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(generated from captions) We're put --you put as well be

puttin' a gun to your head and

pullin' the trigger than sniff

petrol. Tonight, Alice through the

surveillance camera. A bleak

discouraging shift with the petrol

patrol. It's the first time he'd

sniffed. He as fix yaited on the

can, he fell asleep and the can

locked off on his moug and he died

that way. The Opal hope. Can it

break the scourge of sniffing? that way. The Opal hope. Can it

Ablett! Ablett! And - heaven, hell

and the right place in history for

the man they call God. We're not

sort of canonising people. Infamy

and the Hall of Fame - the flawed

legacy of Gary Ablett. For him to

get within 100 miles of this, he

to show improvement in these areas get within 100 miles of this, he has

if you're going to put him in there.

Oh what a mark!

This program is captioned live. Welcome to the program. Tonight we start with a question: is Chinese dissent Chen Yonglin in 40 years? the most important defector And if so,

continue to insist why does the Australian Government like any other asylum seeker? he'll be dealt with the information Chen is offering Some intelligence analysts believe to guarantee him asylum. should be enough in itself

he's put himself in danger Others say reason enough and that that should be to go back to China. for him not to be forced it won't be rushed. But the government says

of China's economy Could the size and importance have anything to do with it? "yes", say others. "No", says the government; reports. Political editor Michael Brissenden

On June 4, 1989, the tanks rolled

into Tiananmen Square. The

movement was crushed. In Australia, into Tiananmen Square. The democracy

a tearful Prime Minister opened the

door and offered asylum to

of Chinese students. Incredibly, door and offered asylum to thousands

despite the horrors and the risks,

we have witnessed acts of

indescribable bravery on our

television screens. Exactly 16

later, June 4, 2005, and Chen television screens. Exactly 16 years

Yonglin walks into the public glare

after trying to defect a week

earlier from his position at the

Chinese Consulate in Sydney. He

he can no longer tolerate his Chinese Consulate in Sydney. He says

country's continued persecution of

dissidents. His is a singular

democratic protest. But this is a

different world. Chen's bid for

political asylum has been rejected.

Australia's relationship with China

has moved from tears to free trade,

and the numbers, it seems, are not

on his side. I should think that

people sitting inside government on his side. I should think that the

squirming in their seats right now. people sitting inside government are

We've just announced that

negotiations for the free trade

agreement will begin. China will

trade in connect issues. Wouldn't

any different if we had a similar trade in connect issues. Wouldn't be

problems with the United States or

Indonesia. They will be saying: you

want a good relationship with us,

don't cause us unnecessary problems.

It's the engine room of the

economy. We pant to be part of it. It's the engine room of the world's

Australia's economic future is more

close le dependent on China than

ever. A free trade deal is now

formally discussed. The Prime ever. A free trade deal is now being

Minister makes frequent vis visits

to Beijing. Robert Hill, the

Minister, is in the Chinese capital to Beijing. Robert Hill, the Defence

destination for Australian today. It's a popular and important

Government ministers. But is this

why we seem to be tiptoeing around

what some at least believe is the

most significant diplomatic

defection of the past 40 years?

You must know that when a senior

official from a consulate wants to

defect, you just don't say in

bugger off and go back to China. defect, you just don't say in effect

at least take a bit of time, you bugger off and go back to China. You

don't within 24 hours say that you can't

can't have plit political asylum.

You would say this could be very

important, it could be very

interesting. Let's see if we can

talk to this person. Surely the

Australian Security Intelligence

Organisation would like to spend

many, many hours with him.

Journalist Brian Toohey is a

spook watcher. He says Chen Journalist Brian Toohey is a veteran

Yonglin's defection should be seen

as a golden opportunities. Now that

someone's offering them vast

of information on a plate for free, someone's offering them vast amounts

you think they'd grab it with both

hands. If they don't, there is

something wrong with the way ASIO

doing its job. If they want our something wrong with the way ASIO is

natural gas, they will buy it. If

they want a free trade agreement

with us, they will go ahead. They

are in an invidious position now.

