can be more delicate surgery than fine

dining. To stop making a mess,

there is always the

restaurant's take on white

linen service. Customer or

victim! You are a patient

right now. The patients

require patience and a little

help. While this may not be a

cure for the economic crisis,

the restaurant's owners say all

this gastronomic blood and gore

and the decor are an anecdote

to the gloom people are

feeling. They find a place they

can come and talk with the nice

nurses. Are you feeling better?

Better, yeah. Just what the patient ordered.

16 candidates for what has

been promoted as the world's

best job will be put to the

test over the next three days.

The winner of the role of

promoting Queensland's Hamilton Island on the Great Barrier

Reef will be announced on Wednesday.

34,000 candidates were

supposed to be Whittled down to

11, but Queensland tourism

ended up with 16 highly

possibles. One of them will be

spending the next six months on

Hamilton Island, raving about

the Great Barrier Reef on the

Internet. For me my fascination

is with fish and the ocean. That's is a key qualification, along with a

sense of adventure, a tolerance

of water sports and good

English. English, this is very

challenging for me. It will be

a punishing schedule with a

blog to get out weekly and all

that world heritage beauty to

soak up daily. It is heaven on earth. Heaven on earth comes

with a six month's salary of

$150,000, but the contest has

already earned Tourism

Queensland a motza. We think

we've tipped over $110 million

in international

publicity. Probably another

hopefully $30 million coming

this week. Contest has

attracted world-wide media

attention. Maybe too much. I

think you can almost over-sell

somewhere. I will find out when

I get there. The candidates

when straight to their

departure lounge to log in on

their laptops and spread the

word through cyberspace. You

saw the evidence. Maybe you

guys could hook us up. Whoever

gets the job will spend a lot

of time in virtual reality, but

they are well aware of the real

world risks. I have a bag track

record of getting stung by fish. I've been stung in

Ireland and Greece. But in

spite of the dangers, including

taking photographs while

walking, they boarded the plane

and blogged off. Not a bad job! Graziers from across the

country are rounding up their

best stock ahead of the 2009 beef expo in central

Queensland. The event is

expected to bring tens of

thousands of people to Rockhampton, despite concern

about the growing threat of

swine flu.

The Rockhampton showgrounds

will be a stomping ground for

the beef industry's finest. I

have six steers that people

have donated to the school.

We're trying to get them clean

for Tuesday. Makeshift cattle

yards are ready and waiting and

for the first time a platform

has been set up in the centring

to bring onlookers closer to

the action. They can watch the

judging which will be going on

in the centre rings. This year

the beef expo is spilling over

into a nearby park. The extra

space will house nine tents,

compared to two tents in

2006. We've expanded so much.

This time we have roughly 2,400

head of cattle made up of stud

cattle and display cattle. The

number of tents for people has

tripled. We've picked up

significant export orders as a

result of this particular

event. It has a significant

export impact and that is important. Organisers are also

busy monitoring the swine flu

outbreak with up to 600 international visitors

scheduled to attend. We do have

one person coming from Mexico

that has registered with us and

maybe they won't come, but it

will be a shame if they

didn't. It's not the first time

I vent organisers have been

forced to consider the

implications of a global health

scare N 2003 international

visitor numbers were down

because of the sars virus in

Asia. About 50,000 people are expected to attend the

week-long event. You're watching ABC News

Breakfast. The top stories -

the World Health Organisation

says the global swine flu

outbreak may have already

peaked. Meanwhile Australian

journalist Kate Corbett has

become the third Australian

living in London to test

positive for the virus. A paid

parental leave scheme is likely

to feature in next week's Federal Budget according to the 'Australian' newspaper. It

comes as the Treasurer, Wayne Swan, says Swan, says the Government will keep key election commitments, including tax cuts for higher income earners. Three members of one family have died after a

