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(generated from captions) Goulburn can expect 25 degrees, Cooma, 22, and it should be 23 at both Albury and Wagga. In Canberra, we can expect rain and possible thunderstorms overnight

of a shower tomorrow with the chance and temperatures from 8 to 23. to the end of the week - Looking ahead it will be fine with a little cloud on Thursday and again on Friday with those showers and patchy rain returning for the weekend. Russell. And that's the news for now. with the '7.30 Report'. Kerry O'Brien is next Goodnight. Thanks for your company. International. Captioning and Subtitling Captions by

(Phone rings) Hello. Hi, Alex. How

are you doing? Good. Tonight -

Telstra's sinking share price and

the free phone revolution. It just

seems a natural progression now to

move your telephone on to your

computer. As the new boss hoses

angry shareholders, can traditional computer. As the new boss hoses down

telcos meet the Internet threat?

There are no free kicks anymore for

the game. any of us. We need to change with

Go nice and even there. Happy with

him? Yeah. And the ole trainer

teaching an old horse new tricks.

You feel for the horse. I don't

know, they seem to get the vibes

animals. you, too. You can communicate with know, they seem to get the vibes off

This program is captioned live. Welcome to the program. for a swift and easy passage The Government's plans of its terror legislation legal hurdle. may have hit a significant Solicitor-General says In fact, the Queensland unconstitutional. the laws may even be lawyers agree More than a few constitutional and magistrates that specifically asking judges

who may have committed no offence to help police detain suspects of the separation of powers would challenge the whole notion a High Court challenge. and would be open to to a request The Prime Minister has today agreed from the Queensland Premier and state legal officers for a meeting between Commonwealth the dilemma. to try to find a way through reports. Political editor Michael Brissenden

I can see in front of me a red.

red... The after shocks of the I can see in front of me a

London bombings have been felt far

and wide. From London to Canberra,

this was a terrorist about that

apart many of our long-held legal this was a terrorist about that blew

and law enforcement certainties. In

both countries governments have

acted with a raft of legislational

changes and political aspirations

have hit hurdles. In Britain it's

been the Human Rights Act and here

in Australia it seems it might be

the Constitution itself. There are

differences between the UK and

Australia in a number of varying

directions. One is that the UK is

subject to certain European-derived

rights cover innocents that we are

not, but in the other direction the

UK is not subject to a

constitutional doctrine of

separation of powers and indeed

judicial power as we are. Our

government is obviously keen to

track its legislative response to government is obviously keen to fast

terrorism. The new ant-terrorism

bill is due to be introduced next terrorism. The new ant-terrorism act

week and unlike the ASIO Bill of

2002 which was the subject of throw

inquiries and dissected and scrut

niesed for 12 months these change

also be subjected to a few days

arbitrary inquiry by a Senate

Committee before they are voted

law T concern about the impact on Committee before they are voted into

human rights and freedom of

expression have been widely

canvassed in 2 past few weeks, but

even putting those to one side

there, are now serious legal

concerns emerging as well. We're

interested in causing problems for concerns emerging as well. We're not

anyone, but my Ken about this is

very simple - the make sure when

laws are passed they are very simple - the make sure when the

and binding. The last thing I would laws are passed they are enforceable

want to see is a constitutional

challenge. Peter Beattie, one of

premiers most eager to see tougher challenge. Peter Beattie, one of the

anti-terror laws, seems a little

surprised that the proposed

legislation could be

unconstitutional, but

lawyers say they've been expecting unconstitutional, but constitutional

such a problem to surface. It effectively would be

effectively would be based on 3 of

the condition institution that has

been breached of the suppositions

that chapter and the judges been breached of the suppositions of

be required to act in a way that that chapter and the judges couldn't

incompatible with their office as be required to act in a way that was

judges and one has to remember that

this is in fact a High Court; that

if it is obsessed with anything,

it's obsessed with precisely that

chapter of the Constitution.

