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PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS

Notices given for Tuesday, 24 October 2017

    *1    Ms Husar : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence Campaign (Campaign) will be from 25 November to 10 December, coinciding with Human Rights Day;

(2)         recognises the importance of community awareness and action to prevent violence against women;

(3)         encourages all Australians to commit to eliminate violence against women;

(4)         understands that:

(a)         on average at least one woman a week is killed by a current or former partner in Australia;

(b)         one in three Australian women has experienced physical violence, since the age of 15; and

(c)         one in five Australian women has experienced sexual violence;

(5)         acknowledges the:

(a)         impact of violence on the safety of women and our communities; and

(b)         high cost to the Australian economy of violence against women, estimated at $21.7 billion per year; and

(6)         asks all Members to show their support to committing to action in the Campaign.

              ( Notice given 23 October 2017. )

    *2    Ms Sharkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Australian Youth Affairs Coalition (AYAC) was established in 2002 as a body to give a national voice to the rights and interests of young people in national policy, provide the most comprehensive access to the full demographic of young people, and contribute to improving national youth services;

(b)         in 2008 the Government began funding AYAC, with it receiving $534,748 in Commonwealth funding in 2013;

(c)         despite being an important link between young people and the Government, funding for AYAC ceased under the Government’s 2014 budget;

(d)         the 2014 funding cut has left Australia’s approximately four and a half million young people without a voice in national policy and contributed to a growing lack of confidence in government amongst young people, despite strong desires to be engaged in politics, due to a perceived lack of influence, resulting in young people seeking new methods of political engagement or disengaging with politics altogether;

(e)         growing evidence suggests that young people face entrenched disadvantage, including lower standards of living and poorer outcomes than those enjoyed by the generation before them, evident in low youth employment levels and disparities in the housing market;

(f)          the lack of stable and ongoing funding from the Government for a peak body for youth affairs directly contradicts Australia’s commitment to upholding the rights and best interests of young people, as ratified in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child;

(g)         on 26 June 2016 at the Liberal Party of Australia’s campaign launch, the Prime Minister stated that ‘as we build a stronger economy, it is vital that we also do all we can to ensure all Australians, especially young Australians, are not left behind’;

(h)         the Government’s failure to fund a national peak body for youth affairs constitutes a failure to recognise and respect not only the ability of young people to contribute to national policy, but the legitimacy of the rights and interests of young people; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         recognise the rights and interests of young people in national policy by providing $600,000 in funding to AYAC in 2017-18 to support the operation of its networking secretariat; and

(b)         guarantee ongoing funding for AYAC as a commitment to the right of young people to be involved in the decisions that affect them.

              ( Notice given 23 October 2017. )

    *3    Ms Vamvakinou : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Amnesty International has evidence that hundreds of Rohingya women, men and children have been killed since the escalation of a violent assault in Northern Arakan/Rakhine State, Myanmar, since 25 August 2017;

(b)         the United Nations has estimated that since August 2017, over 589,000 Rohingyas have been forced to flee to refugee camps in Bangladesh;

(c)         there are at least another 20,000 Rohingyas being detained at the borders;

(d)         the United Nations Human Rights Council has witnessed accounts and heard testimonies of the Myanmar security force setting villages on fire and injuring, torturing, raping, killing and executing innocent victims;

(e)         214 villages have been destroyed through fire and will be taken over by the Myanmar Government because burnt land becomes government-managed land;

(f)          the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Prince Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein, has called these government attacks ‘a textbook example of ethnic cleansing’;

(g)         approximately 600,000 people are still deadlocked inside Rakhine State with limited access to food, medical care or humanitarian assistance;

(h)         despite the history of the Rohingya Muslims in the Rakhine region extending back the post-colonial era, this community has been denied citizenship and most basic government services under since 1982; and

(i)           the treatment of Rohingya Muslims in the Rakhine region is an issue that deeply concerns the Australian community; and

(2)         urges:

(a)         the Government of Myanmar to:

                                                          (i)       recommit to the pursuit of peace and national reconciliation; and

                                                        (ii)       allow access to all parts of Rakhine State to allow for the provision of humanitarian aid;

(b)         the Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs to:

                                                          (i)       do everything in her power to help alleviate the suffering in Rakhine State;

                                                        (ii)       lead the push for a strong United Nations General Assembly Resolution on the violence in Rakhine State, and

                                                       (iii)       work to establish an independent United Nations investigation into human rights abuses in Myanmar; and

(c)         the Australian Government to:

                                                          (i)       support unimpeded humanitarian access to the Rohingya population;

                                                        (ii)       maintain pressure on the Myanmar Government, particularly the military and security forces, by condemning the persecution, attacks, killings and human rights abuses of the Rohingyas; and

                                                       (iii)       stand up for the moderate voices in Myanmar which are being widely suppressed by the threat of persecution by the Myanmar military.

              ( Notice given 23 October 2017. )

Notices —continued

       1    Ms McGowan : To move—That:

(1)         this House establish a joint select committee, to be known as the Joint Select Committee on Regional Development and Decentralisation, to inquire and report on the following matters:

(a)         best practice approaches to regional development, considering Australian and international examples, that support:

                                                          (i)       growing the rural and regional population base;

                                                        (ii)       an equitable share of the rewards derived from rural and regional resources being received by regional communities;

                                                       (iii)       growing and diversifying of the regional economic and employment base;

                                                      (iv)       an improved quality of life for regional Australians;

                                                        (v)       vibrant, more cohesive and engaged regional communities; and

                                                      (vi)       a place-based approach that considers local circumstances and involves collective governance;

(b)         decentralisation of Commonwealth entities or functions, as a mechanism to increase growth and prosperity in regional areas, considering Australian and international examples, including:

                                                          (i)       examining the potential for decentralisation to improve governance and service delivery for all Australians, considering the administrative arrangements required for good government;

                                                        (ii)       identifying the characteristics of entities that would be suited to decentralisation without impacting on the ability to perform their functions;

                                                       (iii)       identifying the characteristics of locations suitable to support decentralised entities or functions, including consideration of infrastructure and communication connectivity requirements;

                                                      (iv)       considering different models of decentralisation, including:

—relocation of all or part of a Commonwealth entity to a regional area;

—decentralisation of specific positions, with individual employees telecommuting, considering any limitations to this in current Australian Public Service employment conditions and rules; and

—co-location of decentralised Commonwealth entities or employees in existing regionally based Commonwealth or state government offices;

(c)         examining the family, social and community impacts of decentralising;

(d)         actions of the Commonwealth that would encourage greater corporate decentralisation and what can be learned from corporate decentralisation approaches, including:

                                                          (i)       considering the role of the private sector in sustainably driving employment and growth opportunities in regional areas in both existing and new industries;

                                                        (ii)       comparing the access to early stage equity and or debt finance of metropolitan and regional businesses for both start up and established businesses;

                                                       (iii)       examining access to capital for regional business, including agribusiness, manufacturing and technology;

                                                      (iv)       considering the adequacy of regional businesses access to early stage accelerators and incubators, including access to business mentors, business networks and capital (debt or equity);

                                                        (v)       considering the adequacy to support the private sector to attract and retain skilled labour to regional areas; and

                                                      (vi)       examining the extent to which employment and growth can be supported by growing existing and new industries in regional areas, leveraging strong transport and communications connectivity; and

(e)         any related matters;

(2)         the committee consist of 12 members: 2 Members of the House of Representatives to be nominated by the Government Whip or Whips, 2 Members of the House of Representatives to be nominated by the Opposition Whip or Whips and 2 Members of the House of Representatives to be nominated by any minority group or independent Member, 2 Senators to be nominated by the Leader of the Government in the Senate, 2 Senators to be nominated by the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate and 2 Senators to be nominated by any minority group or independent Senator;

(3)         every nomination of a member of the Committee be notified in writing to the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the President of the Senate;

(4)         the members of the Committee hold office as a joint select committee until presentation of the Committee’s report or the House of Representatives is dissolved or expires by effluxion of time, whichever is the earlier;

(5)         the Committee elect a:

(a)         Government member as Chair; and

(b)         non-Government member as Deputy Chair who shall act as Chair of the Committee at any time when the Chair is not present at a meeting of the Committee, and at any time when the Chair and Deputy Chair are not present at a meeting of the Committee the members present shall elect another member to act as Chair at that meeting;

(6)         in the event of an equally divided vote, the Chair, or the Deputy Chair when acting as Chair, has a casting vote;

(7)         three members of the Committee constitute a quorum of the Committee provided that in a deliberative meeting the quorum shall include one Government member of either House, and one non-Government member of either House;

(8)         the Committee has power to appoint subcommittees consisting of three or more of its members and to refer to any subcommittee any matter which the Committee is empowered to examine;

(9)         the Committee appoint the Chair of each subcommittee who shall have a casting vote only and at any time when the Chair of a subcommittee is not present at a meeting of the subcommittee the members of the subcommittee present shall elect another member of that subcommittee to act as Chair at that meeting;

(10)     two members of a subcommittee constitute the quorum of that subcommittee, provided that in a deliberative meeting the quorum shall include one Government member of either House and one non-Government member of either House;

(11)     members of the Committee who are not members of a subcommittee may participate in the proceedings of that subcommittee but shall not vote, move any motion or be counted for the purpose of a quorum;

(12)     the Committee or any subcommittee:

(a)         has power to call for witnesses to attend and for documents to be produced;

(b)         may conduct proceedings at any place it sees fit;

(c)         may sit in public or in private; and

(d)         has power to adjourn from time to time and to sit during any adjournment of the Senate and the House of Representatives;

(13)     the Committee may report from time to time, but will produce an issues paper no later than 31 August 2017 and an interim report no later than 31 December 2017, with its final report no later than 28 February 2018;

(14)     the provisions of this resolution, so far as they are inconsistent with the standing orders, have effect notwithstanding anything contained in the standing orders; and

(15)     a message be sent to the Senate acquainting it of this resolution and requesting that it concur and take action accordingly.

              ( Notice given 22 May 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 27 November 2017. )

       2    Mr Jones : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that the Government has failed to respond to the frustration and anger of regional broadband consumers who are suffering with unreliable services and who are paying for broadband packages that advertise speeds that cannot be delivered;

(2)         calls on the Government to impose a new requirement on the NBN and on retail service providers so that NBN customers are not misled when they purchase a broadband service by requiring:

(a)         NBN Co to advise retail service providers where there are known limitations or impediments in its network which would prevent or impede a retailer from providing one of the standard internet services to an end user, with this information being provided on a per premises basis;

(b)         retail service providers to advise customers on a premises by premises basis where there are known limitations or impediments in the NBN network which prevent it from offering one of the standard broadband retail products; and

(c)         retail service providers to renegotiate terms of service with a customer where they have sold a customer a product which it is subsequently revealed cannot be delivered because of limitations in the network; and

(3)         further calls on the Government to cease the planning and rollout of copper-based Fibre to the Node NBN which is one of the significant causes of problems with speed, reliability and congestion in the NBN fixed line network.

              ( Notice given 23 May 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 27 November 2017. )

       3    Mr Georganas : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that the live export of animals for slaughter overseas continues to breach animal cruelty standards, both in a legislative and moral sense; and

(2)         notes that:

(a)         many Australians are deeply disturbed by incidences where animals are hurt and mistreated during mass transport, and that strong community sentiment against live animal exports persists;

(b)         for as long as the practice of live exports continues, laws and regulations that protect animal welfare must be strengthened, and those breaching these standards must be adequately penalised; and

(c)         there are more humane ways to treat animals and as a country we should explore these further with a view to the long term banning of live animal exports, and strengthening local industries and processing capacities.

              ( Notice given 25 May 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

       4    Mr Albanese : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes the recent report released by the Water Services Association of Australia titled ‘Next Gen Urban Water: The role of urban water in vibrant and prosperous communities’;

(2)         acknowledges that healthy urban rivers play a vital role in ensuring cities are sustainable and liveable and that the development of efficient blue-green networks can offset some of the worst effects of climate change by:

(a)         reducing the heat island effect;

(b)         ensuring a strong urban ecology through the preservation of biodiversity; and

(c)         improving flood mitigation through effective management of water, particularly stormwater;

(3)         recognises that rejuvenating urban rivers also has a positive impact on community wellbeing, and that investment in walking and cycling paths is a key component of this renewal process as it provides spaces for recreation and social cohesion;

(4)         commends the previous Labor Government’s investment in urban rivers, noting the positive difference this has made to the natural environment and amenity of urban areas;

(5)         notes, in particular, the successful improvements to the Cooks River, an iconic part of the inner west landscape, which was once used as a storm water drain and today is a popular walking and cycling route;

(6)         recognises that the renewal of the Cooks River is a consequence of hard work from dedicated community groups including the Mudcrabs, Cooks River Valley Association and the Cooks River Alliance, as well as the investment from the previous Labor Government; and

(7)         calls on the Government to provide real leadership and actual investment in our urban areas, instead of just rhetoric, so that Australia’s cities reach their full potential and are productive, sustainable and liveable for all who reside there.