crash near Melbourne last night. Two others are in a serious condition, including a 12-year-old girl and her 76-year-old grandmother who were flown to hospital. The girl's parents and aunt were killed in the wearing, but there is plenty of discussion about how Gretel Killeen performed as host and how the networks performed. How did you rate her performance? I was pleased that they put her on. I thought it was a great, gutsy move, but she didn't work. There was a lot of expectation. It is a really tough job. It is one of the toughest things to do in television to stand up in a room full of cynics who half of them think they should be on the stage. She didn't have a great script to work with I didn't think. That struggled. The audience didn't give her much of the feedback she's used to working with. That died. Then we had some of the other people, Rove who stood up and

presentnd and accepted a couple of things and quipped well and Dave Hughes was hilarious. It showed there are plenty of jokes in the industry, but unfortunately Gretel didn't get there. Of course a Gold Logie

in the - and the first Logie

win for Rebecca Gibney. That

was good so far as we take the

awards seriously. She was doing

good work on the Packed To The

Rafters. I read commentary

this morning about Gretel

Killeen's performance that the

opening gig of her dying, or

apparently dying was apparently dying was good and maybe it should have been left

there. Yeah! Do you think

so? Watching that I thought

this is great. Then she did

disappear for a while. I

thought what a great joke.

There has been so much

speculation about how she'll

go. If they left it at that,

that would have been a real

success. But bringing her back

and it invited the headlines

death on stage. Those headlines

are in the papers

are in the papers today. I wish

it wasn't. So I wish I could

say she was terrific, but it

didn't work out that way. One

thing I noticed, she would

disappear and come back on

again and I thought is this a

woman thing, but they made her

change her outfit every time. I

thought why do they have to do

that when hosting something.

She went through about five

changes. I want to bring up one

of the cartoons of the morning

this morning. It refers to the this morning. It refers to the

Logies from last night. It is

in the 'Australian'. We can see

it on the screen. It has a

diseased pig coming up to

accept the Logie and saying and

the gold lunchy for the most

hyped pandemic in history goes

to swine flu. I'm not sure

about his fashion in that one,

he hasn't been dressed well!

Tied in the two issues. What

else have you got? That reminds

me of a piece me of a piece in the 'Sydney

Morning Herald'. There is a

discussion about earlier this

week we'll find out whether it

was a pandemic or a complete

beat-up. That's the way it is

looking. 16 deaths in total so

far suggest that perhaps

everybody from the World Health

Organisation down has overhyped

this to the max. The 'Sydney Morning Herald' are looking at that. Maybe they've done a good

job of containing

job of containing it. Possibly.

. A step up from SARS and bird

flu. There was commentary in

the Guardian. It talked about

media and authorities justify

their existence and love a

health scair. The word 'could'

is used quite a bit. It will

be interesting to see whether

it was inflation or a genuine threat. Based threat. Based on the initial

reports from Mexico where they were initially saying that more

than 100 people had died,

surely there had to have been

some sort of sense of emergency

about what could

happen? Possibly. I guess that

is what will be the beauty of

this week. We can boil it down

and find out was it an

overreaction, did the face mask providers make a providers make a fortune on the

back of fear or was it

contained by fast-acting

authorities. They are damned if

they do or don't. If they had

said it's not too much of a waste and things got out of

hand, they would be criticised. You have a good

story in the 'Age'. There has

been a case in Victoria that

went through the courts a

couple of years ago and it was

about a 17-year-old girl who

had what is called gender had what is called gender

disfor fa. She felt she was a

boy. She applied to the courts

to have her breasts removed. It went through the courts and

they allowed that at that age.

