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(generated from captions) democratic institutions "to seek and support into a simple formula - He condensed his plan as "ending tyranny in our world". ultimate goal of his foreign policy President Bush declared the State of the Union address, In his last I'm Tony Jones. Good evening. Welcome to Lateline. This program is captioned live. scientific whaling. this outrage which is called to massively expand if Japan is allowed where we will learn This is a vital meeting in the Southern Ocean. increase their science experiment as they plan to dramatically are still primed for humpbacks But Japanese harpoons this organisation. actually you are destroying about whaling issue, very political and emotional By being very extreme or being and the Japanese are angry. Tonight - Round 1 to the whales,

And members of the anti-whaling harvest. Overturning a 19-year ban . harvest. Overturning a 19-year ban return to a commercial whale was tabled. The plan proposed a plan to resume commercial whaling tonight, Japan's much-anticipated After a day of bickering and delays, reports from Ulsan in South Korea. Environment reporter Sarah Clarke in the harpooners' sights. set to join minkes with fin and humpback whales for scientific purposes to expand whaling is pushing ahead with its plan But despite the setback, Japan required three-quarters majority. The Japanese failed to achieve the in South Korea. Whaling Commission meeting in a vote at the International was soundly defeated tonight the ban on commercial whaling Japan's attempt to overturn Greg Jennett, Lateline. is not on his list. Immigration policy during the winter break. and industrial relations the sale of Telstra on foreign debt, Kim Beazley says he'll run hard on the policy front, that the party's been inactive Addressing concern within his ranks which we always keep under review. It's a matter, of course, performers across our front bench. I have got a very effective group of subject to the usual qualification. of a complicated portfolio, in Laurie Ferguson's handling He says he still has confidence and I welcome it. He's been too long behind bars Mr Beazley set the record straight. revised his position. You'll find that Laurie's challenged the remarks in caucus. in the Immigration portfolio with Mr Ferguson's performance Colleagues already unhappy like genuinely stateless people. we define them as stateless and because of lack of cooperation, where they come from, who they are, they don't really clarify where people aren't cooperative, that we might establish a system for most people in Australia a very worrying precedent I think it would be of Peter Qasim. about the release from detention who was less than enthusiastic Laurie Ferguson, but his Immigration spokesman, headaches today who caused Kim Beazley or Stephen Smith It wasn't Wayne Swan for all of your troubles. do not blame the member for Brand and I say to the Labor Party a heavy responsibility The roosters bear seems to relish. a prospect Peter Costello won't be his last - the government's tax cuts He says his stand against it's not a sprint. This is a marathon, vote is holding steady. although the Labor Party's primary approval rating down, with his personal interest in Mr Beazley has slipped, The latest Newspoll suggests that they're not interested in. talking about things and sometimes you'll be that people are interested in, about things means that you'll be talking the nation's problems Sometimes resolving strikes a chord with voters. He concedes not all of it Kim Beazley does a lot of talking. Greg Jennett reports. From Canberra, had "revised" his position. and declared that Mr Ferguson the decision But Mr Beazley later welcomed serving detainee, Peter Qasim. to release Australia's longest- had criticised plans The Immigration spokesman performance. serious unrest in caucus over his over-riden Laurie Ferguson after The Opposition Leader has publicly frontbencher Laurie Ferguson has publicly overridden Opposition Leader Kim Beazley the ban on commercial whaling Japan's attempt to overturn two tyrants. credited with helping topple Roman Catholic powerbroker The legacy of the Filipino And - the wages of Sin. to bypass US lawmakers. as George Bush threatens for UN nominee John Bolton Another Senate rebuff Filibustered again. as Kim Beazley plunges in the polls. brought into line Labor's Immigration spokesman Wake-up call. But first - our other headlines. That's coming up. Robert Fisk. Middle East writer and correspondent to ask the veteran We'll go to Beirut in reality? But what's likely to change in their graves. must have rolled over tyrants and regional strongmen Well, a conga line of US-backed to support democratic aspirations. to take big risks but now, America was willing had been a resolute failure; for the past 60 years Washington's Middle East policy she declared that In Cairo overnight, is taking it on a road trip. Condoleezza Rice, Now his Secretary of State, "in every nation and culture".

