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PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS —continued

Notices given for Thursday, 11 February 2016

    *1    Mr Entsch : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Tibetan Plateau is:

                                                          (i)       the largest source of freshwater beyond the Arctic and Antarctic; 

                                                        (ii)       a major driver of the global climate;

                                                       (iii)       the source of most of Asia’s major rivers; and

                                                      (iv)       an area of great significance to the global environment; and

(b)         traditional nomadic herding has provided Tibetans with resilient livelihoods and ensured the health of Tibetan grasslands, including maintaining biodiversity and soil carbon;

(2)         expresses concern that:

(a)         Tibetan nomads are leaving the grasslands and that their displacement will have harmful impacts on their livelihood and culture as well as on Tibet’s fragile environment; and

(b)         construction of large dams and water diversion projects in the headwater regions will impact the environment and the livelihood of millions of people in the region;

(3)         notes China’s many positive steps towards addressing the challenges of climate change, including reducing dependence on coal; and

(4)         calls for acknowledgement of the:

(a)         important role Tibetan nomads play in ensuring the health of Tibetan grasslands; and

(b)         importance of Tibetans having a say over decisions that affect their land and livelihoods.

              ( Notice given 10 February 2016. )

    *2    Mr Champion : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the:

(a)         importance of the Australian food, beverage and grocery manufacturing sector for driving Australian employment, with the industry employing over 322,000 Australians in 2014-15;

(b)         contribution that the Australian food, beverage and grocery manufacturing sector makes to the economy, including a turnover of $118.8 billion worth of goods in 2013-14; and

(c)         potential for growth of the Australian food, beverage and grocery manufacturing sector in overseas markets;

(2)         congratulates the Australian Food and Grocery Council for its ongoing advocacy for Australian food and grocery manufacturing and jobs; and

(3)         continues to show support for Australian manufacturing by buying and promoting Australian manufactured goods.

              ( Notice given 10 February 2016. )

Notices —continued

       1    Mr Albanese : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges:

(a)         that the productivity, sustainability and liveability of our cities face emerging pressures relating to urban growth as Australia continues to transform into a knowledge intensive economy;

(b)         that the agglomerative effects of this are already being felt keenly in our capital cities, which suffer from traffic congestion and an unprecedented growth in house prices;

(c)         that new technologies:

                                                          (i)       have ensured our communities are more connected and more engaged than ever before; and

                                                        (ii)       provide critical opportunities for city leaders to foster entrepreneurship and innovation;

(d)         the benefits of attracting the next generation of start-ups while using new ways to promote small local businesses on a national and international stage, and the consequent uplift in productivity for our cities in regional and urban areas;

(2)         congratulates Parramatta City Council and the Future Cities Collaborative on their announcement that they will host a city leaders summit on Smart Cities for the Greater Sydney Metropolitan Area on 10 November 2015; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         re-establish the Major Cities Unit;

(b)         encourage the development of second and third central business districts in our capital cities and support opportunities for innovation and entrepreneurship;

(c)         through COAG, develop policy levers to help create the best set of conditions for innovation to flourish, looking at best practice models from around the world;

(d)         assess ways to ensure regulations keep up to date with new ideas and technologies;

(e)         work with city leaders to ensure the promotion and support of local small businesses; and

(f)          recognise the emergence of Smart Cities globally and the contribution they can make to cities in regional and urban areas around Australia.

              ( Notice given 7 September 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 22 February 2016. )

       2    Mr S. P. Jones : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         crystal methamphetamine or ‘ice’ is tearing apart vulnerable communities across Australia;

(b)         the head of the National Ice Taskforce and former Victorian Police Commissioner, Mr Ken Lay, has noted that rural communities want the focus of an ice strategy to be on primary prevention and harm reduction; and

(c)         the Minister for Justice has repeatedly said that we cannot ‘arrest our way out’ of the problem of ice use;

(2)         recognises that Western Australia—the state with the nation’s highest rate of amphetamine use—is struggling to contain the effects of this harmful drug and as a result:

(a)         police statistics show Armadale has one of the highest crime rates in the Perth metropolitan area with 571 assaults and 377 home burglaries in the year to June; and

(b)         treatment services in the electoral division of Canning including Hope Community Services and the Palmerston Association are under significant pressure, particularly given ongoing funding uncertainty caused by the Government’s budget cuts and mishandling of the sector’s future direction;

(3)         acknowledges that the Western Australian Government has no plan to address ice and that the Premier should have been working with the Australian Government to tackle ice-related crime and health issues resulting from abuse of the drug;

(4)         matches Labor’s commitment to provide $3.2 million to assist communities in the electoral division of Canning to combat ice use, including:

(a)         providing $200,000 to install new closed circuit television cameras in crime hot spots in Armadale and Mandurah;

(b)         ensuring access to illicit drug and alcohol rehabilitation, treatment and prevention services by providing $2.7 million to the Palmerston Association and Hope Community Services to guarantee funding for these services to 2019; and

