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(generated from captions) and thunderstorms There's a chance of showers along the coast tomorrow. Wagga - chance of a shower, Goulburn - a few showers, otherwise fine and partly cloudy

in the afternoon. with winds freshening

and the ACT The forecast for Canberra the chance of a shower tomorrow. a fine night then west to north-west winds Moderate to fresh and temperatures from 16-23. a fine but cooler day on Friday The outlook is for to the WSW. as the winds turn around The weekend should be fine over us as a high-pressure system ridges into the early part of next week. and persists Virginia. And that's the news to this minute. The '7:30 Report' is next, with a news update at 8.30. and I'll be back From me, goodnight. International Pty Ltd Captioning and Subtitling Closed Captions provided by

Going back tomorrow is optimistic.

It will increasingly become an

expectation that for every sick day

certificate. you must produce a medical

certificate. This is a scare you must produce a medical

campaign. Tonight - the sting in

tail of the new workplace laws that campaign. Tonight - the sting in the

has doctors going crook. Iousof

common sense, treat people as

adults. More medical certificate

would increase the strain on the

system. And power, precision and

passion - football Uruguay style. passion - football Uruguay style. system. And power, precision and

Behind enemy lines, as Australia

makes its lunge for World Cup glery.

- glory. Mentally, we've got to be

prepared whatever they throw at us,

on and off the field. live. This program is captioned

Welcome to the program. Whatever else they achieved, operations yesterday's counter-terrorism attention on the possibility certainly focused the nation's of an attack on Australian soil. last night The dramatic media headlines by a furious debate on the airwaves, and today were followed

fuelled in parts by a fracas Court yesterday. outside Melbourne's Magistrates' continued to press their case Inside that court today lawyers to have two of the men charged with organisation released on bail. belonging to a terrorist In the end bail was refused,

concern about the fear but the lawyers are expressing more trial by media - that their clients will suffer expressed even by police. a concern that's already been In another development,

were stockpiling chemicals allegations that the Sydney suspects for the manufacture of explosives for a national chemical register. have also sparked renewed calls

be practical? But would such a measure Mary Gearin reports.

As far as I'm concerned we should

bring back the death penalty.

What's he doing carrying hand guns

and allegedly firing at police?

There's fear, there's There's fear, there's anger,

suspicion. There's doubt. It's a

very dangerous thing. Comment is

fuelled by politicians. It is

fuelled by talkback commentators.

is fuelled by other commentators. fuelled by talkback commentators. It

does create an hysteria. All in all, is fuelled by other commentators. It

representing men accused it's a tricky time to be a lawyer

representing men accused of being it's a tricky time to be a lawyer

members of a terrorist organisation.

But Rob Stary believes he and his

defence colleagues haven't been

helped by comments like these,

deemed from a NSW press conference

across the nation as his clients

were in court. We were not prepared

to allow an event to occur here, so

in a very pre-emptive, coordinated

and focussed way, the two

state-based agencies and the two state-based agencies and the two and focussed way, the two

Commonwealth agencies, working clab

bratly together, have drawn the

investigation to a concluld. This

was the appropriate time to take

action and the matter is - has

culminated in the arrests you've

seen today. I was satisfied that

this state was under an imminent

threat of potentially a

terrorist act. As the Premier threat of potentially a catastrophic

outlined, involving the attempted

stockpiling of chemicals stockpiling of chemicals and outlined, involving the attempted

material that could be used in a stockpiling of chemicals and related

major explosion. There's been a

contamination process clearly

taken place. It's not appropriate contamination process clearly that's

when one looks at the notion of the

separation of powers or those

principles and the role of the

executive. It's simply not

appropriate for state premiers or

the Prime Minister or any other

about the thwarting of politician to tune nicically talk

about the thwarting of a politician to tune nicically talk

catastrophic terrorist attack. That

was not borne out firstly in the

nature of the charges that my

clients faced in Melbourne. Do you

think it's jeopardised their

of getting a fair trial? It is fair think it's jeopardised their chances

to say that my view is they've been

irrep probably damaged. It is

inconceive age they could get a

trial in the foreseeable future. inconceive age they could get a fair

Rob Stary is also the President of

the criminal defence lawyers

association. His Melbourne-based the criminal defence lawyers

clients have been charged with

directing a terrorist organisation

or being members of one. And he

believes they've been unfairly

included in chen tri about the

Sydney suspects. They've been

charged with planning a terrorist

attack. In Victoria also, Premier

Steve Bracks had his say. I think

the public can feel assured that

identified and disrupted. this particular threat has been

identified and disrupted. Today a this particular threat has been

spokeswoman for the Premier said Mr

Bracks is well ail wear the matter

will be determined by the courts.