abstentions, so the proposal is not adopted. We were looking down the abyss at going back to the dark abyss at going back to the dark ages of commercial whaling. We looked over the edge as a world and we've stood back, the whales have won, stood back, the whales have won, the fight will go on in a year's time, though. But tonight's vote has no effect on Japan's so-called scientific research. It conducts this work under a loophole in the convention, and the IWC is convention, and the IWC is powerless to block its controversial plan to now hunt humpbacks. Sarah Clarke, Lateline. And just a few moments ago in Sydney, Prime Minister John Howard told reporters the IWC vote shows that world opinion is against commercial whaling. This a very, very good first step, but we can't be certain that it's going to be repeated when it comes to scientific whaling and I congratulate Senator Ian Campbell, the Australian Minister for the Environment, who has really fought so hard amendment, 29 against, and 5 Japan's proposed scheduled There were 23 votes in support of the plan had a resounding win. swing the decision, and opponents of swing the decision, and opponents changed their mind. But it failed to changed their mind. But it failed anti-whaling stance. Tonight, they had vowed to back Australia's Pacific nations. The Solomon Islands Pacific nations. The Solomon went to a vote. All eyes were on the went to a vote. All eyes were on International Whaling Commission less than one hour of debate, the that deserves respect. But after hunting whale is a cultural right cod. Japan has long argued that apply this RMS to a species like fisheries managers would not even up here is an insult. Any serious best practice, but what is offered New Zealand wanted international New Zealand want were lining up to speak out. And members of the anti-whaling camp and so effectively to achieve this vote. But there's still a lot to be done and we can't assume that the battle has been won, but we have won a very important first stage in that battle. The Bush Administration's choice for America's Ambassador to the UN, John Bolton, has been rebuffed for the second time by the US Senate. The decision puts added pressure on the President, who must now decide whether to override the Senate and appoint Bolton anyway or abandon the UN plans for one of his personal favourites. Tom Iggulden reports. Just hours before the Senate vote, President Bush, hosting European leaders in Washington, was still backing his man. The American people know why I nominated him - because the UN needs reform and I thought it made sense to send a reformer to the United Nations. But some wonder what sort of reform the former arms control chief has in mind. A national ad campaign has used these now-infamous comments to discredit him. The Secretariat building in New York has 38 storeys. If you lost 10 storeys today, it wouldn't make a bit of difference. The Senate's been delaying a vote on Mr Bolton's confirmation. And when the question was presented for the second time today, Mr Bolton's backers lost again and by a greater margin. The motion is not agreed to. It's not the end of the road for Mr Bolton. Democrat senators are promising a confirmation vote if Mr Bush's administration lets them see more information about Mr Bolton's past. We will agree to vote up and down on the Bolton nomination as soon as the administration provides the information requested by the committee, which we, again I emphasise, have a right to obtain. And the President can install Mr Bolton as an interim ambassador for 18 months. But either way, Mr Bush is going to have to swallow a bitter political pill to get his way and Republican senators aren't happy about it. The plain and simple truth is that some on the other side of the aisle are obstructing a highly qualified nominee and I believe, by not allowing him to assume this position yet, are doing harm to our country. But Democrat senators say the only other way to resolve the impasse is for the administration to nominate someone more moderate for the post. Tom Iggulden, Lateline. Last night, Lateline revealed confidential documents which, if authentic, back up claims that the Chinese Government is spying on Falun Gong practitioners in Australia. Tonight, more claims of a continuing campaign of harassment from the Chinese Government, including abusive phone calls and hacking into the computers of Falun Gong members on Australian university campuses. Michael Edwards has the story. Jeremy Howard's Melbourne-based email company, Fastmail, has 500,000 clients. In 2002, he noticed that six of them were the target of a sophisticated online attack which came from overseas computers. The consistent message that we got from all of them, they immediately all said, "Yes, I can tell you exactly who's trying to hack us and why." They said, "It's because I'm a Falun Gong member", and they all said that this was the kind of thing that they've experienced before. The attempted interference was thwarted, but Jeremy Howard says it was unprecedented. This is the only time I can recall that somebody made such an effort to hack into particular users' accounts. Lateline has now spoken to dozens of Falun Gong practitioners across the country about what they claim is harassment by Chinese authorities. They have similar stories of abuse and intimidation. Falun Gong claims that, this February, its members were subjected to a campaign of harassing phone calls. As well, Falun Gong's website has been under constant attack from hackers. University campuses have also been fair game. Last night, Chinese defector and former diplomat Chen Yonglin revealed to Lateline the likelihood of close links between Chinese agents and students based in Australia. It seems quite normal that some students - maybe Chinese nationals, or maybe not - they have some close relation with the consulate or embassy. Detailed information about the activities of University of New South Wales student Yan Yan Che was contained in documents obtained by Lateline and believed to be prepared by the anti-Falun Gong Chinese spy agency 6-10. Yan Yan says one of her friends was approached by Chinese operatives to spy on her. I remember one day I was at the computer lab and I was browsing a Falun Dafa website and my friend came up and said, "Oh my God, you browse this sort of website!" I said, "Yeah, why not?" He said, "So you practise?" I said, "Yeah." And then he was so surprised. "I'm so surprised that you practise "because I was asked to look for a girl, "a female student, in the second year of software engineering, "who practise Falun Gong." But while Yan Yan's friend refused to spy on her, the documents indicate that Beijing was able to find an informant. Yan Yan Che claims it's part of a consistent campaign of interference. Chinese political expert Geramie Barme says the Chinese Communist Party perceives Falun Gong as a threat to its power. The Chinese Government wants to use exemplary cases to show everybody else, "Don't get out of line, don't get organised, "don't create nationwide movements, or we'll crush you." A spokeswoman for the Chinese Embassy declined to comment on the latest allegations. Michael Edwards, Lateline. It's not every day that a White House powerbroker takes aim at more than half a century of American policy in the Middle East, but that's exactly what Condoleezza Rice is doing on her visit to the region. In Egypt and Saudi Arabia, the US Secretary of State delivered a message that Washington will no longer silently tolerate dictators, even in friendly countries. America says the time has come for democracy in the Middle East, and in one country where that change is happening, there's been another assassination. Just two days after anti-Syrian parties secured victory in Lebanon's elections, a prominent anti-Syrian politician has been killed in a bomb blast. Norman Hermant reports. We were here, of course, in 2003. This is the kind of talk US Secretaries of State have been making in the Middle East for decades - the awkward, staged-for-the-cameras kind. Very rarely has Washington's top diplomat ever said anything - publicly - quite like Condoleezza Rice did in Cairo. For 60 years, my country, the United States, pursued stability at the expense of democracy in this region, here in the Middle East, and we achieved neither. Now we are taking a different course. Egypt shows how difficult charting a new course will be. As Dr Rice sat down to talk with prominent reformers, demonstrators were protesting her visit, saying the US isn't doing enough to push for real democratic change. Upcoming presidential elections in Egypt are supposed to be open to all. But President Hosni Mubarak dominates the media and has ruled by emergency decree for more than two decades. The largest opposition group, the Muslim Brotherhood, is banned. Pro-democracy rallies have been harshly silenced. The Egyptian government knows well our concerns about this, The measured tone of US criticism The Egyptian government knows well our concerns about this, and we expect that there is going to be a thorough investigation reflects the importance it places on Egypt expect that there is going to be a thorough investigation and understanding of what happened The measured tone of US criticism reflects the importance it places on Egypt and the other big American Arab ally, Saudi Arabia. In both those countries, Washington is walking a risky path. It knows all too well the dangers of standing behind dictators. In Iran, that sparked an Islamic revolution. But unleash true democracy and Islamic fundamentalists can win at the polls. That led to civil war in Algeria. Egypt's Foreign Minister says America must remember to move cautiously. Democratic change is already happening in Lebanon and yet another bombing indicates the challenges ahead. A prominent anti-Syrian politician was killed today when a bomb blew apart his car. George Hawi was the former leader of Lebanon's Communist Party, best known for his role in fighting the Israeli invasion in 1982. He's the second anti-Syrian figure to be assassinated this month, and his death comes just two days after anti-Syrian parties won the first elections free of influence from Damascus since the end of Lebanon's civil war. Its troops may be gone from Lebanon, but Syria still casts a long shadow there. Norman Hermant, Lateline. Robert Fisk is the Middle East correspondent for the 'Independent' and has reported on and observed politics in that region for more than 25 years. He joins us now from Beirut. Thanks for joining us again. Can we start with the assassination of George Hawi? Only yesterday in one of your articles you quoted an old Lebanese friend as saying someone else is going to get killed soon. I mean, you couldn't have been more prophetic. Sadly, no. In fact, a number of Lebanese have been number of Lebanese have been ringing me up today saying it was a very spooky introduction to my story. I think it was. You see, what is happening in Lebanon, through the parliamentary elections, which were freely held, although there are flaws in them as the EU commission of observers said, is that we've reached a new stage where Lebanese can actually in theory at least control their own destiny. So how control their own destiny. So how do you, if you're against the Lebanese doing this or if you resent the Lebanese doing this, the question is: how do you create social political economic instability? And obviously, the killing of leading figures in Lebanese society, the journalist two or three weeks ago, now George Hawi, a respected man in Lebanon, a man who as you right said, was one of the first people said, was one of the first people to call for resistance against Israeli occupation in 1982 and yet at the same time was also harshly critical of the Syrian intelligence services,

