Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Disclaimer: The Parliamentary Library does not warrant the accuracy of closed captions. These are derived automatically from the broadcaster's signal.
ABC News 24: The World -

View in ParlView

(generated from captions) This Program is Captioned

Live. Good evening, I'm Scott bevan.

bevan. On tonight's program - the Gul of Mexico oil disaster

has now spilt over into has now spilt over into BP's corporate headquarters and on to the balance sheet. Stung by

the massive clean up cost, the

oil giant's announced a change

of chief executive and a record

loss of nearly $19 billion. You're watching The World.

We want to know knoe if the

new boss Bob is going to take

them in a new direction, beyond

petroleum as they originally promised. Adding to the petroleum as they originally

blockade BP service stations company's woes protestors

across London. We'll take you live to the British capital.

Also ahead - the security

scramble to unmask the

whistleblower who leaked Afghan

war files. Ready, willing able, Nauru issues its war files. Ready, willing and invitation to invitation to house asylum

seekers. And a brave face, a

Spanish transplant recipient Spanish

shows off a medical first.

It's been a dark day for

British oil giant BP facing battles on several fronts.

Still reeling from the Gulf of

Mexico oil spill the company

has just announced record quarterly losses of nearly quarterly losses of nearly $19 deal billion. It's also having to

deal with its embattled deal with its embattled chief

executive Tony Hayward stepping executive Tony Hayward

down and the anger is seeping into the company's home soil as

well. Protestors have blockade

ing BP service stations across London. We'll speak to our London correspondent Phil

Williams in a moment but first

this report from Brian

Milligan. Despite his exit Tony

Hayward is guaranteed a place Hayward is guaranteed a

in history. For the gaffe that

was a text book case of how not to apologise for was a text book case of how not

to apologise for a

wants this thing over more than disaster. There's no-one who

I do, I want my life I do, I want my life back When

Mr Hayward was mixtured sailing

in the summer it was in the summer it was appeared as though he had got his life back. Question now is whether

his departure can put BP back

monthsity in the on course given the tide of an

States. Getting rid of Tony

Hayward is of huge really because it's a symbolic Hayward is of huge significance

really because it's a symbolic act. It's sacrificing a Brit

for an American, p perception

it's only an American who is it's only in the States alternate moment

going to be able to save the

day there. That American is Bob day there. That American is

Dudley a man who has not only

itself but for in a previous been dealing with the oil spill

job for BP in Russia coped with harassment from the KGB as

well. Today's changes at BP

will only be the start. One

fear is

fear is that jol though the

company is putting money aside

to pay for the disaster it

not be enough to cover the to pay for the disaster it may

final bill, so BP will remain

at the mercy of the courts in America. And things are going

from bad to worse for BP.

Protestors are blockading its service stations across London. service stations across London. Our correspondent Philip

Williams has been speaking to

the the organisers. This is one of

the about 50 BP service station the about 50 BP

s that have been shut down in

central London this morning.

It's all the work of Green

they put peace. They put up the banner,

they put up the fences and as

you can see there's no business

going on today. John Sovan is from Greenpeace UK, what's this

all about. Basically BP have

got today announced that they've

got a new boss and they've got

rid of the old boss and I think

that what we're trying to get

across today is

across today is that that's not

enough. Actually BP promised to

go beyond be trol yum. Tony go beyond be trol yum. Tony

took it back wards into the Canadian Tarzan, into the

arctic wilderness, into the

Gulf of Mexico with catastrophic consequences. We catastrophic consequences.

want the know if the new boss

Bob is going to take them in a

new direction, more money going

into renewable energy, cleaner

fuels. That's the future and

BP. That's what we would like that should be the future of

to see them do. Your to see them do. Your critic

would say really what you've

done is create a stunt here but

you have attracted a lot of

you may cross the legal line publicity. Are you concerned

here, that you've actually broken the law? Well look, broken the law? Well look, this is a very peaceful demonstration, we've rebanded

the BP logo from a competition

that we did on our

that we did on our website. We

had several thousand entrants,

more than 2 million people came

to visit the descience. We've

just rebanded it just rebanded it very

peacefully and we put a banner basically saying what BP said

it was going to do which is go

beyond petroleum and that's the

key issue. We want to know

whether BP is going to do what

it said it would do. Stop

developing all this high-risk

oil like in the Gulf of Mexico or the Canadian

or the Canadian or the or the Canadian or the arctic

alternative. Start investing and start developing the

more money in renewable energy.

That's the future and the

sooner that BP get that message

the more likely it is that we

will see a successful company coming out of it. They

in central London. Greenpeace, certainly got that message here

as I say, have shut down all the petrol stations in central

business if nothing else London, it will cost a day's

seen because these signs will be

seen by many of the motorists

and through the media. So that

message has well and truly been received. Our message has well and truly been

received. Our correspondent

Philip William there's in

London talking to Greenpeace

UK's John Sovan and Phil will

be on the line shortly from

London. Back in the Gulf London. Back in the Gulf of

Mexico BP has resumed its clean

up after a tropical storm

The immediate forced ships to leave the area.

The immediate rupture has been

capped for 10 days but marine

scientists are worried about

how far the effects of the oil

may spread. They have been

using mini submarines 200

nautical miles away from the

original oil leak to assess the threat. Right now we've got

about half a knot of current coming against the submersible

making it a little bit

difficult to manoeuvre but

certainly capable of moving oil droplets

droplets quite a long distance. The pilot program's a mechanical arm to collect

samples to be analysed for

signs of damage although the

more serious affects may more serious affects may take

longer to be felt. For more on

the turmoil at BP let's go live to our London to our London correspondent Philip Williams. Philip, good evening, I guess this

announcement of the departure

of Tony Hayward comes as no

great surprise in light of

great surprise in light of the

events of the past few

months? No, no surprise at all.