Australia they look like they're punishing are in an invidious position now. If

Australia because we give this man'

pro*eks. Others also believe the

government should be acting to

protect someone who's clearly put

themselves in great danger. The

Chinese Ambassador Madame Fu has

said that there will be sweet

brought to pair if Mr Chen's said that there will be sweet reason

repatriated. Look, that is hogwash.

There are 250,000 people in

re-education camps in China at the

moment according to the US State

Department. This is a police state.

It will treat very harshly with Mr

Chen. He will get a very, very long

jail sentence, possibly be subject

to torture, may be executed if

returned to China. Those who know

first hand agree.

first hand agree HuJian came to

Australia after Tiananmen. As such

he has first-hand knowledge of the

determination of the Chinese

authorities to stamp out dissents.

China may have transformed

economically in the past few years

but swoping Mao suits for business

suits he says hasn't changed

everything If you are a dissident

and you really want to speak out

your opinions in the cause --and

cause some impact to a society,

it will be definite

it will be definitely punished. cause some impact to a society, then

The message from the Australian

Government, though, is clear:

procedure will not be overturned

Mr Chen. And our trade relationship procedure will not be overturned for

will have no influence on the

outcome of his case. I don't think

these things should be decided on

economic grounds. I think they

should be decided very squarely on

the grounds that he's claimed,

whether or not he has a legitimate

ground to be considered a refugee,

think that's the ground on which ground to be considered a refugee, I

these things should be decided, and

I have no doubt that they will be

deseeded on those grounds But the

opposition says procedure has

already been breached, and that

exceptions have already been made.

The problem is they just don't know

precisely what's been done and why.

Shadow Foreign Minister Kevin Rudd

says he asked for a briefing on the

Chen matter three days ago, and he

says he's still heard nothing.

I am deeply concerned about the

I am deeply concerned about the fact that if government wants these

matters handled on a bipartisan

basis then why in heaven do they

want to prevent the opposition from

being briefed on the details of

being briefed on the details of this case? Perhaps they are embarrassed

about some of the details

about some of the details concerning this case. I just don't know.

this case. I just don't know. Second point I'd make is this: what we

point I'd make is this: what we know from Senator Vanstone, the

Immigration Minister, is that Mr

Downer has already rejected an

application for territorial asylum.

The one common thread here is that

everyone agrees this is a

everyone agrees this is a difficult dilemma that's come at a delicate

time. If we give this man asylum I

should think the Chinese would be

quite displeaseded. Tiananmen

quite displeaseded. Tiananmen Square is a fading memory and whether

whether what he says is true or not,

he is not a democracy movement.

Whatever information he has, he is

just one defector. It must seem a

lonely place to be right now but he

more than most would also know that

these days China's human rights

record is more often than not

obscured by the smog of its obscured by the smog of its economic development. Political editor Michael Brissenden. Three years ago, the South Australian Coroner issued a blistering finding in the death of petrol-sniffing victim Kunmanara Thompson. The coroner said "the fact that conditions that led to petrol sniffing - "like poverty, hunger, illness, poor education,

"almost total unemployment and a sense of hopelessness - "should exist exist among a group of people defined by race "in the 21st century "in a developed country like Australia "is a disgrace and should shame us all". Well, three years later, those conditions are still a disgrace, and presumably should still shame us all, because, as one symptom, petrol sniffing continues to take a devastating toll. The Federal Government's Budget last month provided $10 million to be spent over the next few years

to introduce into Aboriginal communities a new mix of petrol which does not give sniffers a high. But in Central Australia, there's a growing argument that the new petrol won't be distributed widely enough. Murray McLaughlin reports from Alice Springs. These two houses in Alice Springs are known as Sniffer Central among youth and health workers and the police. It's part of a small Aboriginal community called Hoppys Camp on a bank of the usually dry Charles River at the north end of town. After a spate of criminal offences affecting nearby businesses,

police recently ran night-time surveillance along the riverbed to determine the number of petrol sniffers congregating there. The police were startled by what they saw. We knew the scope of the amount of offences being committed in the area. However, I don't think we were initially expecting the amount of individuals involved. One night we counted 31 people in one area surrounding the camp but it was showing consistency in large numbers of people taking those things.