how do you create this instability? Well, by killing people who have criticised Syria, but people who also have been known to be critical of Israel, because then the people who kill them can say, well, maybe it wasn't the Syrians, maybe it was the Israelis - in other words, you muddy the waters of the deaths in order to suggest, well, you we order to suggest, well, you we can't be sure, it's outside forces, we don't know who they are. There's no doubt that, for example, among the very angry, ferocious crowd that gathered within minutes around George Hawi's body - and I was George Hawi's body - and I was there - they believe that it was the work of the Syrian intelligence services, the Syrians of course deny this which you may have to - it may be a denial you have to take with quite denial you have to take with quite a lot of Syrian Damascus salt on the tongue. But either way you can be sure we will not find out who did sure we will not find out who did it in the near future. As usual the security forces, there's a very big security force ab rat tus here in Lebanon, were at the scene picking over the bits of the car. One isn't quite sure where the evidence will go. You know, we know that after Rafiq Rafiq Hariri's assassination on 14 February, evidence was taken from the scene of the crime and later other evidence was plantsed there. We also know now that the We also know now that the journalist who was murdered earlier this month, that the car, his car was moved that the car, his car was moved from the scene of the crime and the detonator was lost. It has numbers and codings on T I will be interested to see how good the investigation is into Hawi's murder today. Jumblat put it succinctly. today. Jumblat put it succinctly. He says the life of anyone who wants peace in Lebanon is in danger. He said until the security apparatus said until the security apparatus is controlled by democratic government, there can be no real change. Yeah, the real problem you see for the opposition is that the the opposition is that the President of Lebanon, who obtain add three-year extra period in power from pro Syrian parliamentarians last year, is a pro Syrian. He is a

friend. President of of Syria, he effectively is seen as Syria's man in Lebanon. There doesn't seem to in Lebanon. There doesn't seem to be a legal way of actually getting him out of office and one of the problems is that his security apparatus remains very much under his and there are Syrian influence. As we speak, the UN international commission inquiring into Hariri's murder is actually interviewing as we speak brigadier general mu. we speak brigadier general mu., stafa Ham Dan, a close security stafa Ham Dan, a close security aide to President Lahoud. In a sense to President Lahoud. In a sense both Syria's friends are under great pressure, from the international community, from the UN or by extension the United States and France, and at the same time pressures are coming upon those people opposed to Syria in a very violent and tragic way. Last time violent and tragic way. Last time we spoke to you was immediately after the assassination of Rafiq Hariri and you raised the spectre of a potential civil war beginning again in Lebanon. Just how painful do you think this transition to democracy in Lebanon is going to be? Well, I think there are going to be more assassinations, and I haven't met a Lebanese who doesn't think so. But Lebanese who doesn't think so. But I don't think there will be a civil war. I think that every day that goes by since Hariri's asass assassination in which there has assassination in which there has not been violence is another good day, further proof that there won't be. further proof that there won't be. I was only 400m from the convoy when it was blown up. When I saw that explosion, all the dead of the explosion, all the dead of the civil war started climbing out of their grave's for me. But I think now that, you know, so many families sent their children abroad during the war to be educated, to America, to Australia, to Britain, to Switzerland, and they've come back and I don't think they've come back imbued with this sense of sectarian violence that existed for their families that remained here. One of the reasons we've had so many demonstrations in Lebanon is that they're young people who are

demonstrating saying, we refuse to have another war. That probably is the saving of Lebanon. Alright. the saving of Lebanon. Alright. That brings us - that's optimistic note in a way brings us to the extraordinary statements by the US Secretary of State in Cairo yesterday when she declared that 60 years of US foreign policy in the Middle East had been a complete failure. How do you rate her failure. How do you rate her chances of turning that failure around by instituting or pushing for instituting or pushing for democracy throughout the Middle East? I don't think there's going to be democracy in the Middle East and I don't really think we want democracy. One of the problems of democracy in the Middle East is that if it really exists the Arabs may not do what we want them to do and it's much more easy to have dictator, generals, businessmen running countries on businessmen running countries on our behalf, rather than saying, let's have a fair vote, because in many cases, we may find Islamist governments take over, which we don't want. Originally the don't want. Originally the Americans didn't actually want elections in Iraq. It was only later, when the Shi'ites of Iraq threatened