It's been foreshadowed for some

time. In fact it had been widely anticipated over the last last couple of days last couple of days and now

it's happened and they can't go

back on it and they're hoping

that this will draw a line

under the whole sorry episode

and that they will now be able

to say look, we've got a

to say look, we've got a new

team at the helm and team at the helm and we're going to move forward and

establish new relationships

particularly with the US particularly with the US Government which have been so battered, a key relationship

there. And also that sending there. And also that sending a market signal that they market signal that they are back in business, that they're not going to fold and that despite all the enormous difficulties and the enormous

losses that they can

recover. But Phil, I read one

report where the New

report where the New Orleans

mayor was quoted as saying BP

will have to go a lot further

do a lot more yet to regain the

trust of local people and as we

just saw in your package as

well there's anger as well in

London. So it would seem from

all of that that there's still

a long way to go. One man

removed or one man stepping

down doesn't change this

situation? No, it doesn't, it's

really symbolic. He's a

sacrificial lamb in a sense and it doesn't mean

it doesn't mean that the it doesn't mean that the

clean-up's going to be any

different, it doesn't mean the different, it doesn't mean the

engineering is going to be any

different. It really is saying

look, yes, we realise this man

wasn't the right man at the

right time politically and he's gone, we're hoping to establish

new relationships. It's

cosmetic in a sense because he was seen as a good was seen as a good operator. He

was actually seen as doing the

clean-up in an efficient way

and directing it well but

something had to give because of that groundswell of Ange e, particularly in

particularly in tus,

particularly amongst the

politicians. So now they have politicians. So now they have

an American they can deal with, someone with someone with an American

accent, perhaps someone they

feel they can do business with

more readily that is not so

remote and seen as a remote and seen as a foreigner.

So they're hoping that they can

now move ahead. Phil, on top of the Hayward departure the company company has announced it's

dealing with a second quarter

loss of almost $19 billion

Australian, these two pieces of

Australian, these two pieces of

news, how has the share market

responded so far to them? Well, the share market has initially

went down a little, you can imagine

imagine the shock of that

enormous figure, that enormous

loss. It's the biggest in UK corporate history and you

compare that with the previous

quarter in last year where they

profit. But it's now recovered 0.5%.

0.5%. That's really a quite

0.5%. That's really a quite stunning turn around given the

depths of those reports and

those financial losses. What it

really says is investors are now perhaps regaining a little

confidence and seeing that perhaps this company is going to survive and that its

fundamentals, despite all of

this trouble and all of asset sales

sales they're going to

somewhere to make, are actually

pretty good. How much concern

is there still in Britain,

Philip, about what this

disaster means for BP's

future? Well, there is still

concern, of course, that this has been so terribly damaging has been so terribly damaging

to a company that is terribly

important to the British economy, so many of the pension

funds have invested heavily in this company but there is, this company but there is, I

think, just a glimmer of hope now that the worst is past.

What they can't do though is

predict what the outcome may be

in terms of reaction of in terms of reaction of US courts and litigation could

courts and litigation could

continue for years and years and bleed the company slowly over those years too. So

whether we end up with some sort

sort of legal ring fence,

perhaps a deal with the US Government in the future, Government in the future, we

don't know but that is the unpredictable element. Of course the other unpredictable

element is with the oil still

not permanently capped can they actually get that

actually get that engineering

feat right and if not then

there's far more serious trouble ahead for this company. London correspondent

Philip Williams, thanks so much for your time tonight. Thank you. The whistleblower you. The whistleblower website WikiLeaks has released tens of

thousands of secret documents

on the war in Afghanistan and

the White House says it's a threat to national security.

threat to national security. The papers reveal The papers reveal previously unreported civilian casualties.

There are also suggestions that Pakistani intelligence was cooperating with the Taliban. Here's Here's Washington correspondent Craig McMurtrie. In London WikiLeaks founder WikiLeaks founder Australian Julian Assange was un

apologetic. Most of the deaths

in this war are as a result of the every day

the every day squalor of war,

not the big incidences. The

massive leak of thousands of Afghanistan field reports,

cables and raw cables and raw intelligence covers accidents, the

frustrations of dealing with

under prepared Afghan forces and disturbing accounts of civilian casualties. There does

appear to be evidence of war

crimes in this material. The

White House says it's nothing

new but is furious

new but is furious nonetheless. There are nonetheless. There are names,

there are operations, there's logistics, there's sources. In

the reams of data there are reports of insurgents using

heat-seeking surface to air

missiles and incident s

involving Australians. A

December 2008 mortar engagement

with insurgents that left an

Australian soldier wounded. A July 2006 attack where an

Australian and Danish soldier were injured possibly were injured possibly by friendly fire when their fortified position collapsed. An account of Australians

firing on a car at a

checkpoint, children were taken

to hospital. And there's a

brief US diplomatic cable brief US diplomatic cable from

April 2007 reporting that

Canberra was ready to nearly

double its deployment but

wouldn't announce it for five

days asking that the US not

publicly mention the decision.

