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(generated from captions) northwesterlies Fresh to strong and gusty from minus 2 - 14. and temperatures winds to ease on Thursday The outlook is for moves over the region. as another high up to the weekend. Then fine and sunny conditions Virginia. of our top stories tonight. Before we go, a brief recap in Parliament As John Howard came under pressure

petrol prices, to do something about fuelling fears of further rises. a ruptured pipeline in Alaska was has struck a deal And the ACT Government Narrabundah long-stay caravan park with the buyer of the and residents keep their homes. which will see the park remain open And that's ABC News. '7:30 Report' coming up next. Stay with us now for the Goodnight. Enjoy your evening. International Pty Ltd Captioning and Subtitling Closed Captions provided by This program is captioned live. Welcome to the program. impenetrable grip on his own job, The PM may be basking in his now but today's return of parliament the more uncomfortable realities would have brought home some of of political leadership. Question Time to zero in As expected, Labor used they believe could provide them on the three issues for years - their greatest political opportunity and rising petrol prices. interest rates, industrial relations the PM today came from his own side. But the real political heat for Mr Howard's plea Two backbenchers defied not to cross the floor

Immigration amendment bill to vote against his due to be introduced tomorrow to follow them. and two more reserved their right reports. Political editor Michael Brissenden

Peter Costello's ambitions have

dashed and John Howard is sitting Peter Costello's ambitions have been

securely in the Chesterfields of

high office, but there are still

some familiar and uncomfortable

lumps that need to be resolved.

Quite a lot has changed in politics

in the six weeks since the last

the members and senators that make in the six weeks since the last time

up our great democracy took their

seats in the Parliament. Six weeks

ago leadership was still an issue.

Petrol was 10 cents a litre cheaper

and interest rates were lower. But

some things haven't changed at all.

Everyone's views have remained the

same, as far as I can tell, but I

have nothing further to say this

morning. REPORTER: You were

reported yesterday as saying you

were like Liz to cross the floor on

this issue. Is that the case?

I have nothing further to say.

Are you considering that? No

meetings scheduled. "Unity" used to Are you considering that? No further

be a fe fining catch word of Howard

administrator. That's before the

revolts over civil unions, the

privatisation and the continuing revolts over civil unions, the Snowy

opposition to the Prime Minister's

changes to asylum legislation. It

was the unfinished business of the

last parliamentary term and it

is. There's been no change on my last parliamentary term and it still

thinking or resolve on this issue.

Back in June, a senate committee

with a majority of members

recommended the bill should not

preeds as it is. The committee

supported the back Ben chers who

believe they'd had struck a deal

with the Prime Minister on asylum

and saw his amendments in response

to the unwl come arrival of 43

Papuan asylum seekers as a genuine

breach of faith. They still do. The

Prime Minister, though, seems

determined the stare them down. The

legislation will see all asylum

seekers who arrive by boat

offshore is thought to hit the seekers who arrive by boat processed

House unchanged tomorrow morning. offshore is thought to hit the Lower

today's party room meeting Mr House unchanged tomorrow morning. In

implored those who have strong today's party room meeting Mr Howard

objections to it not to cross the

floor, but to abstain if they felt

they couldn't support the bill.

Petro Georgiou and broad Broadband they couldn't support the bill. Both

declare their intention to oppose

on principle. Petro Georgiou declare their intention to oppose it

told the meeting: remained particularly defiant. He

Not surprisingly, the Opposition is

cheefring them on. Sending people

Nauru sends checks and balances out, cheefring them on. Sending people to

takes them beyond the reach of

Australian law. There's an extra

argument there he didn't have

before. What Russell Broadbent and

the Liberal mod res are do to their

credit is saying everything we

believed in he 12 months ago we

believe if now. If nobody does a

backflip, the law can't pass.

