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PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS

Notices given for Wednesday, 9 May 2018

    *1    Mr Hayes : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises the deteriorating humanitarian crisis that has ensued between the Myanmar security forces in Rakhine State and Rohingya Muslims, since 25 August 2017;

(2)         notes with grave concern, evidence from Human Rights Watch of a series of brutal crackdowns carried out by security forces against ethnic Rohingya Muslims, including:

(a)         extrajudicial killing;

(b)         the torture and suffering of Rohingya women, men and children;

(c)         the forced displacement of more than 600,000 Rohingya into Bangladesh;

(d)         the destruction, arson and takeover of more than 300 villages by the Myanmar military; and

(e)         endemic rape and sexual violence;

(3)         further notes:

(a)         that Myanmar was home to an estimated 1.3 million Rohingya Muslims;

(b)         the long history and persecution of the Rohingya population, including the denial of citizenship under the 1982 Citizenship Law and the denial of most basic government services;

(c)         the poor living conditions and widespread inequality facing Rohingya Muslims isolated in Rakhine State and those now living in Bangladesh, including limited access to food, water, shelter, medical treatment and humanitarian assistance; and

(d)         that the United Nations and Human Rights Watch have described the situation in Rakhine State as a textbook example of ethnic cleansing;

(4)         urges the government of Myanmar to:

(a)         recommit to the pursuit of peace and national reconciliation;

(b)         allow unfettered humanitarian access to all parts of Rakhine State; and

(c)         unconditionally release the two Reuters reporters currently detained in Myanmar; and

(5)         echoes the voices of the international community and calls on Australia to:

(a)         consider additional humanitarian assistance in response to the Rohingya crisis, particularly to assist Bangladesh respond to the unprecedented levels of Rohingya refugees that have moved across its border;

(b)         ensure that the development assistance that Australia provides to Myanmar is appropriately targeted to those most in need, and does not risk contributing to the further suffering of minority groups in Myanmar such as the Rohingya;

(c)         exert maximum pressure on the Myanmar authorities to allow independent examination of claims of human rights abuses in Rakhine State, and to hold those responsible for abuses to account; and

(d)         continue condemnation of the human rights abuses against the Rohingya.

              ( Notice given 8 May 2018. )

    *2    Mr Watts : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the role of Government leadership in ensuring the productivity and liveability of Australian cities; and

(2)         notes:

(a)         the importance of public transport infrastructure in shaping cities and regions;

(b)         the record funding commitments for urban public transport infrastructure made under the previous Labor government, including $3.2 billion for the Regional Rail Link project and a further $3 billion committed to the Melbourne Metro rail project (Metro Tunnel);

(c)         the recent Infrastructure Australia report, Future Cities: Planning for our growing population, which highlights the need for Australian governments to increase investment in public transport in areas experiencing rapid population growth, including in Melbourne’s west;

(d)         that if an appropriate route is selected, the construction of an airport rail link to Melbourne Airport through Melbourne’s west has the potential to create social and economic benefits across the region; and

(e)         that further public transport infrastructure projects for fast growing regions like Melbourne’s west will needed in the near future to meet the challenge of population growth.

              ( Notice given 8 May 2018. )

    *3    Mr Zappia : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         2,400 sheep horrifically died on board the Awassi Express whilst being transported to the Middle East in August 2017;

(b)         Australian animal welfare standards are not being maintained in the live sheep export trade;

(c)         in May 2015, in a motion debated in Parliament, Labor Shadow Minister for Agriculture, the Member for Hunter, drew the House’s attention to breaches in the live export sector and called for the appointment for an Independent Inspector General of Animal Welfare and Live Animal Exports;

(d)         in 2016 the Productivity Commission recommended that the Government establish an Australian Commission for Animal Welfare to oversee animal welfare; and

(e)         according to Meat & Livestock Australia, in 2016-17 the sheep live export trade was worth $249 million, which is less than 5 per cent of the $5.23 billion economic value of Australia’s sheep industry; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         appoint an Independent Inspector General of Animal Welfare and Live Animal Exports and an Independent Office of Animal Welfare;

(b)         ensure that Exporter Supply Chain Assurance System (ESCAS) and Australian Standards for the Export of Livestock (ASEL) standards are sufficient and are adhered to in the live export trade;

(c)         ensure that independent inspectors and sufficient veterinary personnel accompany live export shipments;

(d)         impose commensurate penalties including the permanent withdrawal of ESCAS licences and criminal penalties to those exporters who seriously breach ESCAS and ASEL standards; and

(e)         assist sheep farmers transition away from live exports and focus on export of chilled and frozen meats.

              ( Notice given 8 May 2018. )

    *4    Mr Gosling : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the importance of Australia’s bilateral relationship with Indonesia;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         two-way investment between Australia and Indonesia was valued at $10.4 billion in 2016;

(b)         16,200 Indonesian tourists visited Australia and 1.248 million Australians visited Indonesia in 2016, making Indonesia Australia’s second most popular holiday destination;

(c)         cultural engagement programs like those fostered by the Australia-Indonesia Institute, the Australia-Indonesia Centre and CAUSINDY: the Conference of Australian and Indonesian Youth, are paramount to continuing to develop strong people-to-people links;

(d)         Darwin has a key role to play in Australia’s relationship with Indonesia through:

(i)           educational opportunities such as Charles Darwin University’s exchange programs, research groups, and international student places;

(ii)         assisting Indonesia in building their emergency and disaster management capacity;

(iii)        quick-response health resources like the National Critical Care and Trauma Response Centre; and

(iv)       further strengthening trade capabilities and opportunities in the cattle industry, with Indonesia taking approximately 60 per cent of Australia’s overall live cattle exports and more than a third of Australia’s live cattle exports currently shipped through the Port of Darwin; and

(e)         there are many areas in which cooperation between Indonesia and Australia could be strengthened for mutual benefit, including:

(i)           countering transnational crime through cyber-security capacity building;

(ii)         improving Defence capabilities and humanitarian aid/disaster relief assistance;

(iii)        sharing the expertise of NT health professionals through clinical training and trainee/specialist exchange programs;

(iv)       partnering on tourism initiatives like Indonesia’s Beyond Bali campaign to provide opportunities to regional areas such as Eastern Indonesia; and

(v)         expanding trilateral cooperation with Timor-Leste to improve humanitarian aid/disaster relief and strengthen maritime security, with opportunity for inclusion of other nations;

(3)         encourages Members to reflect on recent occasions when the strength of the Australia-Indonesia relationship has been strained by decisions that, with the benefit of hindsight, didn’t adequately balance all aspects of the relationship between our nations; and

(4)         calls on Members to ensure our words and actions at all times demonstrate our deep, enduring respect for Indonesia and the value we place in maintaining a positive relationship.