A ment where a politician says,

"There's a real danger. We've

averted it. We've found these

people." Something like that that

suggests these are the people

implies they must be guilty. Now,

the politician isn't actually

that. It's problem by not what was the politician isn't actually saying

really meant. But there's a concern

in law that maybe

in law that maybe the jury would really meant. But there's a concern

affected. They'll be getting a fair in law that maybe the jury would get

trial with the presumption of

innocence. What was provided

yesterday was information to the

public on a very serious matter and

some very serious charges that are

being laid against individuals.

We are not in trial. I make the

point that I made earlier. This

trial will be a long, long way off

and that gives a chance for

gives a chance everything to settle down. That

everything to settle down. That gives a chance to end the

possibility of things being

prejudicial. I'm finding this

terrorism report just getting

somewhat hysterical. It is just

allegations at this moment. In

allegations at this moment. There

were no bombs in actual production

-- Wooh, I wouldn't agree with that.

How can you exaggerate this when

How can you exaggerate this when the police, not the politicians, the police are

police, not the politicians, the police are saying they foiled a

major terrorist attack? Long-time

Melbourne broadcaster Neil Mitchell

says public interest justifies the

level of interest but sees how the

juries in the case might be

influenced. I hope not but I think

any discussion has that potential

and you've got to balance that

against the public benefit and the

public need to discuss it. Politic commentary aside,

public need to discuss it. Politic commentary aside, this image of a

group of the accused supporters

yesterday has created its own

problems. I've heard things like

this in my life. I don like to see

this in cause. I'm with you and I

agree entirely. About four or five

of them picking on one man, hardly

the Australian way, endeavouring to

kick him in the head. The sight of

that was hideous. Of course it is

unhelpful and nothing to do with that was hideous. Of course it is unhelpful and nothing to do with

unhelpful and nothing to do with our clients and their case or merits or

otherwise of their case. It's an

otherwise of their case. It's an unhappenful process. A Melbourne

magistrate described the

magistrate described the prosecution case as presented in court so far

case as presented in court so far as "vague and a working progress"

"vague and a working progress". Prosecutors will try to establish

that the Sydney suspects were

that the Sydney suspects were trying to stockpile chemicals similar to

those used in the London bombings.

The focus on these chemicals prompted

The focus on these chemicals prompted liberal backbencher and

former police officer Jason Wood to

refew his call for a national

register for those who have access

to specific and dangerous chemical,

biological and radiological

substances. If you undertake a

substances. If you undertake a check on any person you wouldn't know if

they've got a licence to process

explosives and this is right across

the country. So it is fundamentally

important when terrorists are getting hold of

important when terrorists are getting hold of explosives and

chemicals that investigators know

who has what. It is crazy that they

actually some how relying on

actually some how relying on falling over this information. They need it

and they need it now. Homeland

Security expert Anthony Bergin is

not so sure. I would urge some

caution in moving to a very

draconian regime of registrations,

permits, ASIO background checks, et cetera.

permits, ASIO background checks, et cetera. Acetonone and peroxide are

highly available products. For hair

breach and also nail polish. It

could turn into a regulatory

nightmare. Unless we carefully

nightmare. Unless we carefully think through what sort of rauj is

appropriate. As the ramifications appropriate. As the ramifications of this week's raids appropriate. As the ramifications of this week's raids continue to play

out, the 18 accused men must now

wait and trust in the court system.

It will be a difficult trial. There

will be a lot of media focus. But

the legal process floip can deal with that. Mary Gearin with that report. For decades, sick leave has been enshrined as a minimum condition of employment for Australian workers.

It remains that way under the Government's industrial relations overhaul. But what will change once the legislation goes through

is that all employers will have the right to demand a medical certificate from their workers for each and every day of illness, rather than just one certificate to cover how ever many days a worker takes off. Though it's an option for employers rather than mandatory, trade unions are already claiming that mandatory medical certificates are likely to become a feature of the workplace overtime and doctors are concerned that it's an extra load

of unnecessary paperwork. Employer groups have dismissed the objections as nothing more than a scare campaign.

Heather Ewart reports on a little-known element of the Government's workplace changes.

