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Of the capitals tomorrow - fine in Perth, increasing high cloud and dry in Adelaide, a late change
in Melbourne, fine in Hobart, mostly fine in Brisbane, dry and mostly sunny in Sydney. Along the
coast tomorrow - mainly dry in Batemans Bay and Bega, dry in Wollongong with light to moderate
north-east winds, freshening later. For Goulburn, possible early fog and mist, then a dry day, with
light to moderate north-to-north-west winds and a top of 31. Dry in Wagga with light to moderate
north-west-to-north-easterlies and temperatures out west in the mid-30s. The forecast for Canberra
and the ACT - some overnight cloud, clearing to a warm and mostly sunny day. Light to moderate
east-to-north-east winds overnight and at first tomorrow, tending moderate north-west in the
afternoon. Temperatures from 14 to 31. The outlook is for an approaching trough to bring some
showers and thunderstorms by early Thursday, extending into Friday and Saturday before the next
high pressure ridge comes in from the west. Virginia. Thanks, John. And that's the news to this
minute. The '7:30 Report' is next, and I'll be back with a news update at 8:30. On the second
anniversary of the Canberra bushfires, we'll leave you with pictures from tonight's gathering in
Weston of residents affected by the fires. From me, goodnight. Supertext Captions by the Australian
Caption Centre. www.auscap.com.au This program is captioned live. Public office can take it out of
people and after 17 years and two serious life-threatening illnesses the time has come to put my
family and my health first. The roller-coaster stops here. Mark Latham, Labor's great generational
hope, did give his party a white-knuckle ride but it was light-on for thrill and is heavy on
spills. Now it's all over. I do. I do. REPORTER: You obviously feel the media... Mark Latham didn't
just shoot the messenger, he took it with a machine gun, blaming the media for his plight and
ill-health for his decision to abandon his political career. I've had a well-publicised problem
with pancreatitis that has been hard to overcome. This condition and the uncertain timing of the
attacks are incompatible with the demands and stresses of the parliamentary life. Now Labor's
experiment with young blood has failed will it return to experienced hands? I am absolutely fired
with ambition. The Australian people, our nation, and for the Australian Labor Party. Welcome to
the program, I'm Maxine McKew. Mark Latham's announcement this afternoon was the inevitable climax
to weeks of damaging speculation about his leadership and the end of a controversial political
career. It came less than 24 hours after Queensland Premier Peter Beattie made his blunt warning on
this program that the Labor Party had to resolve the issue sooner rather than later. But when the
announcement came, it was a characteristically spectacular exit for the political firebrand who
lived by the political maxim of his mentor Gough Whitlam of "crash or crash through". Matt Peacock
looks back at the Latham experiment. An Eastly angry man and consistent with his political career,
a man who marched alone, even for his final statement. In recent days, I've been able to get away,
to rest and recover and talk to my family about our priorities for the future. Our conclusion is
that I should look after my health and pursue a normal life outside of politics. Therefore, I've
decided to resign both as Labor leader and member for Werriwa. Mark Latham was one of the youngest
Labor leaders and one of the most fleeting, in the job for just over 400 days after his surprise
election when Simon Crean stood down in 2003. I feel deeply honoured... Right from the word go, as
many in the party warned, they were in for a roller-coaster ride. Get in, sit down, put on your
seatbelt and hang on. I think there'll certainly be an element of that with Mark. Now that it's
over, what do his colleagues say? It has been a wild ride. There have been really good moments,
great moments and Mark brought into the job of Opposition Leader a real passionate intensity. He's
a conviction politician and he really went after the Government. Mark tried his darnest to do it
and he, given all the circumstances in which he found himself, he did as well as anyone could in
those circumstances. Mark Latham has always been different. He could certainly dish it out, but
could he take it? The western Sydney biffer could also shed a tear. Lay off my family. Thinks have
been put to me about my sister mother and father that are not true. Say what you like about me, but
leave them out of it, please. Latham's appeal his unpredictable highly-quotable lines his larrikin
streak and back to the people rhetoric, hit a chord with the Australian public, or so it seemed. I
stand for the things I've been doing all my life - working hard, trying to climb that ladder of
opportunity. Working hard, studying hard. I believe in an up wardly mobile society where people can
climb the rungs of opportunity. SONG: # ... it'll never do somehow. # When the rooster crows at the
break of dawn # Look out your window and I'll be gone # You're the reason I'm travelling on # But
don't think twice, it's alright...# The boy from Green Valley certainly distinguished the Labor
Opposition from the Government. Troops would be back from Iraq by Christmas. Politicians' super was
to be scaled back and the US and the Government had to buckle on his free trade agreement
amendment. But they were all Mark Latham's decisions, made on his own without consultation and
no-one was more on his own than Latham the loser, a man clearly energised by the election campaign
who then it seemed, simply couldn't believe the voters had spurned him. It was not our night, it's
not the night we were hoping for. It was Latham the loner again with his second bout of
pancreatitis over Christmas. Not talking even to his closest supporters, let alone the nation at a
time of one of aca's natural disasters. Mark Latham had let the crisis spin out for so long, he was
already politically finished. He, though, blamed the media. Obviously I'm disappointed with the
press coverage over the last fort night, despite being on annual leave and recovering from illness,
the media have been constantly camped outside our home. When I was hospitalised in ought for
instance, the media frenzy was over the top with photographers shooting through my hospital window.
Accordingly I've done everything I could to keep consequent episodes as private as possible. Ever
since the recent bout became known and even though I was on annual leave, the media has been
harassing people in the street, forcing neighbours to call the