              ( Notice given 8 May 2018. )

    *5    Ms Husar : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that well-funded hospitals are critical for a healthy population;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         the Government is cutting $715 million from Australian hospitals over the next three years;

(b)         this includes a $5.7 million cut from Nepean Hospital;

(c)         these cuts will hurt patients, doctors, nurses and other hospital staff;

(d)         the cuts to Nepean Hospital are equal to 8,500 emergency department visits; or 220 knee replacements; or the jobs of 16 nurses;

(e)         these cuts will result in surgery delays and longer emergency department waiting times;

(f)          the proportion of people presenting to Nepean Hospital’s Emergency Department who are seen within recommended times has already declined sharply under the Liberals; and

(g)         now the Government is trying to lock in inadequate hospital funding until 2025; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         immediately reverse these cruel cuts; and

(b)         properly fund hospitals in the future.

              ( Notice given 8 May 2018. )

    *6    Ms Sharkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the key role that volunteers play in our communities across Australia;

(b)         National Volunteer Week is an annual celebration of the contribution of volunteers and this year is from 21 to 27 May 2018;

(c)         there are over 6 million Australians volunteers who generously donate their time to a wide range of social and community causes;

(d)         volunteering Australia estimates that the annual economic and societal benefit of volunteering is valued at $290 billion or more; and

(e)         volunteering provides clear benefits to both volunteers and Australian society;

(2)         thanks the Government and Parliament for their support of volunteering and volunteering support services; and

(3)         calls on the:

(a)         Government to continue its funding support for volunteering support services; and

(b)         Parliament to join together to thank our volunteers for their generous contribution to Australia.

              ( Notice given 8 May 2018. )

      *7    Ms Ley : To present a Bill for an Act to restrict the long haul export of live sheep, and for related purposes. ( Live Sheep Long Haul Export Prohibition Bill 2018 )

              ( Notice given 8 May 2018. )

    *8    Ms Collins : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         access to affordable sexual and reproductive healthcare, including abortion and contraception, is part of every woman’s right to control her own body;

(b)         abortion was decriminalised in Tasmania in 2013 and surgical terminations were being provided at a dedicated private clinic without significant out of pocket expenses;

(c)         recently, this provider closed their clinic, and the Tasmanian Government ruled out providing this essential service within the Tasmanian public health system with women forced to travel interstate for treatment;

(d)         in February, the Federal and Tasmanian Ministers for Health gave assurances that this issue had been resolved; and

(e)         despite these assurances, recent evidence has revealed a significant increase in the number of Tasmanian women being forced to travel interstate to access surgical abortions at great cost; and

(2)         calls on the Australian Government to:

(a)         work with the Tasmanian Government to resolve this issue for Tasmanian women so they can affordably access surgical terminations in the state; and

(b)         intervene, if the Tasmanian government fails to provide affordable abortion services, to ensure funding and provision of essential reproductive health services in Tasmania.

              ( Notice given 8 May 2018. )

    *9    Mr van Manen : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that the Australian Government:

(a)         is acting to provide critical upgrades to the M1 Motorway to deliver safer, less congested roads for the people of Queensland, which will mean people spend less time in traffic and more time with their families;

(b)         is delivering a $1 billion upgrade including between Varsity Lakes and Tugun on the Gold Coast end of the M1 corridor, and between Eight Mile Plains and Daisy Hill within the Brisbane urban area; and

(c)         has previously committed funding to two projects on the M1 which are scheduled to commence construction in coming weeks, being:

(i)           $115 million for the M1 Pacific Motorway-Gateway Merge; and

(ii)         $110 million for the M1 Pacific Motorway-Mudgeeraba to Varsity Lakes project; and

(2)         calls on the Queensland Government to match the funding on a 50:50 basis.

              ( Notice given 8 May 2018. )

  *10    Mrs Marino : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises the importance of infrastructure to the future prosperity of our nation;

(2)         acknowledges the actions the Government is taking in delivering a record $75 billion investment in infrastructure and transport projects focused on building local communities, connecting the regions and our cities, busting congestion and boosting productivity, while creating local jobs;

(3)         notes that for the first time, the Government has committed to a 10 year infrastructure investment pipeline with the recently announced significant infrastructure projects; and

(4)         congratulates the Government in working to deliver the infrastructure that will help secure Australia’s prosperity into the future.

              ( Notice given 8 May 2018. )

Notice given for Monday, 21 May 2018

         1    Mr Bandt : To present a Bill for an Act to amend the Fair Work Act 2009 , and for related purposes. ( Fair Work Amendment (Making Australia More Equal) Bill 2018 )

              ( Notice given 6 February 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

Notices —continued

       1    Ms L. M. Chesters : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges and supports the 190 contracted workers at Esso Australia (a subsidiary of Exxon Mobil) who have been unethically dismissed by UGL Pty Limited (UGL);

(2)         condemns the exploitative tactics of the multinational companies Exxon Mobil and UGL, who are attempting to rehire the workers at a 30 to 45 per cent cut to their wages, which is a disaster for their livelihoods;

(3)         recognises that these:

(a)         190 highly skilled maintenance workers are facing this pay cut when Esso Australia made $8.6 billion in 2016-17 from taking Australian gas and oil overseas, helping them become the sixth largest multinational corporation in the world; and

(b)         workers are also facing the introduction of casual contracts that strip them of work entitlements such as annual leave or sick leave, and leaves them without job security;

(4)         acknowledges that these conditions are being forced on these workers who have no choice but to sign these casual work contracts in hope of providing a living for their families;

(5)         recognises that these wealthy multinational corporations are manipulating the Fair Work Act 2009 and Corporations Act 2001  to cut wages and working conditions for hard working vulnerable Australians;

(6)         acknowledges that Esso Australia’s recruitment of workers from other states to replace local workers is yet another harsh blow to the whole Gippsland community, that is already reeling from huge job losses in the region; and

(7)         condemns the Government for:

(a)         pursuing its ideological and dogmatic attack on unions instead of helping workers to regain bargaining power in the industrial relations system; and

(b)         its failure to stand up for the rights of these workers and all Australian workers.

              ( Notice given 11 September 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 21 May 2018. )

       2    Mr Georganas : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that penalty rates are relied upon by Australian workers and their families to cover everyday costs of living, no matter if they are full time, part time or casual, including workers such as:

(a)         nurses;

(b)         police, firefighters and ambulance officers;

(c)         retail and hospitality workers;

(d)         services sector employees; and

(e)         hair and beauty industry employees;

(2)         condemns government Members and Senators who oppose penalty rates and pressure the Fair Work Commission to cut them; and

(3)         calls on Government Members and Senators to support the Opposition’s private Members bill, the Fair Work Amendment (Protecting Take-Home Pay) Bill 2017, which would stop penalty rate cuts now and in the future.