That will spark a lot of

discussion you would have to

think about children being able

to make those massive

life-changing decisions for

themselves at that age. There

is a large feature story about

that in which they talk about

thering an increasing body of thering an increasing body of

evidence in the court that

allows children to have

involvement in these big

decisions rather than being told by authorities what to

do. It should be pointed out

that this child has been on

medication since the age of 13

or something. Yeah. They

obviously underwent extensive

discussions, testing,

counselling and from what the

courts said, everybody that

gave evidence said counselling is not

is not going to help in this

situation. This is a definite

problem for this person and

unless they are allowed to have

the surgery, there will be dramatic repercussions. Very

interesting in terms of a

17-year-old being allowed to

make the decision and being

helped to pay for it. Even

though it is a controversial

decision, it is one in the best interests of the child. That

would then apply to other

people that would be looking at possibly

possibly doing the same sort of

thing. You would have to think

at 17 it is such a drastic

thing. It seems to me such a

drastic step to take when you

think what might happen, we

mature a lot in those years.

Whether it will have been the

right decision we'll have to

wait and see. We have some

clarification on what might be happening in the

Budget. Speculation! It will happen all happen all week. The

'Australian' has an interesting

angle this morning suggesting

that paid maternity leave is

back on the agenda. We'll have

to wait and find out whether

the union fush for that will

come through. It seems like a difficult decision given we are

in a climate where a lot of

money has been spent on the

financial crisis. So it is

interesting they are putting it

back into the Budget. You can back into the Budget. You can

see the Government spin coming through. They believe this

thing helps stimulate the

economy. Women staying at home

spend the money given to them

by the Government. There could

be legs to this. With the PM

having said last year I think

it was that it is time to bite

the bullet on maternity leave,

you would think that he was

bound to commit to that now. You would think. now. You would think. So there

has been a lot of union

pressure and support and

research and funding going into

getting this up in

Australia. Let's face it, we

are one of the large countries

that doesn't have paid

maternity leave. It would be

something you would think a Labor Government would be committed and would go ahead

with. It seems they won't go

back on the tax cuts for the

higher income earners now as

well. They are not going to

skimp on those skimp on those elections

promises they made. They have

every opportunity. They have

the perfect excuse to say they

can't afford it. It is too

politically dangerous to do

it. You would think so. Thin

ice in terms of managing

Budgetry issues. Mothers - we

have mothers who exercise in

the 'Australian' as well. It is

the mother issue in the

'Australian' today. They have a

report coming in from the

Sunday times which says Sunday times which says mothers

who exercise while pregnant,

their children have 8 IQ points

higher than the mothers who

don't. Mother guilt

continues. Once the conception

is again ahead, father's don't

have anything to do with their

child's IQ. Mum has to get out there and submit there and submit to exhaustion

during pregnancy, but to keep

the kid smart you have to get

out there and do your exercise

and it talks about breast

feegd. Once you have exercised

yourself to exhaustion, you

deliver the baby and quickly on

to the boob so you can keep the

IQ points rolling along. While

dad gets to sit at home with a

deer had n his hand. Possibly

thinking up questions to help

the child get into the child get into mencer if

that is a desire. Thanks

Nicole. Pleasure.

Now with all the weekend

sport, here is Luke Waters. Not

even a gallant century from

Shane Watson could get the

Aussies over the line in their

1-day fixture against Pakistan.

After winning the toss and After winning the toss and batting, Australia made it to

250 in their 50 overs. Watson

scored his second 1-day tonne,

but the Pakistan team passed

the Australian total for the

loss of just three wickets. To rugby league and the Dragons

now sit second on the NRL

ladder after a thrilling win

over the Warriors yesterday.

The Warriors crossed early and

looked in control of the match.

Despite injuries to key players Despite injuries to key players

Jeremy Smith and Matt Cooper.

Bennett's boys rallied and

scored in the final minutes of

the game. After the game,

Bennett paid tribute to his

side's toughness. To AFL and

Geelong and St Kilda remain the

only two undefeated teams after

round six. The Saints continued

their unbeaten run with Brendan

Goddard and riewoldt and

Schneider among the goals. St Schneider among the goals. St

Kilda's pressure around the

ground proved too much. Only

poor kicking stopped the Saints

from extending their margin of

28 points. We will be next hour

having a look at the English

Premiership League where

Liverpool have kept their hopes

alive with a pretty impressive 3-0 win over

Newcastle. Cool. With the cricket, the cricket, the Pakistan Australia

1-day series. Australia had already taken out that

series? It was a dead rubber,

if you like. But obviously

whenever Australians get

involved in a game of cricket

and obviously at that level,

they are fair dinkum about it.