Crossing the floor in the Lower

House won't scuttle the bill. Is

real fight is in the Senate. It is

thought to reach the Upper House

next week and Judith Troeth, the

Senator likely to vote against it,

says she's still considering her

position. If she crossed the floor

the Government would be forced to

rely on the Family First candidate

Steve Fielding but he too is

reserving his position at the

moment. He feels the wait of the

issue and says that Family First

believe Australian families want a

strong border protection system,

also want a fair one. What that strong border protection system, but

means is anyone's guess. He could

either way. It has to be said that means is anyone's guess. He could go

immigration is a niche concern

within the Government's ranks. Most

members are far more worried about

other issues, issues that many are

starting to feel heat on from their

own constituents. Issues like

and interest rates. Issues that are own constituents. Issues like petrol

creating a tangible political

opportunity for Labor. Has the

Minister seen comments by Catholic opportunity for Labor. Has the Prime

bishop Kevin Manning in the latest

edition of the Court of Appeal

Catholic Weekly? The industrial

relations legislation is,

"Manifestly unjust, removed

fundamental measures of fairness,

violated any reasonable notion of a fundamental measures of fairness, it

fair go." I would point out that

even a Catholic bishop does not

speak for all Catholics in this

country, Mr Speaker. I know many

devout mass-going Catholics who are

very strong supporters of this

legislation, Mr Speaker. I think it

is very important to make the

obvious statement that there is no

such thing as a Catholic position

industrial relations. Has the Prime such thing as a Catholic position on

Minister seen comments by mother of

five Debbie Bridgeman of western

noi who told the Sydney Morning five Debbie Bridgeman of western Sid

Herald on 3rd August: "When

says that you put your trust in Herald on 3rd August: "When someone

and feel a certain level of says that you put your trust in them

security, we started plans for the

extension a year-and-a-half ago

knowing we could afford to do that

without expecting interest rates to

continue to rise." Does the Prime

Minister grow with his

Minister grow with his parliamentary secretary Malcolm Turnbull that

people like Debbie Bridgeman have

overdramatised the three rate rises

since the election? At in stage in

the last election campaign did I

give guarantees that interest rates

wouldn't rise. What I said, Mr

Speaker, and as sure as I stand

Speaker, and as sure as I stand here at the dispatch box I know it to be

true, interest rates under the

Coalition will always be lower than

they are under a Labor Government,

Mr Speaker. What I would say to

Debbie, I would say to Debbie, her

Speaker, to Debbie Bridgeman if you

are really interested in long-term

interest rates sustainability and

kfrdty, please, please don't vote

Labor. Well, there's still at least

12 months to go before Debbie will

be forced to make that choice. It

be forced to make that choice. It is clear that Labor would have

preferred to face Peter Costello

when that time comes. But they've

returned to Canberra buoyed by the

prospects the current economic

uncertainty might give them. It is

fair to say many government

backbenchers in marginal seats are

also worried what it might mean for

them. They fear 2007 could be close,

but if anyone can protect them,

but if anyone can protect them, they say, John Howard can. Michael Brissenden. You could call it the showdown at the IT corral. After months of haggling with the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, Telstra has declared it will ditch plans for a $4 billion high-speed Internet network if it has to make concessions to its competitors that it thinks will damage it commercially. The implied threat is that Australians will be left with one of the slowest Broadband Internet services in the world, a claim denied by Communications Minister Helen Coonan, and I'll be talking with her shortly. Telstra's latest snub to the Government is just further evidence of the unprecedented hostility that now marks the relationship between the telco and its major shareholder since Texan phone company executive Sol Trujillo took command. This report from Ben Knight.

Now, if we had decent broad broad

this would be instantaneous. As it

is, looks like it will take 30

seconds to load. It's that sort of

delay that over the course of a day

or a week ends up costing people

like Rob Wellington a lot of money.

I've got a programmer who is down

I've got a programmer who is down in Caulfield. I've got an artist who

Caulfield. I've got an artist who is up in Dalesford and another graphic

designer in Hawthorn and they are

all working with files that vary

from just being 600 K to 80

megabytes. Now 80 megabytes, you

can't actually fit that in your

email box. Most email boxes are a 2

Meg bite limit so we've get to find

round about ways to do things.

Rob Wellington runs an online

production company and under the

current system he has to squeeze a

lot of information through a very

narrow pipe. Because what we call

Broadbent here is by overseas

standards painfully slow. On these

wires, you're lucky to get 1

megabyte of data per second. In

Europe, the average is closer to 7

or 8 and that opens up a whole new

range of services. If you're ageing

and you are frail you can actually

dial up via your broad broad and

dial up via your broad broad and you get a nurse on the other side that

you can actually look in her eyes

and she can look at you. But that

kind of speed is something that

people like Rob Wellington can only

dream of. It could be 20 times

better and 20 times bet ser a huge

difference. So it's a difference

between a little, crumby-looking

poor sounding image and great

Commonwealth with surround sound.