(c)         investing $270,000 in the Peel Community Legal Services which offers support for women and children escaping domestic and family violence, recognising the impact of alcohol and drug related violence in the community;

(5)         reverses $800 million in budget cuts to the Department of Health’s flexible funds, which includes the Substance Misuse Prevention and Service Improvement Grants Fund and Substance Misuse Service Delivery Grants Fund, as these funds support alcohol and illicit drug treatment, rehabilitation and prevention services;

(6)         provides certainty and security for workers in treatment services on the frontline by extending funding under the Non Government Organisation Treatment Grants Program beyond 2015-16; and

(7)         releases the Department of Health’s review of drug and alcohol prevention and treatment in Australia, which was handed to the Government 7 July 2014.

              ( Notice given 7 September 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 22 February 2016. )

       3    Mr Wilkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         in the previous Parliament (31 May 2012), on the motion of the Member for Denison, the House resolved to:

                                                          (i)       acknowledge the large number of mothers and fathers with serious grievances with family law and the child support system;

                                                        (ii)       note that there had not been a comprehensive review of the child support system since the 2005 report In the Best Interests of Children—Reforming the Child Support Scheme ;

                                                       (iii)       call on the Government to undertake a comprehensive review of family law and the child support system; and

                                                      (iv)       recommend that the terms of reference of this review be formulated to ensure that the safety and wellbeing of children is paramount;

(b)         the Member for Denison gave notice of a further motion of this nature this Parliament (26 February 2015); and

(c)         a review has not taken place;

(2)         notes that, although the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Social Policy and Legal Affairs in this Parliament conducted an inquiry into the Child Support Program (CSP), it was not an holistic and detailed review of both child support and family law; and

(3)         calls on the Government to honour the will of the previous Parliament and commission a comprehensive root and branch review of family law and the CSP with sufficient mandate to effectively consider the interaction between these systems.

              ( Notice given 8 September 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 22 February 2016. )

       4    Mr Bandt : To move—That this House:

(1)         takes note of the recent reports of widespread exploitation of workers within 7-Eleven stores across Australia;

(2)         expresses concern at reports that 7-Eleven has been systematically underpaying employees, paying as little as half the minimum wage and threatening foreign workers with deportation; and

(3)         calls on the Government to grant a visa amnesty to affected workers who make underpayment complaints or make submissions to the Senate inquiry into the impact of Australia’s temporary work visa programs on the Australian labour market and on the temporary work visa holders.

              ( Notice given 9 September 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 22 February 2016. )

       5    Mr Danby : To move—That this House calls on the Minister for Foreign Affairs to debate in Parliament:

(1)         the merits of the Government’s changing policy toward Iran, including the rationale and likely consequences of:

(a)         signing an intelligence sharing agreement with Iran, given Iran’s financial, military and intelligence support of regional militias, including some proscribed by the Australian Parliament; and

(b)         allowing Iran to establish consulates or ‘cultural centres’ in Melbourne and Sydney, given the history of terrorism-supporting activities from similar Iranian outposts around the world; and

(2)         any move to amend Australia’s autonomous sanctions in regard to Iran before such a decision is taken.

              ( Notice given 15 September 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

       6    Mr Danby : To move—That this House:

(1)         condemns the ideology and actions of DAISH, including the:

(a)         brutal and systematic rape of and sexual violence towards women and children, including the trafficking of these women and girls;

(b)         use of sadistic violence as a means of oppression; and

(c)         ongoing, genocidal destruction of culture including the destruction of historical artefacts and sites of cultural significance; and

(2)         calls on the international community to do all that it can to bring an end to these horrific acts perpetrated by DAISH and bring all of those involved to justice.

              ( Notice given 17 September 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

       7    Ms MacTiernan : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes the following evidence given at the Senate Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee public hearing into the decision to commit funding to the Perth Freight Link project in Fremantle on 7 October 2015: that,

(a)         the benefit-cost ratio given in Infrastructure Australia’s assessment of the project was based on a ‘reference option’, not the final route;

(b)         a key chart in the Main Roads Western Australia business case executive summary for the Perth Freight Link showing a new outer harbour coming online in 2022 was ‘not a projection’ and ‘not a forecast’;

(c)         the full capacity of Fremantle inner harbour is 1.2 million to 1.4 million 20 foot equivalent units, not the 1.7 million claimed by the Western Australian Premier and Treasurer;

(d)         the Western Australian Government’s stated target of 30 per cent freight-on-rail would not be attainable, despite this target being used as a justification for delaying the outer harbour development and instead building the Perth Freight Link; and

(e)         the project proposal report seeking funding approval for Section 1 is likely to be made before the nature and scope of Section 2 is decided, making a proper benefit-cost ratio impossible to determine;

(2)         notes that of the 219 written submissions to the Senate Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee inquiry into the Perth Freight Link, just four supported the project; and

(3)         calls on the Prime Minister to commission a full and transparent review of the Perth Freight Link in light of the contradictory evidence given at the Senate hearing and the overwhelming opposition to the project.

