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Labor Party marks a decade in Opposition -

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(generated from captions) about a lot. John Howard, thanks

about a lot. John Howard, thanks for talking with us. Thank you. John Howard has seen off four Labor leaders, although Kim Beazley's back again for a third crack at his nemesis. Labor has suffered a number of low points in the Howard decade, but few have been as desperate as the times it confronts now. Matt Peacock reports on the steep climb ahead for Labor.

. Can I conclude on this note,

thanking you sincerely for the hope,

the faith, and sticking with us

through these years. Thank you,

indeed. The landslide defeat he had

to have. 'Hope' was the key word

for the next leader Kim Beazley,

for the next leader Kim Beazley, who nearly won the following election.

The Labor Party is back in town.

CHEERING AND APPLAUSE Not for the

mortgage belt swingers it wasn't.

They've voted John Howard ever

They've voted John Howard ever since and Kim Beazley's words had a

and Kim Beazley's words had a hollow ring. We will put forward an

alternative government that will

win. Thank you very much. They

didn't. They tried another leader,

but even then the knives were out

for him. Then, the meltdown.

I thank you very much and I'll see

you again. Thank you. CHEERING AND

APPLAUSE The flipside to the Howard

decade. Labor out of power and

likely to stay there. You don't

likely to stay there. You don't last to be 10 years PM of this country

to be 10 years PM of this country if you're an idiot and he's not. He's

a very skilled prition politician.

If you've got anything you'd say

about John Howard and there's lots

of things I'd like to say about him,

but one thing you acknowledge is

persistence. Kim Beazley takes some

comfort in that, even two-time

losers can win. What I take and

learn from John Howard is pursue

your core views, make them salient

in politics. But in politics

disunity is death and on John

Howard's anniversary, Labor's

divisions have scarcely been more

East. There has been an immense

about of nonsense in Victoria and

sleaze in Victoria. A small number

of people, standover mer commants

thugs and other sleazebags. Forget

about naz el gazing, we as

individuals are no longer important.

Of course at different times other

people try to get me focussed on

internals of the party to protect people try to get me focussed on the

them, advance them or whatever, but

I won't. If Kim wants to wonder why

people are contemplating their

navels it's because the view down

there is a lot better than looking

into the future. According to

Cavalier, Kim Beazley just doesn't into the future. According to Rodney

get it. On the Liberal country

side you see policemen, pilots, get it. On the Liberal country party

nurses, small businessmen merchant

bankers, a rich array of society.

On the Labor side, it is strictly

staffer, staffer staffer. It's a

monopoly. But for Kim Beazley, it's

all good. This is why we will never

surrender. We will never surrender.

He maintains that John Howard's

industrial relations laws have

his party the shot in the arm that industrial relations laws have given

it needs. I detect as I go round

party a very much changed level of it needs. I detect as I go round the

commitment. They really want to

fight now and I think that's a good

thing. And even when you've got

things like pre-selection ballots

going on. What is interesting is

that there are a lot of people out

there that want to represent the

party. Come the next election it

will be the Government's to lose

more than Labor's to win and

researcher Hugh Mackay thinks the

coalition's safe with John Howard

the helm. The appeal of John Howard coalition's safe with John Howard at

really rests on two things. One is

continuing economic prosperity,

which means people credit him with

having the superb economic

credentials. The other, though, is

that he really does seem to be an

ordinary bloke. If it's an economic

boom time, John Howard's the only

politician, the only PM they've

known. Unless the Labor Party politician, the only PM they've ever

offers them something really to

for, they're going to vote for John offers them something really to vote

Howard. Author Rebecca Huntley,

formerly on Labor's National Policy

Committee researched the views of

hundreds of young voters for her

latest book. The key problem about

the Labor Party strategy is to

out that the Government is corrupt the Labor Party strategy is to point

and it lies to people and for the

majority of young people they're

like, oh, politicians lie to us,

somebody alert the media.? " They somebody alert the media.?

actually don't believe politicians

will tell the truth. If you've got

a low faith in politicians that

tactic just isn't going to work.

There may be another problem.

According to Rodney Cavalier the

party's true believers are now an

enzaenged species. In NSW

effectively the Labor Party has

disappeared below. There might be

22,000 ticket members. The reality

is in terms of active members,

excludeing the political class,

people who are salaried and paid to

do what they do, there are fewer

than 1,000. That's the least of Kim

Beazley's current worries. The

blood-letting over Simon Crean

blood-letting over Simon Crean means that his own position is now even

more vulnerable. I don't even begin

to entertain that sort of

speculation. What I'm on about is

winning the next election. Right

now, that might seem like a remote

possibility. But in politics,

anything's possible. John Howard's

defeatable, we all are. The

Government has to be in deep, deep

trouble economically for there to

trouble economically for there to be any prospect of Labor winning.

We've done it before, we done it

under Whitlam and Hawke and Keating

there's simply no reason why we

can't do it now. Matt Peacock's look at Labor ends this special program on 10 years of Australian political history and a glimpse into the future. Incidentally, John Clarke and Bryan Dawe will be back on air next week in their usual Thursday spot to remind us of the present in their own unique way.