Everyone grows the system needs a

massive upgrade. Telstra was going

to spend $4 billion doing just that,

rolling out a second offering 4

megabyte as second and kick off the

next generation of broad broad

Internet in Australia. But

Internet in Australia. But yesterday Telstra called the whole thing off.

We had different views of cost and

when you have different views of

cost you can't have agreement on

prices and because you can't price

something, you can't sell it.

Telstra wanted it competitors to

Telstra wanted it competitors to pay a fee the use the network this

a fee the use the network this would subsidise its rollout to rural

areas, but the ACCC wasn't having

that. Telstra's network, fibre

network was never part of the plans

they put to us to go out into rural

and remote Australia. Graeme Samuel

said if it wanted to Telstra could

have taken its case to the

competition tribunal. The fact nay

didn't choose to pursue that course

of action suggests they have some

other course of action in mind, and

I can only assume, without having

any other knowledge, what that is

about is attempting to put leverage

on Government to intervene to take

the ACCC out of the process. Well,

we believe there's been a lot of

regulatory game playing from

Telstra. They decided to see if

Telstra. They decided to see if they could get the Government to sweep

away all of the rules about

telecommunications competition,

trying to use the Telstra

privatisation as a bargaining chip

and also trying to use this broad

broad network as a bar baining chip.

The end game was to hold up

wholesale prices so that Telstra

didn't suffer competition from

competitors who had cheaper costs.

Fibre to the nobody was designed to

dramatically improve broad broad

speed in Australia's big cities.

speed in Australia's big cities. The theory goes like this: the

old-fashioned standard telephone

lines that connect every home and

business in Australia, are made

business in Australia, are made from copper wire. They're actually very

good at carrying high-speed broad

broad but they can only do it over

very short distances. So the idea

was to roll out optic fibre

kaibling, not to every home or

business, but to the needs that is

it on the street corners and use

it on the street corners and use the copper wire from that point on to

avoid having to connect optic fibre

to every building. But not everyone

supported the plan. Many people

would argue it's already a redown

tant technology and advances in DSL

technology means that it's probably

going to be a wasted investment

anyway. We don't at this very

anyway. We don't at this very moment in time really need fibre nobody.

Analyst Paul Budde says the

Analyst Paul Budde says the existing copper network is already capable

copper network is already capable of delivering Broadbent 100 times

faster than it currently does.

Telstra only has to flick the

Telstra only has to flick the switch and most of us would have access to

this very high broad broad speed

over the existing copper cable

network. It's called ADSL 2 plus.

We are spending $1850 million on

bringing ADSL 2 plus to our

customers and it's that competition

which is going to drive Telstra and

others in the industry to improve

services, improve speeds. So why

isn't Telstra offering this faster

service to its customers? Well,

service to its customers? Well, that depends on how we see the market

conditions and the regulatory

conditions. So, we'll have an ADSL

expansion when we have it.

expansion when we have it. Telstra's competitors have invested somewhere

between $6 and $9 million in

equipment to provide high-quality,

fast Internet to consumers and

basically Telstra wants to cut that

off and make all of that investment

redundant. But even ADSL 2 isn't a

long-term solution. As the copper

network deteriorates and demands on

the system increase. Everyone else

in the world is facing the same

problem. What you then do is on the

man basis you replace the copper

cable network with fibre networks

and that can be done over the next

5-10 years. Telstra has its own

plan. We'll do it by wireless

because that's unregulated and if

because that's unregulated and if we get the green light we'll do it by

get the green light we'll do it by a wire line if we can get the

regulatory settings right. The last

five years 2 million households and

businesses have deserted Telstra.

Telstra has 8 million customers

Telstra has 8 million customers left and they don't want to follow down

that path and lose another 2

million. Telstra's competitor also

be keeping up the pressure. We

certainly support Australia moving

to higher band width. We see that

happening initially through ADSL 2

plus but we've also said we'll

explore the possibility of bidding

our fibre nobody network. Meanwhile

Rob Wellington is still waiting.

This is an area where we can

This is an area where we can compete internationally or we could compete

internationally if our costs were

the same. We are really good at

producing content. It would be a

real shame if we missed out on this

opportunity simply because we

couldn't get our basic infrastructure right. Ben Knight with that report. And just a short time ago, I spoke with Communications Minister, Senator Helen Coonan, who was in our Canberra studio.