              ( Notice given 13 June 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

       5    Mr Perrett : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         August 6 and 9 are the 72nd anniversaries of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, respectively;

(b)         at Hiroshima, approximately 80,000 people died immediately, and at Nagasaki approximately 40,000 died immediately;

(c)         by the end of 1945, approximately 200,000 people had died from the effects of these two bombs, including from radiation sickness;

(d)         in 2015, the Red Cross hospitals in Hiroshima and Nagasaki reported that they are still treating many thousands of people suffering from the long term effects of radiation exposure;

(e)         childhood survivors of the bombings have experienced ‘multiple types of cancer over decades’, and the health consequences of genetic damage are an ongoing concern;

(f)          there are currently 15,000 nuclear weapons in the world;

(g)         in 2013 and 2014 a series of three intergovernmental and civil society conferences concluded that any use of nuclear weapons would be utterly catastrophic and that they threaten the very survival of humanity;

(h)         other indiscriminate weapons of mass destruction—chemical and biological weapons, as well as landmines and cluster munitions—are explicitly prohibited by treaty;

(i)           the United Nations has convened a conference for 15 June to 8 July 2017 to negotiate a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination;

(j)          the United Nations General Assembly has encouraged all United Nations member states to participate in the conference; and

(k)         the Australian Government did not participate in the conference held between 27 and 31 March 2017; and

(2)         noting the Japanese Government’s approach to this conference, urges the Australian Government to participate constructively in the conference.

              ( Notice given 15 June 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

       6    Mr Keogh : To move—That this House:

(1)         condemns the Government’s decision to release a list of suburbs with the highest rates of job seeker non-compliance last week, now colloquially dubbed the ‘list of shame’;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         in order to boost the employment outcomes of Australians that are doing it tough, the role of government is to create jobs and provide access to effective employment services programs;

(b)         singling out and embarrassing particular communities is divisive and does not resolve the root issues underlying job seeker non-compliance; and

(c)         non-compliance is exacerbated by the Government’s cuts to resourcing at Centrelink; and

(3)         calls on the Minister for Human Services to:

(a)         apologise to the Burt community, including the cities of Gosnells and Armadale, and others around Australia, for talking them down when they should be lifted up; and

(b)         visit the electoral division of Burt so that its federal Member can share with him the real story of our outer suburbs.

              ( Notice given 20 June 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

       7    Mr Bandt : To move—That:

(1)         this House establish a select committee, to be known as the Select Committee on Elections and Qualifications, to inquire and report on the following matters:

(a)         the eligibility of Members of the House of Representatives in the 45th Parliament under Section 44 of the Constitution in so far as it relates to being ‘a subject or a citizen or entitled to the rights or privileges of a subject or a citizen of a foreign power’;

(b)         the legal liability of Members of the House of Representatives who know, or have grounds to suspect, that they are ineligible for office but do not come forward with that information, and whether they are defrauding the Commonwealth; and

(c)         any related matters;

(2)         for the purposes of carrying out the inquiry, the committee must, as soon as practicable, appoint an independent auditor, or auditors, with expertise in migration, citizenship and constitutional law to assist the committee who, among other things:

(a)         would be able to request the committee to use its powers to order the production of documents from Members of the House of Representatives and order them to appear as witnesses and answer questions; and

(b)         on behalf of the committee, may present to representatives of foreign governments in Australia and seek information as relevant to this inquiry;

(3)         the committee consist of 10 members, six members to be nominated by the Government Whip or Whips, three members to be nominated by the Opposition Whip or Whips and one non-aligned member;

(4)         every nomination of a member of the committee be notified in writing to the Speaker of the House of Representatives;

(5)         the members of the committee hold office as a select committee until presentation of the committee’s report or the House of Representatives is dissolved or expires by effluxion of time, whichever is the earlier;

(6)         the committee elect:

(a)         a government member as chair; and

(b)         a non-government member as deputy chair who shall act as chair of the committee at any time when the chair is not present at a meeting of the committee, and at any time when the chair and deputy chair are not present at a meeting of the committee the members present shall elect another member to act as chair at that meeting;

(7)         in the event of an equally divided vote, the chair, or the deputy chair when acting as chair, has a casting vote;

(8)         three members of the committee constitute a quorum of the committee provided that in a deliberative meeting the quorum shall include one government member, and one non-government member;

(9)         the committee has power to appoint subcommittees consisting of three or more of its members and to refer to any subcommittee any matter which the committee is empowered to examine;

(10)     the committee appoint the chair of each subcommittee who shall have a casting vote only and at any time when the chair of a subcommittee is not present at a meeting of the subcommittee the members of the subcommittee present shall elect another member of that subcommittee to act as chair at that meeting;

(11)     two members of a subcommittee constitute the quorum of that subcommittee, provided that in a deliberative meeting the quorum shall include one government and one non-government member;

(12)     members of the committee who are not members of a subcommittee may participate in the proceedings of that subcommittee but shall not vote, move any motion or be counted for the purpose of a quorum;

(13)     the committee or any subcommittee:

(a)         has power to call for witnesses to attend and for documents to be produced;

(b)         may conduct proceedings at any place it sees fit;

(c)         may sit in public or in private; and

(d)         has power to adjourn from time to time and to sit during any adjournment of the House of Representatives;

(14)     the committee may report from time to time, but will report no later than 14 September 2017; and

(15)     the provisions of this resolution, so far as they are inconsistent with the standing orders, have effect notwithstanding anything contained in the standing orders.

              ( Notice given 8 August 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

       8    Ms Husar : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises the importance of NAIDOC Week;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         the promotion of NAIDOC Week celebrations at school is vital to ensuring long term cultural and attitudinal change;

(b)         Western Sydney has the largest Aboriginal population in a metropolitan setting;

(c)         NAIDOC Week’s theme is ‘our language matters’; and

(d)         more needs to be done to record and promote the history, culture and achievement of Aboriginal culture in Western Sydney before it is lost; and

(3)         calls on the Government to ensure that greater language education is provided to the community beyond NAIDOC Week.

              ( Notice given 14 August 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

       9    Ms McGowan : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the ongoing uncertainty about the citizenship status of Members of the House is undermining the business of the Parliament;

(b)         Members are responsible for confirming their citizenship status prior to nominating for election by signing the declaration on the nomination form that they are qualified under the Constitution and the laws of the Commonwealth to be elected; and

(c)         there is no current process or requirement for Members to publicly release evidence of their citizenship status; and

(2)         amends the resolution relating to the Registration of Members’ Interests so that at (1) (a) the following is added: ‘(iii) the citizenship status of the Member, the Member’s parents and grandparents, and evidence of reasonable steps taken to renounce foreign nationality by the Member’.