Latham crashes out of politics

Latham crashes out of politics

Reporter: Matt Peacock

MAXINE McKEW: Mark Latham's announcement this afternoon was the inevitable climax to weeks of
damaging speculation about his leadership and the end of a controversial political career. It came
less than 24 hours after Queensland Premier Peter Beattie made his blunt warning on this program
that the Labor Party had to resolve the issue sooner rather than later. But when the announcement
came, it was a characteristically spectacular exit for the political firebrand who lived by the
political maxim of his mentor, Gough Whitlam, of "crash or crash through". Matt Peacock looks back
at the Latham experiment.

MATT PEACOCK: An evidently angry man, and consistent with his political career, a man who marched
alone, even for his final statement.

MARK LATHAM (OPPOSITION LEADER): In recent days, I've been able to get away, to rest and recover
and talk to my family about our priorities for the future. Our conclusion is that I should look
after my health and pursue a normal life outside of politics. Therefore, I've decided to resign
both as Labor Leader and member for Werriwa.

MATT PEACOCK: Mark Latham was one of the youngest Labor leaders and one of the most fleeting: in
the job for just over 400 days after his surprise election when Simon Crean stood down in 2003.

MARK LATHAM: I feel deeply honoured, and we want to do good things for the country.

MATT PEACOCK: Right from the word go, as many in the party warned, they were in for a
roller-coaster ride.

KELVIN THOMPSON (LABOR FRONTBENCHER): Get in, sit down, put on your seat belt and hang on, and I
think that there'll certainly be an element of that with Mark.

MATT PEACOCK: And now that it's over, what do his colleagues say?

CRAIG EMERSON (LABOR BACKBENCHER): It has been a wild ride. There've been really good moments,
great moments, and Mark brought into the job of Opposition Leader a real passionate intensity. He's
a conviction politician, and he really went after the government.

KIM BEAZLEY (LABOR BACKBENCHER): Mark tried his darnedest to do it, and given all the circumstances
in which he found himself, he did as well as anyone could in those circumstances.

MATT PEACOCK: Mark Latham has always been different. He could certainly dish it out, but could he
take it? The western Sydney biffer could also shed a tear.

MARK LATHAM: Lay off my family. Things have been put to me about my sisters, my mother, my father
that are not true, and they don't deserve it. Say whatever you like about me, but leave them out of
it, please.

MATT PEACOCK: Latham's appeal, his unpredictable, highly quotable lines, his larrikin streak and
his back-to-the-people rhetoric hit a chord with the Australian public, or so it seemed.

