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US issues warning to North Korea -

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Reporter: Shane McLeod

The top American official dealing with the North Koreans has revealed the United States has
directly warned Pyongyang that it will not tolerate a nuclear North Korea.

Transcript

TONY JONES: Japan has called on a divided UN Security Council to impose tough sanctions on North
Korea if it tests an atom bomb. But Pyongyang has warned it will not back down unless the United
States compromises. Washington says it is not prepared to budge and has warned it won't stand by
and wait for North Korea to become nuclear. Our correspondent Shane McLeod has this report.

SHANE MCLEOD: The US is not prepared to tolerate North Korea with nuclear weapons.

CHRISTOPHER HILL, US ASST SECRETARY OF STATE: I think clearly it's very serious.

REPORTER: How concerned are you about the perceptions about them about to take a test?

CHRISTOPHER HILL: We're very concerned about it. We are very concerned about the announcement that
was made yesterday and we're trying to do all we can to head this off.

SHANE MCLEOD: Christopher Hill says the consequences of a test have been made clear to North
Korea's mission to the United Nations. In New York, the US has been working with countries like
Japan and Britain to come up with a strong response from the Security Council.

AMBASSADOR JOHN BOLTON: We think it's going to be quite important for the council to speak very
firmly, very resolutely on this and not just in a knee-jerk reaction with another piece of paper.

SHANE MCLEOD: But other permanent members of the council have different views to deal with
Pyongyang.

WANG GUANGYA, CHINESE UN AMBASSADOR: If North Korea adopt a more constructive approach, this will
enable us to make progress and also if the United States could be more creative in their thinking,
it will certainly help.

SHANE MCLEOD: In South Korea there have been small protests as the government warns its neighbour
of the repercussions of a nuclear test. China has reportedly used diplomatic channels to warn North
Korea of severe consequences. The countries with the most at stake in North Korea will be
discussing the issue in a round of leaders' summits in coming days. Shinzo Abe will depart on
Sunday on his first overseas trip as Prime Minister.