              ( Notice given 13 September 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 21 May 2018. )

       3    Ms L. M. Chesters : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the ASC Pty Ltd (ASC) shipyard currently employs approximately 1,100 workers in South Australia, who have been building three air warfare destroyers (AWD);

(b)         by Christmas this year, 250 jobs at ASC will likely be lost, with that number increasing by 400 to 500 between January and June next year as the AWD project winds down; and

(c)         South Australia’s unemployment rate is approximately 7 per cent and mass layoffs in the automotive and shipbuilding industries mean full time employment levels will go backwards;

(2)         condemns the Government for:

(a)         decimating South Australia’s manufacturing industries in an act of economic vandalism, which has resulted in Australia’s remaining vehicle manufacturers, Toyota and Holden, closing in October, putting tens of thousands of Australian jobs at risk;

(b)         its manifestly inadequate response to the shutdown of the automotive industry, including its attempt in 2014 to rip $900 million from the Automotive Transformation Scheme, which would have sparked an early exit of automotive manufacturers from Australia and the loss of tens of thousands of jobs; and

(c)         failing to keep its promise to create new jobs within the defence manufacturing and shipbuilding industries, with many South Australian shipbuilders facing unemployment as soon as the end of this year; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         apologise to the Australian people for its reckless and disastrous actions in driving Holden and Toyota offshore and to the workers who will face unemployment as a result; and

(b)         ensure there is a requirement in all national naval shipbuilding contracts to use Australian workforces.

              ( Notice given 14 September 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

       4    Ms Husar : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence Campaign (Campaign) will be from 25 November to 10 December, coinciding with Human Rights Day;

(2)         recognises the importance of community awareness and action to prevent violence against women;

(3)         encourages all Australians to commit to eliminate violence against women;

(4)         understands that:

(a)         on average at least one woman a week is killed by a current or former partner in Australia;

(b)         one in three Australian women has experienced physical violence, since the age of 15; and

(c)         one in five Australian women has experienced sexual violence;

(5)         acknowledges the:

(a)         impact of violence on the safety of women and our communities; and

(b)         high cost to the Australian economy of violence against women, estimated at $21.7 billion per year; and

(6)         asks all Members to show their support to committing to action in the Campaign.

              ( Notice given 23 October 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

       5    Ms Sharkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Australian Youth Affairs Coalition (AYAC) was established in 2002 as a body to give a national voice to the rights and interests of young people in national policy, provide the most comprehensive access to the full demographic of young people, and contribute to improving national youth services;

(b)         in 2008 the Government began funding AYAC, with it receiving $534,748 in Commonwealth funding in 2013;

(c)         despite being an important link between young people and the Government, funding for AYAC ceased under the Government’s 2014 budget;

(d)         the 2014 funding cut has left Australia’s approximately four and a half million young people without a voice in national policy and contributed to a growing lack of confidence in government amongst young people, despite strong desires to be engaged in politics, due to a perceived lack of influence, resulting in young people seeking new methods of political engagement or disengaging with politics altogether;

(e)         growing evidence suggests that young people face entrenched disadvantage, including lower standards of living and poorer outcomes than those enjoyed by the generation before them, evident in low youth employment levels and disparities in the housing market;

(f)          the lack of stable and ongoing funding from the Government for a peak body for youth affairs directly contradicts Australia’s commitment to upholding the rights and best interests of young people, as ratified in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child;

(g)         on 26 June 2016 at the Liberal Party of Australia’s campaign launch, the Prime Minister stated that ‘as we build a stronger economy, it is vital that we also do all we can to ensure all Australians, especially young Australians, are not left behind’;

(h)         the Government’s failure to fund a national peak body for youth affairs constitutes a failure to recognise and respect not only the ability of young people to contribute to national policy, but the legitimacy of the rights and interests of young people; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         recognise the rights and interests of young people in national policy by providing $600,000 in funding to AYAC in 2017-18 to support the operation of its networking secretariat; and

(b)         guarantee ongoing funding for AYAC as a commitment to the right of young people to be involved in the decisions that affect them.

              ( Notice given 23 October 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

       6    Ms L. M. Chesters : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         National Asbestos Awareness Week is 27 November to 1 December;

(b)         as part of this year’s events, the Australian Government Asbestos Safety and Eradication Agency (Agency) is holding the Asbestos Safety and Eradication Summit (Summit) in Canberra;

(c)         this year’s Summit will focus on debate on Australia’s next National Strategic Plan to eliminate asbestos nationwide;

(d)         the Agency has raised concerns over workplace safety following the 100 workers who were exposed to asbestos while working on the Sydney Opera House renovation in July 2017;

(e)         it is unclear how many further building sites across Australia contain asbestos or how many workers are unknowingly exposed to asbestos each day; and

(f)          the Agency advised the Senate Economics References Committee’s inquiry into non-conforming building products that building products containing asbestos are being imported to Australia contrary to Australian law;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         Australia has one of the highest rates of asbestos related deaths and injury in the world, with 33,000 people already having lost their lives to asbestos;

(b)         around 700 Australians die each year from asbestos related diseases, and without proper management experts worry that tens of thousands of Australians could be diagnosed with asbestos related diseases in the coming decades; and

(c)         experts believe that 20,000 to 25,000 Australians will die from asbestos or asbestos related illnesses before the end of this century;

(3)         condemns the Government’s inaction and silence on the dangers of asbestos, despite warnings provided to the Senate inquiry; and

(4)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         give greater importance to stopping asbestos importers at the border and immediately increase the penalties for illegal asbestos contamination on Australian building sites; and

(b)         create greater transparency and accountability between the Australian Border Force and the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission in their dealings with asbestos related importations.

              ( Notice given 24 October 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

       7    Ms Lamb : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that increasingly, employers are getting away with using a small cohort of employees to vote up inferior enterprise agreements, which are then used to reduce the pay and conditions of other much larger and often very different workforces;

(2)         welcomes the announcement by the Shadow Minister for Employment and Workplace Relations on 18 October 2017 at the National Press Club that a Labor government will ensure that collective bargaining is not undermined by sham collective agreements;

(3)         notes that Labor’s plan will protect workers from exploitative collective agreements by changing the law to:

(a)         ensure that workers who vote on an agreement must be broadly representative of those to be covered by the agreement, which will prevent for example, short term casual workers from reaching agreements on terms that bind permanent workers, and workers in one place from reaching agreements that cover people employed in different locations; and

(b)         allow workers and unions to apply to the Fair Work Commission to renegotiate enterprise agreements; and

(4)         notes the Government’s inaction regarding the use of sham collective agreements.

