Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Disclaimer: The Parliamentary Library does not warrant or accept liability for the accuracy or usefulness of the transcripts.These are copied directly from the broadcaster's website.
7.30 Report -

View in ParlViewView other Segments

Just keep on going and Mr Latham and Mr Rann will just have a look at what you're doing, OK?
Where's the big bloke gone? Where's the larrikin image? That's the trouble you have I guess if you
print that image and then you try to pull it all back into the box. Tonight - easing and squeezing.
Massaging the message and pitching the image on the Latham trail. There's nothing surer than he'll
lose if he's Mark Latham pretending not to be Mark Latham. Staged, scripted, complete with extras -
does Labor's production propel or stifle its star performer? He wouldn't get a kick in an electric
chair. Rubbish, rubbish, there should be a Victorian club. Blow-ins lay siege to the 'G' for that
big day in September. It might sort of raise the average level of IQ in Melbourne just for a day.
Welcome to the program. For a long time - after the Vietnam War ended

National security dominates campaign

Broadcast: 20/09/2004

National security dominates campaign

Reporter: Michael Brissenden

KERRY O'BRIEN: For a long time after the Vietnam War ended and then the Berlin Wall came down,
defence was probably one of the least contentious of election issues.

In this campaign, with the threat of terrorism playing on the public's mind, Prime Minister John
Howard is determined to put national security front and centre, and Opposition Leader Mark Latham
has, if anything, sought to outgun him.

Today was a classic illustration, as political editor Michael Brissenden reports.

MICHAEL BRISSENDON: Over the last week, this has become a campaign fought in various shades of
green - from the deep forest hues of the Tasmanian old growth forests to the shades of khaki that
resonate through any debate about national security.

Today, both leaders came out dressed metaphorically in fatigues.

Mark Latham announced a new 700 soldier light infantry battalion to be based in Townsville - and
perhaps, more importantly, bang in the middle of the very marginal Liberal-held seat of Herbert.

MARK LATHAM, OPPOSITION LEADER: The experience in Timor shows us that Australia's military capacity
can be overstretched and we need to do more.

It's appropriate now to raise this new light infantry battalion to ensure that we're not
overstretched in the future, that we've got the capacity always for the effective defence of
Australia and our operations in the region and beyond.

MICHAEL BRISSENDON: And John Howard today chose Darwin, the centre of most marginal seat in the
country, Solomon, to announce a plan to set up new anti-terrorism teams, regional flying squads
based in Australia and two special AFP squads based in neighbouring countries, probably Indonesia
and the Philippines.

A plan expected to cost $100 million over five years.

JOHN HOWARD, PRIME MINISTER: Without being specific, we know from discussions that have already
occurred at a police and agency level, that this initiative will be very warmly welcomed in the
region.

MICHAEL BRISSENDON: And on top of that there was a $50 million injection of funds for the Darwin
Hospital, now at the edge, it seems, of a newly defined zone.

JOHN HOWARD: It is a mark of our respect for the professionalism of all the staff of this hospital
who responded so magnificently in our name and for all of us in the wake of the Bali attack.

It recognises the special place of Darwin at the top of Australia at the tip of the arc of
instability in our region It recognises, sadly, that the world in which we live must contemplate at
least the possibility of some other terrorist incident that could require the services of the Royal
Darwin Hospital.

MICHAEL BRISSENDON: In the wake of the Bali attack, of course both Darwin and Perth hospitals took
the brunt of the heaviest immediate casualties.

But Darwin also seems to be in a political zone of its own, it's called marginal.

REPORTER: Is there any more money in the pipeline for Royal Perth given that it was also heavily
involved in these activities?

JOHN HOWARD: We don't have anything specifically to announce at this stage about that.

MICHAEL BRISSENDON: National security was always going to be a focus of this campaign.

We've seen a bit of it up to this point, and the bombing in Jakarta certainly gave it some extra
weight, but so far Labor has been pretty well prepared for the arguments it knew would be coming.

In the debate just over a week ago, Mark Latham came out hard on the issue - straight off the top -
a recognition that it was a weakness that needed to be addressed for sure but an attempt also to
take some of the heat out of it as well.

And today, surrounded by offensive hardware, he was once again promising to bring the focus of our
counter-terrorist efforts back to our own region, but after this exchange over the weekend, the
Government claims that focus has limits.

LAURIE OAKES, 'SUNDAY' PROGRAM, CHANNEL NINE: If you knew that, say, Jemaah Islamiah terrorists in
a neighbouring country were planning an attack on Australia, would you as prime minister be
prepared to act pre-emptively to stop them?

MARK LATHAM: We've rejected Mr Howard's notion of pre-emption, extended pre-emption, You need to do
things in cooperation with our neighbours.

There's obviously sovereignty issues involved in that question.

JOHN HOWARD: If it were necessary in order to prevent a terrorist attack on Australia that we'd
take action ourselves and there were no alternative, then I would do it.