to join the insurrection with the Sunnis that suddenly America became a proponent of democracy in Iraq. I don't think the West wants real democracy out here because it may not turn out to be the kind of democracy we want. We are much happier with shadow military governments as in Algeria. We governments as in Algeria. We didn't object when the Algerian object when the Algerian authorities closed down the second round of elections when they thought that Islamists might take power. And Islamists might take power. And it's constantly the refrain of the Baath Party in Syria that if real democracy came to the Middle East democracy came to the Middle East it would be Islamists who would take over and we don't want that. We saw what happened in Iran, with all the flaws inherent in it, there are flaws inherent in it, there are real elections there. You have to take some of what's being said here at face value. I mean, she's saying that the US, in the past, pursued stability ... Are you sure? I'm asking you whether you can. The US pursued stability at the expense of democracy, but now things are going to be different. She claims the

to be different. She claims the fear of free choices can no longer justify the denial of liberty. Now, she seems to be opening up the possibility there that the US would support Islamist governments. Well, she does, but look, if you live in the Middle East, it doesn't look like this. The Arab world, which is principally what we're talking about, would love some of the shiny beautiful democracy which we possess and enjoy. They would love some of it. They would like some freedom. But many of them some freedom. But many of them would like freedom from us, from our armies, from our influence. And that's the problem, you see. What Arabs want is justice as much as democracy. They want freedom from us, in many cases. And they're not gonna get that, they will not get gonna get that, they will not get it in Uzbekistan, which is not apparently in the little circle of democracy which Condoleezza Rice is talking about. I'd like to believe that what the Americans say is true, but living here, I don't believe it is. What do you think the Egyptian President made of those statements, though, made at his very doorstep, when he faces the potential of an Islamic party coming up to Islamic party coming up to challenge him? Well, the Muslim Brotherhood remains banned in Egypt. Mubarak remains banned in Egypt. Mubarak has been told many times before "We really want democracy in Egypt. really want democracy in Egypt." He said we have democracy, we will said we have democracy, we will have more democracy. That's great and after a year or two we for get the speeches and things carry on as speeches and things carry on as they were. Mrs Bush when she was in were. Mrs Bush when she was in Egypt said it was a push in the right direction when Mubarak decided direction when Mubarak decided there could be contenders for the presidency, it wouldn't be just him standing for the election next time. What she didn't say and what Egyptians know is that the Egyptian governing party has to decide whether those presidential contenders are allowed to stand or not. So it's not a democracy, it's another sham. All the Arabs deserve real democracy, they deserve real democracy, they deserve freedom and freedom from us, but we're not offering that to them. We continue to support the dictators and we to support the dictators and we will to do. How do you know, though,

to do. How do you know, though, that a new breed, just as in Lebanon, you're talking about these young people coming back from many years in the West, and changing the way things are done in a country. How things are done in a country. How do you know that a new breed of young Democrats might not take root and even take heart from these kind of statements in Egypt and in fact right through the Middle East? Look, it's nice and it will be lovely to contemplate that this was the case and I would personally the case and I would personally like to see that. I'd love to see democracies all over the Middle East. But the fact of the matter is that we have - we are anchored into history, the Ottoman empire, the British and French mands dates that followed the First World War and we have created these patriarchal societies in which our kind of democracy, one man, one vote or one woman, one vote or whatever you woman, one vote or whatever you like to say, simply, largely, cannot to say, simply, largely, cannot take root. We have created in Lebanon, for example - there was democracy here by the way before the war. We didn't invent this now. But we've created in Lebanon, for example, a totally sectarian society. You cannot be the President of Lebanon unless you're a Christian Maronite. You cannot be the Prime Minister unless you're a Sunni Muslim. But unless you're a Sunni Muslim. But we don't mention this . We talk about democracy. But this is not a modern state. Lebanon, like all the states state. Lebanon, like all the statess in the Middle East, is artificial. It was created by us and it It was created by us and it is a tribal state as it Iraq as we now know, as know, as is require Syria, governed by a Shi'ite sect where the by a Shi'ite sect where the majority are Sunni. We are not setting up are Sunni. We are not setting up the framework for democracy here. What we are doing is we continue to support the largest tribes, while claiming that we want human rights and more proportional representation. What you've got in Lebanon, for example, is proportional sectarianism, which is what if you look at the electoral lists of the last four weeks, is what has been created. It's a free vote, but you have to vote for your tribe. Alright. We're nearly out of time, but can't you unmake history?