              ( Notice given 25 October 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

       8    Mr Thistlethwaite : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         the Australian General Strike of 1917 was a mass political and social action by working people starting on the NSW railways;

(b)         the strike lasted for approximately six to eight weeks and involved over 100,000 workers;

(c)         the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the strike was on 2 August 2017; and

(d)         Australia’s largest strike began at the Randwick Tramways Depot which shaped the labour movement for decades to come and involved many of the amazing leaders who would mould this nation into the country it is today, including Ben Chifley, Doc Evatt, Bill McKell, Eddie Ward, Joe Cahill and Jack Lang;

(2)         notes with regret the shooting and killing of Mervyn Flanagan during the strike, in particular:

(a)         Mr Flanagan was a striking carter;

(b)         on 30 August 1917 on Pyrmont Bridge Road in Camperdown, Mr Flanagan was shot dead;

(c)         Mr Flanagan was with his brother James Flanagan and friend Henry Williams, who was also shot but not killed;

(d)         the man who fired the shots was Reginald Wearne—a stock and station agent and a strike-breaker shipped in from Bingara and the brother of a powerful conservative state politician;

(e)         a Coroner’s inquest finding saw manslaughter charges withdrawn; and

(f)          the victim’s brother and Mr Williams were each jailed for three months, while Mr Wearne walked free;

(3)         congratulates the organisers of the 100th anniversary celebrations including Unions NSW, the Rail Tram and Bus Union, the Maritime Union of Australia, the Australian Workers’ Union, the Carriage works and the Hon. John Graham MLC; and

(4)         recognises that:

(a)         although the dispute began as a result of significant industrial tensions between rail workers and the (then) NSW Office of the Chief Commissioner of Railways and Tramways, the root causes of the action can be found by looking deeper, including:

(i)           class tensions building throughout the first world war;

(ii)         a fall in real wages of approximately 30 per cent in the five years following 1914; and

(iii)        attempts to introduce conscription; and

(b)         while this strike action happened 100 years ago this year, the message of the workers involved still rings loud to this day.

              ( Notice given 4 December 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

       9    Mr Hill : To move—That this House:

(1)         affirms the importance of strong and effective pharmacovigilance;

(2)         notes that the rates of death due to complications of medical and surgical care are increasing, with drugs, medicaments and biological substances causing adverse effects in therapeutic uses leading to 40 deaths in 2016 and 60 deaths in 2017;

(3)         notes that there are many areas for improvement in Australia’s overall pharmacovigilance regime, in particular that:

(a)         the reported rates of clinical prescribing errors can range from 0.14 to 1.5 per patient while the rate of consumer reporting is only 4 per cent (654) of all reports submitted;

(b)         decision-making in respect of medications has little clinical pharmacy oversight;

(c)         as only limited information is available to community pharmacists, advice to patients regarding potential risks and pharmacological or non-pharmacological alternatives is likewise limited;

(d)         drugs can be Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) approved for one purpose but be prescribed for another, ie, Diane-35 is a TGA approved drug but is not approved as a contraceptive;

(e)         while off-label use of medications is the prescriber’s responsibility, the system does not ensure that approved pharmacological options are exhausted first;

(f)          the TGA relies on drug sponsors to apply for changes in or extensions to the approved indication and does not proactively monitor post-marketing quality of usage, except known high-risk drugs through Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) data or where there has been a number or cluster of reported sentinel events; and

(g)         there is therefore limited or no oversight of TGA approved medications that are not subsidised through the PBS;

(4)         welcomes the TGA’s black triangle system for new medicines, whereby a black triangle symbol is added at the top of the product information and consumer medicines information to advise consumers of additional product monitoring by regulatory authorities;

(5)         notes the:

(a)         likely benefits of promoting this initiative to health professionals and consumers, given considerable under-reporting of adverse effects; and

(b)         opportunity to consider extending this system to over-the-counter and complementary medicines where concerns exist about under-reported side effects, off-label prescriptions, etc; and

(6)         welcomes advice and contributions from regulatory agencies, professional bodies and the Government to guide the way for change. 

              ( Notice given 4 December 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

    10    Mr Wilkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the need to boost the Age Pension as the current payment rates are inadequate;

(2)         further acknowledges that the single rate of Age Pension is particularly inadequate as single people often have to deal with the entirety of household expenses, which are rapidly becoming more and more unaffordable;

(3)         notes that:

(a)         according to recent research by the Australian Council of Social Service, and the Social Policy Research Centre, 13.9 per cent of Age Pension recipients are living below the poverty line; and

(b)         according to a recent poll by the Sunday Tasmanian, 74 per cent of Tasmanian pensioners run out of money each fortnight and 61 per cent go without necessities including fresh food; and

(4)         calls on the Government to immediately increase the Age Pension rate and specifically address the unique challenges faced by single pensioners. 

              ( Notice given 7 December 2017. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

    11    Mr Hammond : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Government established a panel to review the Small Amount Credit Contract (SACC) laws on 7 August 2015, which provided its final report to the Government on 3 March 2016;

(b)         the Government released its response to the SACC review on 28 November 2016, in which it agreed with the vast majority of the recommendations in part or in full;

(c)         the Minister for Revenue and Financial Services said at the time that ‘the implementation of these recommendations will ensure that vulnerable consumers are afforded appropriate levels of consumer protection while continuing to access SACCs and leases’;

(d)         the Minister claimed in an interview on Lateline on 28 February 2017 that The Treasury was drafting legislation to implement the review’s recommendations;

(e)         in response to questioning in Senate Additional Estimates by Senator Gallagher on 1 March 2017, The Treasury’s head of the Financial System Division confirmed that drafting had not commenced for a bill to enact the SACC review recommendations accepted by the Government; and

(f)          a consultation draft of SACC legislation was published by The Treasury on 23 October 2017 but was only open for comment for two weeks;

(2)         acknowledges that consumer credit contracts and consumer leases have been shown to cause unnecessary hardship to vulnerable consumers, and that the Parliament should act to protect vulnerable consumers;

(3)         recognises that the delay in introducing legislation for consideration by the Parliament to implement the SACC review recommendations results in an unnecessary continuation of hardship to vulnerable consumers and their families; and

(4)         calls on the Government to introduce legislation for consideration by the Parliament to implement the SACC review recommendations as a matter of urgency.

              ( Notice given 6 February 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

    12    Ms C. F. King : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         February is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month and 28 February is Teal Ribbon Day;

(b)         ovarian cancer is still the deadliest women’s cancer and has the lowest survival rate of any women’s cancer; and

(c)         the overall five-year survival rate for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer is only 44 per cent;

(2)         recognises:

(a)         the tireless work of Ovarian Cancer Australia in its pursuit to beat the disease and provide the best possible care and support to women with ovarian cancer;

(b)         the approximate 9,000 Australian women currently living with ovarian cancer;

(c)         that every day three women will die from ovarian cancer; and

(d)         there is no early detection test ovarian cancer;

(3)         welcomes the Government’s commitment to provide almost $3 million to help to identify the BRCA 1 and 2 genes within women at risk of ovarian cancer; and

(4)         calls on the Government to match Labor’s $12 million commitment to the full National Action Plan for Ovarian Cancer Research, which would reduce the number of women being diagnosed by 25 per cent by 2025.

