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PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS —continued

Notice given for Monday, 13 August 2018

    *1    Mr Georganas : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         South Australia’s involvement in the space industry dates back to 1947 when the Woomera Rocket Range (the Range) was established on the Arcoona plateau as part of an agreement between the British and Australian governments under the Anglo-Australian Joint Project;

(b)         the Range was initially established to develop long range missiles in response to the threat of attacks on London in World War II and the developing cold war in Europe—over 4,000 short range missiles were tested between 1947 and 1980;

(c)         in 2016 the South Australian Government released the Space Innovation and Growth Strategy (South Australia): Action Plan 2016-2020, the first space strategy of any Australian jurisdiction;

(d)         in 2017 the South Australian Government created the South Australian Space Industry Centre (SASIC) to support the growing space ecosystem in the state; and

(e)         SASIC is well positioned to drive space industry innovation, research and entrepreneurial development and is already home to around 60 space related organisations;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         for over 70 years South Australia has been a national leader in the development of capability for an Australian space industry and has provided a world class launch facility at Woomera;

(b)         annual revenue from the Australian space industry sector is estimated at between $3 and $4 billion, and employment in the sector is estimated to be between 9,500 and 11,500 full time equivalent; and

(c)         South Australia is well positioned to participate in an Australian space program in the future;

(3)         notes the:

(a)         challenges faced by the Australian Space Agency (ASA) as identified by the Review of Australia’s Space Industry Capability; and

(b)         Australian Government’s:

(i)           failure to give ASA the certainty it needs, through its refusal to enshrine its work, structure and objectives in legislation; and

(ii)         irresponsibility in allowing decisions around the long term location of this important nation building project to deteriorate into a politically motivated bidding war;

(4)         welcomes that the new ASA be based in Canberra with nodes in the states and territories; and

(5)         further notes:

(a)         that the development of an Australian space industry is a national endeavour which requires the active participation of companies, universities, workers and scientists across the nation;

(b)         that a Labor Australian Government will invest over $51 million in an Australian Space Industry Plan to promote the development of the Australian space industry, including establishing:

(i)           the Australian Space and Science and Industry Agency to drive investment and co-ordinate the activities of state governments, scientists, industry and universities;

(ii)         a Space Industry Innovation Council to serve as an advisory board for the agency, develop an industry wide agenda and build international confidence; and

(iii)        a Space Industry Supplier Advocate to open up opportunities for space industry companies, attracting investment and jobs;

(c)         the success of the International Astronautical Congress 2017; and

(d)         that South Australia is well positioned to participate in an Australian space program in the future based on our world class tertiary institutions, active international engagement strategies with lead countries, business environment and defence reputation.

              ( Notice given 28 June 2018. )

Notices —continued

       1    Mr Thistlethwaite : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         the Australian General Strike of 1917 was a mass political and social action by working people starting on the NSW railways;

(b)         the strike lasted for approximately six to eight weeks and involved over 100,000 workers;

(c)         the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the strike was on 2 August 2017; and

(d)         Australia’s largest strike began at the Randwick Tramways Depot which shaped the labour movement for decades to come and involved many of the amazing leaders who would mould this nation into the country it is today, including Ben Chifley, Doc Evatt, Bill McKell, Eddie Ward, Joe Cahill and Jack Lang;

(2)         notes with regret the shooting and killing of Mervyn Flanagan during the strike, in particular:

(a)         Mr Flanagan was a striking carter;

(b)         on 30 August 1917 on Pyrmont Bridge Road in Camperdown, Mr Flanagan was shot dead;

(c)         Mr Flanagan was with his brother James Flanagan and friend Henry Williams, who was also shot but not killed;

(d)         the man who fired the shots was Reginald Wearne—a stock and station agent and a strike-breaker shipped in from Bingara and the brother of a powerful conservative state politician;

(e)         a Coroner’s inquest finding saw manslaughter charges withdrawn; and

(f)          the victim’s brother and Mr Williams were each jailed for three months, while Mr Wearne walked free;

(3)         congratulates the organisers of the 100th anniversary celebrations including Unions NSW, the Rail Tram and Bus Union, the Maritime Union of Australia, the Australian Workers’ Union, the Carriage works and the Hon. John Graham MLC; and

(4)         recognises that:

(a)         although the dispute began as a result of significant industrial tensions between rail workers and the (then) NSW Office of the Chief Commissioner of Railways and Tramways, the root causes of the action can be found by looking deeper, including:

(i)           class tensions building throughout the first world war;

(ii)         a fall in real wages of approximately 30 per cent in the five years following 1914; and

(iii)        attempts to introduce conscription; and

(b)         while this strike action happened 100 years ago this year, the message of the workers involved still rings loud to this day.