              ( Notice given 15 August 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    10    Ms Rishworth : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises that 20 September 2017 marks the Centenary of Australia’s contribution to the Battle of Passchendaele, also known as the Battle of the Ypres, when Australia’s infantry took part in the Battle of Menin Road and subsequently the Battle of Polygon Wood;

(2)         notes that the Battle of Menin Road was the first involvement of Australian units in the Battle of Passchendaele and took place from 20 to 26 September 1917;

(3)         recognises the Battle of Menin Road:

(a)         as an important part of Australia's military history;

(b)         allowed significant advances by Australian units during the battle; and

(c)         resulted in 5,013 Australian casualties;

(4)         recognises that efforts of Australian troops during the Battle of Menin Road would pre-empt Australia’s success in the Battle of Polygon Wood;

(5)         notes Australia’s involvement in the Battle of Polygon Wood which took place from 26 September to 3 October 1917, and recognises:

(a)         that Australia’s involvement in the operations of the Battle of the Polygon would contribute to securing strongly defended German positions; and

(b)         the 5,770 Australian casualties in the Battle of Polygon Wood;

(6)         recognises the wretched conditions which our servicemen fought in and the contribution and sacrifice made by Australia’s infantry during the Battle of Passchendaele; and

(7)         remembers and pays tribute to all Australians who served in the Battle of Passchendaele, those who were wounded and those who made the ultimate sacrifice and their families.

              ( Notice given 15 August 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    11    Mr Wallace : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         8 million Australians live outside our capital cities; and

(b)         while some regions like the Sunshine Coast are experiencing strong economic growth, others are not enjoying the same levels of economic activity;

(2)         further notes that:

(a)         many regions, including the Sunshine Coast, can supply substantially lower office accommodation costs and lower operating costs;

(b)         regions such as the Sunshine Coast can offer a highly educated workforce, high quality business facilities, first class health and transport infrastructure, as well as innovative start-up communities;

(c)         regions, including the Sunshine Coast, can offer lifestyle benefits like lower cost housing, short commute times and a family-friendly environment; and

(d)         research suggests that highly skilled people are taking increasing account of lifestyle factors when choosing their employer;

(3)         welcomes the Government's pursuit of a policy of decentralisation of public sector agencies, and the recent relocation of some parts of the Murray-Darling Basin Authority to Wodonga; and

(4)         encourages the Government to continue to explore further options for the relocation of Commonwealth agencies to the regions.

              ( Notice given 16 August 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    12    Mr Burke : To move—That this House resolves that as there is doubt over the Government’s reliance on a single vote in the House of Representatives, all divisions in the House shall be deferred until the House has been advised of the determination of the questions this House referred to the Court of Disputed Returns on 14 August 2017 concerning the constitutional qualifications of the Member for New England.

              ( Notice given 17 August 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    13    Ms T. M. Butler : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that the Government’s proposed higher education fee hikes and lowering of the HELP repayment threshold disproportionately affect women, specifically in that:

(a)         the lowering of the HELP repayment threshold to $42,000 and the associated changes to indexation of these rates will greatly affect people on low incomes (such as people who are in lower paid professions or working part-time), as they would be required to repay their loan sooner and at a rate that represents a higher proportion of their income; and

(b)         women are over-represented in lower paid professions (such as nursing, teaching and social work), and part-time work (71.6 per cent of all part time employees are women), and many women occupy both of these categories;

(2)         expresses concern that increases to fees and debt incurred by students would likely deter debt-averse groups, including women, from participating in higher education;

(3)         notes that the Government did not model the impact these changes and other budget measures would have on women and that if it had, it would have quantified the combined effect of the proposed lowering of the HELP threshold, and other measures, on women;

(4)         acknowledges that the National Foundation for Australian Women conducted its own analysis and concluded that the new HELP repayments combined with proposed increases in the Medicare levy and changes to other benefits such as rental assistance could lead to effective marginal tax rates of possibly 100 per cent or higher for some women, particularly as Family Tax Benefit Part A begins to decrease at $51,903; and

(5)         calls on the Government to abandon its proposed changes to higher education fees and HELP payments.

              ( Notice given 5 September 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    14    Ms Owens : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises that rising energy prices and concerns around energy security are putting the Australian manufacturing industry at risk by:

(a)         making Australian firms uncompetitive globally, as they compete with cheaper imports from markets with lower energy cost;

(b)         decreasing businesses’ profit margins and putting jobs at risk; and

(c)         forcing businesses to consider relocating their operations overseas where energy is secure and more affordable;

(2)         acknowledges the importance of the manufacturing industry to Australia’s economy, jobs and the retention of skills in Australia;

(3)         recognises the Government’s failure to provide solutions to the rising cost of energy for the manufacturing industry; and

(4)         notes that Western Sydney is the largest manufacturing region in the country, contributing $13.5 billion to the economy annually and providing employment for thousands of Australians.

              ( Notice given 5 September 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    15    Ms Keay : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         10 September is World Suicide Prevention Day, with the theme for 2017 being ‘Take a Minute, Change a Life’, which aims to complement the work undertaken by RUOK? Day and encourages people to take the time to notice what is going on with their family, friends, colleagues and themselves;

(b)         14 September is RUOK? Day is a day that reminds people that they have what it takes to start a meaningful conversation if they are worried about someone, using four steps:

                                                          (i)       ask;

                                                        (ii)       listen;

                                                       (iii)       encourage action; and

                                                      (iv)       check in;

(c)         in 2015, 3,027 Australians lost their lives to suicide—a 5.4 per cent increase from the previous year and the highest suicide rate in 15 years;

(d)         this is an average of 8.3 deaths by suicide every day;

(e)         suicide is the leading cause of death for Australians aged 15 to 44; and

(f)          these statistics are heartbreaking and confronting; and

(2)         urges all levels of government and the community to work together to:

(a)         reduce the impact of mental ill health and suicide in our society;

(b)         continue to work towards reducing stigma associated with mental ill health; and

(c)         help raise community awareness around suicide prevention.