The reports which cover the period up until the

period up until the end of last

year also suggest Pakistan's

military spy service, the ISI,

has been helping Afghan insurgents plan attacks. Pakistan denies it and a spokesman and a spokesman for

Afghanistan's Hamid Karzai says most of the leaked information

isn't new. Speculation about

the WikiLeaks source centres on

US army intelligence analyst

Private Bradley Manning who is already

already facing trial for passing classified material to

the website. The WikiLeaks

founder believes he's being watched. The Australian

Government was asked by the

United States to engage in certain forms of surveillance

of my person. And the website

says it has another 15,000 classified documents it's working on.

working on. Let's get a little

more analysis on this. Our North America correspondent

Lisa Millar has been speaking with James Carafano an expert on homeland security at a

Washington based think tank the Heritage Foundation. What was

it that shocked you the most out of these documents? Well

nothing from a kind of a

strategic 10,000 foot

standpoint. It is kind of old

news. It really doesn't tell

you anything about the war going forward. First of all

going forward. First of all we

have a new General, we have a

new strat scrrk, we have new

troops on the ground. This is

history. Kind of reminded history. Kind of reminded me of the Pentagon papers which really didn't tell you much

about the war either because

you get a lot of documents.

Even though it's a lot of Even though it's a lot of

document you don't have all the context so you don't understand

anything about it and again it's about the past. We

released the Pentagon papers we already had a new strategy. It

was vee yet Namisation, we have

a new strategy here as well. I

was shocked from a was shocked from a tactical perspective because war is all about knowledge and

information. So from the

enemy's perspective this is enemy's perspective this is a

treasure trove of information

to look through to find out are

there names of Afghans that we

can go out and kill, are there American locations that we

didn't know about that we can

find about now. Are there find about now. Are there American procedures that we didn't know about that we can

didn't know about that we can get information on now. So I think from the menmy's perspective there could be potentially a lot of things

here. I think it's hard just

looking - I mean I don't know

anyone who could look through how ever many thousand documents. It's superofficially running through that to argue

it doesn't put lives at risk

but I think it arguably might.

I can't state that for a fact

but I'd be kerb concerned about that. What does it

that. What does it do to this sometimes fragile relationship

between the US and Pakistan? Nothing, Pakistan? Nothing, I don't think. The fact that there are elements of the Pakistani

Government which are trying to manipulate the Taliban, that's

not new. Let's not forget in a

lot of ways the people are just

- they're just victim to their history. This was a strategy

they did after the Russians ran

away or the Soviets ran away

and they're say fg the

Americans are going to run away

Americans are going to run away

we're going to do the same strategy again so it's not surprising that there are

people in Pakistan who might be

trying to manipulate the

Taliban. I don't think it's

terribly shocking to anybody

that there could be people who have relationships with

Al-Qaeda. We've seen a number

of reports that have come out

in recent months about Al-Qaeda

operative s meeting with people

not in some cave in the middle

of nowhere but in Pakistani

cities. They're moving around

cities. They're moving around

with some degree of freedom.

Somebody is providing them

cover and concealment. So I don't think there's a lot of new news there. I think

obviously there might be people

might say well why should I

talk to the Americans or give

them secrets if they're going

to wind up on WikiLeaks that's

probably a fair criticism. What's the criticism. What's the possible fall out for the US? I think it

all depends. I think if

all depends. I think if the

strategy takes hold and the

Afghan Government is

increasingly able to take space

away from the Taliban on the

ground and we see tangible proof of that in the months

ahead, then this will be a

speed bump on the road to

building an Afghan state. On

the other hand if things the other hand if things go

really bad people will look

back to this and say this is

when we knew the war

when we knew the war was when we knew the war was unwinnable. The difference here

wean this and the Pentagon

papers is in papers is in the Pentagon

papers we had the Ted offensive

wesmt had a huge wesmt had a huge military

battle which a lot of people,

at least this the public

opinion thought, the war's

unwinnable, we need to run away. We haven't had that here.

I think a lot will depend on

how it will unfold. People

forget the Pentagon papers happened in 1968. US didn't

withdraw from Vietnam until

1973. We thought a long time after people thought the after people thought the war wasn't inwablable. In tend it

it was impeachment of the president that forced us to

abandon the Vietnamese people.

We can fight and win this war.

For me from a political sphand

stand point what's most

disturbing is when you see

people in the President's party like

like Senator Carey jump up and say we

say we need to relook at things

now. That makes no sense

whatsoever. Because all that,

and the Administration is

right, what's in that is history. It doesn't reflect what we are going forward.

Someone from the President's own party

own party who is supposed to be supporting the President that can't be helpful. The WikiLeaks founder claims there's evidence

in these documents of dozens

perhaps hundreds of war crimes,

this is evidence of it? Well I seriously doubt that because

again, a lot of documents out

of context. People die in

battle, right, so every time a civilian dies in battle

somebody can say there's a war

crime. But you have to put all

the context around that. We've

seen a - so that's a very

irresponsible comment. There -

if somebody does think they

have proof of war crimes there there are

there are an awful lot of ways

that can pursue them without

that can pursue them without

leaking them to the worldwide

press. The truth is if you look

at some of the most hay nous

things America ever did, one of

them being Abu Ghraib, there were official investigations over and apart any kind of investigating reporting

whatsoever. The investigating

reporting brought to all our

attention but at the end of the

day that wasn't actually - the military had

military had already been

investigating Abu Ghraib for

weeks and months before the

photographs got public. So photographs got public. So I'm not sure I'm buying that

one. James Carafano, thank you

for joining us. Thank you for having me. Washington correspondent Lisa Millar there talking to James Carafano from the Heritage Foundation, the Heritage Foundation, a Washington-based think tank.