              ( Notice given 4 December 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 13 August 2018. )

       2    Mr Hill : To move—That this House:

(1)         affirms the importance of strong and effective pharmacovigilance;

(2)         notes that the rates of death due to complications of medical and surgical care are increasing, with drugs, medicaments and biological substances causing adverse effects in therapeutic uses leading to 40 deaths in 2016 and 60 deaths in 2017;

(3)         notes that there are many areas for improvement in Australia’s overall pharmacovigilance regime, in particular that:

(a)         the reported rates of clinical prescribing errors can range from 0.14 to 1.5 per patient while the rate of consumer reporting is only 4 per cent (654) of all reports submitted;

(b)         decision-making in respect of medications has little clinical pharmacy oversight;

(c)         as only limited information is available to community pharmacists, advice to patients regarding potential risks and pharmacological or non-pharmacological alternatives is likewise limited;

(d)         drugs can be Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) approved for one purpose but be prescribed for another, ie, Diane-35 is a TGA approved drug but is not approved as a contraceptive;

(e)         while off-label use of medications is the prescriber’s responsibility, the system does not ensure that approved pharmacological options are exhausted first;

(f)          the TGA relies on drug sponsors to apply for changes in or extensions to the approved indication and does not proactively monitor post-marketing quality of usage, except known high-risk drugs through Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) data or where there has been a number or cluster of reported sentinel events; and

(g)         there is therefore limited or no oversight of TGA approved medications that are not subsidised through the PBS;

(4)         welcomes the TGA’s black triangle system for new medicines, whereby a black triangle symbol is added at the top of the product information and consumer medicines information to advise consumers of additional product monitoring by regulatory authorities;

(5)         notes the:

(a)         likely benefits of promoting this initiative to health professionals and consumers, given considerable under-reporting of adverse effects; and

(b)         opportunity to consider extending this system to over-the-counter and complementary medicines where concerns exist about under-reported side effects, off-label prescriptions, etc; and

(6)         welcomes advice and contributions from regulatory agencies, professional bodies and the Government to guide the way for change. 

              ( Notice given 4 December 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 13 August 2018. )

       3    Mr Wilkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the need to boost the Age Pension as the current payment rates are inadequate;

(2)         further acknowledges that the single rate of Age Pension is particularly inadequate as single people often have to deal with the entirety of household expenses, which are rapidly becoming more and more unaffordable;

(3)         notes that:

(a)         according to recent research by the Australian Council of Social Service, and the Social Policy Research Centre, 13.9 per cent of Age Pension recipients are living below the poverty line; and

(b)         according to a recent poll by the Sunday Tasmanian, 74 per cent of Tasmanian pensioners run out of money each fortnight and 61 per cent go without necessities including fresh food; and

(4)         calls on the Government to immediately increase the Age Pension rate and specifically address the unique challenges faced by single pensioners. 

              ( Notice given 7 December 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

       4    Ms C. F. King : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         February is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month and 28 February is Teal Ribbon Day;

(b)         ovarian cancer is still the deadliest women’s cancer and has the lowest survival rate of any women’s cancer; and

(c)         the overall five-year survival rate for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer is only 44 per cent;

(2)         recognises:

(a)         the tireless work of Ovarian Cancer Australia in its pursuit to beat the disease and provide the best possible care and support to women with ovarian cancer;

(b)         the approximate 9,000 Australian women currently living with ovarian cancer;

(c)         that every day three women will die from ovarian cancer; and

(d)         there is no early detection test ovarian cancer;

(3)         welcomes the Government’s commitment to provide almost $3 million to help to identify the BRCA 1 and 2 genes within women at risk of ovarian cancer; and

(4)         calls on the Government to match Labor’s $12 million commitment to the full National Action Plan for Ovarian Cancer Research, which would reduce the number of women being diagnosed by 25 per cent by 2025.

              ( Notice given 7 February 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

       5    Mr Giles : To move—That this House:

(1)         pays tribute to the work of the Jo Cox Foundation in the United Kingdom, and in particular recognises the role of the Jo Cox Commission on Loneliness;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         the bipartisan support for this work in the United Kingdom, and the response of the United Kingdom Government in appointing a Minister for Loneliness; and

(b)         that there is a similar problem in Australia, which carries significant adverse consequences, but this is less well understood than it should be, particularly concerning its impacts on younger Australians and the influence of social media;

(3)         notes the work of Australian academics and civil society in examining the extent and effects of loneliness on individuals and society; and

(4)         calls for a national response to loneliness in Australia, to better understand the scope of the challenge and to inform and support evidence based policy responses.

              ( Notice given 26 February 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

       6    Mr Hill : To move—That this House acknowledges that there is no good reason to wait for the death of Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God Queen of Australia and Her other Realms and Territories, Head of the Commonwealth, in order to become a Republic.