In today's workplace, many Australians

In today's workplace, many Australians are allowed on average

up to four days of sick leave

up to four days of sick leave before having to produce a doctor's

certificate. A few more days. I

think going back tomorrow is

optimistic. Under the government's

industrial relations shake-up, all

employers will now have the option

to demand a certificate from day

one. And if you don't, you'd be at

risk potentially of losing your

day's pay. It adds pressure to risk potentially of losing your day's pay. It adds pressure to work

ing families when they are already

under enough pressure. There's

nothing in the change that would

nothing in the change that would say that there will be a huge influx of

requirements for certificates

anymore than there are today. This

is a scare campaign. We already

is a scare campaign. We already know that there's about 100 million

visits a year by Australians to GPs, so

visits a year by Australians to GPs, so who knows how many more visits

would be required. We've got to

would be required. We've got to get a grip. Get some reality back into

the situation. Use of common sense.

Treat people as adults. Give them

the benefit of some leeway with

their sick leave. Tucked away on

page 117 of the 700-page workplace page 117 of the 700-page workplace rels

page 117 of the 700-page Workplace Relations Amendment Bill is a

page 117 of the 700-page Workplace Relations Amendment Bill is a short

5-point explanation of the new sick

leave provisions, enabling

leave provisions, enabling employers to insist on medical certificate.

This has not been highlighted or

promoted by the government. Yet,

promoted by the government. Yet, how it is put no practice could have

wide-spread ramifications. There

wide-spread ramifications. There are some employers undoubtedly who

some employers undoubtedly who would see this as a way of titaning up on

what they might regard as people

Abbasing their sick leave

Abbasing their sick leave entitlements or accessive

absenteeism. Others might be

inclined to follow suit. People

might think my employer isn't going

to do that and we'll be OK. What

happens ultimately is the culture

happens ultimately is the culture of workplaces change and it will

increasingly become an expect

increasingly become an expect sthaun for every sick day you must produce

a medical certificate. #6 Just for today and tomorrow. It's a medical certificate. #6 Just for today and tomorrow. It's not just

the unions who are worried. The

doctors are sweating on this,

doctors are sweating on this, saying they're already bogged down with

they're already bogged down with too much paperwork and can't cope with

anymore. One of the biggest

anymore. One of the biggest reasons for people leaving the medical

profession today is the huge burden

of red tape and paperwork they are

having to undergo. There's a

having to undergo. There's a severe man power shortage at the moment.

We've not enough dock hours to do

the medical work. We have to

maximise that and be efficient with the medical work. We have to maximise that and be efficient with

our time. Doing certificates for

things that are unnecessary is

probably over the top. The medical

profession's plea to employers is

"please don't force your workers to

add to already overcrowded waiting

rooms with ailments like the common

cold just so they can get a

cold just so they can get a doctor's certificate." We've got to

understand that this whole ethos of

a certificate for everything,

whether it's child care, day care,

swimming, school and even

swimming, school and even employment for common colds is really a

situation spinning out of control.

This clinic in inner suburban

Melbourne is one of a diminishing

number that still offers

bulk-billing so it's always busy.

The management fears that the new

laws could mean doctors will have

laws could mean doctors will have to make difficult choices about who to

treat. To have an additional

treat. To have an additional requirement for Paul Medhursts

requirement for Paul Medhursts would just increase the strain on the

system and and it could be an extra

million visits a year or two

million visits a year or two million however some will miss out because

there's not an unlimited supply of

those. There are concerns, too,

about flow-on effects. The more you

clog up health care, the more

clog up health care, the more likely it is that others have to find

it is that others have to find other places to go for medical services

and the impact. Obviously the one

place that's open 24 hours a day to

get medical support is the

get medical support is the emergency department of the hospital. The

doctors argue these are just some

doctors argue these are just some of the potential side effects the

government hasn't thought through

when a drafted page 117 of the work

police changes. But of course

police changes. But of course what's unknown here is how many employers

might be tempted to take up the new

option and that's a matter of some

dispute. For example, in option and that's a matter of some dispute. For example, in some

existing awards that cover areas

like hospitality and clothing

trades, there are already

trades, there are already provisions for employers to demand a medical

certificate or statutory

from day one of a worker's illness. certificate or statutory declaration

Key employer groups point out that

other industries have not

automatically followed suit.