MARK LATHAM: Well, I stand for the things that I've been doing all my life: working hard, trying to
climb that ladder of opportunity; working hard, studying hard. I believe in an upwardly mobile
society where people can climb the rungs of opportunity.

MATT PEACOCK: The boy from Green Valley certainly distinguished the Labor Opposition from the
government. Troops would be back from Iraq by Christmas; politicians' super was to be scaled back;
and the US and the government had to buckle on his free trade agreement amendment. But they were
all Mark Latham's decisions, made on his own, without consultation, and no-one was more on his own
than Latham the loser, a man clearly energised by the election campaign who then, it seemed, simply
couldn't believe the voters had spurned him.

MARK LATHAM: It's not our night; it's not the night that we were hoping for.

MATT PEACOCK: It was Latham the loner again with his second bout of pancreatitis over Christmas; a
leader not talking even to his closest supporters, let alone the nation, at a time of one of Asia's
biggest natural disasters. It was the illness that ultimately forced him to quit, but Mark Latham
had let the crisis spin out for so long that he was already politically finished. He, though,
blamed the media.

MARK LATHAM: Obviously I'm disappointed with the press coverage over the last fortnight. Despite
being on annual leave and recovering from illness, the media have been constantly camped outside
our home. When I was hospitalised in August, for instance, the media frenzy was over the top, with
photographers shooting through my hospital window. Accordingly, I've done everything I could to
keep subsequent episodes as private as possible. Unfortunately, ever since the recent bout became
known, and even though I was on annual leave, the media's been harassing people in our street,
forcing our neighbours to call the police on several occasions.

JOEL FITZGIBBON (LABOR FRONTBENCHER): And it's pretty difficult to rest in the environment in which
he was living: media camped on the front lawn, his wife and children prisoners in their own home. I
think he's entitled to be angry.

MATT PEACOCK: And where to now for Labor, for its third leader in a little over 12 months? Can Kim
Beazley, as John Howard once was, be resurrected again? His backers say that he's the only one with
the experience who can unite the party.

ANTHONY ALBANESE (LABOR FRONTBENCHER): I think that Kim, if he chooses to put himself forward, will
get a great deal of support. I certainly am of the view that we need a candidate who can unite the
party, and certainly I'll be having discussions with people hoping that we come out of this process
with a single candidate, and I think Kim is the person who's most likely to unite the party around
his leadership.

CRAIG EMERSON: The Australian people did say at the last election to the Labor Party, "We want an
experienced leader." There are high levels of affection in the community for Kim Beazley, and so
that's what caucus members will need to weigh up.

MATT PEACOCK: Mark Latham, now set to be a footnote in Australian history, can take solace from his
family.

MARK LATHAM: I'm exceptionally fortunate to have a fantastic family, especially my beautiful wife
and my two little boys. I'd be crazy to put this at risk. In politics, everyone talks about family
values. I'd like to now practise them in a normal way.

MATT PEACOCK: His best man and closest political friend, Joel Fitzgibbon, says that his decision to
quit politics altogether is one to be regretted.

JOEL FITZGIBBON: I think Mark Latham's a man whose health denied him his destiny, and we will never
know, but I think if he'd had the full month to fully recover in the right environment, Mark Latham
may still be leader today, and may have just taken Labor to an election win in three years' time
and met his destiny to be Prime Minister of Australia.

MAXINE McKEW: Matt Peacock reporting there.

Beazley throws his hat into leadership ring

Beazley throws his hat into leadership ring

Reporter:

MAXINE McKEW: Shortly after Mark Latham made that emotional exit, over in Perth, former leader Kim
Beazley called a press conference to announce that he was putting himself forward as a candidate in
a caucus ballot to be held on Friday week in Canberra. It will be the third time that the West
Australian has recontested the Labor leadership since his departure from the job after the failed
2001 campaign. But Kim Beazley may not have the field all to himself. The 7.30 Report has been told
that Queenslander Kevin Rudd has stronger support than he's given credit for. Then there's
Victorian left-winger Lindsay Tanner, who's also assessing his chances. But so far, Kim Beazley is
the only publicly declared candidate. Today, he turned down all interview requests, but here are
some excerpts of what he had to say at his press conference this afternoon.