Back home in Australia the

Defence Department has set up a task force to

task force to investigate any Australian references in the leaked documents. The Prime Minister says as the Government is in care taker mode the

findings will also be the Opposition. I obviously am concerned the Opposition. I obviously concerned to see national security style material leak.

This is an issue which does touch upon this This is an issue which think touch upon this country. Well I touch upon think it may be comparable think it may be comparable with the release of the think it may the release of the Pentagon papers the think it may be comparable with papers back in papers the release of the Pentagon papers back in 1971. You might

papers back in 1971. You might

remember there that that showed that the Government and the military had remember there that that showed

military had been misleading the public and was military had been the public and was very damaging to the the public and was damaging to the American case for remaining

for remaining in Vietnam. Professor Williams

says the leaks could end says the leaks could end up having the same says the public having the same impact on

public perception regarding having the says the leaks could end up

public perception regarding having the same impact on

Australia's involvement in the Afghanistan conflict. It's the number of number of civilian deaths in Afghanistan conflict.

Afghanistan conflict. It's the the country

the country that is fueling the country that is public anger

international public anger against the

international forces. Today the

Afghan Government said Afghan Government rocket attack last 52 people had been killed in a

Reporter David Lyon is in and says Reporter David Lyon is in Kabul Reporter David Lyon is

and says how the killing of and says how the killing

civilians are undermining the and says how the killing of war

war effort. These mountains civilians are undermining the

have known little but war for

have known little but war for 30 years and almost a third of

that time on one side of the war have been soldiers from the

war have been soldiers from the war have

US-led coalition to US-led coalition who do not aim

US-led coalition who do not to kill civilians

happen. to kill civilians but mistakes

happen. Zargona was widowed to kill civilians but mistakes happen. Zargona

happen. Zargona was husband, a just 3 months ago when her

husband, a car

shot by husband, a car mechanic, was just 3 months ago when her

shot by American soldiers who

raudRaided their house. He'd husband, a car mechanic, was shot raudRaided their

raudRaided their house. He'd gone outside to protect

gone outside to protect his

stealthly family as the Americans came

stealthly and he thought they family

were thieves. His death will bring poverty to his family instead.

instead. "What can I say about the Americans?" She the Americans?" She told instead. "What can I say

the Americans?" She told me. "They've made me a widow and my

"They've made me a widow and my five children orphans." This is

five children orphans." This one of the toughest countries

one of the in the world to one of the toughest countries

in the world to live in, in the world to live in, one of

in the world to live in, the poorest and

the poorest and corrupt. Leaked documents show too how aid missions have failed and the war brings war brings dainge tors such missions documents show too how aid

vulnerable people.

vulnerable people. Opinion

international coalition of polls show support for the

polls show support for forces here is still far higher than it international coalition of

than it is for the forces here is still far than it is for the Taliban. But support for than it is for

support for the Taliban than it is for the Taliban. But support for the Taliban is

gradually rising and one of the

main reasons people give for

main reasons people give the supporting them is because of

the number of civilians killed

by foreign forces. That's what

makes the revelations in makes leaked documents so potentially makes the revelations in these

damaging. The Taliban kill

damaging. The Taliban kill many

more people than are killed by international forces from the

air or the ground. Civilians air or the ground. Civilians international forces from the

are caught between them. The effect is not effect is not only in are caught

effect effect is not only in the numbers of civilians who stay alive

alive but it's much numbers of civilians who stay alive but it's much

broader. Living in a situation

and condition of fear that any

minute a an insurgent would

come in and would attack or an air strike against the

air strike against the Taliban

insurgents may take the life of

insurgents may take an individual or

an individual an individual or their

family. These children an individual or their

family. These children were injured as recently as Friday injured family. These children were

in an attack which killed injured as recently as Friday in an attack which killed

dozens of others.

dozens of others. Claims that in an attack which

dozens of others.

dozens of others. Claims this was caused by an air

strike were originally denied strike were by

by the international coalition

but after a BBC by the international coalition but after a BBC investigation

during the weekend the Afghan

during the weekend the deaths Government today said that the

deaths and injuries were caused

by an deaths and injuries were caused Government today said that the

by an air strike. deaths and injuries

Key members of the Opposition have met Key members of the Federal

Opposition have met the Foreign Key members of the

Minister Opposition have

Minister of Nauru to push their

Minister of Nauru plans to

plans Minister of Nauru to push their seeker processing centre plans to reopen an asylum

seeker processing centre on the island. The Australian

Government though has been

island. seeker processing centre on the focused on

Government though has been focused on building a centre in

East Timor saying Nauru is not a signatory to the UN

convention on refugees. But a signatory to convention on

convention convention on refugees. But the

convention on refugees. But Deputy Opposition convention on refugees. But the

Deputy Opposition Leader joouly

available and the Government Bishop says the Nauru centre is

there wants it available and the Government there wants it operational again. It was a quick at Brisbane airport with Nauru officials in at Brisbane

officials in transit. But it gave at Brisbane airport with Nauru

gave the Opposition the chance

to confirm they gave the Opposition towards reopening the Nauru

processing centre if they win

government next month. It was

purpose built, it was funded by

the Australian taxpayer, and it remains available the Australian

remains available to be remains available to be used

again as an remains available to again as an offshore processing

centre. There are no again as an offshore processing centre. There are no constitutional barriers, that centre. There are can be done today, it could have constitutional barriers,

have been done 3 weeks ago, it could have been could have been done 3 months have been done 3 weeks ago, it could have been done 3 months ago. This is nothing more,

nothing less than ago. This is nothing nothing less than a political

stunt, an attempt nothing less than a political stunt, an attempt to again trick the Australian stunt, an trick the Australian public into believing that into believing that somehow there's a quick trick the Australian public into there's a quick fix. The there's a quick processing centre was an important there's a quick fix. The important economic benefit to the small island nation and its

important economic benefit Government is keen to reopen

it. We believe given the experience that we've Government is keen to reopen it. We believe experience that we've had in hosting experience hosting the facility in Nauru

that we know how that hosting the facility in

that we know how that can work, we've that we know

we've seen how well it can work. There were complaints at we've seen how well it work. There were complaints at the time about the work. There were the time about the way refugees

were treated, the time about the were treated, accusation s

refuted today by Nauru's

Foreign Minister. He said Nauru would also talk to Prime Foreign Minister. He said Nauru