And I am amazed that he didn't give the same unhesitating, unconditional response.

MARK LATHAM: Imagine if a country in our region said they were prepared to launch unilateral
strikes on targets in Australia, our sovereign territory, without the cooperation and involvement
of the Australian Government.

Imagine the outrage in this country.

As Australians, we would feel absolutely appalled.

ALEXANDER DOWNER, FOREIGN MINISTER: It's a clear position.

Either you are determined, as the prime minister of our nation, to stop a terrorist attack against
our country and you'll use any means in order to ensure a terrorist attack doesn't happen, or if
you can't bring yourself to say that, then I'm afraid you're demonstrating remarkable weakness.

MICHAEL BRISSENDON: So, in essence, it's about character.

Each of those who seek to lead us have strengths and weaknesses.

Well, don't we all.

But in politics, perceived character flaws are magnified for political advantage.

The idea that John Howard is less than careful with the truth is raised often by the Opposition,
for instance.

And the Government likes to paint Mark Latham as an unpredictable loose cannon.

Consequently, his public performance are more closely watched than most.

For the first two weeks of the campaign, Mr Latham was Mogadon Mark.

Now, after an angry exchange with a journalist who questioned whether he planned to send his son to
a private or a public school and this performance when he was questioned about his tax policy on
the Sunday program, some have concluded he's crossed the line.

MARK LATHAM: Mate, if you don't get it, if you don't get it, I can assure you 1.4 million
Australian families do.

Because they've got the nightmare of having to deal with Centrelink to deal with this problem.

If journalists don't get it, well bad luck, the Australian people do.

MICHAEL BRISSENDON: Well, you be the judge.

Is Mark Latham thin skinned?

Probably.

He wouldn't be the first politician who suffered from that disorder.

But will anybody really care about a politician having a swing at journalists?

Unlikely.

KERRY O'BRIEN: Political editor Michael Brissenden.