Senator, are you aware of the BRW

business magazine survey of stock

analysts, fund managers and

investment banks to rank

investment banks to rank Australia's top 100 companies, which found that

Mr Trul trul trul was Australia's

lead admired CEO and Telstra was

lead admired CEO and Telstra was the least admired company. This was

least admired company. This was once one of Australia's iconic

institutions. What on Earth has

happened? Well, I this I it can be

again, Kerry. Telstra has a very

good story to tell. It's our major incumbent telecommunication company.

On the cusp of making new

investments and dealing with new

technology that ought to be providing services for all

Australians. It's aven icon company.

Not at the moment is it not.

I think it can be again. What we

need to do is hear - we'll have

Telstra's results on Thursday and

I'm certainly hoeing that Telstra

will then have a co heernt story to

tell the market about how it plans

to take the company forward. Given

the importance of the outcomes

within the telecommunications

industry, the strategic and social

importance of all of this, why

haven't you been able to develop a

more effective partnership with Dennis

and the senior management and the

board? The regulatory framework has

been something that in the current

management has found very difficult

to understand and the importance of

Telstra, the importance for the

social fabric of this country of

getting good telecommunications as

against the returns to shareholders

seems to have been the kind of

approach that's a bit of an

impediment. But we know that

impediment. But we know that Telstra is rolling out, for instance, its 3

G mobile network. That's going to

cover regional areas. If they don't

want to proceed with a fibber

network, there are nine other

telecommunication companies

following the footprint that

was going to. They have the similar following the footprint that Telstra

technology the old ADSL 2 but with

the enhancents of ADSL 2 and plus

that will give fast Broadbent to a

vast number of people. Telstra

to make those sort of decisions and vast number of people. Telstra needs

go to plan B. The fact is that plan

B is not there. The fact is that

vast majority of Australians are B is not there. The fact is that the

still comparative to much of the

rest of the developed world on very

slow broad broad. The Internet

industry association says within

next four years most Australians industry association says within the

will need to have high-speed broad

broad connection at least six times

faster than they are now if our

economy is going to remain

internationally competitive. Given

Telstra's decision, even allowing

for what you are saying about the

possibility of ADSL 2 , it's just

not going to happen within that

of bench mark, is it? Well, I not going to happen within that kind

disagree. ADSL 2 plus have speeds

average about 12 megabytes up to 18, disagree. ADSL 2 plus have speeds on

even 23, depends on some

circumstances. So that's very good

technology and currently no-one is

complaining about the speeds of

broad broad in metropolitan areas

and Telstra -- Nobody is

about their speed within the and Telstra -- Nobody is complaining

metropolitan areas? About the speed

of broad broad in metropolitan

areas. Everybody in metropolitan

areas around Australia is happy

the speed of their broad broad. areas around Australia is happy with

Well, they ought to be in Sydney,

Melbourne, Adelaide, Brisbane

certainly and Perth. They should be

reasonably happy with their speed

broad broad if they have ADSL 2, reasonably happy with their speed of

plus there are nine providers that

already provide these speeds. So it

is available, it is competitive and

it doesn't have to depend on

Telstra. Isn't it also true with

ADSL 2 that the further away you

from the hub, from the exchange, ADSL 2 that the further away you get

slower it gets once you get beyond from the hub, from the exchange, the

1.5kms of -- That's why, Kerry, we

have not only a Broadbent blueprint

out there looking at gitting

national coverage, but we also have

$1.1 billion to invest in getting

the right mix of technologies so

that we're not entirely dependent

ADSL 2 plus or any other version of that we're not entirely dependent on

ADSL because there are wireless

providers, there are satellite

providers for really remote areas

and we have $1.1 billion investment

in getting these solutions. We've

had an expressions of interest with

70 submissions and providers with

very innovative solutions to ensure

that the distance is not

going to be an issue. Wireless that the distance is not necessarily

pushes 50kms from a base station,

for instance. So what we need to do

is not to pick technologies. Fibre

is not the end of the world. It is

only one technology. What we need

do is get the very best mix of only one technology. What we need to

technologies to ensure that there

coverage across Australia and you technologies to ensure that there is

are not going to be disadvantaged

irrespective of where you live.