              ( Notice given 6 September 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    16    Ms L. M. Chesters : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges and supports the 190 contracted workers at Esso Australia (a subsidiary of Exxon Mobil) who have been unethically dismissed by UGL Pty Limited (UGL);

(2)         condemns the exploitative tactics of the multinational companies Exxon Mobil and UGL, who are attempting to rehire the workers at a 30 to 45 per cent cut to their wages, which is a disaster for their livelihoods;

(3)         recognises that these:

(a)         190 highly skilled maintenance workers are facing this pay cut when Esso Australia made $8.6 billion in 2016-17 from taking Australian gas and oil overseas, helping them become the sixth largest multinational corporation in the world; and

(b)         workers are also facing the introduction of casual contracts that strip them of work entitlements such as annual leave or sick leave, and leaves them without job security;

(4)         acknowledges that these conditions are being forced on these workers who have no choice but to sign these casual work contracts in hope of providing a living for their families;

(5)         recognises that these wealthy multinational corporations are manipulating the Fair Work Act 2009 and Corporations Act 2001  to cut wages and working conditions for hard working vulnerable Australians;

(6)         acknowledges that Esso Australia’s recruitment of workers from other states to replace local workers is yet another harsh blow to the whole Gippsland community, that is already reeling from huge job losses in the region; and

(7)         condemns the Government for:

(a)         pursuing its ideological and dogmatic attack on unions instead of helping workers to regain bargaining power in the industrial relations system; and

(b)         its failure to stand up for the rights of these workers and all Australian workers.

              ( Notice given 11 September 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    17    Mr Georganas : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that penalty rates are relied upon by Australian workers and their families to cover everyday costs of living, no matter if they are full time, part time or casual, including workers such as:

(a)         nurses;

(b)         police, firefighters and ambulance officers;

(c)         retail and hospitality workers;

(d)         services sector employees; and

(e)         hair and beauty industry employees;

(2)         condemns government Members and Senators who oppose penalty rates and pressure the Fair Work Commission to cut them; and

(3)         calls on Government Members and Senators to support the Opposition’s private Members bill, the Fair Work Amendment (Protecting Take-Home Pay) Bill 2017, which would stop penalty rate cuts now and in the future.

              ( Notice given 13 September 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    18    Ms L. M. Chesters : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the ASC Pty Ltd (ASC) shipyard currently employs approximately 1,100 workers in South Australia, who have been building three air warfare destroyers (AWD);

(b)         by Christmas this year, 250 jobs at ASC will likely be lost, with that number increasing by 400 to 500 between January and June next year as the AWD project winds down; and

(c)         South Australia’s unemployment rate is approximately 7 per cent and mass layoffs in the automotive and shipbuilding industries mean full time employment levels will go backwards;

(2)         condemns the Government for:

(a)         decimating South Australia’s manufacturing industries in an act of economic vandalism, which has resulted in Australia’s remaining vehicle manufacturers, Toyota and Holden, closing in October, putting tens of thousands of Australian jobs at risk;

(b)         its manifestly inadequate response to the shutdown of the automotive industry, including its attempt in 2014 to rip $900 million from the Automotive Transformation Scheme, which would have sparked an early exit of automotive manufacturers from Australia and the loss of tens of thousands of jobs; and

(c)         failing to keep its promise to create new jobs within the defence manufacturing and shipbuilding industries, with many South Australian shipbuilders facing unemployment as soon as the end of this year; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         apologise to the Australian people for its reckless and disastrous actions in driving Holden and Toyota offshore and to the workers who will face unemployment as a result; and

(b)         ensure there is a requirement in all national naval shipbuilding contracts to use Australian workforces.

              ( Notice given 14 September 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    19    Ms Sharkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         plastic bags are detrimental to the environment;

(b)         Australians use an estimated 5 billion plastic bags a year, which represents over 20 million bags used every day;

(c)         research has indicated that as of 2013, approximately 5.25 trillion pieces of plastic have been floating in our world’s oceans—these are mostly microplastics of less than 5 millimetres in size and are regularly eaten by marine life, through which they enter the global food chain and are consumed by humans;

(d)         thousands of marine mammals and seabirds die every year around the world as a result of plastic litter;

(e)         plastic bags are particularly bad for the environment because they take from between 20 and 1,000 years to biodegrade and can travel long distances via air and water;

(f)          South Australia led the nation with the phasing out of lightweight non-biodegradable plastic shopping bags, which state legislation defines as a carry bag, the body of which comprises (in whole or in part) polyethylene with a thickness of less than 35 microns and includes handles;

(g)         South Australia’s ban on plastic shopping bags came into force on 4 May 2009; and

(h)         the South Australian Environmental Protection Authority estimates that the state’s ban on plastic shopping bags has resulted in almost 400 million fewer plastic bags in that state each year; and

(2)         calls on the:

(a)         state governments yet to enact a ban on lightweight non-biodegradable plastic shopping bags to do so with speed and urgency; and

(b)         Australian Government to work with the state Governments to implement a national ban on lightweight non-biodegradable plastic shopping bags by the end of 2018.

              ( Notice given 17 October 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    20    Mr van Manen : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises positive effect of the Government’s measures to assist more hard working Australians to:

(a)         earn more through the tax system, in particular by:

                                                          (i)       legislating tax cuts for middle income earners to ensure they are not pushed into the second highest tax bracket;

                                                        (ii)       introducing to Parliament the Enterprise Tax Plan, which will extend small business tax concessions to businesses up to $10 million from the outdated $2 million threshold; and

                                                       (iii)       supporting employers to invest more, provide more hours and increase wages through a more competitive international tax rate;

(b)         save more for their retirement through increased flexibility in the superannuation system, in particular by:

                                                          (i)       abolishing the so called ‘10 per cent rule’, which prevents anyone earning more than 10 per cent of their income from salary and wages from claiming a deduction for personal superannuation contributions; and

                                                        (ii)       introducing catch up concessional contributions to provide assistance to those—particularly women—who have interrupted work patterns, whether to raise children, look after elderly parents, or seek to boost their retirement savings just before retirement; and

(2)         notes with deep concern that the Opposition:

(a)         refuses to support tax relief for small business, while at the same time advocating tax cuts for foreign workers;

(b)         seeks to abolish measures to improve the retirement savings of hard working Australians, particularly those on low incomes and with interrupted work patterns; and

(c)         has no plan for jobs and growth, despite having previously advocated for a more competitive tax rate for employers.

              ( Notice given 17 October 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    21    Mr Zimmerman : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes the release on 5 October 2017 of the Consular State of Play 2016-17 (State of Play), which provides an overview of the Government’s provision of consular assistance to Australians in the last financial year;

(2)         acknowledges the hard work and dedication of Australian consular officials who have provided high-quality assistance to Australians in distress in 12,454 cases during 2016-17;

(3)         notes with concern that a significant number of Australian travellers are travelling overseas without insurance;

(4)         reiterates the Minister for Foreign Affairs’ remarks in launching the State of Play that if travellers cannot afford travel insurance, they cannot afford to travel;

(5)         acknowledges that the Australian Government will provide consular assistance where possible, while noting there are limits to what it can do to assist Australians in trouble overseas; and

(6)         calls on Australians to:

(a)         draw on resources such as Australian Government Smartraveller advice to inform themselves about their destination; and

(b)         purchase insurance appropriate to their activities and circumstances.