A large proportion haven't because

they haven't thought it necessary

their particular industry and there they haven't thought it necessary in is no reason why is no reason why they would their particular industry and there

necessarily move to this under the

new system. Look, when you give all

of these power s

of these powers to employers it is

likely a number of employers are

going to use these powers. Employer

groups counter in any event worker

also have protection if they can't

produce a certificate due to

circumstances beyond their control.

The fact is that the legislation

provides a safety net for employ yeses that

yeses that allows them an exemption provides a safety net for employ

due to no fault of their own they

can't complay. But if an employer

takes the view that, look, I think

you could have got a medical

certificate, it's going to be very

hard for an employee to dispute

that. They'd have to go to court to

try and argue that they're entitled

to be paid for the day they took

and for most employees that's just to be paid for the day they took off

not going to be a not going to be a practical option. and for most employees that's just

The minister for workplace

Kevin Andrews was unavailable for The minister for workplace relations

interview but his office pointed to Kevin Andrews was unavailable for an

blue flu as some justification for

the changes. That's when workers

take sick leave to avoid

prohibitions on strike action.

Blue flu has plagued building and

construction sites in Perth over

past three months. Employees with construction sites in Perth over the

the support of their unions have

walked off the job, taken strike

action, but then come to their

employer the next day and say, "We

were all sick, so we'd like to be

paid sick leave." Building industry

employers in Western Australia are

delighted they now have the option

to say no. The benefit is with a

more focus currently on these to say no. The benefit is with a lot

employers perhaps are going to be more focus currently on these issues

more aware they have the right to

demand proof of illness before

employees are paid for sick leave.

The final word on this from the

doctors, who warn that employers

pay an unexpected price if they doctors, who warn that employers may

seize upon their new sick leave

powers. It's quite possible people

will go to work when it's not the

right thing to do and it is

important they do think twice about

going to work because it can

actually infect their colleague ps

and bring the workplace down.

And that could well prove to be a

powerful deterrent for many

employers. A word of clarification

on the introduction to that story

before we move on, the change does

not mean the prospect of a separate

medical certificate for each and

every day's sick leave, but a

certificate every time you take every day's sick leave, but a

leave without exception. certificate every time you take sick That report from Heather Ewart.

At the height of the Cold War, outback Maralinga in the South Australian for British atomic weapons. served as a testing ground has now been cleaned up, While the radioactive fallout that servicemen who worked there there have been persistent claims were left carrying a deadly legacy. Despite the hazards they faced, the entitlements nuclear veterans never received and women given to many other servicemen in a theatre of war. because they didn't serve Now, with their numbers dwindling, to leave a record one long-time campaigner has decided at Maralinga of what he and others went through and other nuclear test sites. Mike Sexton reports.

They were naive. They were young.

They had little or no understand

They had little or no understanding

of the effects of radiation on

bodies. It's been half a century of the effects of radiation on their

since the last atomic bomb was

detonated at Maralinga, but for the

men who worked at the weapons range

the shockwaves are still

reverberating. You are living with

time bomb inside of you, perhaps. reverberating. You are living with a

Waiting for it to manifest itself

a disease like cancer or leukaemia Waiting for it to manifest itself in

or whatever. It's a bit like living

on death row waiting for the final

sentence, as I put it. Avon Hudson

was a 23-year-old RAAF leading

aircraftsman when he arrived at

Maralinga in 1960. By then the

British had stopped testing A bombs

and started what was known as the o

trials at the old bomb sites.

I had no idea when I went out to

this site, nor did the chap ice was

working with, know that there had

been a boom exploded there and we

set up these experiments and

starting building these heavy steel

firing platforms just 200m from

Ground Zero. While not as

spectacular as the atmospheric

t minor trials were far dirtiest spectacular as the atmospheric tests

with experimental blasts scattering

uranium and plutonium and berrylium

across the desert. Scientists wore

protective clothing at Taranki but

the closest he got to being warned

of the potential

of the potential dangers of the

was a conversation with a so-called of the potential dangers of the work

boffin. He did indicate to me once

that there was a hazard down there.

"You shouldn't spend any more time

than you needed to." That was the

only indication that I was ever

given from anybody in those sort of

positions that there might have

something - some danger. But then positions that there might have been

the time I never get much notice of something - some danger. But then at

it. Eventually a few of them like

Hudson began to question that. They

are dressed up like mummies when

we're having fun in our shirt

sleeves or down to the waist, you

see. As soon as you kind of look at

the difference you understand (a)

their naivety and (b) the duplicity

of the British and Australian

Governments in this whole affair.