Minister Julia Gillard who's

interested in opening a processing centre in interested in opening processing centre in East Timor. The leader of Fiji's

Labor Party Mahendra Chaudhry

says he will vigorously Labor Party Mahendra Chaudhry says he will vigorously fight charges brought against him

when he faces the High Court charges when he faces the High Court in

soouf a a on Friday. He was questioned for soouf a a on questioned for two days last

week before being charged with questioned for two days last

12 offences ranging week before being charged with 12 offences ranging from tax evasion to 12 offences evasion to money laundering.

12 offences ranging from tax evasion to money laundering. Mr Chaudhry says evasion to money Chaudhry says the charges relate to relate to money he relate to money he allegedly

received after he relate to money received after he was removed from power in the relate to money he allegedly received after from power in the 200 # during which he was held

hostage by George Speight for more than 2 during which he was held more than 2 months. A more more than 2 months. A

31-year-old man from Spain who

has had the 31-year-old man from

has had the world's first full face transplant has appeared

before the camera s for the

first time 4 months after his

surgery. The man identified only as surgery. The man only as Oscar accidentally shot only only as Oscar accidentally shot himself in the face 5 only as Oscar

himself in the face 5 years ago before himself in the face

before being sent home he himself in the face 5 years before being sent home he thanked doctors

before being sent home he thanked doctors for performing

the operation as well as the family of thanked doctors for performing the operation as well as the family of the donor. His new

face is still swollen and he

has yet to regain full muscle has yet to has yet to regain full muscle control but for the man known

only as Oscar this is a

dramatic improvement. 5 years ago the

dramatic improvement. 5 ago the 31-year-old ago the ago the 31-year-old farmer accidentally shot himself in

the face. He'd been unable to

breathe or swallow. Now he's

beginning to learn how to talk

again. "I would like to thank

all the medical again. "I would like to all the medical team" Oscar said,

said, "The donor's family all the medical team" Oscar said, "The donor's family and

above all my relatives for supporting above all

supporting me until the end."

The operation in March lasted The operation The operation in March lasted

24 hours. From a donor on the 24 24 hours. From a donor on the

left, doctors at the hospital

in Barcelona removed the entire face and

in Barcelona removed the face and muscles plus the face and muscles plus the jaw, nose, cheek bones, teeth nose, cheek bones, teeth and eye lids along with a network of nose, cheek bones, teeth and eye lids of nerves and blood vessels. of nerves and blood vessels. It

was the most extensive face was was the most extensive face transplant ever carried out.

Doctors said Oscar will need

more than a year transplant ever carried out. Doctors more than a year of physical therapy and Doctors said Oscar will need more therapy and should regain 90% of his therapy and should regain of his facial functions.

sister said he just wanted of his facial functions. sister said he just wanted to be be normal.

TRANSLATION: A life like he had

before, the simple fact TRANSLATION: A life being able to go down the before, the street without people looking at

being able to at him in a street without people

at him in a strange way, we can

have a family meal, we at him in a strange way, have a family meal, we can all be have a family be together. French woman Isabelle be together. French woman Isabelle Dinwiois was the first person to Isabelle Dinwiois

person to receive a partial person person to receive a partial

face transplant 10 year ago. Since then 10 person to receive a partial face Since then 10 more patients worldwide

face transplant 10 year ago. worldwide have received new

faces all with the ambition of worldwide have received new

returning to a normal

life. Let's get the latest

world weather now with world weather now with Graeme creed. Rain fall's creed. Rain fall's big

feature across not only many parts of parts of the northern hemisphere but also in Australia. Not parts of the northern

Australia. Not quite as heavy

across our continent as what we're seeing in Australia. Not quite as heavy we're seeing in some areas but we across our continent as what

we are expecting to see that rain wide spread with moderate we are expecting to see that rain wide rain wide spread with moderate

fall tlus Queensland, NSW and

also into the norNorthern

inland of Victoria. It's in

association with an upper

trough system and that rain

will last for a couple of days.

Strong winds still continuing through New Zealand but the

heavy rain from the South

Island is gradual ly starting to

to ease off. We've got strong winds developing around Noumea.

The heavy rain fall, we've got

heavy show wers thunderstorm

and significant fall ace cross the western half

the western half of Java, all the way through to the highlands of Papua New

Guinea. We've also got a band

of heavy rain and thunderstorms, now that's stretching from the Gulf of stretching from the Gulf of Thailand through to the Andaman

Sea. The heaviest falls are expected around the Thai Burma

border. We've got a broader

area of rain. That stretches up

to tie wand and across the

South East China Sea and models

are also picking

are also picking an intense

area of storm activity about the North Korea, Russia and north-east Chinese border

areas. We've got intense range approaching the east coast of India.