KIM BEAZLEY (LABOR BACKBENCHER): I've seen Mark Latham's statement and I'm deeply saddened by it. I
think it's a matter of great sadness for the Labor Party and the Australian people that he has not
had a chance to properly put before the Australian people the best that he could provide them in
leadership for the party and the country. He's a bloke with considerable ability, great talent, and
it is a shame that his health has meant that he has not been able to do that. But that's in the
past. What we now need to do is to look to the future.

I did not think these circumstances would arise, and in all honesty, I thought that, for me, all
that was left in politics was to operate in a way which supported the election ultimately of a
Latham Labor Government. When I made comments some time ago about whether or not I had much of a
political future, it was made entirely in that context.

Obviously, a lot of people have talked to me about our situation over the last few days, and I've
been encouraged by many who did not vote for me in those tumultuous ballots a year or so ago, and
I've been encouraged by their support for me and their desire that I should run. It's not really
surprising. There is in the Labor Party a very deep desire for unity, for stability and for
experience to be presented to the Australian people, and I can bring that with energy and
commitment.

I'm not motivated particularly personally for high office, although that is important to me, and
it's important motivation in my running. I am absolutely fired with ambition for the Australian
people, our nation, and for the Australian Labor Party.

I've learned a lot from my time on the back bench. I've learned anew the value of my colleagues.
I've not changed my ideas or principles, but I have changed my approach. This is a government that
has to be rigorously kept to account. There has been some talk around the place about two-term
strategies. That's politics 1-0 stuff. Forget it. We need a strategy to win the next election, and
the public interest demands that we are the sort of political party that can win that election and
that they can trust with office, and one of the points that have been made to me consistently by my
colleagues is that we need, in leadership, a great deal of experience with the proven support of
the Australian people.

Our disagreements with this government are profound. We believe that you can have, simultaneously,
a strong economy in equality of opportunity for all Australians. We believe that in an age of
terror, you can provide for security of the nation but, at the same time, provide a sense of
security around the kitchen table when people sit down to consider the health needs of their
families, the educational needs of their families, the environment in which they live. You can do
both things. You can provide for the security of your people physically and you can provide for the
security of your people in all those needs that make for a happy and decent life.

The road to the prime ministership of this nation is a long and hard road. It's not an easy one,
and there are many twists and turns on that road, and I'm in my 25th year as a member of the
Federal Parliament, and I know this: that public opinion is volatile and can change. I fought two
elections in the most difficult of circumstances: one after we'd suffered a massive defeat, and the
other in the environment of September 11, and we won the majority of the votes in the first and it
was very close in the second. I do feel that if you look back over that record, then you look at
the views that have been expressed through public opinion polls and the like, and more important
than that, the views that are expressed to me directly by many of the people I've had a chance as a
backbench member to meet over the course of the last three years, there's no doubt in my mind that
I can lead a winning team at the next election.

MAXINE McKEW: Kim Beazley wasn't the only senior figure, by the way, refusing interview requests
today. It seems that all of the major players have gone to ground tonight. But one way or another,
it will all be settled in 10 days' time, on Friday 28 January. Now, that only leaves the matter of
a by-election in Mark Latham's Sydney seat of Werriwa - not something the Labor Party will welcome.
On a 9 per cent margin, keep in mind that the much safer seat of Cunningham was lost in a
by-election when Steve Martin cut short his parliamentary term after the 2001 election.

Doctor hopes to heal tsunami-ravaged village

Doctor hopes to heal tsunami-ravaged village

Reporter: Mick Bunworth

MAXINE McKEW: One of the first Australians to provide assistance to victims of the tsunami that
devastated the coast of Sri Lanka was Melbourne pediatrician Dr Sian Hughes. Dr Hughes and her
family were lucky to survive the deadly surges themselves, but having done so, she began treating
survivors with whatever medical supplies she could gather in the chaotic aftermath. Now safely
home, she and her colleagues are trying to organise long-term assistance for the Sri Lankan village
of Unawatuna. But Dr Hughes is worried that, in the reconstruction process, the people will be left
to fend for themselves. Mick Bunworth reports.