Senator, you are almost making it

sound like the fibre optic doesn't

really matter. All of this noise,

all of the sound, doesn't really

matter. We've had Telstra in

negotiation for months with the

to try and make this thing happen. negotiation for months with the ACCC

We've had every other Telco

on the outcome, but the way you are We've had every other Telco sweating

talking it's almost as if it

matter. That's not really the talking it's almost as if it doesn't

situation, is it? Well t honest matter. That's not really the honest

situation is that there are the

footprint that Telstra wished to

cover with fibre to the nobody was

only capital cities. It was - not

even Darwin. When you say "only

capital cities" , that's the vast

bulk of Australia, both in terms of

industry and in terms of households,

in terms of social infrastructure,

in terms of hospitals, universities,

pretty much. But it would only

matter if it wasn't available from

any other providers and if those

areas and that footprint you can

already get an average of about 12

Meg bits you go to a provider that

provides it, up to about 18. That's

about the averages of the speedious

can get. Now, are you seriously

telling me, Kerry, that you've got

speed of Broadband that you can telling me, Kerry, that you've got a

access? Very few people of those

footprints have an issue with the

speed that's available from

providers today. What is important,

and I mean, fibre would have been a

welcome addition, no-one is saying

that it wouldn't, but it couldn't

have been put in at the expense of

burning off every competitor that

that is why it has been important

for the regulator to persevere with

trying to get an appropriate access

regime to the new technology, the

new fibre technology, that have

ripped out the copper and would

effectively newted all of the ripped out the copper and would have

competition unless you could get a

proper access price. It's not so

much the principles that are at

issue here, but more the access

price as I understand it. Briefly,

Senator, one last question: the

issue of Telstra shares. You can't

possibly put the shares up for sale

in that climate, can you? I think

what we need to do is take a

decision as to where we pull up as

result of Telstra announcing this decision as to where we pull up as a

particular withdrawal from this

proposal. There's a possibility,

instance, that as they are not proposal. There's a possibility, for

to have this expenditure and they instance, that as they are not going

weren't going to spend it for five

years anyway, that might be

something that would impact

favourably on shares. What we have

to do -- We'll know that soon.

We need to look at all of the

and decide who we will proceed, We need to look at all of the issues

Kerry, and if so the very best way

we can do it. We have options and

both the market and Telstra know

that the government does have other

options. We're certainly not going

to proceed with a retail sale at

price. Senator Coonan, thanks for to proceed with a retail sale at any

talking with us. Thanks, Kerry. in the Australian music industry, During his 50 years every award possible, Jimmy Little's won virtually centre stage. but his talents stretch far beyond of the Year In 1989 he was named Aboriginal

an Order of Australia for his work and he's also been awarded and education programs. with Indigenous health a kidney transplant 2.5 years ago, And now after receiving the Jimmy Little Foundation, he's established kidney health which will focus on improving and early childhood health, Aboriginal communities. especially in remote in central Australia. Murray McLaughlin caught up with him

RADIO: It's the man himself Jimmy

Little is in the studio with me.

Six months out from his 70th

birthday Jimmy Little has a new

mission. I'm here with the message

as well. The mess age is all about

setting up a foundation, a kidney

foundation that should raise some

money, extra money, with shows and

money, extra money, with shows and a lot of entertainers on board.

Hello, my brother. You alright?

Will I play for you? Jimmy Little

spends more time these days comforting kidney patients than he

does on the concert circuit. He was

on diaylsis himself for two years

until he was lucky enough to get a

kidney transplant in February 2004.

(Sings) # Baby blue # Do you know

# The experience opened his eyes to

the appalling statistics of kidney

doze among Indigenous people.

(Sings) # How I want you # Baby

blue # They've been dismissed for

blue # They've been dismissed for so long, this was a shock and it made

me angry to think that it had got

me angry to think that it had got to this stage. So if I can turn my

anger into positive action, along

with like-minded people, then if I

can save somebody a day or a week

can save somebody a day or a week or a month or a year I'm doing

something from my own experience.

Jimmy Little chose Alice Springs

last week to launch his own chart

table foundation. The annual cock

festival if Alice Springs attracts

more than 2,000 primary school

students from more than 40 central

Australian schools and its primary

message is health promotion.

I'm Jim. Hi. Jimmy Little wants his

foundation to promote and improve

kidney health across Indigenous communities.

Especially he wants to help

Especially he wants to help patients from remote communities like this

one in the western desert near the

Northern Territory border with

Western Australia. From here it's a

journey of more than 500kms for

diaylsis treatment in Alice Springs.

People have to go a lot of

kilometres to places where the

clinics are and then have to go

clinics are and then have to go back to country, back home. This is very

taxing on the mind and the spirit

taxing on the mind and the spirit of the whole family and the community.