They will be disappointed to

have been overhauled by

Pakistan, especially with 250

on the board. Michael Clark has decided to go

decided to go back home to

Australia after a gruelling

five months on the road. He

will miss the one-off Twenty20

game and freshen up for the

Ashes. I noticed David Warner performed well in the

IPL? Yeah. A lot of people

wonder why he didn't get even

more chances with the

Australian side. He is such an

excitement machine. He really

is good. He's the type of is good. He's the type of guy

notice the game in Abu Dhabi that brings crowd in. You will

was incredible. It didn't look

like there was anyone at all in

the stands. Now here is Vanessa

O'Hanlon with the weather. Despite the wet season

being over, there are storms in

the north of Queensland because

of a slow moving trough that

will weaken midweek. It is dry

over the other side of the

country as warm easterlies

persist over WA.

persist over WA. In the Bight a

high will lang around. It will

bring cold mornings and sunny

days to the south. Dry fresh

winds over the east will cause

an increase in showers while maintaining gusterly south

easterly winds. A cold front

will move through the Bass

Strait. A high will move over

Tasmania tonight. Another cold

front laugh move through the

south-east midweek. The cloud

sitting over the northern NSW

and south of Queensland will

cause showers along the coast

and the odd storm inland. The

odd shower is expected over

southern Victoria and Tasmania

with cloud along a weak front.

There is no rain in the cloud

crossing WA. For Queensland -

showers east of Charleville. Scattered showers for the east

coast and thunderstorms about

the south-east and northern

Cape York Peninsula. NSW - a southerly change around midday

may cause showers in the far

south-east. Showers over the

northern coast and adjacent northern coast and adjacent

ranges. In Victoria - another

cool morning with frost patches

in the north-east. A morning

fog inland. Showers about the

coast extending to the ranges

and clearing tonight. Tasmania

- the scattered showers about the west and south should clear

this afternoon. A cooler

south-west change is due

throughout the morning. SA -

isolated showers about the

southern peninsula, moving

across Kangaroos island and the

lower south-east throughout the

morning. Over in WA

morning. Over in WA - apart

from morning possible drizzle

along the Eucla coast,

conditions will remain sunny

across the south until about

Thursday. Up in the north - it

will continue to be fresh and

gusty with those easterly

winds. The Top End can expect frequent showers about the

north-east coast but it will be

dry around the Alice. Ahead to

tomorrow:

Thanks, Vanessa. Still ahead

- it's been a year since

Cyclone Nargis killed more than

7 # 78,000 people in Burma.

We'll be expecting to an expert

from CARE Australia about how

the response is going there.

An Australian journalist in

London tests positive for swine flu, but the World Health

Organisation says the outbreak

may have already

may have already peaked. The

Rudd Government puts paid

parental leave back on the

agenda and vows to stand by

election commitments in next

week's Budget. Three members of

the same family killed in an

overnight car crash in Melbourne. Pakistan beats

Australia by seven wickets in

the 5th and final 1-day

international in Abu Dhabi.

Good morning. It's Monday 5

May. I'm Joe O'Brien. I'm Kesha

West. The top story on ABC News

Breakfast - the World Health Organisation says it has no

immediate plans to upgrade its warning over swine flu and declare it a pandemic. The

outbreak has

outbreak has prompted an

extreme response in some

countries. China has been

detaining Mexicans in hotels

whether they are sick or not.

And there were violent protests

in Egypt after the Government

said it was slaughtering all

the country's pigs as a

precautionary measure.

Meanwhile a journalist living

in London has become the third

Australian to test positive for

H1N1, despite being given the

all-clear by Britain's health

services last

services