MICK BUNWORTH: Those that were there don't need television images to remember the force of the
Boxing Day tsunami; it's been indelibly etched into their memory.

SIAN HUGHES: It was just unbelievable. I mean, it still seems like a dream now. It was when the
water got to our first storey and came over the top of the balcony that we started getting
extremely scared.

MICK BUNWORTH: Dr Sian Hughes, husband Tony Heselev and their children, Sam, Rosie and Matilda,
were in the village of Unawatuna, near Galle in Sri Lanka's south, when their holiday adventure
turned nasty.

SIAN HUGHES: The children were, fortunately, all upstairs. I mean, it would have been such a
different story if we'd gone to breakfast at that time, because our waiter in the hotel where we
had breakfast - which was right on the very edge of the sea - he was killed. But we were all on the
balcony.

TONY HESELEV: The downstairs was totally devastated, you know, and had we stayed down there, well,
who knows? But we went upstairs and we were able to see the wave come in, and we just got up there
in time.

SAM HESELEV: I wasn't really scared at first, but then everyone started screaming and running up to
our room, and I just panicked.

ROSIE HESELEV: I went up the roof and I could see - there was actually someone stuck in a tree, and
there was someone crying for help, and so the people from the hotel was down in the water actually
helping people, and it was really scary up there.

SIAN HUGHES: I went into doctor mode. I just went back to work for three days. It was my children
who were really brave and really tolerated not only having survived a tsunami, but not having their
mother with them.

MICK BUNWORTH: Dr Hughes, a Melbourne pediatrician, was joined by two other tourists with limited
medical knowledge. They set up a makeshift hospital in a small hotel which had survived the
tsunami.

SIAN HUGHES: We asked everybody in the complex to give us whatever medical supplies they had, and
most tourists do carry a small medical kit with them, and we got quite a few supplies. We had
antibiotics, we had painkillers and we had disinfectants, which is really what we needed, and
sterilising solutions to put onto wounds as well, antiseptics. We did manage to get enough. When we
did return short of antiseptics, we were actually using scent to spray on the wounds to try and get
them clean.

TONY HESELEV: She's that sort of person. She always give 100 per cent of herself, and we were very
proud with what she was able to do, although we would have to say that, selfishly, we missed her a
hell of a lot during those three days.

MICK BUNWORTH: The children put their own trauma behind them and decided to help their mum at the
hospital.

SAM HESELEV: Well, there were a lot of people with cuts. There was a lot of barbed wire around, so
a lot of people with cuts, and me and Rosie were tearing up sheets for bandages. We tore up
hundreds, yeah. Matilda especially was a great help with mum. She stayed around and got things for
her like cream.

MICK BUNWORTH: While they survived the tsunami uninjured, Dr Hughes' children are not without their
own scars.

ROSIE HESELEV: Well, at night I still get a bit freaked, but I try and get over it.

MICK BUNWORTH: But their trauma is minor in comparison to the Unawatuna community, who showed
incredible care for them when it was feared that the Australian family might have perished in the
tsunami.

TONY HESELEV: We came across some Muslim boys. So friendly, so fantastically welcoming, and they
were really nice guys. About 20, 22, about four or five of them. Played cricket with them on the
beach. We rang 'em later, and they said on the Sunday night, the Boxing Day night, they actually
came down to Unawatuna to look for us. I mean, you can imagine trying to actually get in there
would've been so hard, yet they went out of their way to try and find us.

MICK BUNWORTH: Dr Hughes and her family are now determined to help the people of Unawatuna rebuild
their lives, but good intentions will be difficult to act upon.