India. It will still be a day

or two away but finally we are

starting to see a system begin

to move through that region.

We're expecting to see warnings

for forest fires. They're

likely through estonia, Finland

and also Switzerland and for

Europe the big feature is the

loss of the heat although Portugal is still looking at heat warnings at the moment.

Through Africa, mostly dry

conditions across the southern

areas but Eck torial regions still expecting to see some

widespread rain fall although

we're not expecting to see the

extreme downpours that we extreme downpours that we were expecting yesterday so tomorrow should be a slightly better day

but there will still be some

heavy falls about. For the US a relatively calm period as well.

There's no tropical storms of

note around at the moment.

We're also starting to see some

of that high heat begin to ease

off through some states,

particularly around the particularly around the mid west and we're still expecting

to see quite a bit of rainfall

around the Gulf coast. Further

south into South America and

the west coast gale to storm

force winds. They're set to

hang around for a day or two.

Most other areas at this Most other areas at this stage

are looking at relatively dry

conditions. Just the

possibility of a lightish shower shower or two

shower or two around Rio. One

of the biggest studies of the biggest studies ever

undertaken in water quality on

the Great Barrier Reef has

found that sea weed thrives in

poor water conditions, which then then significantly affects coral

coral diversity. Researchers

say climate change is the

reef's number one threat but

poor water quality is also having a long-lasting and

damaging impact. One of the 7 wonders of

wonders of the world, the Great

Barrier Reef, is facing an abundance of well known,

natural and man made threats

but researchers say seaweed

could be choking the reef fast erthan climate change substantial increase in the erthan climate change itself: A

amount of seaweeded on the

reefs and those seaweeds

the coraling to colonise the obviously take away space from

area. The Australian Institute of Marine Science has of Marine Science has just

released its findings in an

international scientific

journal. It indicates poor

water quality as the catalyst

for increasing amounts of

seaweed on the reef which in

turn lowers the bio diversity

of coral species. Water quality

affects many aspects of coral communities and it's also interesting to know how those communities have communities have changed over

time. Similar research has been conducted previously but mainly

on a local scale. This study was much broader with data collected from 150 reefs taking

in more than 2,000 water

quality testing stations right

across the marine park. Already the results from the research

have been ute utilised by

scientist at the Great Barrier Reef marine park authority and water guidelines have been released for the released for the agricultural water quality sector. We can manage local

water quality and regional water quality on water quality on the Great

Barrier Reef. Climate change is

a little bit hard tore

tackle. The study estimates

that water on about 22% of

reefs don't meet water quality

guidelines. Still ahead on the

program - fresh fears of war on

technology that allows heart the Korean peninsula and the

surgery to be done at arm's length.

You're watching The World on

ABC News 24. Our top stories -

the Pentagon is scrambling to

find out who leaking tens of find out who leaking tens

thousands of US military

documents about the war in

Afghanistan to website WikiLeaks. The papers reveal

previously unreported civilian

casualties and suggestions that

cooperating with the Taliban. Pakistani intelligence was

It's one of the biggest

security breaches in US military history. Nauru's

Foreign Minister has reissued

open the immigration processing an invitation to Australia to

centre on the island. The

Pacific nation is keen to have

asylum seekers processed in

by the Rudd Government two their centre which was closed

its chief executive years ago. And BP has confirmed

its chief executive Tony

Hayward will step down as head

will be replaced by Bob Dudley of the oil giant in October. He

who's currently in charge of

the oil spill clean up in the

Gulf of Mexico. It comes on the

day BP announced a record $19 billion quarterly

loss. Pyongyang has ramped up

the rhetoric on the Korean peninsula warning that war

could break out at any moment.

The dramatic statement from the

North came as it marked

years since the Korean War came North came as it marked 57

to an end and against the

background of a huge military South exercise involving the US and

South Korean navies. An international investigation

found a torpedo fired from a

North Korean submarine sank the South Korean ship the

South Korean ship the

'Cheonan'. Focuses have turned

to countering submarine attack.

US says the drills are designed to send a clear message that

aggression in the region won't

be tolerated. Our intent is not

to provoke reactions from any

nation, be it North Korea or

any other here in the western Pacific region. It's to demonstrate our readiness, our interoperaability our

interoperaability our collective resolve. But North

Korea say the war games pose a direct threat. TRANSLATION: The United States and its supporters are

provoking confrontation and war

against our Republic, therefore

the situation has been driven

to the edge and war could easily break out at any time. While the US and South

Korea sent a message of

solidarity, so too did North

Korea. Thousands joined a mass

Korea. Thousands joined a mass

rally of communist party

military officials to celebrate

57 years since the end of the

Korean War. Pyongyang says it

won that battle and is ready

for another.

TRANSLATION: Should the US

imperialists and Lee Myung-bak

and his traitors ignore a new aggression, North Korea will

mobilise its tremendous

military potential its nuclear deterrence and wipe military potential including

out the agressors. Military

exercises off South Korea's east coast involve 8,000 military personnel, 200

aircraft and 20 ships. They're

due to finish on Wednesday.

Iran has unexpectedly announced that its ready to

return to talks on a return to talks on a nuclear

fuel swap. It made the surprise announcement shortly after the European

European Union agreed to impose tougher sanctions on the

country. The EU's penalties include a ban on dealing with

Iranian banks and insurance

companies and steps to prevent investment in Tehran's

lucrative oil and gas sector.