chapter of the Constitution. Chapter

3 in judicial power. Essentially chapter of the Constitution. Chapter

preventive detention and control 3 in judicial power. Essentially the

orders contained in the new

legislation would be asking judges

and magistrates to directly aid

police in detaining people who may

have committed no offence. This

Greg Craven would bring the courts have committed no offence. This says

into disrepute and inevitably lead

to a lying court challenge. The

Prime Minister, though, says his

advice is that the proposed laws

constitutional and no-one in the advice is that the proposed laws are

government's legal team has ever

raised any doubts. Lawyers often

have different opinions as to what

the law means and there's nothing

new for a group of lawyers to have

rain of views about the validity or new for a group of lawyers to have a

otherwise of an approach, but

speaking for the Commonwealth and

based on the advice I have received

from the Crown law authorities at a

Commonwealth level, these laws are

quit constitutional. If Mr Beattie

or anybody else has queries, he

wants to talk to me about it, well

I'm only as far as way as the foenl.

The Commonwealth is fond of

believing its legal advice just as

the state is fond of believing its

legal advice, but at the end of the

day the only legal advice that

matters is what the High Court says

at the end of the kiss. They both

want to work this out. Few

politicians want to publicly appear

to be opposed to tougher terror

laws. There is an argument brewing

about just how tough nay need to be.

The premiers and the Commonwealth

appear to be in broad agreement on

proposalsment the only real most of the legislative

opposition to the preventive

detention and control orders has

been coming from within the

government's own backbench and from

former prime ministers and retired

judges. Where the Premiers and the

Prime Minister do seem the part,

though, is on the so called

shoot-to-kill provisions. You'd get

the impression from some of the

the impression from some of the talk over the last few days that

something new I'm trying to bring

something new I'm trying to bring in - shock, horror, John Howard is

bringing in #134g that will allow

people to shoot to skill. The use

people to shoot to skill. The use of lethal force in certain

circumstances has been part of the

law of states of Australia now for

decades. In fact, ever since police

forces were established they

forces were established they they've had the right to take action to

protect themselves and protect the

public. After all, that's what

police are meant to do, isn't it?

Well, yes, but even former

Well, yes, but even former policemen are asking why more new laws would

be needed if they are simply

replicating provisions that already

exist. I can't see why we would

exist. I can't see why we would need to change the law at all because

to change the law at all because the powers are there. One could only

envisage it's some sort of

politicisation of this particular

issue in light of the fallout of

issue in light of the fallout of the death in London. Mark Craig is a

former Queensland copper and now a

doctrine of criminology. He says it

is true under current laws if a

policeman judges there's a clear

policeman judges there's a clear and present threat, such as a terrorist

threatening to blow himself up, he

can shoot to kill, provided there's

no other option. He says what the

new legislation would do is take

away some of the responsibility of

policemen to justify their actions

and allow the government to better

manage the fallout from mistakes.

The shooting of an innocent man in

the London Underground just after

the London bombings is often cited

as a case in point. It's a

as a case in point. It's a political move to manage and contain fallout

in the event that some unfortunate

incident happens and someone loses

their life and it turns out to be a

mistake there's an out for the

police, an out for the government.

Dr Craig also argues the laws as

proposed in the draft legislation

now in the public domain would put

more pressure on police to make

judgements they may not be properly

equipped to make and allow them to

act on suspicion alone. They're

going to be in situations where

going to be in situations where they are uninformed. Not all police

understand anything about terrorism.

They are asked to make these kind

They are asked to make these kind of very, very split-second decisions

that could cost lives and it's

really, really dangerous. The

government, though, says the

government, though, says the changes it is proposing? This area will

actually give police more certainty

and the circumstances surrounding

the use of force will be more

clearly defined. But the government

also wants to get these bills

through and may be prepared to

compromise to do so. The new

so-called shoot-to-kill provisions

could even be dropped all together

and state and Federal Police will

have to abide by common law. It a a

somewhat complicated and circular

argument for sure, but that's more

reason for more time to be given

reason for more time to be given for public scrutiny and debate than the

government at this stage appears to allow. Political editor Michael Brissenden. Telstra boss Sol Trujillo has confronted plenty of new faces since he said yes to arguably the toughest job in corporate Australia. From the Prime Minister and a legion of other politicians to financial journalists and telecommunications analysts and of course Telstra executives and staff. Some have been hostile. Others prepared to wait and see

if he can lift Australia's biggest telco out of the quicksand.

Finance editor Emma Alberici reports.