Home Archive About Us Letters

(c) 2006 ABC | Privacy Policy

of curbing his colourful and aggressive style - to demonstrate the kind of stability and
statesmanship required of a prime minister. In that time, the old Mark Latham has rarely shown
through. So much so that the tag of 'Mogodon Mark' began to stick and the view developed that
Labor's minders had been too successful in crimping their leader's natural style. So controlled has
been the Latham style - and so disciplined his party's policy mantra - that even a mild display of
emotion yesterday became, in media terms, an outburst. But the fact is, a modern campaign is an
extraordinarily stage-managed business, where even the moments of spontaneity might well have been
planned in advance. Geoff Hutchison reports from the Latham campaign bus. I'm honoured that you're
such a fine expert on everything I've ever said, so good on you Freddie, have a good day. I think
the reality with a person like Latham is that he's the political whirlwind and once you get on the
political whirlwind, once you start to ride it, you've got to ride it till it stops. Will you take
Mark Latham to be your lawful wedded PM? Yeah, OK. That's what we wanted to hear. I do. I do. I
don't know that it would be possible for anyone to, if you like, suppress Mark's personality and
anyone who tries to do that I think is acting in an ill-advised way. (Cheers and squeals) He either
wins or loses, but there's nothing surer than he'll lose if he's Mark Latham pretending not to be
Mark Latham. Welcome to Pakenham Senior High School in Melbourne's south-east, venue for one of the
most important policy launches of Mark Latham's election campaign. He's here to reinforce his
mantra of opportunity for all and the release of an education policy which will strip more than
$500 million from wealthy schools to help make it reality. We want equity in action in the
Australian schools system. His delivery is heart-felt, but you can sense the agitation in the air.
In a now typical campaign ploy popular with both sides of politics, Latham's media people have only
just handed out the policy. If there is devil in the detail, then those assembled here won't have
much time to find it. We as journalists get heavily criticised for not pummeling one side or the
other hard enough but it is very hard to keep on top of the information when each side is actively
trying to prevent you from doing that. The sell doesn't well. Latham is forced to defend the
hit-list rather than extoll the policy virtues and tomorrow the headlines will read: "Class Wars".
But at least the conference ends on a light note and a rare photo opportunity. REPORTER: Did you
cop any grief for seemingly getting married again yesterday, and is that why... LAUGHTER Never.
This, if you didn't know, is a Tasmanian quoll who with her friends is waiting outside Mark
Latham's Melbourne hotel to chat with him about old growth forests, but it's not going to happen.
In the 'How to avoid public embarrassment hand book' this is a given. Never be photographed with a
protester wearing a silly costume. And just to make sure none of us are there when he does leave,
we're bundled into the bus and told we'll miss our flight to Adelaide if we don't hurry. I think
Mark Latham could probably have handled a quoll. Where's the big bloke gone? Where's the larrikin
image? That's the trouble you have, I guess, if you present that image and then you try to pull it
all back into the box. The following morning in Adelaide we received the big bloke's itinerary. The
priority here is - don't stuff up and don't tell those of us on this bus what's happening until
absolutely the last moment. where the message gets out and gets some grip without too much media
scrutiny or any Government attempt to sabotage it. And as we trail behind the Latham convoy, I
wondered the reason for such paranoia. It apparently dates back to Mark Latham's Budget Reply
speech in May which was released on an embargo basis to the press gallery so they could be better
prepared. Unfortunately, that embargo was broken and you can probably imagine Mr Latham's surprise
when he saw Peter Costello waving a copy of the speech from the Government benches. Now Labor was
furious about that. They've told me they were furious, and they've said, "Well, sorry, somebody
ratted on the rest of the media pack and that means we're not going to give you information in
advance as we travel around because we can't trust you. Our job to try and present our policies and
our personalities in the most effective way that we can to encourage people to support us, and the
media's job is to try and put public policy and public figures under, you know, fair and reasonable
scrutiny, so there's an obvious creative tension there. RADIO ANNOUNCER: And we have Angela on the
line. Angela, you'd like to talk about private schools? Yes I would. Hello Mr Latham, how are you?
G'day Angela, I'm good thanks. I'm actually a single invalid mother... Talkback radio is supposed
to represent that spontaneous opportunity for real people to ask real questions of their political
leaders. But what's real? Today, we have Angela explaining that her son has a disability and goes
to a private school. She's worried that she won't be able to afford to send him there anymore. Mr
Latham, it's over to you. What's the name of the private school that your son attends? ANGELA: Um,
I don't know if I'm allowed to say it on the air or not, but, oh, I will. It's Thomas Moore
College, you're actually going there today. Yes, yes, I'm going there because they're a beneficiary
of our school funding plan. That school will be receiving more funding... What great luck for
Angela. What a perfect first-up question for Mr Latham. What a happy ending for all concerned.
Well, I think it's generally acknowledged that the Liberal Party run much more effective telephone
trees or radio talkback trees than we do. Just keep on going and Mr Latham and Mr Rann will just
come around and have a look at what you're doing, OK. How's it all going? What a few days on the
campaign bus teaches you is that everyone is under firm instructions about how to behave and
respond. Have you been told to be on your best behaviour today? Yes. What was the instruction? "No
silly behaviour and no yelling things out" and "look respectable", which we are. We're respectable
here at Thomas Moore College. She's won my vote already. But if there's one place which will surely
offer something real, where true colours emerge without cynical manipulation and smiles aren't all
wooden, then it's at Football Park. Will you be voting for Mark Latham? No. Why not? Don't like
him. Because I don't reckon he's going to do anything he says. Do you reckon he'd get a kick at
Port Adelaide if he went on the training... reckon he'd get a kick? Nah. Why not? He wouldn't get a
kick in an electric chair! For Mark Latham, this was just one stop on the great opportunity for all
tour and his education policy just one strand of the grand plan. We're only into week four and
there are an awful lot of people who still need to be convinced. You've got to feel sorry for him,
don't you? Look at that. That's really dreadful. Look at it. They're just like bloody mice to a
piece of cheese. That's really... I feel so sorry for him, regardless of his politics.

Latham fireworks fail to ignite

Broadcast: 20/09/2004

Latham fireworks fail to ignite

Reporter: Geoff Hutchison

KERRY O'BRIEN: For most of his 10 months as Labor leader, Mark Latham's political enemies and the
media have watched with fascination to see whether he really was capable of curbing that colourful
and aggressive style to demonstrate the kind of stability and statesmanship required of a prime
minister.

In that time, the old Mark Latham has rarely shown through - so much so that that tag that Michael
Brissenden referred to of "Mogadon Mark" began to stick and the view developed that Labor's minders
had been too successful in crimping their leader's natural style.

So controlled has been the Latham style and so disciplined his party's policy mantra, that even
that mild display of emotion yesterday became in some media terms "an outburst".

But the fact is a modern campaign is an extraordinarily stage-managed business, where even the
moments of spontaneity might well have been planned in advance.

Geoff Hutchison reports from the Latham campaign bus.

MARK LATHAM, OPPOSITION LEADER (ON TALKBACK RADIO): I'm honoured that you're such a fine expert on
everything I've ever said, so, good on you, Freddie.

Have a good day.

GREG CRAVEN, CURTIN UNIVERSITY: I think the reality with a person like Latham is that he's the
political whirlwind, and once you get on the political whirlwind, once you start to ride it, you've
got to ride it till it stops.

MAN OFFSCREEN: Will you take Mark Latham to be your lawful wedded prime minister?

BRIDE: Yeah, OK.

(Laughs) MAN OFFSCREEN: That's what we wanted to hear.

(Laughs) MARK LATHAM: Nah - I do.

(Laughs) BRIDE: I do!

STEPHEN SMITH, CAMPAIGN STRATEGIST: I don't know that it would be possible for anyone to, if you
like, suppress Mark's personality.