              ( Notice given 7 February 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

    13    Ms McGowan : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Commonwealth’s Financial Assistance Grants are a key source of revenue for local governments, especially for regional and rural councils;

(b)         the impact of the indexation freeze in the 2014-15 budget meant that local councils missed out on $925 million in funding to provide better infrastructure and better services for our local communities—in Victoria this equated to $200 million in cuts to funding for local roads and community services;

(c)         the impact of the indexation freeze was magnified in rural and regional areas where local governments have small ratepayer bases and ageing infrastructure and these councils cannot afford a repeat of the indexation freeze;

(d)         cost shifting onto local governments places them under increasing pressure to deliver services and maintain assets previously provided by other tiers of government and for rural and regional councils the impact is magnified due to their limited ability to increase revenue;

(e)         the two main sources of funding for councils are rates and grants and as grant income declines, councils have had to fill the revenue gap by increasing rates or reducing services;

(f)          the ability of rural and regional councils to increase revenue via rates is limited due to a high proportion of ‘non-rateable’ land and a smaller population, and revenue raising via user charges for facilities, parking fees and development applications adopted by metropolitan councils is not an option for regional councils; and

(g)         rural and regional councils often have higher costs per capita than metropolitan councils, with:

(i)           older, more disadvantaged or more vulnerable populations, who require more services from councils;

(ii)         larger asset bases relative to the population;

(iii)        an environmental stewardship role, including responsibility for weed and pest animal management and flood mitigation infrastructure;

(iv)       more dispersed populations, which increase the amount of travel needed to deliver services or which require duplicate facilities to be provided in multiple locations to meet local needs; and

(v)         reduced competition among service providers and suppliers, which can increase costs for councils when purchasing goods and services; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         commit to the sustainability of rural and regional councils by guaranteeing the Financial Assistance Grants will not be subject to another indexation freeze;

(b)         work with the states and territories and local governments to review the funding methodology of Financial Assistance Grants so that distribution of funds supports the sustainability of rural and regional councils; and

(c)         support the development of regional strategic plans with the states and territories and local governments to guide investment and avoid cost shifting and duplication.

              ( Notice given 13 February 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

    14    Mr Giles : To move—That this House:

(1)         pays tribute to the work of the Jo Cox Foundation in the United Kingdom, and in particular recognises the role of the Jo Cox Commission on Loneliness;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         the bipartisan support for this work in the United Kingdom, and the response of the United Kingdom Government in appointing a Minister for Loneliness; and

(b)         that there is a similar problem in Australia, which carries significant adverse consequences, but this is less well understood than it should be, particularly concerning its impacts on younger Australians and the influence of social media;

(3)         notes the work of Australian academics and civil society in examining the extent and effects of loneliness on individuals and society; and

(4)         calls for a national response to loneliness in Australia, to better understand the scope of the challenge and to inform and support evidence based policy responses.

              ( Notice given 26 February 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

    15    Mr Hill : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges:

(a)         the Prime Minister’s persistent failure to resolve the ever growing gas crisis in Australia;

(b)         that this gas crisis is hurting Australian households and threatening manufacturing jobs all over the nation, especially in Victoria, NSW and Queensland;

(c)         that manufacturing companies around the nation have experienced:

(i)           between a tripling and quadrupling of the price they pay for Australian gas; and

(ii)         upwards of a 200 per cent increase in the price they pay for electricity;

(d)         that cost increases are seriously impacting on the ability of manufacturing companies to continue operations; and

(e)         that manufacturing companies around the nation are still unable to secure affordable gas supply contracts despite the Prime Minister’s handshake agreement with the gas companies in September 2017;

(2)         condemns the Prime Minister for failing to pull the export control trigger by November 2017 to ensure that Australian households and manufacturers are not being charged exorbitant prices for Australian gas;

(3)         recognises that the responsibility for every job lost in the manufacturing industry due to the skyrocketing price of Australian gas falls squarely with the Prime Minister and the Minister for the Environment and Energy; and

(4)         calls on the Government to act decisively now and find a solution to the gas crisis which is threatening jobs in the electoral division of Bruce and countless others around the nation.

              ( Notice given 26 February 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

    16    Mr Hill : To move—That this House acknowledges that there is no good reason to wait for the death of Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God Queen of Australia and Her other Realms and Territories, Head of the Commonwealth, in order to become a Republic.

              ( Notice given 26 February 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

    17    Ms McGowan : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that

(a)         on 29 November 2012, in the 43rd Parliament:

(i)           the House of Representatives endorsed a draft code of conduct for Members of Parliament contained in Appendix 5 of the Privileges and Members’ Interests Committee discussion paper of 23 November 2011;

(ii)         the House of Representatives requested the Leader of the House urgently bring forward proposed changes to standing orders and resolutions of the House necessary to give effect to the code of conduct; and

(iii)        the report of the Senate Standing Committee of Senators’ Interests code of conduct inquiry was tabled without debate, which concluded that the Senate should not adopt a code of conduct unless it is meaningful, workable and reasonably likely to be effective and did not recommend that the Senate adopt the code endorsed by the House of Representatives;

(b)         because the prospect of a uniform code of conduct was uncertain, the debate on a code of conduct reached a stalemate; and

(c)         no action has been taken since 2012 to implement a code of conduct for Members of Parliament;

(2)         notes that in democratic societies, codes of conduct are widely considered to be the norm for public officials in all aspects of governance:

(a)         the House of Commons in both the United Kingdom and Canada have codes of conduct;

(b)         most Australian public officials are subject to a code of conduct;

(c)         most state and territory legislatures have adopted codes of conduct and other prescribed measures to establish standards of conduct for members; and

(d)         most local councils have standards imposed, with many codes prescribed by law;

(3)         requests the Privileges and Members’ Interests Committee:

(a)         develop a code of conduct for Members of Parliament and their staff, giving consideration to:

(i)           the previously endorsed draft code of conduct contained in Appendix 5 of the Privileges and Members’ Interests Committee discussion paper of 23 November 2011;

(ii)         the terms of the Government’s existing Ministerial and Ministerial Staff codes of conduct, the Australian Public Service values and code of conduct and other relevant codes of conduct;

(iii)        consolidating the numerous provisions which regulate the conduct of Members and their staff; and

(iv)       any gaps in conduct or ethical matters not adequately addressed by the previously endorsed draft code of conduct;

(b)         consult with the equivalent committee in the Senate on the text of the code of conduct with the aim of developing a uniform code for Members and Senators and their staff; and

(c)         report back to the House by the beginning of the spring sittings in 2018;

(4)         requests the Standing Committee on Procedure:

(a)         develop proposed changes to standing orders and resolutions of the House necessary to give effect to a code of conduct, including:

(i)           procedures for considering complaints under the code of conduct; and

(ii)         the role of the Standing Committee of Privileges and Members’ Interests in oversight of the code;

(b)         consult with the equivalent committee in the Senate with the aim of developing uniform processes for implementation of a code of conduct for Members and Senators and their staff; and

(c)         report back to the House by the beginning of the spring sittings in 2018;

(5)         agrees that while developing a uniform code and process is the preferred approach, should one House decide not to implement a code of conduct, this will not preclude the other House from doing so; and

(6)         agrees that this resolution be communicated to the Senate for its concurrence in similar terms.