              ( Notice given 26 February 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

       7    Ms McGowan : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         on 29 November 2012, in the 43rd Parliament:

(i)           the House of Representatives endorsed a draft code of conduct for Members of Parliament contained in Appendix 5 of the Privileges and Members’ Interests Committee discussion paper of 23 November 2011;

(ii)         the House of Representatives requested the Leader of the House urgently bring forward proposed changes to standing orders and resolutions of the House necessary to give effect to the code of conduct; and

(iii)        the report of the Senate Standing Committee of Senators’ Interests code of conduct inquiry was tabled without debate, which concluded that the Senate should not adopt a code of conduct unless it is meaningful, workable and reasonably likely to be effective and did not recommend that the Senate adopt the code endorsed by the House of Representatives;

(b)         because the prospect of a uniform code of conduct was uncertain, the debate on a code of conduct reached a stalemate; and

(c)         no action has been taken since 2012 to implement a code of conduct for Members of Parliament;

(2)         notes that in democratic societies, codes of conduct are widely considered to be the norm for public officials in all aspects of governance:

(a)         the House of Commons in both the United Kingdom and Canada have codes of conduct;

(b)         most Australian public officials are subject to a code of conduct;

(c)         most state and territory legislatures have adopted codes of conduct and other prescribed measures to establish standards of conduct for members; and

(d)         most local councils have standards imposed, with many codes prescribed by law;

(3)         requests the Privileges and Members’ Interests Committee:

(a)         develop a code of conduct for Members of Parliament and their staff, giving consideration to:

(i)           the previously endorsed draft code of conduct contained in Appendix 5 of the Privileges and Members’ Interests Committee discussion paper of 23 November 2011;

(ii)         the terms of the Government’s existing Ministerial and Ministerial Staff codes of conduct, the Australian Public Service values and code of conduct and other relevant codes of conduct;

(iii)        consolidating the numerous provisions which regulate the conduct of Members and their staff; and

(iv)       any gaps in conduct or ethical matters not adequately addressed by the previously endorsed draft code of conduct;

(b)         consult with the equivalent committee in the Senate on the text of the code of conduct with the aim of developing a uniform code for Members and Senators and their staff; and

(c)         report back to the House by the beginning of the spring sittings in 2018;

(4)         requests the Standing Committee on Procedure:

(a)         develop proposed changes to standing orders and resolutions of the House necessary to give effect to a code of conduct, including:

(i)           procedures for considering complaints under the code of conduct; and

(ii)         the role of the Standing Committee of Privileges and Members’ Interests in oversight of the code;

(b)         consult with the equivalent committee in the Senate with the aim of developing uniform processes for implementation of a code of conduct for Members and Senators and their staff; and

(c)         report back to the House by the beginning of the spring sittings in 2018;

(5)         agrees that while developing a uniform code and process is the preferred approach, should one House decide not to implement a code of conduct, this will not preclude the other House from doing so; and

(6)         agrees that this resolution be communicated to the Senate for its concurrence in similar terms.

              ( Notice given 27 February 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

       8    Mr Zappia : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         scams have a devastating impact on their victims, many of whom lose significant sums of money and sometimes their life savings;

(b)         the ACCC and the Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network (ACORN) combined received over 200,000 scam reports in 2016;

(c)         almost $300 million was reported lost to scams in 2016 through Scamwatch, ACORN and other programs;

(d)         scams often operate from overseas and impersonate Australian companies and government departments; and

(e)         to make the scam more convincing, scammers often use Australian telephone numbers through a Voice over Internet Protocol service, despite being located outside of Australia; and

(2)         calls on the Government to investigate whether restrictions can be placed on the allocation of Australian telephone numbers to overseas customers and other measures which may add to protections against scammers who use the telephone or internet to scam. 

              ( Notice given 27 February 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

       9    Mr Zappia : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         2,400 sheep horrifically died on board the Awassi Express whilst being transported to the Middle East in August 2017;

(b)         Australian animal welfare standards are not being maintained in the live sheep export trade;

(c)         in May 2015, in a motion debated in Parliament, Labor Shadow Minister for Agriculture, the Member for Hunter, drew the House’s attention to breaches in the live export sector and called for the appointment for an Independent Inspector General of Animal Welfare and Live Animal Exports;

(d)         in 2016 the Productivity Commission recommended that the Government establish an Australian Commission for Animal Welfare to oversee animal welfare; and

(e)         according to Meat & Livestock Australia, in 2016-17 the sheep live export trade was worth $249 million, which is less than 5 per cent of the $5.23 billion economic value of Australia’s sheep industry; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         appoint an Independent Inspector General of Animal Welfare and Live Animal Exports and an Independent Office of Animal Welfare;

(b)         ensure that Exporter Supply Chain Assurance System (ESCAS) and Australian Standards for the Export of Livestock (ASEL) standards are sufficient and are adhered to in the live export trade;

(c)         ensure that independent inspectors and sufficient veterinary personnel accompany live export shipments;

(d)         impose commensurate penalties including the permanent withdrawal of ESCAS licences and criminal penalties to those exporters who seriously breach ESCAS and ASEL standards; and

(e)         assist sheep farmers transition away from live exports and focus on export of chilled and frozen meats.