The police also kept secret watch over two car yards across the highway from Hoppys Camp. Till the police operation, one yard had been hit 270 times in the last year by sniffers desperate for petrol. Next door, Alan Thorp, too, was a regular target. Daytime as well - we've been hit in the middle of the day, cars parked out on the kerb. Even this week, we got one car raided this week. We went out to move the car and the fuel was gone. (Laughs) So they're getting cheeky. He's going into the fuel tank. He's starting to suck on it.

This video recorded by police captured a petrol siphoner on the job. Siphoning fuel now. They're not taking, like, large volumes at any one time. They're only after about a Coke can full. Theo, start making your way down the side. Stop! Police! Many of the young people who inhabit Hoppys Camp have come to Alice Springs from western desert communities. Blair McFarland, who works for the federally funded Central Australian Youth Link-Up Service, has charted the drift into town from places out west. Older members of the families get sick and might need to come in for renal dialysis and their families sort of come with them as support and people come into town for banking and going to concerts and often the younger people don't get the lifts back particularly if they fall in with a bunch of sniffers. And at Hoppys Camp, as at many remote communities in Central Australia, families are intimidated by sniffers. One of the houses there has got a man who's had a stroke in it. He can't stop the sniffers coming in there, basically, and when he had the stroke, there were sniffers in his house and they basically stepped over his body for a while until somebody else came out, found him and sort of took him to the hospital. Some of the out-of-town sniffers at Hoppys Camp have travelled to Alice Springs because standard petrol is no longer available in their home communities. In some places, petrol has been replaced with Avgas or aviation fuel because its smell is not attractive to sniffers. But that advantage has disappeared as the composition of Avgas has changed.

Now the fuel company BP has created a new mix of petrol called Opal, which has no effect on sniffers. It's harder to get fuel on communities

because they're using more Avgas. Some communities are starting to switch to Opal fuel.

So the kids are also telling us that, yeah, the availability of fuel in a major regional centre is much easier than being out on communities. Opal petrol is 33 cents a litre more expensive than standard petrol and last month's Federal Budget allowed $10 million to subsidise the introduction of Opal to remote Aboriginal communities. But the scheme will not be universal. It won't, for example, include the community of Willowra, 250 kilometres north of Alice Springs. People in that community have had on again-off again sniffing for a number of years. Last year a young fellow died there. It was the first time that he'd sniffed. He asphyxiated on the can. He fell asleep and the can locked off on his mouth and he died that way. Willowra, home to about 200 people, is applying to join the Opal scheme. But while it waits for approval from Canberra, the community has decided to order in the new fuel and will itself subsidise the 33 cents a litre extra cost.

The store has been broken into, the petrol pumps, numerous cars have been broken into by these people trying to siphon petrol out

and I think that is why the community has taken this decision - "Let's bite the bullet, let's pay the extra money." In Alice Springs,

the Central Australian Youth Link-Up Service, CAYLUS, which supports community programs to help petrol sniffers,

is arguing for a blanket roll-out of the new Opal petrol across Central Australia. Tristan Ray points to the experience at Mutitjulu, the Aboriginal community at Uluru and near the resort township of Yulara. Mutitjulu, like Alice Springs, is a place that's near a source of sniffable fuel