              ( Notice given 27 February 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

    18    Mr Ramsey : To move—That this House:

(1)         expresses its support for continued trials into suicide prevention in rural and regional Australia;

(2)         recognises:

(a)         the huge toll suicide takes on regional communities;

(b)         that people in regional areas are more likely to take their own lives than those in metropolitan areas;

(c)         that suicide is the leading cause of death in people aged between 15 and 44; and

(d)         that regional communities are affected by economic stress, the effects of natural disasters, isolation and loneliness, leading to increased risk of suicide;

(3)         encourages the National Suicide Prevention Strategy to:

(a)         commission regionally appropriate suicide prevention activities; and

(b)         identify young people at high risk of self-harm or suicide and support them; and

(4)         supports funding into mental health research and trials in electoral divisions across regional Australia, such as those conducted in Whyalla, Port Augusta, Port Pirie, Port Lincoln and Yorke Peninsula, in the electoral division of Grey.

              ( Notice given 28 February 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

    19    Mr Zappia : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         scams have a devastating impact on their victims, many of whom lose significant sums of money and sometimes their life savings;

(b)         the ACCC and the Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network (ACORN) combined received over 200,000 scam reports in 2016;

(c)         almost $300 million was reported lost to scams in 2016 through Scamwatch, ACORN and other programs;

(d)         scams often operate from overseas and impersonate Australian companies and government departments; and

(e)         to make the scam more convincing, scammers often use Australian telephone numbers through a Voice over Internet Protocol service, despite being located outside of Australia; and

(2)         calls on the Government to investigate whether restrictions can be placed on the allocation of Australian telephone numbers to overseas customers and other measures which may add to protections against scammers who use the telephone or internet to scam. 

              ( Notice given 27 February 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

    20    Ms Husar : To move—that this House:

(1)         acknowledges that the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS):

(a)         supports a better life for hundreds of thousands of Australians with a significant and permanent disability, and their families and carers; and

(b)         will provide about 460,000 Australians under the age of 65 with a permanent and significant disability with the reasonable and necessary supports they need to live an ordinary life;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         the NDIS began in a number of trial sites around Australia from July 2013;

(b)         the NDIS is now operational across Australia;

(c)         as at 31 December 2017, there were 132,743 participants with an approved plan with the NDIS and 9,523 children receiving support through the Early Childhood Early Intervention approach; and

(d)         the NDIS roll-out in Western Australia will commence 1 July 2018;

(3)         calls on the Government to urgently address delays and inadequacies in the NDIS operations and roll-out, including:

(a)         funding adequacy and access to the scheme;

(b)         NDIS plan approvals and plan renewals;

(c)         access to adequate health services, care and supports, housing and other essential services; and

(d)         ensuring that the pricing structure of the NDIS enables service providers to deliver high quality support to participants in the scheme including for group activities that are being threatened by the current model;

(4)         reaffirms its commitment to:

(a)         ensuring Australians with a disability continue to get the support they need;

(b)         the scheme roll-out continuing to ensure a smooth transition for people with disability and support providers; and

(c)         an adequately funded and resourced NDIS; and

(5)         encourages all Members of Parliament to support the NDIS roll-out and the access to support it provides to people with disability.

              ( Notice given 26 March 2018; amended 7 May 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

    21    Mr Christensen : To move—that this House recognises that:

(1)         the Australian Labor Party has abandoned workers in Queensland, to chase Green votes in Victoria;

(2)         Opposition Leader Bill Shorten:

(a)         tells workers in Queensland he is pro coal, and in Victoria that he is against it; and

(b)         promised green activist Geoff Cousins that he would tear up the approvals for the Adani Carmichael mine;

(3)         the opening up of the Galilee Basin has the potential to create over 16,000 jobs in Queensland;

(4)         the Australian Labor Party is gambling with the integrity of Australia and has created a sovereign risk; and

(5)         Australia should utilise its natural resources and encourage investment in our mining sector to create much needed jobs for regional areas.

              ( Notice given 26 March 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

      22    Mr Bandt : To present a Bill for an Act to amend the law in relation to air services, and for related purposes. ( Air Services Amendment Bill 2018 )

              ( Notice given 27 March 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

    23    Ms Sharkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         vehicle manufacturers that sell into the Australian market often limit access to service and repair information to independent repairers;

(b)         independent vehicle repairers having access to this technical information is important to ensure competition, and ultimately benefits consumers;

(c)         by limiting access to service and repair information, vehicle manufacturers are inflating the cost of servicing and repairs;

(d)         both the United States and the European Union have introduced laws to prevent this abuse of market power;

(e)         in December 2017 the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) released its New Car Retailing Industry market study; and

(f)          the ACCC recommends a mandatory scheme be introduced that sets out rules for car manufacturers to share technical information with independent repairers; and

(2)         calls on the Government to adopt the recommendations of the ACCC market study as a matter of urgency to support independent vehicle repairers.

              ( Notice given 27 March 2018. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

Orders of the day

         1    Fair Work Amendment (Terminating Enterprise Agreements) Bill 2017 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  11 September 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 21 May 2018. )

         2    Fair Work Amendment (Recovering Unpaid Superannuation) Bill 2017 ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  11 September 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 21 May 2018. )

         3    Renewable Fuel Bill 2017 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  11 September 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 21 May 2018. )

         4    Competition and Consumer Amendment (Exploitation of Indigenous Culture) Bill 2017 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  11 September 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 21 May 2018. )

         5    Israel: Resumption of debate ( from  11 September 2017 —Mrs Prentice ) on the motion of Mr Robert —That this House:

(1)         supports the right of Israel to defend its citizens against terrorist attacks by organisations or by individuals;

(2)         calls on the Palestinian Authority to cease incitement of its population to attack Israel and Israelis;

(3)         further calls on the Palestinian Authority to take seriously the task of educating its people on the options, process and potential for peace;

(4)         urges the Palestinian Authority to abide by the Oslo Accords and specifically to cease attacking Israel in an unfounded manner in international forums;

(5)         further urges the Israel and the Palestinian Authority to return to negotiations in good faith and without preconditions;

(6)         acknowledges and affirms the Jewish connection to the Jewish holy sites in Jerusalem and elsewhere in Israel; and