              ( Notice given 8 May 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

    10    Ms Husar : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that well-funded hospitals are critical for a healthy population;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         the Government is cutting $715 million from Australian hospitals over the next three years;

(b)         this includes a $5.7 million cut from Nepean Hospital;

(c)         these cuts will hurt patients, doctors, nurses and other hospital staff;

(d)         the cuts to Nepean Hospital are equal to 8,500 emergency department visits; or 220 knee replacements; or the jobs of 16 nurses;

(e)         these cuts will result in surgery delays and longer emergency department waiting times;

(f)          the proportion of people presenting to Nepean Hospital’s Emergency Department who are seen within recommended times has already declined sharply under the Liberals; and

(g)         now the Government is trying to lock in inadequate hospital funding until 2025; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         immediately reverse these cruel cuts; and

(b)         properly fund hospitals in the future.

              ( Notice given 8 May 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

    11    Ms Collins : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         access to affordable sexual and reproductive healthcare, including abortion and contraception, is part of every woman’s right to control her own body;

(b)         abortion was decriminalised in Tasmania in 2013 and surgical terminations were being provided at a dedicated private clinic without significant out of pocket expenses;

(c)         recently, this provider closed their clinic, and the Tasmanian Government ruled out providing this essential service within the Tasmanian public health system with women forced to travel interstate for treatment;

(d)         in February, the Federal and Tasmanian Ministers for Health gave assurances that this issue had been resolved; and

(e)         despite these assurances, recent evidence has revealed a significant increase in the number of Tasmanian women being forced to travel interstate to access surgical abortions at great cost; and

(2)         calls on the Australian Government to:

(a)         work with the Tasmanian Government to resolve this issue for Tasmanian women so they can affordably access surgical terminations in the state; and

(b)         intervene, if the Tasmanian government fails to provide affordable abortion services, to ensure funding and provision of essential reproductive health services in Tasmania.

              ( Notice given 8 May 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

    12    Dr Leigh : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         in Australia, 21 July 2019 will mark the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landings;

(b)         Australian tracking stations in Honeysuckle Creek (ACT), Tidbinbilla (ACT), Carnarvon (Western Australia) and Parkes (NSW) played a pivotal role in relaying to NASA telemetry, voice and imagery from the Columbia command module and Eagle lunar module;

(c)         Honeysuckle Creek Tracking Station (Honeysuckle Creek), a 26 metre antenna dish, received and relayed to 600 million people on Earth the first historic images of Neil Armstrong walking on the Moon;

(d)         after the conclusion of the Apollo Moon missions in 1972, the Honeysuckle Creek Tracking Station began supporting regular Skylab passes and supporting the Apollo scientific stations left on the Moon by astronauts; and

(e)         in 1974, Honeysuckle Creek joined the Deep Space Network in assisting with interplanetary tracking commitments;

(2)         recognises the importance of all Australians understanding the role that our nation played in these historic events, and the ongoing value of a strong and explorative Australian space program in the future;

(3)         notes the:

(a)         challenges faced by the Australian Space Agency as identified by the Review of Australia’s Space Industry Capability;

(b)         Government’s failure to give the Agency the certainty it needs, through its refusal to enshrine its work, structure and objectives in legislation; and

(c)         Government’s irresponsibility in allowing decisions around the long term location of this important nation building project to deteriorate into a politically motivated bidding war; and

(4)         notes that:

(a)         the development of an Australian space industry is a national endeavour which requires the active participation of companies, universities, workers and scientists across the nation; and

(b)         a Labor Government will invest over $51 million in an Australian Space Industry Plan to promote the development of the Australian space industry, including establishing:

(i)           the Australian Space and Science and Industry Agency to drive investment and co-ordinate the activities of state governments, scientists, industry and universities;

(ii)         a Space Industry Innovation Council to serve as an advisory board for the agency, develop an industry wide agenda and build international confidence; and

(iii)        a Space Industry Supplier Advocate to open up opportunities for space industry companies, attracting investment and jobs.

              ( Notice given 18 June 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

    13    Mr Hayes : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that on:

(a)         Monday 18 June 2018, the Australian Parliamentarians Against the Death Penalty hosted a screening of Guilty , an Australian film about the final 72 hours in the life of Myuran Sukumaran, the ‘Bali Nine’ convicted criminal who, along with Andrew Chan, was executed by a firing squad in Indonesia on 29 April 2015; and

(b)         World Day Against the Death Penalty on 10 October 2018, screenings of Guilty are being held right around Australia to coincide with the Government’s efforts to negotiate a resolution on a moratorium on the death penalty at the United Nations Human Rights Council; and

(2)         acknowledges the Australian Parliament’s continued strong opposition to the death penalty and commits to the whole-of-government Strategy for the Abolition of the Death Penalty.