China's south-west has been

hit by more flooding with water

levels at riverside communities

surging once again. The clean

up is continuing across part

up is continuing across part s

after serious flooding in low lying areas. Though China

experiences heavy runs every

summer flooding this year is

worse than in more than a

decade so. Far it's left more

than 750 people dead with than 750 people dead

hundreds still missing. The new

President of the Philippines

has given a scathing critique

of the previous administration in his first policy speech congress. Be Benigno Aquino in his first policy speech to

says Gloria a-Roy's's spending

left a deficit. The new leader

has enjoyed a dream start. The recent survey put his

popularity at 88%, the highest

rating ever for a Philippines

president. But the savvy

politician and son of a former

leader knows the honeymoon will

leader knows the honeymoon will

soon end and it will be time to deliver deliver results. TRANSLATION: In our

administration there will be kickbacks, our countrymen's administration there will be no

money will be spent only for

our countrymen. In his maiden

speech to congress Mr Aquino

was at pains to declare his government would be a responsible

responsible one unlike that of

his predecessor. In a scathing

address he condemn ed Gloria

Arroyo's secret spending that

will send the country into a

deficit he will need to work hard to escape.

TRANSLATION: The real state of

our nation was kept secret and

our countrymen were purposely

delewded in the first months of

this year the Government spent

more than it earned in revenue. more than it earned in revenue.

Our deficit grew further and it

reached $1 - 1966.7 pe says. Reducing debt and

improving health and education

is a key aspect. The plan has

the support of people and

congress alike.

people should TRANSLATION: The Filipino

people should unite. Leaders

all over the Philippines should

unite to help our President

fulfil his needs . Outside congress thousands gathered to

demand their new leader make

good on his promises. But the

people most in need of change

are the estimated 4 million Filipinos living below the poverty line. "We don't know

if your lives will get better"

this mother of 8 says. "We

voted for other presidents in the past and nothing has changed." The new president has

6 years to make a difference.

Fidel Castro has broken a long

ra tradition on Cuba's foremost

public holiday. The former

president attended a revolution day event in his 7th public

outing in 3 weeks which ended a long

long period of long period of seclusion prompted by ill health. He took part

part in a Wall Street laying ceremony but chose not to speak. It's the first time since Cuba's speak. It's the first

since Cuba's 1959 revolution since

that a member of the Castro

family has failed to address Revolution Day crowds. Bull

fighting may become a thing of the past Revolution Day crowds. Bull the past in Spain's the past in Spain's Catalonia

region with the local

parliament due to vote on a

region wide ban. While parliament due to vote on

region wide ban. While many Spaniards remain passionately devoted to bull fighting the number of spectators has been dwindling. devoted to bull fighting the number dwindling. The long-standing

tradition has been drawing increased opposition increased opposition from animal rights activists. And animal animal rights activists. And

Moscow residents are Moscow residents are living

under a cloud animal rights activists. And Moscow under a cloud of smog with under a under a cloud of smog with 21

forest fires burning near the

city. The record heat is forest fires burning near the city. The record heat is also making life uncomfortable for many city. The record heat is also making many locals. Forecasters expect temperatures to

temperatures to rise to many locals. Forecasters expect temperatures to rise to 39 degrees Celsius temperatures to rise to

degrees Celsius on Thursday. The British Prime Minister

David Cameron is giving his

backing to Turkey's ambitions

to join the European Union. In a

a speech in the Turkish capital

it's thought the Prime Minister

will say he's angry about Turkey's slow progress towards

EU membership. He's also

expected to criticise other

countries who, like France,

have been less than enthusiastic about Turkey

joining the union. If clocking

up air miles travelling to

distant lands was a way to

claim political credit then

David Cameron would be scoring

well. Today he's in Ankara well. Today he's in Ankara the

capital of Turkey, a country he

believes can unite East and

West, a country he will argue

should be accepted by the

European Union. With Europe on

one side and Iran and Iraq one side and Iran and Iraq on

the other, it's easy to see why

this mainly Muslim democracy is an important friend for an important friend for

Britain. But as the Prime Minister will argue today, it's not just about the geography. Turkey has the

second biggest army in NATO second biggest army in NATO and

works alongside the UK in Afghanistan.

Afghanistan. And with its young

and growing population, it's

expected to be the second

fastest growing economy in the

world within a decade, a target for British trade. There are

obstacles though, Turkey still refuses full diplomatic ties

with Cyprus and there have been

worries about its attitude to

Iran but by making Ankara his

first stop in a week of travels

the Prime Minister hopes to restart Turkey's campaign to join the European club. Well

heart surgery seems miraculous

enough as it is. Now it's even

more so. A new kind of robotic surgery means doctors don't

even have to be in the operating theatre and for the

first time the technique is

being used on patients with common heart condition. Nick Parsons was diagnosed with atrial fibrillation 5 years

ago. The electrical impulses of

his heart weren't regular given

him a rapid heart beat. I went

for a run on the beach one morning and my heart started to

race and it was something

totally new to me. I sort of

ran out of power. When his

heart medication stopped

working doctors decided to try

surgery. He's one of the first

patients to undergo atrial

fibrillation surgery using a

new kind of robotic technology. This is the first

robotic system used for

specifically designed and used

for the treatment of cardiac

rhythm problemings in Australia

and indeed the whole of the

Asia Pacific region. A catheter with

with a heated tip is inserted

into the heart to disconnect the

the veins that are sending the

irregular impulses. By gently moving the joy stick surgeons

can move around a 3D image of

the heart. The 62-year-old says

he's confident about letting the machine do the operation. In fact

operation. In fact it's

probably better than it's probably better than it's done

robotically in some cases

because this has to be a because this has to be a very

accurately done procedure and I

think the machine may well be

steadier than the doctor's hand to be honest. It reduces the X-ray exposure associated with

the manual technique by about

80% for the operator and about

50% for the patients and that

in itself is a major break through. Robotic surgery had

already been used for other

heart procedures with a high

success rate. Nick Parsons is

hoping for the same good

result. Let's take a look at what's making

what's making headlines on news

websites around the world. The

BBC leads with the turmoil

facing BP the company has

announced a record $19 billion

loss on the same day it was

confirmed that CEO Tony Hayward would step down. The 'Straits Times'