We've come a long way in a

relatively short period from a time

when humans directed telephone

traffic in a frenzy of plugs and

wires on a manual switchboard and phones weren't go

phones weren't going anywhere. They

were big and clun kid fixed to a

wall or sitting a mobile on a table.

As always, though, in the course of

remarkable technical development,

the longer the distance and the

longer the call, the higher the

price. Now even that telephone

truism is becoming ancient history.

It's a sunny Sydney morning on

It's a sunny Sydney morning on Manly Beach. Resident Luke Pearce is

calling his mate Alex Hooker in

London over his broadband Internet

connection. (Phone rings) Hello.

Why, Alex. How are you doing? Very

good, very good. We had a visit

good, very good. We had a visit from your nephew the other day, young

Callum. How is the lad? Is this the

end of the line for traditional

telephone calls? The software costs

nothing to download, there are no

rental fees and depending on who

Luke Pearce calls, he'll either pay

nothing or in this case just a few

cents a minute. Bye-bye. The

computer seems the be like the

central part of a lot of households

now. It's delivering entertainment,

it's delivering communication, so

it's delivering communication, so it just seems a natural progression

just seems a natural progression now to move your telephone on to your

computer. The world of the

telecommunications business is

changing and it's changing fast. No

more so than in relation to our

fixed line business where revenues

are falling due to increasing

migration to other services, mobile

services, email, Internet and

services, email, Internet and things that some of you may or may not

that some of you may or may not have heard of like voice-over the

Internet. As customers of Telstra,

the crowd here will probably

the crowd here will probably welcome voice-over the Internet, but as

shareholders, the rise of this new

technology is all bad news.

Increasing usage of these new tell

communication services at the

expense of the traditional fixed

line is now happening not just in

Australia, but all over the world.

The heart and soul of Telstra's

business has been the fixed line.

The hard-wired home and business

phone delivers a 50% profit margin

and that's precisely what's under

attack here. What future is there

for STD and ISD when more and more

customers start to realise they can

make a call to anywhere in the

make a call to anywhere in the world for free or next to nothing? Sol

Trujillo has already presided over

Trujillo has already presided over a $10 billion plunge in the value of

the business. How the company plugs

into this latest phenomenon nom is

critical to its future. The reality

is that the game in which we

compete, the markets in which we

play, are changing. There are no

free kicks any more for any of us

free kicks any more for any of us in the market place. But it's no use

the market place. But it's no use my standing here and kind of wringing

my hands about all of. This we need

to change with the game. How do you

balance the need to blow tect your

profit margins with them merge

of voice-over

of voice-over int

profit margins with them merge jence of voice-over Internet, free

voice-over Internet offerings?

Again, Emma, the issue that voice-over int

Voice-over Internet Protocol

telephony represents is no

telephony represents is no different to what Optus has faced throughout

its 12ier life. That's different in

so far as it is free. The point is

really this: new technologies are

coming along all the time and our

job is to make decisions about

job is to make decisions about which ones we invest in and which one we

roll in our network. Australia's No.

2 telco Optus is in denial.

Regulatory chief Paul Fletcher says

his company doesn't have any plans

to offer free Internet phone calls

to consumers. He's not concerned

about the drift of VoIP, despite

about the drift of VoIP, despite the fact that Luxembourg-based Skype

fact that Luxembourg-based Skype has managed to attract 282,000

Australian users without having

Australian users without having ever advertised here. You can't compete

against free calls, though, can you?

Clearly, any business is going to

struggle to make money if you're

selling products for free. I think

it is also worth making the point,

though, that any sustainable

business model for an

business model for an Internet-based telephony operator is also going to

involve them needing to charge

involve them needing to charge their customers at some point. Nothing

customers at some point. Nothing can stay free forever. Hello. This

stay free forever. Hello. This short film is about how easy it is to use

Skype. Skype and other Internet

telcos provide the ultimate in free

speech, VoIP. Calls between Skype

users do not cost a thing. The

world's biggest provider of

Voice-over Internet Protocol allows

people to make free calls to other

Skype users anywhere in the world.