And anyone who tries to do that I think is acting in an ill-advised way.

GREG CRAVEN: He either wins or loses, but there's nothing surer than he'll lose if he's Mark Latham
pretending not to be Mark Latham.

GEOFF HUTCHISON: Welcome to Pakenham Senior High School in Melbourne's south-east, venue for one of
the most important policy launches of Mark Latham's election campaign.

He's here to reinforce his mantra of opportunity for all and the release of an education policy
which will strip more than $500 million from wealthy schools to help make it reality.

MARK LATHAM: We want equity in action in the Australian schools system.

GEOFF HUTCHISON: His delivery is heart-felt, but you can sense the agitation in the air.

In a now typical campaign ploy popular with both sides of politics, Latham's media people have only
just handed out the policy.

If there is devil in the detail, then those assembled here won't have much time to find it.

KAREN MIDDLETON, PRESS GALLERY PRESIDENT: We as journalists get heavily criticised for not
pummelling one side or the other hard enough, but it is very hard to keep on top of the information
when each side is actively trying to prevent you from doing that.

GEOFF HUTCHISON: The sell doesn't go well.

Latham is forced to defend the hit-list rather than extol the policy virtues.

And tomorrow the headlines will read: "Class Wars".

But at least the conference ends on a light note and a rare photo opportunity.

REPORTER: Did you cop any grief for seemingly getting married again yesterday, and is that why -

(Laughs) MARK LATHAM: (Kisses wife) Never.

GEOFF HUTCHISON: This, if you didn't know, is a Tasmanian quoll, who with her friends, is waiting
outside Mark Latham's Melbourne hotel to chat with him about old growth forests.

But it's not going to happen.

In the 'How to avoid public embarrassment handbook' this is a given.

Never be photographed with a protester wearing a silly costume.

And just to make sure none of us are there when he does leave, we're bundled into the bus and told
we'll miss our flight to Adelaide if we don't hurry.

I think Mark Latham could probably have handled a quoll.

KAREN MIDDLETON: Where's the big bloke gone?

Where's the larrikin image?

That's the trouble you have, I guess, if you present that image and then you try to pull it all
back into the box.

GEOFF HUTCHISON: The following morning in Adelaide we received the big bloke's itinerary.

The priority here is - don't stuff up and don't tell those of us on this bus what's happening until
absolutely the last moment.

What Mark Latham and his campaign team want is clear air, where the message gets out and gets some
grip without too much media scrutiny or any Government attempt to sabotage it.

And as we trail behind the Latham convoy, I wondered the reason for such paranoia.

It apparently dates back to Mark Latham's Budget Reply speech in May, which was released on an
embargo basis to the press gallery so they could be better prepared.

Unfortunately, that embargo was broken and you can probably imagine Mr Latham's surprise when he
saw Peter Costello waving a copy of the speech from the Government benches.

KAREN MIDDLETON: Now Labor was furious about that, they've told me they were furious.

And they've said, "Well, sorry, somebody ratted on the rest of the media pack and that means we're
not going to give you information in advance as we travel around, because we can't trust you."

STEPHEN SMITH: Our job to try and present our policies and our personalities in the most effective
way that we can to encourage people to support us, and the media's job is to try and put public
policy and public figures under, you know, fair and reasonable scrutiny.

So there's an obvious creative tension there.

RADIO ANNOUNCER: And we have Angela on the line.

Angela, you'd like to talk about private schools?

ANGELA: Yes I would.

Hello, Mr Latham, how are you?

MARK LATHAM: G'day, Angela, I'm good thanks.

ANGELA: I'm actually a single invalid mother -

GEOFF HUTCHISON: Talkback radio is supposed to represent that spontaneous opportunity for real
people to ask real questions of their political leaders.

But what's real?

Today, we have Angela explaining that her son has a disability and goes to a private school.

She's worried that she won't be able to afford to send him there anymore.

Mr Latham, it's over to you.

MARK LATHAM: What's the name of the private school that your son attends?

ANGELA: Um, I don't know if I'm allowed to say it on the air or not, but, oh, I will.

It's Thomas Moore College.

You're actually going there today.

MARK LATHAM: Yes, yes, I'm going there because they're a beneficiary of our school funding plan.

That school will be receiving more funding -

GEOFF HUTCHISON: What great luck for Angela.

What a perfect first-up question for Mr Latham.

What a happy ending for all concerned.

STEPHEN SMITH: Well, I think it's generally acknowledged that the Liberal Party run much more
effective telephone trees or radio talkback trees than we do.

THOMAS MOORE COLLEGE SCHOOL PRINCIPAL: Students, just keep on going and working and Mr Latham and
Mr Rann will just come around and have a look at what you're doing, OK.

GEOFF HUTCHISON: What a few days on the campaign bus teaches you is that everyone is under firm
instructions about how to behave and respond.

GEOFF HUTCHISON (TO FEMALE STUDENTS): Have you been told to be on your best behaviour today?