              ( Notice given 18 June 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

    14    Ms McGowan : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         at a roundtable meeting in Wodonga on 12 June 2018, the Australian, Victorian and NSW governments came together to sign a historic tripartite agreement to ease the burden of doing business in cross-border regions;

(b)         for many years business and communities in border regions have been calling on all levels of government to take action to address inconsistent regulations that impact upon small and medium sized businesses;

(c)         the current Council of Australian Governments system has failed to deliver solutions to these cross border issues because they have become overly bureaucratic and disconnected from the realities on the border;

(d)         the NSW Cross Border Commissioner has been working with his counterparts in Queensland and the ACT to address 80 and 65 projects respectively, focusing on policing arrangements, emergency services and taxi services; and

(e)         with the pending appointment of a Victorian Cross Border Commissioner to complement the existing NSW Cross Border Commissioner, we now have the chance to cut the red tape that put limits on our cross border economies;

(2)         acknowledges the Federal Minister for Small and Family Business, the Workplace and Deregulation, the NSW Deputy Premier and Minister for Skills and for Small Business, and the Victorian Minister for Small Business, who came together to sign this landmark agreement; and

(3)         calls on the Australian Government to:

(a)         provide regular updates to the House on the progress of the agreement and any outcomes of the trial to address cross border operation of taxis, responsible service of alcohol and heavy vehicle regulations which have resulted in the reduction of red tape; and

(b)         continue to work with the Victorian and NSW governments and hold them to account for delivering the expectations of the agreement.

              ( Notice given 19 June 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

    15    Ms Brodtmann : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Bahá’í community in Iran is subject to a widespread and systematic campaign of persecution;

(b)         in 2012 and 2015, the House condemned the persecution and treatment of Bahá’ís in Iran;

(c)         the discriminatory and unjust persecution continues, despite Iranian President Hassan Rouhani promising justice and equal opportunity for all Iranians;

(d)         Australia was a co-sponsor of the December 2017 resolution by the General Assembly of the United Nations which expressed ‘serious concern about ongoing severe limitations and restrictions on the right to freedom of thought, conscience, religion or belief in Iran’; and

(e)         persecution of Bahá’ís has recently spread to Yemen where a death sentence was passed against Mr Hamed bin Haydara in January 2018 due to his religion; and

(2)         calls for:

(a)         the immediate release of all Bahá’ís currently imprisoned in Iran for their religion, including the remaining Bahá'í leaders imprisoned since 2008;

(b)         the Iranian Government to repeal all discriminatory legislation and practices, including the 1991 Bahá’í Question memorandum of the Supreme Revolutionary Cultural Council;

(c)         respect for the right of freedom of religion and belief for all and an end to the persecution of the Bahá’ís in Iran; and

(d)         the repeal of the death sentence against Mr bin Haydara and the immediate release of all Bahá’ís currently imprisoned in Yemen for their religion.

              ( Notice given 25 June 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

    16    Mr Hill : To move—That this House:

(1)         congratulates all those acknowledged in the 2018 Queen’s Birthday Honours List in the Order of Australia;

(2)         acknowledges that while change is occurring in the number of women nominated for an honour, this change is incremental and is occurring at a too slow a rate to achieve gender parity in a reasonable timeframe, for example:

(a)         gender inequality has been present since the Order of Australia awards were instituted in 1975, with men consistently receiving over 70 per cent of Australian Honours awards;

(b)         of the nominations considered for the 2018 Queen’s Birthday Honours List, 34 per cent were women, against a long term average of around 30 per cent;

(c)         women from all states and territories were awarded less than 50 per cent of the honours in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List, with the lowest recorded rate around 30 per cent in South Australia;

(d)         despite the number of nominations received, the success rate for nominations of women in the recent Honours List was almost 78 per cent, 10 per cent higher than that for men;

(e)         while 60 per cent of recipients of the Companion of the Order of Australia (AC) in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List were women, this is the first time women have outnumbered men at any level in an Australian honours list;

(f)          despite the number of women AC recipients in the recent Honours List, the full year total of women AC recipients (Australia Day 2018 and Queen’s Birthday 2018) remains under 50 per cent; and

(g)         comparable jurisdictions, including the United Kingdom, are significantly further along in achieving gender equality in nominations, with New Zealand having already achieved parity;

(3)         supports the work of Honour a Woman in its goal to achieve 50:50 gender representation in Australian honours nominations by 2020, including by;

(a)         calling on the Governor-General to apply gender targets to the existing quotas, for all levels of the Australian honours;

(b)         encouraging states and territories to:

(i)           work proactively to increase nominations from and of women, including through the celebration and acknowledgement of honours recipients and the effective local marketing of the honours nomination process; and

(ii)         allocate appropriate resources to the identification and nomination of women, including by following Victoria’s lead in appointing a public servant to progress state-based Women’s Honour Roll recipients to Australian honours nominations;

(c)         advocating for:

(i)           reform of the honours nomination forms in order to meet accessibility and inclusivity guidelines—seeking data on applicants’ backgrounds, considering the impact of the focus on occupation, reviewing nomination categories for inclusiveness, and reducing the potential for conscious and unconscious bias; and

(ii)         heightened fairness and rigour in the way that Orders of Australia are nominated, assessed and awarded including through a review of practices in similar jurisdictions;

(d)         supporting changes in the approach to marketing the Australian honours brand;

(e)         encouraging diversity in the makeup of the Council for the Order of Australia, ensuring that the independent body that considers and recommends the award of honours reflects the gender and cultural diversity of the wider community; and

(f)          acknowledging the role of Honour a Woman Ambassador in encouraging the nominations of women for Australian honours;

(4)         welcomes the efforts made by the Governor-General, the members of the Council for the Order of Australia, the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet and others in encouraging more nominations of women, including through the implementation of an online nomination form; and

(5)         acknowledges that while the community should be encouraged to nominate women, embedding structural change in the nomination and selection process is required in order to effect genuine and lasting gender equality in Australian honours.