I mean, you talk about not setting up the framework ... Ah, look, you cannot escape from history. Why can't you set up those frame works for democracy to take place? It doesn't work like that. Look, history - I will be very brief. I know you're running out of time. History for us is easy to cut off from. End of the Second World War, European Union, you say what you like. The Palestinian in the like. The Palestinian in the refugee camps which are scarcely 2.5 miles from where I'm speaking, they still look back and say the Balfa declaration which was Britain's support for a Jewish poem land in Palestine is what drove them into exile. They lived that declaration last night, one hour before. You cannot ask the Arabs to separate themselves from history because themselves from history because they live it today. Okay. We're living history just talking to you, I think. Thanks very much once again. We'll see you as soon as we We'll see you as soon as we possibly can. (Laughs) The Catholic Church leader who helped topple two corrupt Philippine presidents has died, aged 76. Cardinal Jaime Sin had led the Philippines' 65 million Catholics for more than three decades and is best remembered for inspiring the people power revolution that overthrew the regime of President Ferdinand Marcos. He died in Manila early this morning after a long illness. South East Asia correspondent Peter Lloyd reports. They're mourning the man known to friend and foe as the politician priest, a divine commander in chief. First to pay her respects, the First to pay her respects, the woman Cardinal Jaime Sin helped rise to power after the overflow of President Marcos in 1986. He was a good man, and I shall always remember him with a lot of remember him with a lot of gratitude and I hope we can be a little like him, serving God, serving our country and serving our people. And this from the country's And this from the country's current leader. Let us mourn his passing. leader. Let us mourn his passing. He was the one who fought for the freedom of the Filipino people, and

he was a good servant of God. As Archbishop of Manila, he was As Archbishop of Manila, he was the spiritual leader of the people spiritual leader of the people power movement that ousted Marcos. His support her another people power movement four years ago ended the presidency of Joseph presidency of Joseph Estrada. Never shy about mixing religion with politics, he always rejected the notion of a separation of church notion of a separation of church and state. When there is separation, state. When there is separation, but we say a critical collaboration is beautiful. Critical collaboration. We praise the government, the government is doing alright. And we can decide if it is not doing alright. He was revered by millions, but he was sometimes controversial. In an overpopulated country racked by dire poverty, he often spoke out against abortion and birth control. His was a long career, at 47, he became the youngest member of the College of Cardinals, remaining Archbishop of Manila for almost three decades. He had a quirky three decades. He had a quirky sense of humour, often referring to his official rez denls as the House of Sin. A kidney ailment and diabetes finally forced him to step down two years ago. But he vowed to remain the conscience of the nation the conscience of the nation . I am retiring, but I am not keeping quiet! Declining health kept him from attending the election of a successor to his friend John Paul successor to his friend John Paul II at the Vatican. His deaths at the age of 76 robs the Philippines of a man with world renown for standing up to tie rants in the name of freedom. Peter Lloyd, Lateline. To the markets now. The All Ordinaries ended lower as resource and energy stocks slip from recent highs. Profit taking saw local oil stocks ease. Santos was down 30 cents. The higher oil price caused Qantas to slide. The banks were mixed. Now to the weather. That's all for this evening. If you'd like to look back at tonight's interview or review any of Lateline's stories or transcripts, you can visit our website at abc.net.au/lateline. I'll be back tomorrow night, so please join me then. Goodnight. Captions by Captioning and Subtitling International.