Avon Hudson is one of more than 10,

10,000 servicemen who took part in Avon Hudson is one of more than

the nuclear tests. Since the 1980s

when he helped form the National

Nuclear Veterans' Association, he's

fought to lift the veil of secrecy

surrounding the tests and gain

recognition for the men who worked

there. Many died early on after

leaving Maralinga from various

complaints, mainly radiation

indoused cancers and leukaemias and

the like. Some committed suicide,

for instance. Veterans' Affairs so

far has paid out some $5,000 to

eight ex-serving personnel who've

made successful claims, related to

their participation in the nuclear

tests. While some individuals have

been compensated, the nuclear

veterans believe they should all be

entitled to benefits under

Commonwealth laws covering those

who've served in workplaces deemed

hazardous. Australian governments

have never classified Maralinga as

hazardous workplace but five years have never classified Maralinga as a

ago then Science Minister Nick

Minchin celebrated a $100 million

clean-up of the site paid for by

clean-up of the site paid for by the British. Obviously when atomic

weapons were developed no-one

weapons were developed no-one really knew how dangerous they were or how

dangerous it would be to deal with

them, but now we know and it is

terrific we've accepted the

responsibility to clean up the mess

that was created. The most recent

inquiry into veterans' entitlements,

the Clarke Review, concluded by

common sense and by any reasonable

measure service in the test

operations must be regarded as

involving hazards beyond those of

normal peacetime duties, adding

normal peacetime duties, adding that natural justice for these members

natural justice for these members is long overdue. As a result of the

Clarke Review last year, the

government commit they'd would

respond positively to the findings

of this current health study. We

intend to do that and make sure

those who are affected receive

those who are affected receive their full and just entitlements. It is

divided into two parts. The first

divided into two parts. The first is a mortality study. In effect,

finding out who has died and why.

The second is a dose reconstruction

committee, whose task it is to

decide what amounts of radiation

those at Maralinga were exposed to.

Now the results of this health

Now the results of this health study should decide what, if anything,

should decide what, if anything, the veterans are entitled to. But after

more than 40iers and four inquiries,

including a royal commission, Avon

Hudson is deeply cynical about the process.

Hudson is deeply cynical about the process. Successive governments

process. Successive governments have ordered another inquiry or another

committee to be set out, sometimes

they take 3-5 years. That's another

3-5 years. In that time another 10%

of the veterans are dead. Given

another five years, there won't be

any of us left, quite frankly.

There's no intention at all to

stall. We want to find out about

stall. We want to find out about the health of those who stall. We want to find out about the health of those who participated in

the nuclear tests here in Australia

as quickly as we can. At 68, Avon

Hudson knows his time is running out. He wants out. He want s

out. He wants to leave a record of

the experiences of those at

Maralinga and other nuclear test

sites. He's co-written a become

detailing some of the veterans'

stories. Royalties from which will

be used to build a memorial to

be used to build a memorial to those who lived and worked there. This will be the

who lived and worked there. This will be the last great effort I

will be the last great effort I make because I'm getting too tired and

worn out. After that, I don't know what can happen. Mike Sexton with that report. When the Socceroos line up against Uruguay in Montevideo this weekend in the first leg of the World Cup qualifier, they'll be keen to avenge one of the more heartbreaking moments in Australian sporting history. It was here four years ago that Uruguay buried Australia's World Cup dream. This time the Socceroos believe they're better prepared

after that bitter experience, against them. but the odds are stacked in front of a fanatical home crowd Uruguay is a red-hot favourite as an obsession - which treats football two World Cup championships, an obsession that has produced a population of just 3.5 million. a mighty effort for a nation with Montevideo and Buenos Aires Peter Wilkins reports from where the Socceroos are in training.

this. It's only natural to do this. And

And this...dl from the market And this...dl from the market place

to the beach along the estuary

there's a presence. It is round, it

bounces and in Uruguay it sings.

To walk through Uruguayan football

is to journey through the history

the modern game. We have two is to journey through the history of

official replicas, this one and the

1950 that was won in

1950 that was won in Brazil. This official replicas, this one and the

one was won in Montevideo. This

fervour is passed through

generations and rments all

virtuosos. Uruguayans are hugely

proud of their football heritage.