and it's surrounded by communities that use non-sniffable fuels. It has meant that, over the years, people have gravitated to Mutitjulu because it's 1 kilometre from Ayres Rock and Yulara is a ready source of petrol because at the moment close to 500,000 tourists go through there a year. The new Opal fuel has only recently arrived in the Northern Territory. The main users are coastal and island communities in the Top End. The Central Australian zone identified by CAYLUS contains around 500 sniffers. 20 million litres of petrol a year are used across that zone and it would cost an estimated $8 million a year subsidy to replace that with Opal. We know that we already are covering that cost in property damage, in tertiary health costs with people who are in permanent care from brain damage. We know that we're spending for that region far more than $8 million a year already on just looking after the damage caused by petrol sniffing. In the end, it's not really practical to convert the whole of Australia's fuel supply to this Opal petrol. In the end, what we've got to do is try to get people off sniffing, and that means that in their home communities, there's got to be a bit of a community campaign, probably led by the elders. Communities have railed for decades against the scourges of substance abuse. More than 25 years ago, Alison Hunt was leading a march in Alice Springs against grog and violence. Today she leads a program which deals in traditional ways with petrol sniffing and sees a community role in dealing with those out-of-town sniffers who've come seeking petrol in Alice Springs. We can have the families and the elders to come in and talk about it in town here, if this is where the problem is, and try and find some solutions.

I know there are many angry businesspeople in this town. Fewer are angry in Alice Springs now that the police have clamped down on crime related to petrol sniffing. After their surveillance at Hoppys Camp, police made 11 arrests and referred others to government welfare agencies. Illegal activity has fallen off at Alan Thorp's garage but he's left sad rather than angry. They're kids, you know. It's just sad to see them with so little to do in life that they've gotta go and blow their brains. You might as well be puttin' a gun to your head and pullin' the trigger to sniff petrol. It's not very good for you. Murray McLaughlin with that report.

On the basis of his 248-game career, Gary Ablett should have been an automatic and unanimous inclusion in the Australian Rules Football Hall of Fame. But while he was a genius on the ground, his life off the field was a litany of disasters, culminating in his involvement with a young female fan who died of a drug overdose in Ablett's hotel room. Consequently,

even though he's been eligible for induction into the Hall of Fame for the past four years, it took until last night

for his inclusion among the pantheon of Aussie Rules greats, and then only after a sometimes bitter debate. Mick Bunworth reports.

Ablett! Down goes Frawley. Ablett

still a chance. He has two on him

now. Still Gary Ablett! Great

football! Line it up, son and kick

the goal. He goes for the pass.

the goal. He goes for the pass. Even better. Ablett, Ablett! It is a

decision deemed as inevitable as it

is controversial. Gary Ablett's

induction into the AFL's Hall of

Fame has been a talking point in

Australian rules circles since he

first became eligible for years ago.

Over the years we have overlooked

Gary for several reasons. Despite

the fact his playing record is an

overwhelming endorsement of his

right to belong to this group. The

reasons we did that are to do with

off-the-field events that took

off-the-field events that took place some years after Gary's playing

career ended. There was no doubting

his legacy on the field of battle.

248 games, mostly for the Geelong

football club, more than 1,000

goals, and a momentous September

afternoon in 1989, when he kicked

nine goals in a losing grand final

side. He really didn't know a lot

about the opposition. It was

amazing. He was just a fellow who

had natural ability and natural

talent. Garry Hocking played with

Ablett during his glory years at

Geelong. I used to room with him a

fair amount of time, and you know,

just - just loved footy, loved

people. Sort of knew him more in

people. Sort of knew him more in the born-again Christian stage and he

was up at 7, maybe 6.30 sometimes

and he would be at the front of the

bed just reading through the Bible

and that sort of thing. It was when

forced Gary Ablett to again face

forced Gary Ablett to again face the limelight he so hated that the

football community struggled with

the question of honouring him. The

manic named God by his adoring

manic named God by his adoring fanss with with a 20-year-old girl in a

Melbourne hotel room in February

2000 when she died from a toxic

cocktail of drugs after a five-day

bender with her idol. The coroner

found that Ablett had not only

participated in the drug binge with

her, he had neglected to protect

her, he had neglected to protect the young woman, who was half his age

and infatuated with him. His

biographer says the fame that

Ablett's skill attracted could well

have contributed to his downfall.

