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(generated from captions) for most of the region tomorrow. and Wollongong, Mostly sunny in Batemans Bay in the mid-to-high-20s. with temperatures Fine and mostly sunny in Goulburn and Cooma,

while in Qagga, mostly sunny with light to moderate W-NW winds. and the ACT - The forecast for Canberra dry and mostly sunny tomorrow. Winds should be moderate to fresh NW, gusty at times. Temperatures from 9 to 24. on Thursday The outlook is for a windy day with perhaps a shower, cooler with showers on Friday, over the weekend. then dry, cool and mostly sunny Virginia. And that's ABC News. the '7.30 Report' with Maxine McKew Stay with us now for coming up next. Goodnight. Enjoy your evening. International Pty Ltd Captioning and Subtitling Closed Captions provided by

The bottom line subpoena we have to

get useded to the higher oil prices.

Tonight - bracing for more pain at

the pump. Will the latest oil shock

let the inflation genie back out of

the bottle? We are living through

our third oil shock and the last

ended really badly for the world our third oil shock and the last two

for Australia. I see a crisis ended really badly for the world and

looming. There's not a whole lot

can do about it. We just have great looming. There's not a whole lot we

difficulty getting Australians

willing to work with honey bees.

And to bee or not to bee. The

shortage that could have a major And to bee or not to bee. The labour

flow-on effect. Whilst they are

small in numbers, they have an

enormous impact overall. We don't

fruit. have pollination there won't be

This program is captioned live. Welcome to the program. were high over Easter, If you thought petrol prices experts say, "Get used to it." Tension over Iran's nuclear program, of demand, together with soaring levels to US$70 a barrel. have pushed the price of oil And it's likely to go still higher, $100 a barrel is inevitable with some analysts predicting within a few years.

is comparing the price spike Treasurer Peter Costello to the sharp rises of the '70s, calling it "our third oil shock". Back in the '70s, inflation genie out of the bottle. soaring fuel prices let the performance? So are we set for a repeat Ros Childs reports.

The bottom line is we have to get

used to the higher oil prices.

I see a crisis looming. But there's

not a whole lot we can do about I

I think $1.50 will be the next

point where people start seriously I think $1.50 will be the next price

looking around for alternatives.

Motorists may have braced

for an expensive Easter at the Motorists may have braced themselves

bowser, but t likes as though

prices are set to head higher still. bowser, but t likes as though petrol

Overnight, the price of crude oil

skyrocketed back over US $70 a

barrel. Analysts expect that to

through to petrol pumps over the barrel. Analysts expect that to feed

next 1-2 weeks, pushing up prices

about 5 cent as litre. 60 cents next 1-2 weeks, pushing up prices by

I first got my licence. It's just about 5 cent as litre. 60 cents when

gone up so much. I can't afford any

more than I pay for. When the

gets low, I stay home. We're living more than I pay for. When the petrol

through our third oil shock and the

last two ended really badly for the

world and for Australia. So let's

vigilant to make sure the same world and for Australia. So let's be

doesn't happen here. Treasurer vigilant to make sure the same thing

Costello has already drawn a doesn't happen here. Treasurer Peter

comparison with the two oil crises

of the '70s. In 1973, the price of

oil went from $2.50 to $12 US a

barrel in just a few months. That

was down to the organisation of

petroleum of exporting countries.

OPEC cut back production in

to the Western world's support of OPEC cut back production in response

Israel during the Yom Kippur war.

Again if 1979, the oil price more

than doubled to around US $40 a

barrel. The Iranian refugee lus

compounded by the outbreak of the

Iran-Iraq Warsaw world oil

production drop by more than 10%.

We're certainly living through

another oil shock. The big

difference in the 1970s was a

shock. OPEC withheld production for difference in the 1970s was a supply

various reasons and that meant

whether you wanted the stuff or not,

it became very difficult. That led

to a recession and ultimately a

flow-on to inflation. This time

around we're see ago demand shock.

Shane Oliver at AMP Capital

strong demand from India and China Shane Oliver at AMP Capital believes

is putting pressure on prices this

time round and it' this thirst for

energy which he thinks will see oil

prices pushed beyond US $100 within

a few years. That'swhere we are

ultimately headed and that as with

what I refer to as a super spike.

The main reason I think we need to

see that is, and are likely to see

this, as the oil price has gone up,

it hasn't crimped global demand. So

you've still got the demand that's

strong and supply is constrained.