(7)         condemns the Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions movement as inherently anti-Semitic and calls on all Australian political parties and institutions to disavow it.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 21 May 2018. )

         6    Renewable Energy Legislation Amendment (Supporting Renewable Communities) Bill 2017 ( Ms McGowan ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  16 October 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

         7    Competition and Consumer Legislation Amendment (Small Business Access to Justice) Bill 2017 ( Dr Leigh ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  16 October 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

         8    Australia and the United States of America: Resumption of debate ( from  16 October 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Hastie —That this House:

(1)         recognises the strong historic relationship that exists between Australia and the United States of America;

(2)         acknowledges the Australia, New Zealand, United States Security Treaty, which for the past 65 years has provided for our mutual defence, anchored regional stability, and spurred economic growth;

(3)         notes the many ties that bind our nations together, in areas including:

(a)         intelligence and law enforcement, where information sharing and coordination are at all-time highs, which has led to the prevention of far more terrorist attacks than have occurred;

(b)         security cooperation, in which Australia has made valuable contributions in the past 15 years to the United States-led campaigns against terror in Afghanistan, Iraq and across the Middle East, noting as well that the United States Force Posture Initiatives in Australia, launched in 2012, have and will continue to enhance the readiness and interoperability of our militaries;

(c)         trade, with the Australia-United States Free Trade Agreement in particular having expanded the flow of fair, free, and high-standard trade between our countries for 12 years;

(d)         investment, recognising that the United States is Australia’s largest foreign investor, and the top destination for Australian investment, with mutual investment by the United States and Australia in each other’s economies having grown to nearly AUD$2 trillion; and

(e)         political engagement, including the frequent exchange of politicians, officials and dignitaries between our nations, recognising in particular that over the last three years alone, the President, Vice President, and half of the President’s cabinet has visited Australia, as well as more than 100 congressional delegations and prominent United States governors; and

(4)         affirms that our nations’ mutual and long-standing commitment to freedom, democracy and the pursuit of happiness will continue to guide and shape our relationship into the future, through both challenging and prosperous times ahead.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

         9    Catheter ablation: Resumption of debate ( from  16 October 2017 ) on the motion of Dr Freelander —that this House:

(1)         acknowledges the outstanding work of hearts4hearts and its CEO Ms Tanya Hall in promoting awareness and improved treatment of cardiac arrhythmias;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         atrial fibrillation affects at least 500,000 Australians and comes with high risk of stroke and heart failure with conventional treatments;

(b)         while many cardiovascular conditions have declined in mortality rates in the past years, the mortality rates for atrial fibrillation have almost doubled in the last two decades;

(c)         catheter ablation is the acknowledged best practice treatment;

(d)         there are long waiting lists for catheter ablation in the public hospital system and the treatment is not listed on the Prostheses List; and

(e)         up to 40,000 Australians could benefit from catheter ablation, including 13,000 on private health insurance; and

(3)         welcomes the recent announcement by the Minister for Health that the Government will consider changes to Prostheses List processes in order to account for catheter ablation and other non-implantable devices, but calls on the Minister to provide further details on this announcement, including a clear time line for implementation.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

      10    Medicinal Cannabis Legislation Amendment (Securing Patient Access) Bill 2017 ( from Senate ): Second reading ( from  19 October 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

      11    Coal-Fired Power Funding Prohibition Bill 2017 [No. 2] ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  23 October 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

      12    National Integrity Commission Bill 2017 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  23 October 2017 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

      13    White Ribbon Day: Resumption of debate ( from  23 October 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Hayes —That this House:

(1)         notes that 25 November 2017 is White Ribbon Day (WRD), the United Nations’ symbol of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women;

(2)         recognises that WRD aims to prevent violence against women by increasing public awareness and challenging attitudes and behaviours that allow violence to continue;

(3)         encourages all Australian men to join the ‘My Oath Campaign’ and take the oath: ‘I swear never to commit, excuse or remain silent about violence against women’;

(4)         understands that:

(a)         one in three women have experienced physical and/or sexual violence perpetrated by someone known to them;

(b)         each week approximately one woman is killed by a current or former partner; and

(c)         domestic and family violence is the principle cause of homelessness for women and their children;

(5)         acknowledges the high economic cost of violence against women, which is estimated to cost the Australian economy $21.7 billion a year; and

(6)         asks all Members to show their support for the principles of WRD by taking the oath and wearing a white ribbon or wristband on the day.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

      14    Tadeusz Kościuszko: Resumption of debate ( from  23 October 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Falinski —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         15 October 2017 marks the 200th anniversary of the death of Tadeusz Kosciuszko; and

(b)         on 22 June 2016 the Polish Sejm (the lower chamber of Polish Parliament) adopted a special resolution proclaiming 2017 ‘The Year of Tadeusz Kosciuszko’, leading to world wide celebrations under the patronage of UNESCO;

(2)         recognises Tadeusz Kosciuszko as an indomitable fighter for the universal values of freedom, liberty and equality;

(3)         acknowledges the importance of Tadeusz Kosciuszko to the 180,000 strong Polish community in Australia, marked by our naming of the highest mountain on Australian mainland after him; and

(4)         recognises the work of Kosciuszko Heritage Inc. whose mission is to promote Kosciuszko in Australia, and to organise activities aimed at commemorating this Polish national hero.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

      15    Fair Work Amendment (Improving National Employment Standards) Bill 2018 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  5 February 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

      16    Australia and Japan: Resumption of debate ( from  5 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr van Manen —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the importance of the trade and economic relationship between Australia and Japan;

(2)         welcomes the sixty year anniversary since the signing of the Australia-Japan Agreement on Commerce;

(3)         notes the significant opportunities offered by the Japan-Australia Economic Partnership Agreement for Australian exporters;

(4)         recognises and celebrates the significant role of Japanese investment in Australia’s economy, noting that this investment is creating and supporting Australian jobs;

(5)         notes the ongoing cooperation and commitment between Australia and Japan to open markets and a strong, rules-based global trading system; and

(6)         encourages the Australian Government to continue its economic cooperation with Japan to the mutual benefit of both countries, to create jobs and support prosperity in both our nations. 