              ( Notice given 17 October 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    22    Mr Wallace : To move—That this House:

(1)         welcomes the Government’s action to make our cities better places to live in and do business through ongoing City Deal developments in Townsville, Launceston, Western Sydney and Darwin;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         City Deals:

                                                          (i)       bring together all three levels of Government to develop collective plans for growth with a focus on jobs, housing, transport and the environment; and

                                                        (ii)       are already delivering firm commitments and real benefits for communities, including the $250 million North Queensland Stadium, the Townsville Eastern Access Rail Corridor, movement of the University of Tasmania’s main campus and the rejuvenation of the CBD in Launceston;

(b)         further benefits through City Deals are under development, including the Western Sydney Housing Package and the redevelopment of Paterson Barracks in Launceston;

(3)         commends the Government for continuing to encourage and pursue new City Deals with other regional cities around Australia, including areas such as the Sunshine Coast; and

(4)         encourages state and territory governments and local councils in regional cities, especially on the Sunshine Coast, to work closely with their local Members of Parliament and the Assistant Minister for Cities and Digital Transformation to develop City Deals for their eligible communities.

              ( Notice given 17 October 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    23    Mr Coulton : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the important contribution that the Export Finance and Insurance Corporation (Efic) makes to supporting Australian exporters;

(2)         notes the recent passage of the Insurance Corporation Amendment (Support for Commonwealth Entities) Bill 2016 through the Parliament with bipartisan support, helping Efic keep pace with Australia’s changing exports; and

(3)         commends the Government for issuing a new Statement of Expectations for Efic, re-enabling it to support onshore resource projects, and related infrastructure.

              ( Notice given 17 October 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    24    Ms Claydon : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         one in three Australian women have experienced physical violence since the age of 15; and

(b)         two thirds of women who experience violence are in paid employment;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         family violence isolates and excludes its victims and disconnects people from community, work, education, friends and family;

(b)         the trauma experienced by an employee facing family violence will be lessened if they have the support of an understanding and accommodating employer that offers domestic and family violence leave; and

(c)         access to a leave specifically allocated for situations of domestic and family violence protects employees from discrimination and allows them to maintain stable employment which increases their likelihood of leaving violent relationships;

(3)         commends the many private companies that already provide domestic and family violence leave, including Telstra, Virgin, Qantas, the National Australia Bank, to more than one million Australian workers;

(4)         condemns the Government for its public service bargaining policy which has resulted in the removal of domestic and family violence leave provisions in some public service enterprise agreements; and

(5)         calls on the Government to amend the National Employment Standards to include domestic and family violence leave as a universal workplace right.

              ( Notice given 17 October 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    25    Mrs Marino : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises the:

(a)         importance of educating and protecting our children in the online space; and

(b)         work of the Australian Federal Police through the ThinkUKnow program, a free, evidence based cyber safety program, to provide educational presentations to parents, carers and teachers, and students across Australia;

(2)         congratulates the Australian Government on passing the Criminal Code Amendment (Protecting Minors Online) Act 2017 , also known as Carly’s Law, which targets online predators preparing or planning to cause harm to, procure or engage in sexual activity with a child; and

(3)         recognises the new law is a testament to Sonya Ryan, who has advocated for this since her 15 year old daughter Carly was murdered a decade ago by an online predator posing as a teenage boy.

              ( Notice given 17 October 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    26    Mr Albanese : To move—That this House:

(1)         declares:

(a)         its support for the vital work performed each and every day by the highly trained professionals providing aviation rescue and fire fighting (ARFF) services to ensure the safety of the flying public;

(b)         that the ARFF service is particularly important to the safe operation of airports in regional Australia where it also responds to non-aviation emergencies within its local communities; and

(c)         that the presence of the ARFF service is key to safeguarding the safety and security at major metropolitan and regional airports around the country, which is critical for international and domestic tourism; and

(2)         calls on the Government to reject any proposal to increase the threshold for the provision of ARFF services at airports from the existing 350,000 passenger movements annually, noting that this would preclude the establishment of these services at Proserpine Whitsunday Coast Airport and lead to the removal of these services from the following regional communities: Ballina; Coffs Harbour; Ayres Rock; Gladstone; Hamilton Island; Broome; Karratha; Newman; and Port Hedland. 

              ( Notice given 19 October 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

Orders of the day

         1    Public Service Amendment (Supporting a Regional Workforce) Bill 2017 ( Ms McGowan ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  22 May 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 27 November 2017. )

         2    Decentralisation: Resumption of debate ( from  22 May 2017 ) on the motion of Ms Brodtmann —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Canberra was established to be the Commonwealth seat of Government, administration and policy support;

(b)         more than 60 per cent of the Australian Public Service is located outside of Canberra, serving the needs of communities around Australia; and

(c)         the proposed relocation of the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority from Canberra to Armidale demonstrates the adverse impact of the Government’s ad hoc decentralisation decisions on the Canberra community and economy and effective and efficient government; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         commit to a cost-benefit analysis of its proposed decentralisation strategy and make the outcome of that analysis available to the public;

(b)         agree that:

                                                          (i)       decisions regarding decentralisation should only be made subject to an open and transparent public consultation process and take into account the outcome of a cost benefit analysis; and

                                                        (ii)       any decentralisation of Government agencies is based on a demonstrated net benefit to the nation and does not come at the expense of the Canberra community and economy and effective and efficient government; and

(c)         protect the Sir Robert Menzies vision of Canberra as the Commonwealth seat of Government, administration and policy support and a ‘worthy capital’ that Australians can admire and respect.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 27 November 2017. )

         3    Cyclone Debbie: Resumption of debate ( from  22 May 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Hogan —That this House:

(1)         recognises the widespread devastation in Lismore caused by flooding associated with Cyclone Debbie;

(2)         acknowledges the hard work of the state emergency services, rural fire services, police, fire brigades and Australian Defence Force and other emergency services in responding to the recent flooding and damage caused by Cyclone Debbie in numerous communities in Northern NSW and Queensland; and

(3)         congratulates the Australian Government, in conjunction with the NSW and Queensland governments, on their swift response to this event.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 27 November 2017. )