Continuing nerves over the nuclear

ambitions has been the driving

of the price spark overnight. Iran ambitions has been the driving force

is one of the world's major

exporters and disruptions from

supply from Nigeria have also made

their mark. But leaving political

and military tensions aside, demand

support oil still outstrips supply.

Dewayne Travelstead is an ft oil

engineer. Oil could go up

significantly more and we can't do

any more than we are already doing

because there's only so many

technical people involved in the

business around the world and the technical people involved in the oil

problem is there's nothing we can

about it. We're all working way too problem is there's nothing we can do

many hours and we're not bringing

supply up as fast as demand is

up. Another difference between now supply up as fast as demand is going

and the '70s is the likely impact

inflation. Then sudden sharp oil and the '70s is the likely impact on

price rises fuelled higher costs,

triggered hikes in interest rates

and plunged economies into recession. Now,

recession. Now industry is more

efficient and less reliant on oil. recession. Now industry is more fuel

Gerard Kerr from JP Morgan believes

higher petrol prices mean

will simply cut their spending in higher petrol prices mean consummers

other areas, relieving inflationary

pressure. When they buy petrol they

might substitute away from other

goods. So if you are spending - we

worked it out that if petrol gets

to $1.40 maybe $1.50 a litre that worked it out that if petrol gets up

will average out to $16 a week for

the average consumer extra to fill

the car. If that eventuates, then

that's going to drain about $700

million in retail spending per

month. So you will have a dam

opinioning impact on retail sales

consumers substitute away and spend opinioning impact on retail sales as

less on discretionary areas. Energy

price also keep dweg up and up and

there are a lot of global players

there are a lot of global players in the market and oil is getting

scarcer and scarcer and people look

for alternatives. Michael O'Connor

is manager of the Alternative Technology Association. He believes

the market is heading towards a

critical price where alternative

energy sources, like ethanol and

bio-diesel, fuels from ago curl

bio-diesel, fuels from ago curl turl bye products may become more

commercially viable. I think once

commercially viable. I think once it starts climbing up towards $1.80

starts climbing up towards $1.80 and $2 which it could do over the next

12 months easily, that will start a

very, very large push for serious

alternatives to to the marketplace.

Bio-diesel is great. You could

Bio-diesel is great. You could drink the stuff if you could stomach it.

If you spill it on the ground, you

don't have to clean it up. The

problem is how much can we produce.

It's going to help, but it just is

It's going to help, but it just is a drop in the bucket and it's the

drop in the bucket and it's the same thing around the world, whether

thing around the world, whether it's solar or wind or whatever else.

solar or wind or whatever else. It's just a drop in the bucket compared

to fossil fuels. But some

to fossil fuels. But some economists think that only a rising oil price

will drive demand for a workable

alternative. Oil is not an infront

resource. We'reiousing it up. It

will run out at some point in time.

The process by which we adjust to

alternatives, using other sources

alternatives, using other sources of energy, for example,.unfortunately

means that we will see higher oil

prices until that occurs. That report from Ros Childs. The Prime Minister has tonight set the ground for the next big political battle with the Labor Party. In a speech to the Menzies Research Center in Canberra just a short time ago titled 'Keeping Faith with Australian Families', Mr Howard has reiterated his government's commitment to the family tax benefit system and attacked Labor's planned amendments. With echoes of his attacks in the last election on Labor's schools' policy with its hit-list of private schools Mr Howard made the case today that Labor's plan to cap the payments for single income families earning more than $250,000 was an attack on the aspirations of middle Australia. Labor argues the system is flawed because currently even millionaires are eligible for the benefit. We'll be talking to the Shadow Treasurer Wayne Swan in just a moment but, first, I'm joined by political editor Michael Brissenden who's been watching the Prime Minister's speech.

Michael, first of all, what seems

Michael, first of all, what seems to be interesting about this speech

tonight is what is not in it. Here

we have this tax report out there

we have this tax report out there by Peter Hendy and Dick warburton. It

appears that would demand some kind

of response from the Prime Minister?