SIAN HUGHES: It's not an easy issue. I mean, there's lots of issues with setting up charities and
how we can get the money. Although Friends of Unawatuna has been established in the UK, I'm looking
at how to establish an Australian branch or whether we donate through a major charity to them in
the UK, and how we go about organising the infrastructure on the ground.

MICK BUNWORTH: Doctors John Hodgeson and Andrew Ramsay, principals of Melbourne's Coolaroo Clinic,
where Dr Hughes works, have agreed to set up a long-term assistance package for Unawatuna. But
first, a new medical clinic will need to be built.

MAN: There's things like needles and syringes and crepe bandages...

MAN: And maybe even have some interchange with the doctors themselves, like you'd have like an
exchange situation, where we could swap over. Would you see that working at all?

MAN: Yeah - you'd have to be a bit careful, I suppose, in what we thought we were actually going to
do. We'd actually go there, I suppose, to educate doctors.

MICK BUNWORTH: The Australian Government's Chief Medical Officer, Professor John Horvath, is
responsible for coordinating Australian medical assistance to tsunami-hit countries. He says he can
only respond to requests from the governments of those nations.

PROFESSOR JOHN HORVATH (AUSTRALIAN CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER): One of things in many of these areas
we've got to be very alert to is that you need a lot of support to deliver the type of care you
give. It's hard to know what the reconstruction of each of these areas is going to take, and which
of the countries will take primary responsibility for helping each of the communities.

MICK BUNWORTH: Dr Hughes' fear is that her adopted community of Unawatuna is not on the Sri Lankan
Government's radar and will miss out.

SIAN HUGHES: We saw very little support in the first 36 hours that we were there, and as I said,
the Sri Lankan people don't depend on government hand-outs for their existence, and we really feel
that we need to focus on this particular village and make sure that they get the support and the
help that we can give them.

MICK BUNWORTH: If Dr Hughes, her colleagues, family and friends can do that, the effects might
extend well beyond one village.

MAXINE McKEW: Mick Bunworth reporting there.

Drug claims mishandled: tennis authorities

Drug claims mishandled: tennis authorities

Reporter: Tracy Bowden

MAXINE McKEW: A few days ago, Russian tennis player Svetlana Kuzenotsova was focused on winning the
first big tournament of the year, the Australian Open. But the fifth seed has now been completely
distracted by drugs allegations, which seem to fly in the face of the sport's anti-doping protocol.
Belgian authorities have revealed that the teenager tested positive for a banned substance at an
exhibition match last month. But tennis authorities have slammed the handling of this case, saying
that they still haven't been officially notified of the positive test and that the athlete should
not have been named. Tracy Bowden reports.

TRACY BOWDEN: 2004 was a spectacular year for Russian teenager Svetlana Kuzenotsova. Rising through
the world rankings from No. 36 to No. 5, she won three of seven finals, including the US Open in
September. Now, the 19-year-old is in Melbourne, one of the favourites to take out the first big
tournament of the year, the Australian Open. But after an easy first-round win yesterday, all the
media wanted to talk about was drugs. News had broken that one of the four players in an exhibition
tournament in Belgium last month had tested positive for a banned substance.

SVETLANA KUZNETSOVA: Nobody knows nothing yet. Nobody contact me, so um, I don't know nothing about
this, really.

TRACY BOWDEN: Svetlana Kuzenotsova played in the tournament, but seemed unconcerned.

SVETLANA KUZNETSOVA: I've been tested 11 times. I think I'm the most player who've been tested.
Other players, they've been tested the same amount of times, like 10, 9, 8, so I'm pretty sure that
everybody's pretty clean, and maybe if something happened, it was like mistake, but you never know.

TRACY BOWDEN: Overnight, Belgian authorities went even further, naming Svetlana Kuzenotsova as the
athlete who'd tested positive for the stimulant ephedrine. Today, the Russian player issued a
statement saying she prides herself on being a clean athlete, adding: "There is absolutely no
reason why I would take a stimulant to enhance my performance at an out-of-competition exhibition
match in the middle of the off-season. What is true is that at the time of the exhibition match in
question, I did have a cold and was taking a cold medicine."