         4    Social Services Legislation Amendment (Relieving Domestic Violence Victims of Debt) Bill 2017 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  29 May 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

         5    Businesses and communications by post fee: Resumption of debate ( from  29 May 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Hammond —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the rapid increase in the use of electronic communication technology in recent decades, including in commerce;

(b)         that access to electronic communication technology differs between Australians, and is often related to income, age, education level and remoteness;

(c)         that not all Australians have the skills and infrastructure to communicate effectively via electronic channels;

(d)         that many businesses, including banks, telecommunications companies and utilities, charge consumers an extra fee to receive communications via post; and

(e)         that often the fee charged by companies to receive communications by post are intended as a disincentive, and do not represent the actual cost incurred by the company; and

(2)         calls on the Government to bring forward legislation that will give consumers the right to receive communications from companies by post for no extra fee.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

         6    Banking and Financial Services Commission of Inquiry Bill 2017 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  15 June 2017 —Mr Hawke, in continuation ) on the motion—That the Bill be made an order of the day for the next sitting— And on the amendment moved thereto by Mr Burke , viz. —That the words “the next sitting” be omitted with a view to substituting “14 August 2017, where it shall be the first item of private Members’ business, and if the second reading debate has concluded on 14 August 2017, the bill be called on immediately for its third reading as the first item of private Members’ business on 4 September 2017, and on each day it shall be permitted for the debate to conclude and the question to be put.”.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

         7    Competition and Consumer Amendment (Safeguarding the Reputation of Australian Beef) Bill 2017 ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  19 June 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

         8    Competition and Consumer Amendment (Paper Bills and Statements) Bill 2017 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  19 June 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

         9    Fair Work Amendment (Protecting Take Home Pay of All Workers) Bill 2017 ( Mr Christensen ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  19 June 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. On 22 June 2017, the Selection Committee made a determination that this Bill be referred to the Standing Committee on Employment, Education and Training. )

      10    Jobs in Whyalla: Resumption of debate ( from  19 June 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Ramsey —That this House:

(1)         expresses its support of Adani’s decision to purchase $74 million worth of steel rail from Arrium’s Whyalla steel works;

(2)         recognises that the:

(a)         order will help sustain jobs in South Australia and particularly in Whyalla;

(b)         extra work comes at a vital time in the process of selling the Arrium business; and

(c)         Arrium business in Whyalla is vital to the city’s future and loss of this order would have a material impact on its future;

(3)         rejects any further:

(a)         attempts to delay the Adani project which was taken by both the Queensland and Commonwealth governments to their respective constituencies prior to their last elections; and

(b)         delays which threaten the jobs of workers in Whyalla; and

(4)         condemns actions that threaten Australian manufacturing jobs.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

      11    Electoral Amendment (Banning Foreign Political Donations) Bill 2017 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  14 August 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

      12    Australian Bill of Rights Bill 2017 ( Ms McGowan ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  14 August 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

      13    Murray-Darling Basin Plan: Resumption of debate ( from  14 August 2017 ) on the motion of Ms Rishworth —That this House:

(1)         recognises the importance of the Murray-Darling Basin Plan (MDBP) in returning the rivers to health;

(2)         condemns any plans to walk away from the MDBP that will undermine the health of the system and the rivers;

(3)         notes the good work of the Member for Watson in his former role as the Minister for Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities, who was able to deliver a once in a century agreement of the MDBP;

(4)         expresses concern that the Member for New England, as the Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources, is walking away from the plan by refusing to return 450 gigalitres of water to the Basin;

(5)         recognises that:

(a)         removing too much water from the river is bad for irrigators and communities, and devastating for the environment in the long term; and

(b)         South Australians in particular deserve the water they were promised; and

(6)         reinstates its commitment to implement the complete MDBP.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

      14    Telecommunications Amendment (Guaranteeing Mobile Phone Service in Bushfire Zones) Bill 2017 ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  4 September 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

      15    Renewable Energy (Electricity) Amendment (Continuing the Energy Transition) Bill 2017 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  4 September 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

      16    Commission of Inquiry (Coal Seam Gas) Bill 2017 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  4 September 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

      17    Northern Adelaide Irrigation Scheme: Resumption of debate ( from  4 September 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Champion —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that the Northern Adelaide Irrigation Scheme (NAIS) has the potential to create 3,700 jobs for northern Adelaide and add more than $500 million a year to the State’s economy; and

(2)         calls on the Government to immediately commit to provide the $45.6 million in funding required by the South Australian Government for the NAIS to proceed.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

      18    Australian aid: Resumption of debate ( from  4 September 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Perrett —That this House: 

(1)         acknowledges that Australia has a significant role in assisting countries to reduce poverty and achieve inclusive prosperity through its international aid;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         every year Australian aid improves the lives of millions of people around the globe;

(b)         Australia is playing a leading role in international initiatives such as the Asia Pacific Leaders Malaria Alliance; and

(c)         Australia has played an important role in having the G20 Health Ministers commit to action on drug-resistant tuberculosis and the World Health Assembly endorsing action to accelerate access to vaccines;

(3)         notes that:

(a)         while the global community is making progress towards ending poverty, hunger and the worst epidemics, the world is facing multiple challenges of war, poverty, hunger, displaced people and climate change;

(b)         in the Asia-Pacific region, 330 million people live in extreme poverty, 1.5 billion people lack access to safe sanitation, and one in 7 people suffer from malnutrition; and

(c)         Australia is one of 194 countries which have endorsed the Agenda for Sustainable Development, which sets out 17 goals to eliminate poverty, improve health and achieve inclusive economic and social development; and

(4)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         set clear long term goals for the Australian aid program, consistent with our interests in supporting sustainable economic development, health security and poverty reduction for countries throughout our region in the forthcoming Foreign Policy White Paper, which has received more than 9,000 public submissions on a range of issues, including our aid commitments;

(b)         commit to consideration of increasing Australian aid in real terms in the next four years, to support achieving these goals;

(c)         build understanding within the Australian community of the work that has been achieved through Australian aid, to lift our national pride in our contribution to the world; and

(d)         expand opportunities for everyday Australians to contribute in practical ways to regional development, through short work parties to exchange agricultural and practical skills in developing countries.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

      19    Fair Work Amendment (Terminating Enterprise Agreements) Bill 2017 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  11 September 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

      20    Fair Work Amendment (Recovering Unpaid Superannuation) Bill 2017 ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  11 September 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

      21    Renewable Fuel Bill 2017 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  11 September 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

      22    Competition and Consumer Amendment (Exploitation of Indigenous Culture) Bill 2017 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  11 September 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