FEMALE STUDENT #1: Yep.

GEOFF HUTCHISON (TO FEMALE STUDENTS): What was the instruction?

FEMALE STUDENT #2: "No silly behaviour and "no yelling things out" and "look respectable", which we
are.

We're respectable here at Thomas Moore College.

GEOFF HUTCHISON: She's won my vote already.

But if there's one place which will surely offer something real, where true colours emerge without
cynical manipulation and smiles aren't all wooden, then it's at Football Park.

GEOFF HUTCHISON (TO ELDERLY LADY): Will you be voting for Mark Latham?

ELDERLY LADY: No.

GEOFF HUTCHISON (TO ELDERLY LADY): Why not?

ELDERLY LADY: Don't like him.

GEOFF HUTCHISON (TO ELDERLY LADY): Why not?

ELDERLY LADY: Because I don't reckon he's going to do anything he says.

GEOFF HUTCHISON (TO ELDERLY LADY): Do you reckon he'd get a kick at Port Adelaide if he went on the
training?

Reckon he'd get a kick?

ELDERLY LADY: Nah.

GEOFF HUTCHISON (TO ELDERLY LADY): Why not?

ELDERLY LADY: He wouldn't get a kick in an electric chair!

(Laughs) GEOFF HUTCHISON: For Mark Latham, this was just one stop on the great opportunity-for-all
tour and his education policy just one strand of the grand plan.

We're only into week four and there are an awful lot of people who still need to be convinced.

LADY (AT FOOTBALL PARK): You've got to feel sorry for him, don't you?

I mean, look at that.

That's really dreadful.

Look at it!

They're just like bloody mice to a piece of cheese.

That's really - I feel so sorry for him, regardless of his politics.

KERRY O'BRIEN: At least he's not a piece of cheese in a trap.

Geoff Hutchison with that report.

(c) 2006 ABC | Privacy Policy

Jewish candidates go head to head in Melbourne Ports

Broadcast: 20/09/2004

Jewish candidates go head to head in Melbourne Ports

Reporter: Heather Ewart

KERRY O'BRIEN: For the first time in Australian history, two Jewish candidates representing the
major parties are going head to head in a federal seat, at least as far as we know.

Melbourne Ports is one of the country's more diverse electorates, taking in some of the more
affluent and trendy bayside suburbs of the Victorian capital, as well some of its poorer
communities.

It also claims to have the biggest Jewish community in Australia - a fact not lost on the Liberal
Party, which is trying to wrest the seat from sitting Labor member, Michael Danby.

This has led to a colorful and emotive debate that's creating tensions and confusion in the Jewish
community.

Heather Ewart reports.

HEATHER EWART: At the start of the week of Jewish high holy days, this community of elderly Russian
Jews is celebrating.

It's a time for vodka and music and the traditional apple and honey that marks the Jewish New Year.

But in the heart of the Victorian seat of Melbourne Ports, which boasts the largest Jewish
electorate in the country, they're also caught up in an odd political power play.

For the first time in our history, two Jews representing the major parties are contesting a Federal
seat.

On one side, the sitting Labor member Michael Danby, and on the other - Liberal candidate David
Southwick.

Tonight, not for the first time, they're in the same room at a Jewish function.

MICHAEL DANBY, LABOR MEMBER: It's a bit awkward sometimes, but that's - you know, he's a Liberal
and I'm representing the Opposition and um, that's life.

DAVID SOUTHWICK, LIBERAL CANDIDATE: We're civil, we're civil.

I suppose that's the best way to put it.

HEATHER EWART: The streets of Melbourne Ports have never had to go through anything quite like this
before.

Frenetic campaigning on both sides, as they wheel out the big guns in the battle for the limelight
and the all-important Jewish vote.

Labor has held this seat for almost 100 years.

The margin is now 5.7 per cent.

Amid the trendy coffee shops of this Bohemian district, it's all enough to remind the sitting
member of six years of a famous American TV sitcom.

MARK DANBY: Oh, it's a bit like an episode of Seinfeld.

DAN GOLDBERG, NATIONAL EDITOR, JEWISH NEWS: Those wouldn't be the words that come to mind.

Look, I can see from his point of view, there have been some instances over the past few weeks
which have been dramatic and comical at the same time.

HEATHER EWART: For the man known in these parts as 'Disco' David after the party music business he
ran in his youth, it hasn't been all smooth sailing.

If you're going to take on a high-profile fellow Jew, a simple street walk can produce unexpected
results.

MELBOURNE PORTS RESIDENT: Why ah, should be another Jewish candidate against another Jewish
candidate?

HEATHER EWART: Why take on another Jew?

Indeed, the only one who's made it to Federal Parliament, is becoming a common theme in this
campaign, and the answer does not always satisfy.

MELBOURNE PORTS RESIDENT: OK, I understand you're a politician, you do not answer the questions.

DAVID SOUTHWICK: No, no, no, that's not true.