Maxine, I guess the response to

Maxine, I guess the response to this report will come ultimately in the

budget. That report argues for cuts

to the top rate but show was eare

relatively - are a relatively low

tax country compared to others in

the OECD. Although there have been

rumbling from within the Government

that tax cuts should have more of a

priority, the message from John

Howard very much tonight is that

Howard very much tonight is that the family tax benefit system will

remain the centrepiece of tax

policy. This speech tonight was

really a celebration of, and in

part, a defence of the family tax

benefit system and of course a

benefit system and of course a tough attack on Labor's proposal on

attack on Labor's proposal on family mean package B with a $250,000 cap.

Labor wants to undermine the family

tax benefit system and let me put

tax benefit system and let me put to you that the thin end of the wedge

is its proposed family income test

of $250,000 a year on family tax

benefit Part B. Once a means test

benefit Part B. Once a means test is proposed by the Labor Party, and

this current benefit is nonmeans

tested in relation to family income,

applies to FT BHP, there's nothing

to stop that threshold being

whittled down. The fact is that the

current means test proposed by the

Labor Party by way of an amendment

introduced in the Senate would save

a poultry $6 million a year and

a poultry $6 million a year and that poultry saving can mean only one

thing - that in government Labor

would have a much tighter income

test that would affect tens of

thousands of single income

Australian families who by no

stretch of the imagination could be

described as "rich". Let me

illustrate: a family income test

for family tax benefit B of $125,

for family tax benefit B of $125,000 a year would yield savings of under

$100 million. Mr Howard made the

point tonight. , Maxine, that his

government has been pretty

government has been pretty effective in the redistribution of money to

families, particularly low and

middle income families. He said

almost 40% of families this

financial year will receive more in

cash benefits than they actually

cash benefits than they actually pay in personal income tax disb. So

certainly sounds like much more of

certainly sounds like much more of a political speech, doesn't it, than

any kind of new policy blueprint?

I don't think there's any doubt

about that. This is clearly

about that. This is clearly designed to attack Labor just as they hope

to attack Labor just as they hope to paint themselves in the run-up to

the election as the party that puts

the interests of low and middle

income families first. As you said

in the introduction there, it had

echos of the campaign against Mark

Latham's schools' policy in that by

introducing a means test for the

FTB, this would hit a lot of people

who the Prime Minister says don't

really regard themselves as rich.

So it sounds like we're starting to

see the jut line already of next

year's campaign, 2007? Yep. I don't

think there's any doubt about that

either. It certainly sets the tone

of the politics for the next 18

months or so. It will be a battle

for the middle ground and

aspirations of middle income family

here's a sample of the sort of

rhetoric we will be hearing a lot

more of in the coming months.

Whether it is FT BHP or funding for

independent schools or support for

private health insurance, Labor's

old ideological agenda can never be

totally killed off. So that when it

comes to choice, don't trust them,

don't believe them because they

don't believe in it themselves.

We can expect to hear about the

politics of envy more than a few

times in the coming months I would

say, too. Interestingly we're

say, too. Interestingly we're seeing a disstint pitch to women. The

a disstint pitch to women. The Prime Minister was strong on the impact

women to the FT BHP system.

Minister was strong on the impact of women to the FT BHP Let me make a

final point. That is if the

anti-churn advocates get their way,

and the family tax benefit system

were to be dismant med, in favour

were to be dismant med, in favour of tax cuts for individual taxpayers,

the people who will suffer most

the people who will suffer most will be Australian women. Because one of

the distinguishing features of FTB,

spre icely because most families

choose to take the payment as a fortnight

fortnightly payment, is of course

that overwhelmingly it is paid to

the principal carer and again

overwhelmingly in most families

overwhelmingly in most families that is the mother. So if you simply

is the mother. So if you simply roll into a reformed income tax system,

the existing family tax benefit

system, the bulk of the individual

tax cuts would go to men financed

tax cuts would go to men financed by the withdrawal of direct

the withdrawal of direct fortnightly payments to women. On that

interpretation what our critics are

really advocating is redistribution

within the tax system from women to

men. You'd almost think from that

that the election was almost upon

us. You certainly would. Michael,

the Government has the harder task

in arguing this one. I mean,

a very good argument, always has in arguing this one. I mean, there's

been, for means testing these kind

of payments and certainly it's been

pointed out it's 70 families in

category, not very many, but pointed out it's 70 families in this

certainly 70 millionaire families

actually get this benefit. Yeah,

Labor has a strong point here

think the government knows it, but Labor has a strong point here andise

it's not just the few millionaires,

70-odd million their family but

those who earn over $250,000 a year.