You've been treated like a

You've been treated like a superstar right from your add less sent years.

You grow up in this little fish

bowl, where ever whim, every desire

is catered for. By the time you

reach the end of your year, you

reach the end of your year, you have lost that support network and

lost that support network and you're thrut into the real world. Last

week, ed eie McGuire attacked the

Hall of Fame committee for

Hall of Fame committee for honouring Ablett, despite selection criteria

covering a player's record, ability,

integrity, sportsmanship and

character. The AFL now must come ou

and I think get rid of these

selectors because they have

selectors because they have breemped their duty of care in filling that

cry tear ya. They have totally

disdisregarded it. For Gary Ablett

to get within 100 miles of this, he

has to show improvement in these

areas, if you're going to put him

there. We're not canonising people.

areas, if you're going to put him in there. We're not canonising people.

Veteran football writer Mike

Veteran football writer Mike Sheahan has been on the selection committee

since its inception. He asks

since its inception. He asks critics how long they want Ablett's

transgressions to overshadow the

sheer joy he brought legions of

football fans. I have four kids of

my own. I just feel so much for the

Horan family and just dread the

thought that it could be my family.

I mean, we have been as mindful as

we possibly can be about the hurt

that they've suffered, about the

ongoing publicity and about the

ongoing publicity and about the fact that a young lady lost her life.

that a young lady lost her life. But there is another part to that and

there's the rehabilitation and the

forgiveness. In the context of

football ball, and it is

football ball, and it is essentially a football decision, I think the

majority of us took the view that

sufficient time had passed for us

sufficient time had passed for us to say we would welcome him into the

Hall of Fame. But inclusion in the

AFL Hall of Fame does not

necessarily mark the beginning of

Gary Ablett's rehabilitation. Like

the latest act in one of Australian sport's great

sport's greatest Greek tragedies,

last night's induction ceremony

last night's induction ceremony said as much about life off the football

field as on it. It's sad that Gary

is not here, but we understand

that's his choice, a choice that he

has made under medical advice. By

any definition, Gary Ablett is a

football genius. A football genius

who has always been a troubled soul.

Just hours before the induction

ceremony, Melbourne's 'Herald Sun'

took a photograph of Gary Ablett

took a photograph of Gary Ablett at a camp where he is seeking

a camp where he is seeking treatment for depression. It was left to his

manager to read the champion's

words. It is a great honour and

privilege to be inducted into the

AFL Hall of Fame. It is with great

regret and with humble apologies

that I am unable to attend this

wonderful occasion. However, due to

my current battle with depression I

am not in a position to be able to

accept this award in person. I did

not make this decision lightly, but

due to medical advice, it was

due to medical advice, it was deemed best for my health that I do not

attend tonight. Those who love

football hope the honour may help

Gary Ablett return to the fold,

especially since he has two sons

playing with Geelong, and already

showing hints of his freakish

ability. I hope this sort of

encourages him, in his personal

problems at the moment, and maybe

long term, to come back and say, he

has two boys playing at Geelong, he

wants to be part of what they're

doing in their footy career.

doing in their footy career. Geelong would love to see him back, we all

would. He was a freak that comes

along not just once in every

generation but once in every five

generations, I think. Mick Bunworth with that report. Every four years, the Paralympics serve to remind us all that physical disability is no insurmountable barrier to sporting achievement. It's a message that's been taken literally by one group of surfers in Australia, who are helping people with disabilities discover the thrill of surf. Jonathan Harley reports.

When we first started taking

disabled people to the beach, the

amount of stares, the amount of

comments that we had from the

general public was unbelievable.

These gentle waves at Gerroa on

New South

These gentle waves at Gerroa on the New South Wales south coast may

New South Wales south coast may not be world championship material but

they are producing some unlikely

surfing legends. I don't really

think there is nothing I can't do,

really. I do surfing, what can't I

do, you know. None more

extraordinary than Kelly McCann.