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

      17    Domestic and family violence leave: Resumption of debate ( from  5 February 2018 ) on the motion of Ms Claydon —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         one in three Australian women have experienced physical violence since the age of 15; and

(b)         two thirds of women who experience violence are in paid employment;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         family violence isolates and excludes its victims and disconnects people from community, work, education, friends and family;

(b)         the trauma experienced by an employee facing family violence will be lessened if they have the support of an understanding and accommodating employer that offers domestic and family violence leave; and

(c)         access to a leave specifically allocated for situations of domestic and family violence protects employees from discrimination and allows them to maintain stable employment which increases their likelihood of leaving violent relationships;

(3)         commends the many private companies that already provide domestic and family violence leave, including Telstra, Virgin, Qantas and the National Australia Bank, to more than one million Australian workers;

(4)         condemns the Government for its public service bargaining policy which has resulted in the removal of domestic and family violence leave provisions in some public service enterprise agreements; and

(5)         calls on the Government to amend the National Employment Standards to include domestic and family violence leave as a universal workplace right.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

      18    Competition and Consumer Amendment (Free Range Eggs) Bill 2018 ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  12 February 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

      19    Modern slavery legislation: Resumption of debate ( from  12 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Crewther —That this House:

(1)         notes that modem slavery continues to devastate the lives of millions of people, with latest estimates of over 40 million people impacted across the world, including over 4,000 people in Australia;

(2)         acknowledges that the Government has one of the strongest responses to combat human trafficking and slavery around the world, delivered under the National Action Plan to Combat Human Trafficking and Slavery 2015-19;

(3)         notes that the Government:

(a)         remains committed to continuing to improve this response and recognises the importance of partnering with those on the frontline to combat this abhorrent crime;

(b)         initiated the inquiry into Australia establishing modern slavery legislation, led by the Foreign Affairs and Aid Sub-Committee of the Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade, which released its interim report in August 2017 making a number of recommendations and statements of in-principle support; and

(c)         following extensive consultation with business and civil society, and taking into account the Foreign Affairs and Aid Sub-Committee’s recommendations in its December 2017 final report, will introduce targeted legislation requiring large businesses to report on the actions they are taking to address modern slavery in their supply chains; and

(4)         calls on the House to support the Government’s modern slavery legislation when it is brought before the Parliament.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

      20    South Australian schools funding: Resumption of debate ( from  12 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Champion —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that the $210 million funding cut to South Australian schools in 2018 and 2019 means that schools will face significant cuts, which the South Australian Government has estimated to include:

(a)         $1,315,000 from Adelaide High School;

(b)         $882,000 from Craigmore High School;

(c)         $1,392,000 from Norwood Morialta High School;

(d)         $1,114,000 from Gawler and District College B-12;

(e)         $817,000 from Parafield Gardens High School;

(f)          $1,226,000 from Paralowie School;

(g)         $875,000 from Playford International College;

(h)         $512,000 from Nailsworth Primary School;

(i)           $731,000 from Glenelg Primary School;

(j)          $24,000 from South Australian School for Vision Impaired;

(k)         $1,165,000 from Roma Mitchell Secondary College;

(l)           $426,000 from Port Noarlunga Primary School; and

(m)       $863,000 from Thebarton Senior College; and

(2)         calls on the Australian Government to immediately reinstate the funding previously committed to South Australian schools.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

      21    Lieutenants ‘Breaker’ Morant, Handcock and Witton: Resumption of debate ( from  12 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Buchholz —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         approximately 16,000 Australians fought in the Boer War in contingents raised by the Australian colonies or the Commonwealth Government (after 1901), or joined British and South African colonial units;

(b)         Australians, Lieutenants Harry ‘Breaker’ Morant, Peter Handcock and George Witton served as volunteers in a South African irregular unit, the Bushveldt Carbineers, under British Military Command;

(c)         Lieutenants Morant, Handcock and Witton were found guilty at their courts martial for the death of 12 Boer prisoners even though they pleaded their actions were in accordance with orders of their British superiors; and

(d)         Lieutenants Morant and Handcock were executed on 27 February 1902, and Lieutenant Witton’s sentence commuted to life imprisonment, but he was released from prison in 1904 after representations from the then Australian Government and British parliamentarians, including Winston Churchill;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         that Lieutenants Morant, Handcock and Witton were convicted of committing a serious crime;

(b)         the serious deficiencies in the handling of the legal case against the three men, including the right to appeal their sentences by their legal advocate, Major James Francis Thomas, the opportunity to seek intervention by the Australian Government and the ability to contact their families to inform them of their plight;

(c)         the failure of British Military Command to implement the recommendations for mercy made by the courts martial to be applied equally to these men;

(d)         the findings of respected legal figures and community leaders who support this assessment; and

(e)         the ongoing emotional suffering this case has caused the descendants of Lieutenants Morant, Handcock and Witton; and

(3)         expresses:

(a)         sincere regret that Lieutenants Morant, Handcock and Witton were denied procedural fairness contrary to law and acknowledges that this had cruel and unjust consequences; and

(b)         sympathy to the descendants of these men as they were not tried and sentenced in accordance with the law of 1902.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

      22    Competition and Consumer Amendment (Misleading Representations About Broadband Speeds) Bill 2018 ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  26 February 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

      23    Banking Amendment (Rural Finance Reform) Bill 2018 ( Ms McGowan ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  26 February 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

      24    Eighty-fifth anniversary of Holodomor: Resumption of debate ( from  26 February 2018 ) on the motion of Mr Crewther —That this House:

(1)         notes that commemorations are underway for the eighty-fifth anniversary of Holodomor, to mark an enforced famine in Ukraine caused by the deliberate actions of Joseph Stalin’s Communist Government of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics;

(2)         recalls that it is estimated that up to seven million Ukrainians starved to death as a result of Stalin’s policies in 1932 and 1933 alone;

(3)         condemns these acts aimed at destroying the national, cultural, religious and democratic aspirations of the Ukrainian people;

(4)         condemns all similar acts during the twentieth century as the ultimate manifestations of racial, ethnic or religious hatred and violence;

(5)         honours the memory of those who lost their lives during Holodomor;

(6)         joins the Australian Ukrainian community and the international community in commemorating this tragic milestone under the motto Ukraine Remembers—The World Acknowledges;

(7)         recognises the importance of remembering and learning from such dark chapters in human history to ensure that such crimes against humanity are not allowed to be repeated; and

(8)         pays its respects to the Australian Ukrainians that lived through this tragedy and have told their horrific stories.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

      25    Higher Education Support Amendment (National Regional Higher Education Strategy) Bill 2018 ( Ms McGowan ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  26 March 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

      26    Fair Work Amendment (Better Work/Life Balance) Bill 2018 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  26 March 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

      27    Fair Work Amendment (Tackling Job Insecurity) Bill 2018 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  26 March 2018 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 May 2018. )

 

 

 

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS has precedence each Monday in the House of Representatives Chamber from 10.10 am to 12 noon; and in the Federation Chamber from 11 am to 1.30 pm and 4.45 pm to 7.30 pm (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS has precedence from the conclusion of consideration of committee and delegation business each Monday (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

The SELECTION COMMITTEE is responsible for arranging the timetable and order of committee and delegation business and private Members’ business for each sitting Monday. Any private Members’ business not called on, or consideration of private Members’ business or committee and delegation business which has been interrupted and not re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays, shall be removed from the Notice Paper (standing order 42).