HEATHER EWART: But this budding politician is learning fast.

Like his opponent, always look on the bright side.

DAVID SOUTHWICK: Many people are coming up to me saying, "Thank you for standing, thank you for
giving us a choice to vote for a party now that we've always believed in."

MICHAEL DANBY: His selection is designed to sort of undermine my credibility with the community,
but it's not really something that concerns me.

I hope people will judge me on the basis of the work I've done over the last six years.

HEATHER EWART: Since this contest got under way, the 'Jewish News' has been inundated with letters
to the editor, some of them welcoming the competition, others accusing the Liberal Party of trying
to split the Jewish vote.

DAN GOLDBERG: It's created a lot of interest in the Jewish community, frankly, because it is
historic and there are people in the Jewish community who say to David Southwick, "Why, why are you
standing in Melbourne Ports?

Why don't you stand in Goldstein, or another seat and therefore the Jewish community could perhaps
have two federal members in Parliament."

HEATHER EWART: The talk on the streets would appear to bear out the dilemma.

Both sides calculate the Jewish community makes up almost 30 per cent of the vote here.

In the past, some would have backed Michael Danby simply because he was Jewish, but this time
Jewish voters are torn about their choices.

JEWISH VOTER #1: It's a shame that they have to stand against each other.

JEWISH VOTER #2: It's a bit of a problem, but I think competition is very healthy.

JEWISH VOTER #3: I would prefer they weren't running against each other.

This way it makes it more of a legitimate win if the Jewish guy gets picked.

JEWISH VOTER #4: We split a little bit in our views, but I think it's a great experience.

JEWISH VOTER #5: May the best man win.

HEATHER EWART: So exactly what is David Southwick's game plan here?

He has some powerful backing from the Liberal hierarchy, but insists his bid is about nothing more
than wanting to represent the electorate where he's spent most of his life.

Can you see it as a fairly provocative move to go into a seat where there is already a sitting
Jewish member?

DAVID SOUTHWICK: Look, I mean, that's a crazy thing for anyone to say.

If you had a Catholic that was sitting, a strong Catholic, would that mean you wouldn't go up
against somebody who was of that religion?

HEATHER EWART: Catholicism is not an issue in the seat of Melbourne Ports.

But, make no mistake, Jewishness and which candidate can deliver most for the Jewish community here
is being made an issue, with the Liberal candidate firing the first shots.

DAVID SOUTHWICK: We must make a stand against the ALP that would desert the State of Israel -

HEATHER EWART: At this gathering of some of the most influential Jewish figures in Melbourne Ports
last month, David Southwick made a sweeping attack on various Labor backbenchers and the New South
Wales Premier, Bob Carr, accusing them of being anti-Jewish.

The Federal member for Fowler, Julia Irwin, was singled out for special attention.

DAVID SOUTHWICK: From the safety of the floors of Parliament, Julia Irwin referred to Australian
Jews as the most implacable, arrogant, cruel, powerful lobby in the country.

HEATHER EWART: It was a clear move to flush out Michael Danby, who urged the audience to take
notice of Labor's leadership team, not rebel backbenchers.

And then came this tit-for-tat claim against the Coalition and a former National Party leader.

MICHAEL DANBY: Interestingly enough, Tim Fischer was the person who said that the Mossad stole
Malcolm Fraser's pants, was actually the most powerful person in the Federal parliament, who's ever
supported the Palestinian cause, not some nebek like Julia Irwin.

HEATHER EWART: For the record, 'nebek' means a nothing or minor person.

This was not an edifying debate, but the Liberal Party had to get full marks for sheer gall, even
if it was caught in the act with a planted question.

MICHAEL DANBY: I don't think anyone in this room regards me as a schmuck, Jason.

I'm not to respond to the campaign director of the Liberal Party.

HEATHER EWART: And that's about the level of where things are at in Melbourne Ports these days.

By the end of this campaign, the Jewish community may well be fed up with being in the spotlight.

DAN GOLDBERG: I think there's a lot of members of the Jewish community who don't like the Jewish
community being front and centre in the news.

HEATHER EWART: But, like it or not, that's what they're stuck with till election day.

KERRY O'BRIEN: Heather Ewart with another campaign corner.

