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Notice given 30 November 2006

2895  Senator O’Brien: To ask the Minister for Justice and Customs—With reference to the answer to question on notice no. 1881 (Senate Hansard , 6 November 2006, p. 230) concerning payment of the passenger movement charge (PMC) by persons who purchased tickets but did not travel due to the suspension of Air Paradise services in November 2005:

(1) Has the Government made any effort to establish how many affected persons paid the PMC; if so, how many; if not, why not.

(2) Has the Government made any effort to establish how many affected persons paid the PMC but have not received a refund; if not, why not.

(3) Has the suspension of services caused the Government to review the regime for collecting and remitting the PMC; if so, what is the outcome of the review.

(4) What is the nature of the authority that permits the collection of the PMC as part of the ticketed fare paid to an airline or ticketing agent.

(5) What are the details of the formal arrangements under which airlines remit the PMC to the Government.

(6) Under these formal arrangements, does the Government pay the administration costs incurred by airlines in collecting and remitting the PMC; if so, by year, what amounts have been paid to Air Paradise.

(7) Is it the case that section 9 of the Passenger Movement Charge Collection Act 1978 provides that a person is entitled to a refund of the PMC paid by the person if the departure in respect of which the PMC was paid does not take place.

(8) Is the Commonwealth liable for the refund of the PMC paid by persons who purchased tickets to travel on Air Paradise but did not travel due to the suspension of services; if not, why not.

2896  Senator O’Brien: To ask the Minister for Justice and Customs—

(1) Can the Minister confirm that passenger movement charge (PMC) revenue collected for the 2005-06 financial year was $374.6 million.

(2) Can the Minister confirm that, based on the revenue projections provided in the answer to question on notice no. 1272 (Senate Hansard , 15 May 2003, p. 11329), for the 2005-06 financial year, actual revenue exceeded projected revenue by $52.4 million.

(3) Can the Minister confirm that PMC revenue collected for the 2004-05 financial year was $363.8 million.

(4) Can the Minister confirm that, based on the revenue projections provided in the answer to question on notice no. 1272, for the 2004-05 financial year, actual revenue exceeded projected revenue by $51.3 million.

(5) For the financial years 2004-05 and 2005-06, why has actual PMC revenue exceeded estimated revenue by more than $103 million.

(6) For each of the financial years 2006-07, 2007-08, 2008-09 and 2009-10, what is the total amount of PMC revenue estimated to be collected.

 

 2897  Senator Allison: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Health and Ageing—

(1) Is the Minister aware of the results of a recently released study by the University of South Australia, conducted by Dr Helen Calabretto and her colleagues, that found: that only 38 per cent of university students knew that emergency contraception was available over-the-counter, 75 per cent of young people believed that emergency contraception can only be used the morning after rather than within 120 hours, and at least half of those surveyed confused it with RU486 and believed it caused an abortion.

(2) Does data available to the Government suggest that this study reflects the knowledge on, and use of, emergency contraception within the general population.

(3) Does the Government consider that the lack of knowledge of emergency contraception is a barrier to its use.

(4) Given the rate of unintended pregnancy in Australia, does the Minister believe that emergency contraception is under-utilised.

(5) What steps, if any, does the Government propose to take to improve knowledge about, and use of, emergency contraception.

(6) Has the Government considered allowing emergency contraception to be advertised to the general public.

2898  Senator Allison: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Transport and Regional Services—Is it the case that the Civil Aviation Safety Authority has introduced a limit of 0.02 per cent blood alcohol level for all persons airside at airports; if so, why does this test, which is at a lower limit than that applied to road use, apply to personnel not engaged in flying aircraft.

2899  Senator Allison: To ask the Minister representing the Treasurer—

(1) What action, if any, has been taken by the Government in relation to reports in The Age on 29 October and 30 October 2006, of an internal investigation that suggested that lawyers at Clayton Utz deliberately deceived the Supreme Court of Victoria in their action on behalf of British American Tobacco Australia Services Ltd in the appeal in 2002 against an earlier ruling by the Supreme Court of Victoria in favour of Rolah Ann McCabe.

(2) Does the Government consider that Clayton Utz has an obligation to inform the Supreme Court of Victoria, the Legal Services Commissioner of New South Wales, the Legal Ombudsman of Victoria and the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, if the investigation found evidence of ethical misconduct and deception.

2900  Senator Allison: To ask the Minister representing the Minister Assisting the Prime Minister for Indigenous Affairs—With reference to National Aborigines and Islander Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC) Week to be held in Perth in 2007:

(1) Will there be an official: (a) opening ceremony; and (b) flag raising ceremony.

(2) Who will coordinate events and send out brochures with the list of events a few weeks prior to NAIDOC Week, as the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission once did.

(3) Will official awards be given to recognise the efforts of Indigenous people.

 

 (4) (a) Will there be an official Western Australian representative on NAIDOC; and (b) will all states be represented.

(5) Will the funding application of the Office of Indigenous Policy Coordination be less cumbersome and funds distributed earlier than in the past.

(6) (a) What funds will be made available for NAIDOC celebrations in Western Australia; and (b) will there be recognition of the cost of organising events over such a vast area as is necessary in that state.

2901  Senator Allison: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs—On what date will the In-Home Care program be released.

2902  Senator O’Brien: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Transport and Regional Services—With reference to the article ‘Big Empty Sky’ in the Manning-Great Lakes Extra of 30 November 2006:

(1) Has the suspension of Transair’s air operators certificate by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) resulted in the grounding of flights from Taree to Sydney provided by Big Sky Express.

(2) Is the newspaper report that Transair is ‘the company from which Big Sky Express leases its Metroliner aircraft’ correct.

(3) Can an outline be provided of the operational relationship between Big Sky Express and Transair.

(4) Was CASA’s evidence to the estimates hearing of the Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Legislation Committee on 13 February 2006 (Committee Hansard , p. 156) that Big Sky Express is ‘Transair’s operation in New South Wales’ correct.

2903  Senator Stott Despoja: To ask the Minister representing the Attorney-General—

(1) (a) Can the Attorney-General explain why it was necessary to remove the classification policy support function of the department’s Canberra operation; and (b) was the Office of Film and Literature Classification (OFLC) advice of inferior quality or was it not in accord with the conservative views of the Government.

(2) Given that the Remuneration Tribunal Determination 2006/13 indicates that the total remuneration packages for the Director and Deputy Director of the OFLC have been reduced, respectively, from $245 000 to $191 370 and $206 490 to $164 510: (a) can the Attorney-General release the submission made to the Remuneration Tribunal; if not, can the review on which the submission might be based be released; (b) can the Attorney-General advise why the Remuneration Tribunal Determination makes the exception of continuing with the higher remuneration for the Director and Deputy Director, despite the downgrading of the remuneration levels; and (c) are the positions now different and simpler and as a result deserve a lower level of remuneration.

(3) Will the cost savings afforded by this new structure be passed on to industry in the form of lower classification fees.