It's just two years old, but last

month EBay, the giant online

month EBay, the giant online auction house, paid $3.5 billion to but

Skype. EBay is arguably the

shrewdest Pret tor on the Web, but

it was a staggering sum to pay for

it was a staggering sum to pay for a company that brought in only $60

million in refugee you and hasn't

yet made a profit. We were

surprised, frankly, of the

valuiation that EBay put on it give

tuberculosis fact that most Skype

user don't pay Skype any money. It

seems an incredibly high sum to pay

for the company. For many analysts

it's no longer a question of

it's no longer a question of whether voice-over the Internet will wipe

out traditional telephony but how

quickly it will do so. Telstra

offers the business to its business

customers. 3,000 staff online and

all 27,000 due the hook up to the

system next year. Next year

Telstra's residential customers

Telstra's residential customers will be invited to join up but analyst

Neale Anderson said the company

Neale Anderson said the company will be sure to bundle it up rather than

risk cannibalism from other

lucrative services. Telstra and

Optus have no interest in driving

the adoption of this as they've a

lot of existing revenue streams to

protect. EBay already has 3 million

members in Australia. As they

integrate Skype into their business,

each one of them will be offered

each one of them will be offered the service. Potentially, that means

everyone with a broadband

everyone with a broadband connection be will making free phone calls

be will making free phone calls over the Internet and saving themselves

$40 a more or so in line rentals.

It's a compelling offer and one

It's a compelling offer and one that Sol Trujillo will have to match

he announces the results of the Sol Trujillo will have to match when

review next month. Good news to the

new language, VoIP, for instance,

something we'll hear much more of the future. something we'll hear much more of in

Emma Alberici. That report from finance editor being used in chain gangs The idea of prisoners is nothing new to this country. of modern Australia After all, the foundations were built by convict labour. But in South Australia, albeit in a slightly modified way. the tradition continues inmates from Port Augusta prison For a decade now, of the state have been used in remote areas conservation parks. to rebuild and restore for prisoners The camps also offer a chance to prove they're ready for parole. their biggest challenges yet - But now the workers face one of former pastoral lease the restoration of a degraded of the state's outback. in the middle of a hostile part Mike Sexton reports.

If you are driving between Adelaide

and Broken Hill and you blink,

you'll miss Olary. Not surprising,

really, with a population of eight

it isn't much more than a pub and a

few cor gitted iron shacks. But

these days Olary is the entry point

to South Australia's newest

conservation park - 75,000 hectares

of rugged outback known as

Bimbowrie. Granite dopes that rise

out of this landscape combined with

the tree-lined water courses,

particularly the red gum water

courses and the threatened species,

the yellow-footed rock wallaby is

very significant. Bimbowrie was

one of the state's largest sheep very significant. Bimbowrie was once

stations. One year, 75,000 sheep

were shorn here and 200 men worked

in this shearing shed, but the

years have passed and last year the in this shearing shed, but the glory

South Australian Government brought

the property and set about

the country that's been degraded by the property and set about restoring

introduced animals and trees.

In some areas they're so thick

they're actually strangling the

native vegetation from recovery.

Now with the sheep, rabbits and

gone, plus good winter rainfall, Now with the sheep, rabbits and gets

Bimbowrie is freshening up. The

Conservation Department is

to take advantage of the change in Conservation Department is desperate

fortunes by clearing the invase #i6

plants. But the department's

was finding workers willing to come plants. But the department's problem

out to such a remote location to

sweat under the outback sun. The

answer to their cry from help has

come from the big house. We've

bought a MOW camp with low security

prisoners into the area to do some

of the manual labour-intensive

tasks. These in-mates from Port

Augusta jail are spending two weeks

at a time removing hundreds of

trees, pulling weeds, removing old

fences and water courses and

restoring the heritage listed

buildings. Is it hard work? It can buildings. Is it hard work? It can

be at times, yeah. Sometimes it's

very hard. Some of that moving of

the - or pulling up of the piping

was, yeah, pretty back-breaking.

know, it's good. How much better is was, yeah, pretty back-breaking. You

it than being inside? (Laughs). A

million times better. There's nokm

parson. It's pretty good. We get to

come out here away from everyone

it's a good way to do your time. come out here away from everyone and

Dave Maleckas is nearing the end of

his stretch and is such an

enthusiastic worker that even

sometimes his pants have trouble

keeping up with him. This is his

third trip to Bimbowrie and he's rt

r starting to see a difference.