(c) 2006 ABC | Privacy Policy

From the time Aussie rules was opened up to genuine national competition, it was only a matter of
time before Victoria's vice-like grip on the games richest prize was broken. So Victorian fans have
had to suffer grand final losses to teams from South Australia, the West and, more recently,
Queensland. But never before has a Victorian team failed to make a final. So next Saturday, when
the Brisbane Lions and Adelaide's Port Power run onto the MCG, diehard Melbourne fans will be left
to mutter through gritted teeth that the result is good for football. Mary Gearin reports.
COMMENTATOR: Port by a straight kick. SIREN SOUNDS And they are there. The first time the Power are
in a grand final. PORT POWER THEME SONG PLAYS It's good for South Australia. This was the
penultimate nail in the coffin for Victorian teams. COMMENTATOR: There it is. And this buried
parochial dreams forever. BRIBANE LIONS CLUB SONG PLAYS You're going to see history next week,
history, we're going to take four in a row. Do you think people are going to be upset, you know,
that it's going to be an all interstate grand final? We don't care! We're in again. The inevitable
has finally happened, a grand final fought between two teams based outside the Aussie rules
traditional stronghold. Cha, cha, cha... Port Adelaide and Brisbane will make history - watched
with some satisfaction by those who helped build the national competition. Is this the moment
you've been waiting for? No, I don't think it's the moment I've been waiting for but I think it is
a watershed time for the Australian Football League to have two non-Victorian teams in the grand
final. It's fantastic. Well, it's about time, all right, because it is now 25 years since we
started this push for a national competition, and to me it's very, very timely. In fact, I think
it's sensational. SCARY MUSIC Of course, Victorians aren't overreacting. The fact both preliminary
finals were so hard-fought against the two form teams of the past few seasons was comfort for many.
It's the AFL, the two best sides are playing off in the grand final, so be it. Rubbish, rubbish,
there should be a Victorian club. Why's that? It's patriotic, it's the game, it's the Victorian
game, there should be a Victorian team. There's always been more than a suspicion that the powers
that be in football, or some of them at least, still sort of think in terms of the VFL. They are
two worthy teams to be playing in a grand final and I am certain they will pack the Melbourne
Cricket Ground and we look forward to a wonderful day. Former All-Australian player Allen Aylett,
now recognises as a dental surgeon that pain is sometimes needed. for the greater good. DRILL
WHIRRS And as VFL chief two decades ago, it was the argument he used against critics of the very
first move towards a national league, when the suburban South Melbourne team was transplanted to
Sydney amid much bitterness. Well, we believe the whole thing is a disaster, the football club of
course is part of our history, and belongs to South Melbourne. Yes, there were a lot of people in
opposition and our family, in particular the Aylett family in particular, came under a lot of flak,
and things happened to us - police guard, human faeces in our swimming pools and letter box. I
mean, all those sorts of things were par for the course when this revolutionary step was taken. The
growing pains haven't totally disappeared. There's discontent that Brisbane still receives
concessions it qualifies for as a club in a non-AFL-loving State, and will do so until 2006. Over
the last four years, the Lions have been allowed to spend an estimated $2 million more on their
players than any other club except Sydney. At the same time they've won three flags and are
favourites to win a record-equalling fourth in a row. I think it is timely that those concessions
were wound back. The game is certainly established now in Queensland and that's what we set out to
do. As former footy chief Wayne Jackson left Saturday night's game, some friendly souls reminded
him of the concessions he helped implement. MAN: (Yells) How much more money for Brisbane? They've
got a great group of players who are playing for a lot less in monetary terms than some of the
players in the Melbourne sides, so I guess we could debate that for a long, long time. Not
surprisingly, Queensland Premier Peter Beattie says not only is the money still needed - one day he
even wants to wrestle the grand final away from the MCG. If a State can prove it's got the ground
and the facilities then I think if you've got like we've got now, two non-Victorian clubs in the
grand final, then in 10 years' time that should be consideration as to where the grand final is
held. This might be the 1,000th step. I think that we would be looking at the 1 millionth step for
that to happen. So, spare a thought for footy's heartland. For the first time in grand final week,
local clubs are staying lonely and silent, leaving Brisbane coach Leigh Matthews to wonder how many
Victorians will turn up to the 'G. I don't know the answer to that. I assume they'll turn up.
There's going to be swarms and swarms of Brisbane supporters and there's going to be a whole lot of
us from Port Adelaide coming across the border. That's got to be good for tourism in Melbourne and,
as I said, it might sort of raise the average level of IQ in Melbourne just for a day. Very cheeky.
Mary Gearin reporting. And that's the program for tonight. We'll be back at the same time tomorrow,
but for now, goodnight. Supertext Captions by the Australian Caption Centre www.auscap.com.au

Victoria hurts in lead up to AFL final

Broadcast: 20/09/2004

Victoria hurts in lead-up to AFL final

Reporter: Mary Gearin

KERRY O'BRIEN: Next Saturday's AFL grand final will mark a historic watershed in Australian Rules
football.

From the time Aussie rules was opened up to genuine national competition, it was only a matter of
time, I guess, before Victoria's vice-like grip on the game's richest prize was broken.

So over the past 12 years Victorian fans have had to suffer grand final losses to teams from South
Australia, the West and, more recently, Queensland.

But never before has a Victorian team failed to at least contest a grand final.

Next Saturday, when the Brisbane Lions and Adelaide's Port Power run onto the MCG.

Die-hard Victorian fans will be left to mutter through gritted teeth that "the result is good for
football".

Mary Gearin reports.

COMMENTATOR: Port by a straight kick.