DR PETER LARKINS (SPORTS PHYSICIAN): Look, ephedrine isn't normally considered one of the worst
categories of drugs by any means. I mean, we're familiar with anabolic steroids and growth hormones
and EPOs and these sort of drugs in world sport cases. So along the lines of those, it's certainly
not sinister. But in terms of an athlete having a potential advantage from using it, it is still
there, and so clearly, it is present on the WADA list, it's present on the Olympic list, it's
present on most international sports as a drug because we don't want exploitation of it.

TRACY BOWDEN: Sports physician Peter Larkins says while ephedrine is contained in a number of
medications to ease respiratory problems, in larger doses, it could assist an athlete.

DR PETER LARKINS: As an athlete who is perhaps dehydrated or low body weight or takes a higher dose
than they're allowed to, the advantages of ephedrine are going to be as a stimulant drug. It will
improve reflexes, hand-eye coordination and have an effect of increasing heart rate. So it's a
stimulant drug; it's a go-fast drug.

LARRY SCOTT (CHIEF EXECUTIVE, WTA TOUR): I want to make clear that under the tennis anti-doping
program, ephedrine is not a banned substance when it's out of competition. So I wanted to just make
that clear. What Svetlana was playing in was a two-day charity exhibition during our off-season.
This was not a competition.

TRACY BOWDEN: Tennis officials are outraged at the handling of this case, saying that Belgian
authorities have not complied with anti-doping procedures.

LARRY SCOTT: It's acts like this by a government minister which I think undermine the campaign
against anti-doping, which is very, very regrettable. I've never seen anything like this, where
someone has been just so irresponsible in terms of leaking a story to the press without going
through the type of due process that any credible anti-doping program would follow.

TRACY BOWDEN: Under the tennis anti-doping program, if a player tests positive during competition,
they would only be named after a second positive test and an independent review on procedure.

PATRICK SMITH (THE 'AUSTRALIAN'): What they're really doing in out-of-season drug testing or
out-of-competition drug testing is looking for steroids, an EPO. That's what they're chasing. So
the stimulant is irrelevant out of competition; very relevant in competition, and we test for it
vigorously then, but not out of competition.

TRACY BOWDEN: Senior sports commentator for the 'Australian' newspaper Patrick Smith says the
impact of claims like these on a player's reputation cannot be underestimated.

PATRICK SMITH: An athlete who is named in this way, I think, has a problem. Once you're tainted, it
remains.

TRACY BOWDEN: This is the second year in a row that doping allegations have overshadowed the
Australian Open. Last year, Briton Greg Rusedski tested positive for the steroid nandrolone.

GREG RUSEDSKI: All I want to say is that I've already released my statement. I'm innocent of all
charges. That's all I have to say.

TRACY BOWDEN: He was later cleared on the basis that the Association of Tennis Professionals had
admitted handing out contaminated supplements to several players. Today, Greg Rusedski spoke out
against the handling of these latest allegations.

GREG RUSEDSKI: What I think is it should never be made public, these sorts of things, you know,
until all the facts are out, until there's a tribunal, until everything goes through.

TRACY BOWDEN: This afternoon, the current star of Australian women's tennis, Alicia Molik, stepped
in to defend her doubles partner.

ALICIA MOLIK: There's absolutely nothing wrong with anything that she's done. I saw the papers and
I read the front page, and I bought every single newspaper in the convenience store and threw them
away - that's how strongly I felt about the issue.

TRACY BOWDEN: Larry Scott, head of the Women's Tennis Association Tour, says Svetlana Kuzenotsova
is very disturbed by what's happened.

LARRY SCOTT: Here we are at the Australian Open, you know, one of most important tournaments in the
world for the players, and it's a huge distraction.

TRACY BOWDEN: Just how much of a distraction may become apparent tomorrow, when the fifth seed is
due to play her next match against Marion Bartoli from France.

MAXINE McKEW: Tracy Bowden reporting there.

Very relevant in competition and we test for it vigorously then, but not out of competition. Senior
sports commentator for the 'Australian' newspaper Patrick Smith