              ( Notice given 27 June 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

    17    Mr Dick : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Brisbane’s southside hosts a vibrant Vietnamese-Australian community; and

(b)         Vietnamese migration is a successful case of multiculturalism at its finest and has strengthened the social fabric of Australian society;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         Australia must continue to advocate for freedom and the respect of human rights for the people of Vietnam and for all people around the world;

(b)         international human rights organisations such as Human Rights Watch, have become increasingly concerned about abuses to human rights in Vietnam;

(c)         Vietnam’s prisons currently hold at least 140 political prisoners; and

(d)         during the first five months of 2018 alone, at least 26 rights activists and bloggers were put on trial, convicted and sentenced to long prison terms; and

(3)         calls on the Australian Government to:

(a)         exert pressure on the Vietnamese Government to allow thorough examination of claims of human rights abuses;

(b)         seek the holding of those responsible for these abuses to account; and

(c)         help protect vulnerable citizens from human rights abuses in Vietnam.

              ( Notice given 27 June 2018; amended 13 August 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

Orders of the day continued

         1    Fair Work Amendment (Improving National Employment Standards) Bill 2018 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  5 February 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

         2    Australia and Japan: Resumption of debate ( from  5 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr van Manen —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the importance of the trade and economic relationship between Australia and Japan;

(2)         welcomes the sixty year anniversary since the signing of the Australia-Japan Agreement on Commerce;

(3)         notes the significant opportunities offered by the Japan-Australia Economic Partnership Agreement for Australian exporters;

(4)         recognises and celebrates the significant role of Japanese investment in Australia’s economy, noting that this investment is creating and supporting Australian jobs;

(5)         notes the ongoing cooperation and commitment between Australia and Japan to open markets and a strong, rules-based global trading system; and

(6)         encourages the Australian Government to continue its economic cooperation with Japan to the mutual benefit of both countries, to create jobs and support prosperity in both our nations. 

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

         3    Domestic and family violence leave: Resumption of debate ( from  5 February 2018 ) on the motion of Ms Claydon —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         one in three Australian women have experienced physical violence since the age of 15; and

(b)         two thirds of women who experience violence are in paid employment;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         family violence isolates and excludes its victims and disconnects people from community, work, education, friends and family;

(b)         the trauma experienced by an employee facing family violence will be lessened if they have the support of an understanding and accommodating employer that offers domestic and family violence leave; and

(c)         access to a leave specifically allocated for situations of domestic and family violence protects employees from discrimination and allows them to maintain stable employment which increases their likelihood of leaving violent relationships;

(3)         commends the many private companies that already provide domestic and family violence leave, including Telstra, Virgin, Qantas and the National Australia Bank, to more than one million Australian workers;

(4)         condemns the Government for its public service bargaining policy which has resulted in the removal of domestic and family violence leave provisions in some public service enterprise agreements; and

(5)         calls on the Government to amend the National Employment Standards to include domestic and family violence leave as a universal workplace right.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

         4    Competition and Consumer Amendment (Free Range Eggs) Bill 2018 ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  12 February 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

         5    Modern slavery legislation: Resumption of debate ( from  12 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Crewther —That this House:

(1)         notes that modem slavery continues to devastate the lives of millions of people, with latest estimates of over 40 million people impacted across the world, including over 4,000 people in Australia;

(2)         acknowledges that the Government has one of the strongest responses to combat human trafficking and slavery around the world, delivered under the National Action Plan to Combat Human Trafficking and Slavery 2015-19;

(3)         notes that the Government:

(a)         remains committed to continuing to improve this response and recognises the importance of partnering with those on the frontline to combat this abhorrent crime;

(b)         initiated the inquiry into Australia establishing modern slavery legislation, led by the Foreign Affairs and Aid Sub-Committee of the Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade, which released its interim report in August 2017 making a number of recommendations and statements of in-principle support; and

(c)         following extensive consultation with business and civil society, and taking into account the Foreign Affairs and Aid Sub-Committee’s recommendations in its December 2017 final report, will introduce targeted legislation requiring large businesses to report on the actions they are taking to address modern slavery in their supply chains; and

(4)         calls on the House to support the Government’s modern slavery legislation when it is brought before the Parliament.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

         6    South Australian schools funding: Resumption of debate ( from  12 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Champion —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that the $210 million funding cut to South Australian schools in 2018 and 2019 means that schools will face significant cuts, which the South Australian Government has estimated to include:

(a)         $1,315,000 from Adelaide High School;

(b)         $882,000 from Craigmore High School;

(c)         $1,392,000 from Norwood Morialta High School;

(d)         $1,114,000 from Gawler and District College B-12;

(e)         $817,000 from Parafield Gardens High School;

(f)          $1,226,000 from Paralowie School;

(g)         $875,000 from Playford International College;

(h)         $512,000 from Nailsworth Primary School;

(i)           $731,000 from Glenelg Primary School;

(j)          $24,000 from South Australian School for Vision Impaired;

(k)         $1,165,000 from Roma Mitchell Secondary College;

(l)           $426,000 from Port Noarlunga Primary School; and

(m)       $863,000 from Thebarton Senior College; and

(2)         calls on the Australian Government to immediately reinstate the funding previously committed to South Australian schools.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

         7    Lieutenants ‘Breaker’ Morant, Handcock and Witton: Resumption of debate ( from  12 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Buchholz —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         approximately 16,000 Australians fought in the Boer War in contingents raised by the Australian colonies or the Commonwealth Government (after 1901), or joined British and South African colonial units;

(b)         Australians, Lieutenants Harry ‘Breaker’ Morant, Peter Handcock and George Witton served as volunteers in a South African irregular unit, the Bushveldt Carbineers, under British Military Command;

(c)         Lieutenants Morant, Handcock and Witton were found guilty at their courts martial for the death of 12 Boer prisoners even though they pleaded their actions were in accordance with orders of their British superiors; and

(d)         Lieutenants Morant and Handcock were executed on 27 February 1902, and Lieutenant Witton’s sentence commuted to life imprisonment, but he was released from prison in 1904 after representations from the then Australian Government and British parliamentarians, including Winston Churchill;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         that Lieutenants Morant, Handcock and Witton were convicted of committing a serious crime;

(b)         the serious deficiencies in the handling of the legal case against the three men, including the right to appeal their sentences by their legal advocate, Major James Francis Thomas, the opportunity to seek intervention by the Australian Government and the ability to contact their families to inform them of their plight;

(c)         the failure of British Military Command to implement the recommendations for mercy made by the courts martial to be applied equally to these men;

(d)         the findings of respected legal figures and community leaders who support this assessment; and

(e)         the ongoing emotional suffering this case has caused the descendants of Lieutenants Morant, Handcock and Witton; and

(3)         expresses:

(a)         sincere regret that Lieutenants Morant, Handcock and Witton were denied procedural fairness contrary to law and acknowledges that this had cruel and unjust consequences; and

(b)         sympathy to the descendants of these men as they were not tried and sentenced in accordance with the law of 1902.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

         8    Competition and Consumer Amendment (Misleading Representations About Broadband Speeds) Bill 2018 ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  26 February 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

         9    Banking Amendment (Rural Finance Reform) Bill 2018 ( Ms McGowan ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  26 February 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      10    Eighty-fifth anniversary of Holodomor: Resumption of debate ( from  26 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Crewther —That this House:

(1)         notes that commemorations are underway for the eighty-fifth anniversary of Holodomor, to mark an enforced famine in Ukraine caused by the deliberate actions of Joseph Stalin’s Communist Government of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics;

(2)         recalls that it is estimated that up to seven million Ukrainians starved to death as a result of Stalin’s policies in 1932 and 1933 alone;

(3)         condemns these acts aimed at destroying the national, cultural, religious and democratic aspirations of the Ukrainian people;

(4)         condemns all similar acts during the twentieth century as the ultimate manifestations of racial, ethnic or religious hatred and violence;

(5)         honours the memory of those who lost their lives during Holodomor;

(6)         joins the Australian Ukrainian community and the international community in commemorating this tragic milestone under the motto Ukraine Remembers—The World Acknowledges;

(7)         recognises the importance of remembering and learning from such dark chapters in human history to ensure that such crimes against humanity are not allowed to be repeated; and

(8)         pays its respects to the Australian Ukrainians that lived through this tragedy and have told their horrific stories.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      11    Higher Education Support Amendment (National Regional Higher Education Strategy) Bill 2018 ( Ms McGowan ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  26 March 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      12    Fair Work Amendment (Better Work/Life Balance) Bill 2018 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  26 March 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      13    Fair Work Amendment (Tackling Job Insecurity) Bill 2018 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  26 March 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      14    Fair Work Amendment (Making Australia More Equal) Bill 2018 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  21 May 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      15    Air Services Amendment Bill 2018 (No. 2) ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  21 May 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      16    Mining and jobs: Resumption of debate ( from  21 May 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Christensen —That this House recognises that:

(1)         the Australian Labor Party has abandoned workers in Queensland, to chase Green votes in Victoria;

(2)         Opposition Leader Bill Shorten:

(a)         tells workers in Queensland he is pro coal, and in Victoria that he is against it; and

(b)         promised green activist Geoff Cousins that he would tear up the approvals for the Adani Carmichael mine;