And they are there.

The first time the Power are in a grand final.

FAN: It's good for South Australia.

MARY GEARIN: This was the penultimate nail in the coffin for Victorian teams.

COMMENTATOR: There it is.

MARY GEARIN: And this buried parochial dreams forever.

LIONS FAN: You're going to see history next week, history, we're going to take four in a row.

MARY GEARIN: Do you think people are going to be upset, you know, that it's going to be an all
interstate grand final?

LIONS FAN #2: We don't care!

We're in again.

MARY GEARIN: The inevitable has finally happened, a grand final fought between two teams based
outside the Aussie rules traditional stronghold.

Port Adelaide and Brisbane will make history - watched with some satisfaction by those who helped
build the national competition.

Is this the moment you've been waiting for?

WAYNE JACKSON, FORMER AFL CHIEF EXECUTIVE: No, I don't think it's the moment I've been waiting for
but I think it is a watershed time for the Australian Football League to have two non-Victorian
teams in the grand final.

It's fantastic.

ALLEN AYLETT, FORMER VFL PRESIDENT: Well, it's about time, all right, because it is now 25 years
since we started this push for a national competition, and to me it's very, very timely.

In fact, I think it's sensational.

MARY GEARIN: Of course, Victorians aren't overreacting.

The fact both preliminary finals were so hard-fought against the two form teams of the past few
seasons was comfort for many.

FAN #3: It's the AFL, the two best sides are playing off in the grand final, so be it.

FAN #4: Rubbish, rubbish, there should be a Victorian club.

MARY GEARIN: Why's that?

FAN #4: It's patriotic, it's the game, it's the Victorian game, there should be a Victorian team.

MIKE RANN, SOUTH AUSTRALIAN PREMIER: There's always been more than a suspicion that the powers that
be in football, or some of them at least, still sort of think in terms of the VFL.

ALLEN AYLETT: They are two worthy teams to be playing in a grand final and I am certain they will
pack the Melbourne Cricket Ground and we look forward to a wonderful day.

MARY GEARIN: Former All-Australian player Allan Aylett, now recognises as a dental surgeon that
pain is sometimes needed.

for the greater good.

And as VFL chief two decades ago, it was the argument he used against critics of the very first
move towards a national league, when the suburban South Melbourne team was transplanted to Sydney
amid much bitterness.

COUNCILLOR BERT JONES, MAYOR OF SOUTH MELBOURNE: Well, we believe the whole thing is a disaster,
the football club of course is part of our history, and belongs to South Melbourne.

ALLEN AYLETT: Yes, there were a lot of people in opposition and our family, in particular the
Aylett family in particular, came under a lot of flak, and things happened to us - police guard,
human faeces in our swimming pools and letter box.

I mean, all those sorts of things were par for the course when this revolutionary step was taken.

MARY GEARIN: The growing pains haven't totally disappeared.

There's discontent that Brisbane still receives concessions it qualifies for as a club in a
non-AFL-loving State, and will do so until 2006.

Over the last four years, the Lions have been allowed to spend an estimated $2 million more on
their players than any other club except Sydney.

At the same time they've won three flags and are favourites to win a record-equalling fourth in a
row.

ALLEN AYLETT: I think it is timely that those concessions were wound back.

The game is certainly established now in Queensland and that's what we set out to do.

MARY GEARIN: As former footy chief Wayne Jackson left Saturday night's game, some friendly souls
reminded him of the concessions he helped implement.

MAN: (Yells) How much more money for Brisbane?

WAYNE JACKSON: They've got a great group of players who are playing for a lot less in monetary
terms than some of the players in the Melbourne sides, so I guess we could debate that for a long,
long time.

MARY GEARIN: Not surprisingly, Queensland Premier Peter Beattie says not only is the money still
needed - one day he even wants to wrestle the grand final away from the MCG.

PETER BEATTIE, QUEENSLAND PREMIER: If a State can prove it's got the ground and the facilities then
I think if you've got like we've got now, two non-Victorian clubs in the grand final, then in 10
years' time that should be consideration as to where the grand final is held.

ALLEN AYLETT: This might be the 1,000th step.

I think that we would be looking at the 1 millionth step for that to happen.

MARY GEARIN: So, spare a thought for footy's heartland.

For the first time in grand final week, local clubs are staying lonely and silent, leaving Brisbane
coach Leigh Matthews to wonder how many Victorians will turn up to the 'G.

LEIGH MATTHEWS, BRISBANE COACH: I don't know the answer to that.

I assume they'll turn up.

MIKE RANN: There's going to be swarms and swarms of Brisbane supporters and there's going to be a
whole lot of us from Port Adelaide coming across the border.

That's got to be good for tourism in Melbourne and, as I said, it might sort of raise the average
level of IQ in Melbourne just for a day.

KERRY O'BRIEN: Very cheeky!

Mary Gearin reporting.

(c) 2006 ABC | Privacy Policy