Times' in Singapore says BlackBerry smart phones have

been declared a national threat in Dubai because security

agencies can't monitor data storage. And the news website

in poll listen says WikiLeaks

has uncovered a file

documenting the investigation

into the kill of 8 civilians into the kill of 8 Afghan civilians by Australia's new safety regulators are poised to shake

up the country's rail and

trucking industry. They're

moving to introduce national

fatigue laws but unions say a

uniform approach across the

country could actually mean a

drop in safety standards. David

Mathie has been driving trains

for more than 30 years. He knows how deadly falling

knows how deadly falling asleep

on the job could be. The last

defence is the driver. The

driver had to be alert. If the

driver's not alert then - or

asleep, then a freight train it could be catastrophic. Rail safety in Australia has come a

long way since the Glenbrook

and Waterfall tragedies but the

rail union is worried drivers

could be forced to work longer

hours under a new national rail

safety regulator. What the draft legislation proposes is

to allow rail operators the flexibility to determine their

own shift lengths and to

determine what they think are reasonable rest breaks. Drivers

say that's a step backwards. In

the past we used to work weeks

of night shift. You were permanently fatigued. You felt

like you were jet lagged. But the National Transport

Commission has rejected the

suggestion that standards will drop. There will be

drop. There will be no

reduction in safety. It says

the national regulator will

establish uniform laws across Australia. Currently there are

7 regulators, as you're probably

probably aware, and it does

operate slightly different operate slightly different in each jurisdiction at the moment. Truck drivers are also

in for a bumpy ride when a new

heavy vehicle regulator takes

over the wheel. The shake up could see demerit points

deducted for breaching fatigue laus. The rail and heavy

vehicle regulators won't take over until 2013 but decisions

about the new fatigue laws are

being made right now. The key players will be given the

chance to thrash out their

differences at a policy

workshop next month. Let's take a check of

a check of the markets now.

Qantas has been forced to

explain why it pays New Zealand pilots less than their

Australian counterparts on flights across the Tasman. The Australian International Pilots

Association has launched a challenge against the airline

over the wages paid to crew the Qantas subsidiary Jet Connect. the Qantas Connect. The Fair Work Australia tribunal was Australia tribunal was told

today that New Zealand pilots are paid

Australia tribunal was told today

are paid 40% less than their Australian colleagues. The Australian colleagues. The ACTU disputed a claim by Qantas disputed a claim by Qantas that its subsidiary is a New Zealand company. How can Jet Connect be an airline if its subsidiary is a New Zealand company. How an airline if it doesn't own

any planes and it doesn't have

any licences to fly anywhere. any planes and it doesn't have All the uniforms any licences to

All the uniforms are provided by

All the uniforms by Qantas, the tail of All the uniforms are provided by Qantas, the tail of the plane has got the white

kangaroo on the red background so we plane has got the white so we say it's Qantas and they kangaroo on the red background should pay Qantas so we say it's Qantas should pay Qantas wages. The airline applied to have the

case dismissed today but the

full bench of the agreed to hear the case full bench of the agreed to hear the case next

month. It's exactly 2 month. It's exactly 2 years out from the London 2012 Olympics month. It's exactly 2 years out where top athletes will shows from the London 2012 where top athletes will shows

can days the fafteds in can days can days the fafteds in London's East end for the London's East end for the first time. The Games London's East time. The Games take an extraordinary amount London's East end for the first time. extraordinary amount of

dedication and sacrifice for competitors around the competitors around the world.

Nowhere more so than in Mongolia where boxing has

Nowhere more so than in Mongolia where boxing has been put on the Mongolia where boxing

put on the map thanks to Mongolia where boxing has been put on the map thanks to one

fight ner fight

fight ner

particular. Mongolia's best

boxers battling it out. London

2012's 2 years away but the

competition here is still

this are fierce. National contests like

this are where you show you this are where you show you

have what it takes to compete

for Olympic gold. Wrestling is

the sport Mongolia's probably

most famous for but boxing is

becoming more and more popular

here and that's largely due to

the success of this man. the success of this man. This is Enkhbatyn Badar-Uugan, voted

the best box ner the world in

2008. That year he won Olympic

gold for Mongolia in Beijing, a

feat he plans to repeat in

London. Frustratingly for him

though he's injured at the

though he's injured at the Biden moment, confined to the gym for

moment, confined to the gym for

Biden from entering the TRANSLATION: As soon as one Biden from entering the ring.

Olympics is over, you start

It's the same for any preparing for the next

It's the same for any athlete. It's the same for any Mon - Mongolians are no It's the same for any athlete.

different. Right Beijing Olympics I set different. Right after the

the goal of going to the games Beijing Olympics I set myself

Beijing Olympics I set myself in

in 2012. the goal

the goal of going to the games

in 2012. This in 2012. This is where he

in 2012. This is where on the started, a rough neighbourhood

started, a rough on the edge of the capital

on the edge of the capital where often he got into trouble. where often he got int