Labor will argue this is welfare

the rich but what the Government is Labor will argue this is welfare for

trying to do is set up a new policy

argument and paint Labor as

against the aspirations of middle argument and paint Labor as standing

Australia. Already Mr Howard has

painted this means testing of the

family tax benefit 3 as the thin

of the wedge so I think we are family tax benefit 3 as the thin end

seeing the par metres of the next election starting to be played out

and there will certainly be more in

the budget in May. Alright. Michael

Brissenden, for that tonight, thank

you very much, indeed. for the Labor Party is - Well, the question on this issue can they avoid being wedged its huge generosity by a government that can boast about to all Australian families. the prime ministerial attack The job of countering the party's Shadow Treasurer. falls to Labor's Wayne Swan, He joins me now from Brisbane.

Wayne Swan, good evening to you.

With your amendment to family tax

benefit B and how it would be

capped, it does look as if the

Party has handed the Prime Minister capped, it does look as if the Labor

a weapon, as you've heard. He is

saying this is the thin end of the

wedge. I don't believe so. I think

the Prime Minister is ir, rattled

and out of touch. He didn't sound

it. Well, I tell you what, it's

irbecause those people who suffer it. Well, I tell you what, it's very

most in his family payment system

are second income earners who are

mainly women and they face some of

the worst work incentives in the

Western world and another study out

today saying the worst when it

to average tax rates. So he's quite today saying the worst when it comes

happy to have a situation where

second income earners who are going

back to work to pay off the

mortgage, who want to improve their

lives and get ahead, are pay

lives and get ahead, are paying

effective marginal tax rates of 50,

60 and 70 cents in the dollar, that

is after they pay their income tax

and family payments withdrawn, they

can have as little as 30 cent miss

the hand and that's before they

to pay for the cost of going to the hand and that's before they have

and particularly the cost of child to pay for the cost of going to work

care. So this system is not

to women and it is savage on low care. So this system is not friendly

middle income families where there to women and it is savage on low and

is one partner going back to work,

say after the birth of a child,

trying to get ahead, and John

and Peter Costello have their hand trying to get ahead, and John Howard

deeply in their pocket. They've

renewed to reform this system for a

long period of time. OK. You've yet

to outline any detail on how you will address that. On the other

hand, you have said it talked about

capping this family tax benefit B.

First of all, how many families are

going to be affected byior decision?

Well, I think there's something

2,500 families affected. Maxine, Well, I think there's something like

consider this fact: family tax

benefit A cuts out at a maximum of

something like $140,000. So the

Prime Minister already operates a

means test in the family tax

system at around $140,000. So how means test in the family tax benefit

can argue the argument tonight that system at around $140,000. So how he

somehow Labor is anti-aspirational

or doesn't support those people family payment s

family payments is beyond me. He or doesn't support those people with

already operate as means test of

$140,000. Let's go to the figure

u mentioned there yo. U are $140,000. Let's go to the figure you

2500 family also be affected by u mentioned there yo. U are assuming

the cap that Labor is proposing. As 2500 family also be affected by this

the Prime Minister sees it, these

are 2500 families who are raising

children. They are entitled to a

benefit, as he sees it, and he

almost pains this as a national

interest question. Maxine, I don't

believe the great bulk of

Australians would share the Prime

Minister's view that these people

are entitled to a benefit. I

absolutely have the view, that

single income families and sole

parent families, deserve support in

the system. I strongly support them

receiving a benefit like family tax

payment benefit B but I certainly

don't support paying family

to multi-millionaires or people on don't support paying family payments

extraordinarily high incomes and I

particularly don't support that

they operate a system of withdrawal particularly don't support that when

family payment and a tax system

attacks those people when they work family payment and a tax system that

a bit of overtime or do an extra

shift to get ahead. The last time -

you see this in equity terms and

that's fair enough -- I see see

in economic terms, Maxine. Many that's fair enough -- I see see this

people tell you this people aren't

going into the work force because

the system punishes them at and a

time when we are coping with the

problems of the ageing of the

population we must enhance

participation and productivetive in

our economy and all of the business

groups in this country, all of the

think-tanks acknowledge that this

tax grab, the high effective

marginal tax rates, is a drag on

productivity. Everyone but John

Howard and Peter Costello want to

sweep it under the carpet. But you

are talking about taking money away

from 2500 families. The last time

you wanted to take away money from

families is with your private

schools' hit-list. With that you

managed to frighten every family

with a child in a non-Government

school. Maxine, I don't believe

Australians think we ought to be

making family payments to multi

millionaires in this society. I

think they believe that our family

payment system out to be targetted

fairly and squarely at those people

who are in need and particularly

those people who are now the

of attack by the Prime Minister those people who are now the subject his extreme industrial relations of attack by the Prime Minister with