How many countries have a now seem

totally dedicated to round ball

worship? This labour of love is

found in the heart of a world

Stadium. football monument, the centre Nario found in the heart of a world

This is a nice picture of the

inauguration, the first day they

played in the Sent ten tri Stadium.

The 1950 World Cup triumph over

lasting love, ever Brazil sits like the memory of a

lasting love, ever warming the Brazil sits like the memory of a

heart. This is a culture Australia

has to compete with. It's not just

case of 11 against 11. It's a whole has to compete with. It's not just a

perspective on life.

TRANSLATION: In Uruguay, we have a

saying that's very close to our

hearts. It says that football - I

love it more than my wife, my old

lady, my mother. You've got lady, my mother. You've got to love it more than my wife, my old

the underdog tag into the game and lady, my mother. You've got to take

mentally we've got to be prepared

for whatever they throw at us, on

and off the field. It's hard not to

be infected by the passion

Uruguayans have for their football.

Sure, it's a passion that could go

over the top and we've seen several

unsavoury incidents over the past

few years, but most true Uruguayan

football devotees see that as a

is a celebration misrepresentation. Football to them

is a celebration of life. We put a misrepresentation. Football to them

lot of passion in the pitch and

people, the small minority, may put lot of passion in the pitch and some

passion out of the pitch, but it

ends when the ref ends it should

end. This is the preferred face of

Uruguayan football. What do you

to see your Uruguayan football. What do you love

to see your players do? TRANSLATION: Uruguayan football. What do you love

Obviously as a trainer you want to

see your team play really well. To

make a spectacle. To play

beautifully. To play really well.

The sublime moment that every team

wants is a goal and that's what we

are always searching for. In the

passion stakes, it's a hard game to

match.

match. CHEERING When you are passion stakes, it's a hard game to

playing at home and with the

national team playing in this

statement it's great. You can see

them on the field. I don't know if

you saw it last time, but you can

feel 60,000 people and the whole

country looking forward to the game

and it's really nice. In the pure

numbers game, Australia falls well

short, despite high

short, despite high levels of numbers game, Australia falls well

participation the country can still

only find 18 places at its national

institute. In your your, population

3.5 million, there are 128 First

Division teams. Across football-mad

South America, Australia can't

possibly compete. Perhaps we

got the same football culture where possibly compete. Perhaps we haven't

they are saturated with it day in

and day out. We have a lot

and day out. We have a lot of they are saturated with it day in

players that just don't play

football. They play different

sports. Only there there is only

sport. They play football and sports. Only there there is only one

it. But that doesn't hinder the sport. They play football and that's

confidence of Australia's new

well-travelled breed. We are now

quietly confident that Australia is

growing as a football nation.

Will that confidence carry them

landscape through to counter the intimidating

landscape of the away game? through to counter the intimidating

Scotland, Argentina, Iran, yourure.

yourure...it's in this domain Scotland, Argentina, Iran,

Australian soccer hasn't quite met

the challenge. For 32 years. To

the higher ranked team with the the challenge. For 32 years. To boat

flourishing history. We can't be

be intimidated by them. scared of them. We can't go out and

be intimidated by them. That's the scared of them. We can't go out and

major point. We've got to go out

say, "No, we're going the get a major point. We've got to go out and

result go with with that sort of

attitude. That's the attitude theby

also have and if we go in with that

attitude we've players with the

ability to get us a good result.

They'll have to find that inspect

factor where the heart and the head

match the skill of the feet. TRANSLATION:

TRANSLATION: I appreciate this

interview. Hi to the Australian

people and your Spanish is

improving. Gracia.

improving. E x cellento.

live in hope. improving. E x cellento. Australians Peter Wilkins reporting there. And that's the program for tonight. for a special edition Join us tomorrow of the Whitlam Government to mark the dismissal

of the Whitlam Government to mark the dismissal by Governor-General Sir John Kerr. with teh principal players - It will feature extensive interviews Gough Whitlam and Malcolm Fraser - but looking to the future. not just reflecting on the past, Until then, goodnight. International Pty Ltd Captioning and Subtitling Closed Captions produced by

This program is not subtitled

This program is not subtitled

APPLAUSE Hello, I'm James O'Loghlin. Welcome to The New Inventors. Tonight, we'll see a pool table the smallest room in the house. that you can use in even that'll help mechanics. A disappearing hole

other way of saying this - And, well, there's no definitely been crying out for something the world has for a long time - of measuring bulls' testicles. a whole new way On our panel tonight, Veena Sahajwallah, are engineering professor