Ever since she was in a terrible

Ever since she was in a terrible car accident when she was just 3 years

old, Kelly McCann's had no movement

in her arms or legs, and can't even

breathe properly without a

ventilator. People see the chair

before they see you and they just

think oh my God the poor person.

think oh my God the poor person. She won't be able to do much. I don't

think of myself as disabled. I

usually forget because I do

everything I want to do and need to

do to keep me happy. Keep my mind

off it. My biggest fear as a

off it. My biggest fear as a nurse

is can I get air to her? The

logistics, we can work around.

The logistics are mind boggling.

The logistics are mind boggling. She will hold her breath, yeah, I

will control it... While disabled

surfs association founder Gary

Blaschke works out the plan with

Blaschke works out the plan with his team of volunteers,... 1, 2, 3.

team of volunteers,... 1, 2, 3... Kelly McCann forgoes her electric

ventilator for a hand pumped one. This

This entire exercise hinges on

keeping Kelly's airway dry. Surfing,

the worst case scenario can be

getting water in the trachey.

Probably the last time about six

waves, depending on how she is

going, you know. Depending on how

many wipe-outs we get, yeah! Kelly

McCann's never come off the board

yets and for all the jokes, there

there's a serious effort to keep it

that way. The air bag is off just

for the short time of the ride.

For me, lying on the board, looking

up at the sky, see the sun, just

up at the sky, see the sun, just see the clouds, see the water beside

the clouds, see the water beside you and all these people are confident

in you, and... you're confident in

them, and being free and when

them, and being free and when you're gliding along the water, feels like

you're flying. Flying or something

like that. So..., yeah, it's great.

Righto, guys, line up. Gary

Righto, guys, line up. Gary Blaschke set up the Disabled Surfing

Association after a motorbike

accident threatened to end his

surfing days. I've taken blind

people out that, you know, 35 years

old, never felt sand between his

toes and have never been to the

beach. Didn't know what a wave was,

had to explain how waves were

created. Nearly 20 years later,

thousands like Len Snowdown are

getting help to catch waves.

That wave, that wave was

unbelievable! Len Snowdown last an

arm and a leg in 1992 in a train

accident at BHP's Wollongong steel

works. That was 13 years ago now.

It's still extremely hard to

actually come to terms with. He had

never been on a surfboard before

never been on a surfboard before the accident, but strange as it may

seem, surfing became the key to his

recovery. It's given me the

opportunity to experience life to

the maximum, and to be accepted as

not a disabled person but as a

person having a surf. Nevertheless,

the association only just stays

afloat, thanks to a lost good will

and a trickle of donations. It

and a trickle of donations. It can't buy enough boards, aquatic

wheelchairs and other bits of kit

wheelchairs and other bits of kit to support what may be Australia's

fastest-growing surfing movement.

We have something to sell to the

rest of the world. I think we can

teach a lot of people around the

world not to lock your disabled

people up in rooms and let them

waste away, let 'em get out there

and experience what life is all

about. Fun. Surfing. But as Kelly

McCann discovered, the surf is an

unpredictable thing. Yeah, go.

I was just flying along the waves

and next thing I know, I thought I

would die for five seconds there.

Underwater. Next thing I know the

surfboard's there and there peace

surfboard's there and there peace no Kelly. Are you right? Suction.

Suction. Suction is needed to clear

the water from Kelly's McCann's

airway. Everyone else go for a walk,

please. It's a painful procedure,

and distressing to watch. But it's

not enough to keep Kelly McCann out

of the water. I don't know what's

happening, but... I want to go back in. (LAUGHTER)

This is everything about getting

This is everything about getting out of the comfort zone. I was in my

comfort zone before I did this and

now I'm out of it. You have to come

down and see it to believe it. I

didn't believe it either.

Extraordinary and inspiring to

Extraordinary and inspiring to think of the effort behind the laughs. Jonathan Harley reporting there. That's the program for tonight. We'll be back at the same time tomorrow, but for now, goodnight. Captions by Captioning and Subtitling International.