changes, which are going to bring

down wages. We'll knee the family

payment system more than ever as

John Howard has his way with the

wage system and his extreme

industrial relations changes which

will drag down wageser for many

families. If you do the ambitious

things you want to do, though,

change of tax entitlements and the

rest of it, you'll need to save

than $6 million. That's the heart rest of it, you'll need to save more

this argument. He says the cap than $6 million. That's the heart of

this argument. He says the cap won't stop at 250,000 because saving 6

million is nothing. What can you do

with that? We don't pretend that

saving $6 million will solve all of

the problems in the system. First

the problems in the system. First of all, we need to get the Government

to acknowledge there's a massive

problem. Everyone accepts John

Howard and Peter Costello. What we

do need is fundamental reform in

do need is fundamental reform in the income tax system, as well as the

family payment system. That can be

done and it can be implemented in

done and it can be implemented in an affordable and staged way. But the

first thing you need to do is to

acknowledge the financial pressure

that the current system puts on

lower middle income family as then,

secondly, the negative economic

impact of the current system which

is a drag on productivity and a

is a drag on productivity and a drag on economic growth. Let me just ask

you how real that pressure is

because again the Prime Minister

wasable to point tonight to the

extraordinary redistribution

capacity of this government. I mean

family paints have again up

something like $6 billion a year

since 1996. This is an

since 1996. This is an extraordinary level of bounty, isn't it? Well,

certainly we need in this country a

generous level of family payments.

After all, parents are bringing up

the next generation of young

Australians. How whole future is in

their hands. The question here,

however, is the structure of the

family payment system and this is

one that punishes hard work,

punishes those families that do a

bit of overtime or an extra shift.

Whether they are single income

Whether they are single income earns or dual income earners and one that

is absolutely savage of those

married women, flairly, who want to

work a few more hours and hits them

for six if they do it. That's not

good for the country and it's

certainly not good for the balance,

for the financial balances in that

family. Alright. Wayne Swan for

appearing tonight, thanks for your

time. Good to talk to you. A parliamentary inquiry has heard worrying evidence about threats facing one of the smaller and more colouful of our agricultural industries. Beekeepers are appealing for urgent action to set up educational and research facilities to arrest a perilous decline in their industry. They claim a lack of new and skilled entrants. Equally, investment in science to fight bee parasites,

is not just threatening the future of honey production, it could have serious effects on the whole of agriculture. Christopher Zinn reports. They've been very good workers for us. Yes, we've enjoyed having you. It might be a hive of activity, but honey is not the only way that bees make money. Now they're being corralled as livestock on the wing, largely by foreign workers. I'll do the pouring and you do the weighing. Plump honey bees are being packed by the kilos to fly as airline cargo to North America. It's a multimillion-dollar business for bee exporter Warren Taylor, but there's a recruitment problem. require expanding number of workers Yes, we're an expanding company and getting Australians willing to work and we just have great difficulty with honey bees. as much as a business. Beekeeping is a nomadic way of life of the flowering Eucalyptus. Following the flow, as they say, doesn't seem to cut much ice. Today the romance of the road to work here? Why is it hard to find people have neglected our industry Well, Australian Government our only two bee-training courses. and they've closed down The issue is wider than labour. as they gather nectar and pollen. As bees work very hard for all of us all manner of crops Their real value is in pollinating alone this largely free service, and it's estimated in Australia and those managed in hives, from both wild bee populations to agriculture. is worth up to $2 billion a year 60% of Australian agriculture for pollination. depends upon honey bees there won't be almonds, peaches, If we don't have pollination apricots and pears. an energetic spreader of pollen, The European honey bee, was first brought here in the 1820s. In recent years, going through some tough times. those who depend on it have been

hit by drought, bushfire, The beekeeping industry has been low honey prices to national parks and reserves. and even problems getting access But there's one small intruder much more than just their business. which they say could damage the beekeeping industry The Varroa mite has devastated of the globe bar Australia. as it spreads to most parts around the world. You hear about it all America has lost -