      23    Israel: Resumption of debate ( from  11 September 2017 —Mrs Prentice ) on the motion of Mr Robert —That this House:

(1)         supports the right of Israel to defend its citizens against terrorist attacks by organisations or by individuals;

(2)         calls on the Palestinian Authority to cease incitement of its population to attack Israel and Israelis;

(3)         further calls on the Palestinian Authority to take seriously the task of educating its people on the options, process and potential for peace;

(4)         urges the Palestinian Authority to abide by the Oslo Accords and specifically to cease attacking Israel in an unfounded manner in international forums;

(5)         further urges the Israel and the Palestinian Authority to return to negotiations in good faith and without preconditions;

(6)         acknowledges and affirms the Jewish connection to the Jewish holy sites in Jerusalem and elsewhere in Israel; and

(7)         condemns the Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions movement as inherently anti-Semitic and calls on all Australian political parties and institutions to disavow it.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

      24    Renewable Energy Legislation Amendment (Supporting Renewable Communities) Bill 2017 ( Ms McGowan ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  16 October 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

      25    Competition and Consumer Legislation Amendment (Small Business Access to Justice) Bill 2017 ( Dr Leigh ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  16 October 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

      26    Australia and the United States of America: Resumption of debate ( from  16 October 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Hastie —That this House:

(1)         recognises the strong historic relationship that exists between Australia and the United States of America;

(2)         acknowledges the Australia, New Zealand, United States Security Treaty, which for the past 65 years has provided for our mutual defence, anchored regional stability, and spurred economic growth;

(3)         notes the many ties that bind our nations together, in areas including:

(a)         intelligence and law enforcement, where information sharing and coordination are at all-time highs, which has led to the prevention of far more terrorist attacks than have occurred;

(b)         security cooperation, in which Australia has made valuable contributions in the past 15 years to the United States-led campaigns against terror in Afghanistan, Iraq and across the Middle East, noting as well that the United States Force Posture Initiatives in Australia, launched in 2012, have and will continue to enhance the readiness and interoperability of our militaries;

(c)         trade, with the Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement in particular having expanded the flow of fair, free, and high-standard trade between our countries for 12 years;

(d)         investment, recognising that the United States is Australia’s largest foreign investor, and the top destination for Australian investment, with mutual investment by the United States and Australia in each other’s economies having grown to nearly AUD$2 trillion; and

(e)         political engagement, including the frequent exchange of politicians, officials and dignitaries between our nations, recognising in particular that over the last three years alone, the President, Vice President, and half of the President’s cabinet has visited Australia, as well as more than 100 congressional delegations and prominent United States governors; and

(4)         affirms that our nations’ mutual and long-standing commitment to freedom, democracy and the pursuit of happiness will continue to guide and shape our relationship into the future, through both challenging and prosperous times ahead.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

      27    Catheter ablation: Resumption of debate ( from  16 October 2017 ) on the motion of Dr Freelander —that this House:

(1)         acknowledges the outstanding work of hearts4hearts and its CEO Ms Tanya Hall in promoting awareness and improved treatment of cardiac arrhythmias;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         atrial fibrillation affects at least 500,000 Australians and comes with high risk of stroke and heart failure with conventional treatments;

(b)         while many cardiovascular conditions have declined in mortality rates in the past years, the mortality rates for atrial fibrillation have almost doubled in the last two decades;

(c)         catheter ablation is the acknowledged best practice treatment;

(d)         there are long waiting lists for catheter ablation in the public hospital system and the treatment is not listed on the Prostheses List; and

(e)         up to 40,000 Australians could benefit from catheter ablation, including 13,000 on private health insurance; and

(3)         welcomes the recent announcement by the Minister for Health that the Government will consider changes to Prostheses List processes in order to account for catheter ablation and other non-implantable devices, but calls on the Minister to provide further details on this announcement, including a clear time line for implementation.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

      28    Medicinal Cannabis Legislation Amendment (Securing Patient Access) Bill 2017 ( from Senate ): Second reading ( from  19 October 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    *29    Coal-Fired Power Funding Prohibition Bill 2017 [No. 2] ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  23 October 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    *30    National Integrity Commission Bill 2017 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  23 October 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    *31    White Ribbon Day: Resumption of debate ( from  23 October 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Hayes —That this House:

(1)         notes that 25 November 2017 is White Ribbon Day (WRD), the United Nations’ symbol of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women;

(2)         recognises that WRD aims to prevent violence against women by increasing public awareness and challenging attitudes and behaviours that allow violence to continue;

(3)         encourages all Australian men to join the ‘My Oath Campaign’ and take the oath: ‘I swear never to commit, excuse or remain silent about violence against women’;

(4)         understands that:

(a)         one in three women have experienced physical and/or sexual violence perpetrated by someone known to them;

(b)         each week approximately one woman is killed by a current or former partner; and

(c)         domestic and family violence is the principle cause of homelessness for women and their children;

(5)         acknowledges the high economic cost of violence against women, which is estimated to cost the Australian economy $21.7 billion a year; and

(6)         asks all Members to show their support for the principles of WRD by taking the oath and wearing a white ribbon or wristband on the day.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

    *32    Tadeusz Kościuszko: Resumption of debate ( from  23 October 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Falinski —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         15 October 2017 marks the 200th anniversary of the death of Tadeusz Kosciuszko; and

(b)         on 22 June 2016 the Polish Sejm (the lower chamber of Polish Parliament) adopted a special resolution proclaiming 2017 ‘The Year of Tadeusz Kosciuszko’, leading to world wide celebrations under the patronage of UNESCO;

(2)         recognises Tadeusz Kosciuszko as an indomitable fighter for the universal values of freedom, liberty and equality;

(3)         acknowledges the importance of Tadeusz Kosciuszko to the 180,000 strong Polish community in Australia, marked by our naming of the highest mountain on Australian mainland after him; and

(4)         recognises the work of Kosciuszko Heritage Inc. whose mission is to promote Kosciuszko in Australia, and to organise activities aimed at commemorating this Polish national hero.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 27 November 2017. )

 

 

 

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS has precedence each Monday in the House of Representatives Chamber from 10.10 am to 12 noon; and in the Federation Chamber from 11 am to 1.30 pm and 4.45 pm to 7.30 pm (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS has precedence from the conclusion of consideration of committee and delegation business each Monday (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

The SELECTION COMMITTEE is responsible for arranging the timetable and order of committee and delegation business and private Members’ business for each sitting Monday. Any private Members’ business not called on, or consideration of private Members’ business or committee and delegation business which has been interrupted and not re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays, shall be removed from the Notice Paper (standing order 42).