When I first came up here there was

a lot of weeds and stuff like that

growing around and in the last

couple of camps weve been here,

we've problem by cleared # 0% of

them weeds and stuff. In the two

weeks that we're gone and come back

up, they always sprout back up

quicker than I've even noticed and,

yeah, we are eventually getting the

place up pretty good, I reckon.

Similar camps operate across South

Australia and soon an inter

Australia and soon an

intergovernmental agreement will

make them a permanent workforce tor

the government. It isn't only these

parts that benefit. A work camp

helped clean up after the

devastating bushfires on the Eyre

Peninsula. What was the reaction of

locals to the work you were doing?

Great. Every couple of days we had

different person coming up, giving Great. Every couple of days we had a

us a can of Coke, or something like

that, icy pole, stuff like that

to say thanks and we're doing a that, icy pole, stuff like that just

job. For the department of to say thanks and we're doing a good

environment and heritage, the free

labour is an enormous saving and

mens the project for bin Laden can

be fast-tracked. For the workers,

the camp has other benefits like

discipline and fitness and it mayly

a better chance of adjusting to the

outside world. In my own case I had

been sitting around not dough much,

sitting around on the dole, and

getting pretty lazy and I have no

intention of doing that when I get

out. So, the idea of getting into

work, the work ethic is a really

good thing. There was a study done

into the reoffending and we had a

very good success rate with

reoffending. As the camp draw to a

close, the men made a chance

discovery of a fraj Jill Sturt

Desert pea growing on one of the

tracks. It's the most spectacular

sign yet that their hard work is

paying off with the original bush

Bimbowrie reyou've Nating by their paying off with the original bush of

self-esteem. Makes me feel like a

better person and to help out other

communities that really need the

help, too. That's a good felling,

too. - feeling, too.

Finding enlightenment in the desert. That report from Mike Sexton.

They say in the racing game years of bad luck that all you need to turn around is just one good horse. is finding that animal. The problem, of course, For every champion like Makybe Diva there are thousands of thoroughbreds disappointments on the race track. who turn out to be thorough mad hope and blind optimism But few sports are filled with such as horse racing. campaigners have gone back to work In Melbourne, a couple of very old life out of long retired legs. in the hope of squeezing some new Geoff Hutchison reports.

This lady came to me and this is

about 12 weeks ago. She said,

"Laurie, would you train a horse

me?"I said, "Oh, well, I'm pretty "Laurie, would you train a horse for

old now and I've got two or throw

down there. I really don't want to.

She said, "It's Blues Grandee." I down there. I really don't want to."

said, "I won with him 10 years ago.

Going nice and even there. Are you said, "I won with him 10 years ago."

happy with him? Yeah. You know

what, I said OK. So, I didn't take

any short cuts with him because I

knew that all of the flak you would

get if you mugged it. Loork, his

stride is nice. He's no problems.

assen joying his work. - he's stride is nice. He's no problems. He

enjoying his work. He's obedient. I

just wish he was about 10 years

younger. Laurie Cleary is just a

couple of months shy of his 89th

birthday and after half a century

birthday and after half a century of experience inform the racing game,

winning some and losing a lot more

this optimistic trainer remain as

firm believer in the power of

dreams. You feel for a horse. I

don't know, they seem the get the

vibes off you, too. It's all in the

hands. That's all it is. They

understand, it's like teaching a

dog, teaching a horse, teaching a

parrot, anything you like. You can

communicate with animals. (Laughs)

communicate with animals. (Laughs). Oh, yeah. Right now Laurie Cleary

Oh, yeah. Right now Laurie Cleary is trying to keep the dream alive for

owner Nancy Buhler who a few months

ago swapped her horse float for

ownership of a happily retired 13

year nag called Blues Grandee.

This horse is as sound as a bell.

His bone structure is fantastic. His bone structure is fantastic. His tendons and everything is fantastic.