or trying to get Australian bees and they're now demanding for pollination. because they need them They've lost a terrific lot. and queen bee breeding for 50 years. Grechen Wheen has been beekeeping because it makes a difference. I hope these are virgins of queen bees She's a skilled inseminator because improving a bee's blood line and performance. can be vital to both its health 1 cent a kilo levy on honey, Research is funded by an under matches dollar for dollar. which the Federal Government that's less than $500,000 worth. But even in a good year, about bees? We know everything there is to know No way. No, there's a great deal between the bees and the plants. and also the connections the impact of the Varroa mite In Canberra, the concerns about are echoed by the CSIRO's expert of the beekeeping industry. who calls it the foot and mouth have got it here in Australia We would have thought that we would before New Zealand got it strict quarantine. because New Zealand has very, very in 2000. But it arrived in New Zealand inevitable that it will get here. So you'd just have to say it is studying the mite Denis Anderson has spent years to make the honey bee resistant. to try and find ways it would look something like that. If you were to find the mite inadequate to bring bee research, He says the available funding is which is in the national interest, into the 21st century. a bee research lab, It's very expensive to run things like DNA technology particularly if you're dealing with strategic-type problems but when you're looking at for research. that definitely isn't enough money their submissions The apiarists have put and research facilities for specific honey bee educational on rural skills, to a parliamentary committee which met in Queensland last week. The whole issue was centred around frustrations the beekeeping industry's the governments of the day in trying to convince that they are an important industry in numbers, and whilst they're small overall. they have an enormous impact works with Tim Alfroy Lewin Goodwin Brickhill on a family honey business, but they are atypically young. apiarist is 58. The average age of an Australian Honey prices are hardly high,

in the industry. but these two see a future

you get to move around lots, Because it's migratory, places right out west or upper coast so you get to get to see different depending on where the honey is. It's a bit like droving, I suppose. A bit romantic or stuff like that. As with other businesses, from just honey. that future may involve diversifying And if, as many have feared, slip into Australia, the Verroa mite will one day like their US counterparts, then Australian farmers, for what they now get for free. will have to get used to paying for pollination, In America they get paid

paid much for pollination. but whereas here we don't get many hives left, In America they haven't got for pollination, especially almonds. so they have to pay big money are now leaving the bush Warren Taylor's bees pollinate the spring blueberry crop. and heading to Canada to help

boxes with some 5 million bees At the airport, the pallet of 400 to ensure their safe arrival is specially wrapped and treated where the mite has wreaked havoc. on a side of the world this parliamentary committee, We are hoping through honey bee pollination the committee will recognise down the same track and realise we don't want to go down that America has gone down to pollinate their crops where they have insufficient bees before it is too late. and will do something now Christopher Zinn with that report. And that's the program for tonight. tomorrow, but for now, goodnight. We'll be back at the same time International Pty Ltd Captioning and Subtitling Closed Captions produced by

This program is not subtitled the show fails its first test of family and friends. in front of an audience your attention please? KATY PITNEY: May I have we have had to stop the show. Due to technical difficulties, fight to cut the show down to length. And tensions flare as the writers No, no, no, no, no.

on one performance. Don't panic too much With only one week to go for the world premiere? will it be ready DEPUTY STAGE MANAGER: Stop please. THEME MUSIC only eight days away With the official world premiere to know if their show is working. it's important for the producers They have to get it right. So the traditional preview week begins. There'll be nine performances in front of test audiences, as a way of finetuning the show for opening night. DEPUTY STAGE MANAGER: You have half an hour, until Act One beginners. Half and hour. Thank you. Tonight is what they call 'Friends and Family'. Usually friends and family have about 200 people, tonight we've got 1,600. It's sort of like a de facto first night. But it's the first public performance and that's pretty daunting with an audience that size for the first public performance. So, we've really got to let them know that this is NOT the opening night and it is... Things will change and things may go wrong. The technology may not be 100%. But they got a free ticket, they can live with that. They don't have to pay to see it. So, you know, anything that goes wrong, "Well, OK, you didn't pay." So, to parents and friends night tonight, I've got my mum and my dad and their partners. No, he hasn't. Oh, Kate Tuckerman, come in. Come in where? I was just telling everyone who's coming tonight. But you don't have any friends. I've got you. No. (Laughs) I think for him, this is just so special because it's his first professional role that's he's actually in.