(3)         the opening up of the Galilee Basin has the potential to create over 16,000 jobs in Queensland;

(4)         the Australian Labor Party is gambling with the integrity of Australia and has created a sovereign risk; and

(5)         Australia should utilise its natural resources and encourage investment in our mining sector to create much needed jobs for regional areas.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      17    Inspector-General of Animal Welfare and Live Animal Exports Bill 2018 ( Mr Fitzgibbon ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  18 June 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      18    Refugee Protection Bill 2018 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  18 June 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      19    Endometriosis: Resumption of debate ( from  18 June 2018 ) on the motion of Mrs Marino —That this House:

(1)         recognises that endometriosis is a terrible condition that afflicts 1 in 10 women globally and notes that there is:

(a)         delay in diagnosis of between 7 and 10 years; and

(b)         a huge need for further research on ways to treat this terrible condition;

(2)         notes that the Government is committing funding to researching this dreadful disease;

(3)         congratulates the Minister for Health for working with the Australian Coalition for Endometriosis to establish the first National Action Plan for Endometriosis; and

(4)         further congratulates the Government for also committing funding of $160,000, through the National Health and Medical Research Council, for Professor Grant Montgomery to use genomics to investigate better treatments for women with endometriosis.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      20    Banking System Reform (Separation of Banks) Bill 2018 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  25 June 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      21    Telecommunications Amendment (Giving the Community Rights on Phone Towers) Bill 2018 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  25 June 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      22    Fair Work Amendment (A Living Wage) Bill 2018 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  25 June 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      23    Regional, Rural and Remote Education Commissioner Bill 2018 ( Ms McGowan ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  25 June 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      24    Stronger economy: Resumption of debate ( from  25 June 2018 —Ms Banks ) on the motion of Ms Banks —That this House:

(1)         recognises the positive effect of the Government’s measures for a stronger economy mean that essential services are guaranteed including the Government’s:

(a)         support for education and childcare; and

(b)         measures to support more choices for Australians to live longer, healthier lives; and

(2)         notes with deep concern that the Opposition has no plan for a stronger economy that will deliver essential services to Australians.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

      25    Cyprus: Resumption of debate ( from  25 June 2018 ) on the motion of Ms Vamvakinou —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges peace, re-unification and reconciliation in Cyprus through the progress achieved during 2015-2017 United Nations-sponsored Cyprus peace talks, including the framework set out by the United Nations Secretary-General, Antonio Guterres;

(2)         congratulates all those involved in the Cyprus peace talks, especially the personal commitment by Greek Cypriot leader Nicos Anastasiades and Turkish Cypriot leader Mustafa Akinci;

(3)         expresses full support for the United Nations Secretary-General’s Good Offices in Cyprus, and supports the resumption of negotiations at the parties’ earliest convenience;

(4)         recognises that even though the 2015-17 Cyprus talks took place between two compatible and affable leaders and a rather diligent United Nations, Mont Pèlerin, Geneva and Crans-Montana reminded us that the difficulty in constructing a new peace paradigm in Cyprus is not only exacerbated by inter-communal division, but is also vulnerable to external, regional and international tensions;

(5)         reaffirms its support for an enduring, peaceful, comprehensive and just settlement based on the relevant United Nations Security Council resolutions, and encourages all parties to sustain their commitment to the reunification of Cyprus;

(6)         realises that many Cypriots have fled to Australia over the last six decades and the Cypriot diaspora in Australia can make a positive contribution to peacebuilding efforts in their former homeland;

(7)         welcomes the bicommunal contacts, engagement and exchanges, resulting from the continued crossings at the Green Line, as evidenced by the work of the Cyprus Academic Dialogue, the Bicommunal Kyrenia Initiative, the Committee on Missing Persons in Cyprus, the Home for Cooperation and others;

(8)         congratulates the grasswork action by two Australian friends of Cypriot background, Yalcin Adal and Stavros Protz (Tzortzis), for their 16 day, 350 km Cyprus East2West walk from 21 March to 6 April 2018, as a symbolic gesture of reunification, peace, hope, reconciliation and friendship, and all those who supported such an endeavour, especially our High Commission in Nicosia; and

(9)         calls on the Government to continue its support of the peacemaking efforts in Cyprus including considering re-appointing a special envoy on Cyprus to promote dialogue, peace and reconciliation.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 13 August 2018. )

 

 

 

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS has precedence each Monday in the House of Representatives Chamber from 10.10 am to 12 noon; and in the Federation Chamber from 11 am to 1.30 pm and 4.45 pm to 7.30 pm (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS has precedence from the conclusion of consideration of committee and delegation business each Monday (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

The SELECTION COMMITTEE is responsible for arranging the timetable and order of committee and delegation business and private Members’ business for each sitting Monday. Its determinations for today are shown under ‘Business accorded priority for …’. Any private Members’ business not called on, or consideration of private Members’ business or committee and delegation business which has been interrupted and not re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays, shall be removed from the Notice Paper (standing order 42).