To me, why wouldn't he be up there

with the younger horses? For six

years, the horse had beenlying?y

years, the horse had beenlying?y yet retirement, roaming the hills and

winking at fillies. In his first

start back, well, he finished last,

but Laurie Cleary reckons the old

horse enjoyed the attention almost

as much as he did. Kids were coming

up and putting arms around his neck

and the mums were there. Gee, I

and the mums were there. Gee, I tell you it was a good day. You liked

that as much as winning anything,

don't you? Oh, yes. And down the

years, Laurie Cleary has saddled up

some pretty good horses. None

some pretty good horses. None better than Sans Rival who in 1983 caused

than Sans Rival who in 1983 caused a huge upset to win the prestigious

Oakleigh Plate. As they came

around the turn, we straightened up

and that's when I said my little

prayer, I said, "Lord, just this

once let's beat them." I had help

upstairs and we did. But a year

later, the horse Laurie Cleary

called big, bold and beautiful died

in a fall at Moonee Valley. We came

home that night without our horse.

home that night without our horse. I dropped away from racing then.

(Bell rings) Laurie Cleary may have

been lost to racing for a while,

been lost to racing for a while, but he couldn't stay away for long and

on a brilliant spring day he's come

to Ballarat to give Blues Grandee

another run and another chance to

defi convention that says most

racehorses are past their best at

eight. Best of luck to you, too,

mate. Thanks. A very old friend.

Listen, this crowd here behind you

have come to back your horse.

But the betting ring is quiet and

bookmaker Michael Sampieri is not

sure whether to laugh or just shake

his head. There's a horse going

around in race 4 called Blues

Grandee. That's right. Much money

for him today? I wouldn't think so.

Where do you think he will start at?

100, 200 to 1. Have you seen a

100, 200 to 1. Have you seen a good 13-year-old racehorse? No, never

seen a 13-year-old racehorse before.

Not much interest out here for him?

You wonder why they bother, but

obviously they are enjoying

themselves wit. While buy bow buy

looked on nervously Leigh Coghlan

paid his only house call of the

afternoon. He's satisfied that

afternoon. He's satisfied that Blues Grandee is fit enough to run, but

not sure he'll run very fast.

I saw him race before and he get

around already. It will be

interesting how he handles the

track. Riding Blues Grandee today

another veteran on the comeback track. Riding Blues Grandee today is

trail, 46-year-old Graham Hartshorn.

The feels as though the odds are

lengthiening by the minute. RACE

CALL: Way out in front... Blues

Grandee left the stalls OK and

mained to keep up for a while but

when called upon for something in

the strait, started to think about

far I way fillies and the hills of

home. He finished fit and fresh and

stone motherless last. Yes, well,

enjoyed the race. There was no stone motherless last. Yes, well, he

pressure put on him. I don't know enjoyed the race. There was no undue

yet whether he goes in the good

going and that would be heavy out

there today. Although Nancy Buhler

is disappointed, the old hands are

more philosophical. The oldest

and oldest trainer and oldest more philosophical. The oldest horse

in the race - that's not bad. and oldest trainer and oldest jockey

It is true, of course, that the

racing game drip feeds hope to the

hungry, but it would seem that

Laurie Cleary, Nancy Buhler and

maybe even Blues Grandee haven't

even quit lost their appetite for

yet. What we might do is give him even quit lost their appetite for it

one more run. One more run, Nance?

Alright. But not a grey hair on

horse. Alright. But not a grey hair on the Geoff Hutchison reporting there. And that's the program for tonight. at the same time tomorrow, We'll be back but for now, goodnight. International. Captioning and Subtitling Captions by

This program is not subtitled a large proportion of their lives Humans clearly devote to courtship and mating. compared to some animals. But we're complete amateurs

BIRDSONG Picking the perfect mate a female will make in her life. is the most important decision on her mate having excellent genes The success of her babies all hangs and plentiful resources. But appearances can be deceptive. from Mr Wrong? How does she tell Mr Right A male's really got two options. He can get there by fighting, beating up on other males, driving them off. being so gobsmackingly attractive The other way he can get there is that females flock to him. the goal is always the same - Whatever his tactics, to beat the competition, that he's the one. and convince the girl doesn't run smooth. But the course of true love is difficult for all animals. Finding the perfect mate '50s PARTY MUSIC PLAYS to a nightclub on Friday night Oh, I think anyone that's ever been that sex has generated for life. can come up with a lot of problems