We don't call it relocation. We

call it dislocation. Sarah Brown

manages a diaylsis clinic in Alice

Springs. Years ago there were 7

Springs. Years ago there were 7 from the Western Desert and today there

are 32 and the clinic mows with at

least 40 more out there with

least 40 more out there with failing kidneys. They go from being a

kidneys. They go from being a member of the community where they are

valued to people really living on

the fringes of society. Their whole

lives revolve around 15 hours of

diaylsis a week which has to happen

every second day. They have to

negotiate housing, they have to

negotiate income. There are

pressures with living in a town to

do with alcohol and violence.

To relieve the burden of isolation

from home, the Western Desert

from home, the Western Desert people are helping themselves. Some of

Australia's best-known artists live

in the Western Desert and they've

raised nearly $1.5 #34i8on from

actions of their own paintings to

run the most remote diaylsis unit

run the most remote diaylsis unit in Australia. It enables desert

patients on diaylsis in Alice

Springs to get home twice a year

Springs to get home twice a year and helped inspire Jimmy Little to set

up his foundation. There can be

hints everywhere in terms of remote

and regional with communities being

assisted by well-meaning and

well-situated people right across

happen the board to install and keep it

happening - the curing, the

prevention and the enabling people

to extend and enjoy their life

those conditions. Sometimes family to extend and enjoy their life under

come and see you, hey? Sometimes.

Yeah, sometimes. He's get to know

our patients from the Western

fairly well over the last 6 months our patients from the Western Desert

or so. He's heard their stories of

the difficulties they have when

come to town and the loneliness the difficulties they have when they

experience and he's - he has come to town and the loneliness they

actually offered them a lot of

comfort. Jimmy Little is now spared

the dislocation and boredom that

comes with diaylsis because he's

a kidney transplant. But being comes with diaylsis because he's had

Aboriginal, he's very much an

exception. Indigenous people are

only one-third as likely to get a

transplant as other people on

diaylsis. Dr Alan Cass is leading a

study into why Aboriginal people

aren't getting equal access to

transplants. There are issues of

people who live remotely being

perhaps many hundreds of even

thousands of kilometres away from

specialist kidney transplant

services. Difficulties in

key tests to tell whether someone services. Difficulties in organising

fit for a transplant, like checking key tests to tell whether someone is

their heart, cardiac status. Issues

of general communication with

Aboriginal kidney patients. Dr Alan

Cass also is advising Jimmy Little

and his new foundation. The

foundation will be driven as much

fill lan tloppy as Little's own foundation will be driven as much by

skills and innate empathies.

Now I know that you won't be here

more. It breaks my heart. I still Now I know that you won't be here no

put on a smile and a face and be

jolly rather than morbid and sad

overly sympathetic, but inside of jolly rather than morbid and sad and

I'm breaking down. (Sings) # Now I overly sympathetic, but inside of me

know you won't want me to go #

I do get hurt in my sensitivity

I just want to do more. The anger I do get hurt in my sensitivity and

me makes me want to do more and the I just want to do more. The anger in

heartbreak wants me to do more.

come back again after. Alright. heartbreak wants me to do more. I'll Murray McLaughlin reporting. And that's the program for tonight. tomorrow, but for now, goodnight. We'll be back at the same time International Pty Ltd Captioning and Subtitling Closed Captions produced by

This program is not subtitled G'day. Welcome to Star Portraits. Hampstead Theatre in North London. We've come to the newly built Royal Institute of British Architects This theatre won an award from the

when it was opened in 2003. as a television actor, Our sitter, who is well known both as an actor and a director. has worked here a wonderful portrait. And I think he'll make THEME MUSIC when he joined RADA Our sitter had a career change at the age of 27 to become an actor. he was in his mid-50s, But it wasn't until that he touched millions that was written specially for him. with a television role what the problem is, Mr Sturgeon. Well, I'll tell you exactly in the garden when he arrived. I was out the back working for the time being, So I asked him if, in the downstairs toilet for me. he'd put it He's only planted it in the... And you know what he's done? ROLF: (Laughs) A classic series. It is, of course, Richard Wilson. I'm very well. How are you doing? How are you, Richard? I'm very fit and well. you've got such an expressive face. I can't wait to see this because

to have your portrait painted? What was your reason for agreeing the idea of getting a portrait, Well, I could say it's nice for a very long while. which I haven't had done