              ( Notice given 12 October 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 7 February 2016. )

       8    Mr Danby : To move—That this House calls on the:

(1)         Minister for Foreign Affairs to debate in Parliament the Australian Government’s changing policy in relation to Iran and Syria, including:

(a)         the nature and rationale of any proposed intelligence sharing agreement with Iran, and the rationale and likely consequences of entering into such an agreement given Iran’s financial, military and intelligence support of regional militias, including some proscribed by the Australian Parliament, such as Hezbollah;

(b)         the change in Government policy, from calling for the removal of Syrian President Bashar Hafez al-Assad as a necessary step for a stable political transition agreed to by all opposition groups, to one aligned with the Russian, Iranian and Hezbollah position that President Assad is seen as part of the political solution to that country’s civil war;

(c)         the Minister for Foreign Affair’s statements on Syria that ‘Russia’s involvement is positive’, in light of Russian airstrikes and Russian, Iranian and Hezbollah military attacks against moderate western backed and non Daesh (IS) rebels in Syria; and

(d)         concerns that the Minister for Foreign Affair’s backing of Iranian and Russian involvement in Syria, and particularly, the Government’s false claim that ‘the West’ must choose between President Assad and Daesh, are making British and American diplomatic efforts towards viable political transition more difficult;

(2)         Government to:

(a)         withdraw Australian Army trainers from the Taji military complex if, as a result of Iraqi-Iranian military cooperation, Iraq’s apparent participation in a pact with Russia, Syria and Iran, and the Australian Army trainers and Special Forces being redeployed to arm and train non PKK Kurds in northern Iraq, aid our fight against Daesh; and

(b)         call on Russia to negotiate with Turkey, Europe and the United States on a no fly zone and humanitarian corridor in northern Syria, and, along with Iran and Hezbollah, cease its attacks on non Daesh rebels;

(3)         Minister for Foreign Affairs to debate in Parliament any move to amend Australia’s autonomous sanctions in relation to Iran before such a decision is taken; and

(4)         Government to defer any permission for Iran to establish an increased diplomatic presence in Australia until there is evidence that Iran ceases to support proscribed terrorist organisations, especially given the history of terrorism supporting activities by Iranian diplomats around the world.

              ( Notice given 13 October 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

       9    Mrs Prentice : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that Australia is a prosperous nation with a high standard of living and low levels of poverty by international standards;

(2)         recognises that despite our national prosperity, poverty remains an issue for some Australians;

(3)         notes that 11 to 17 October is Anti-Poverty Week, a week where all Australians are encouraged to organise or take part in activities to highlight and overcome poverty in Australia and overseas;

(4)         understands that the main aims of Anti-Poverty Week are to:

(a)         strenthen public understanding of the causes and consequences of poverty and hardship; and

(b)         encourage research, discussion and action to address these problems, including action by individuals, communities, organisations and governments; and

(5)         commends the organisers and sponsors of Anti-Poverty Week for their ongoing efforts to raise awareness and take action to address poverty.

              ( Notice given 13 October 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

    10    Ms McGowan : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the report of the National Review of Mental Health Programmes and Services (the Review) was delivered to the Government on 1 December 2014; and

(b)         the Review:

                                                          (i)       reveals a wide gap between the wellbeing and mental health of Indigenous Australians to other Australians, in particular, the death from suicide being twice that of non-Indigenous Australians; and

                                                        (ii)       made recommendations across five areas which are aimed at transforming the mental health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         make Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health a national priority; and

(b)         introduce an additional COAG Closing the Gap target specifically for mental health.

              ( Notice given 12 November 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

    11    Ms Claydon : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that the:

(a)         16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence is a global campaign to raise awareness about violence against women and its impact on a woman’s physical, psychological, social and spiritual wellbeing;

(b)         international campaign originated from the first Women’s Global Leadership Institute coordinated by the Center for Women’s Global Leadership in 1991; and

(c)         16 Days of Activism begins on 25 November—the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, and ends on 10 December—the International Human Rights Day; and

(2)         urges all Members of Parliament to be leaders in their community in the campaign to end violence against women and girls by taking part in activities in their electorates that raise awareness of this important issue.

              ( Notice given 23 November 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

    12    Mr Williams : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises tourism is a major strength of the Australian economy, which:

(a)         generates around $100 billion a year; and

(b)         employs more than one million Australians in 270,000 businesses;

(2)         celebrates Australia being ranked among the top 10 countries in the world in the Lonely Planet’s Best in Travel 2016;

(3)         recognises our tourism industry is one of Australia’s top export sectors with significant growth opportunities from the Asian middle class; and

(4)         welcomes the Government’s ongoing commitment to the sector with the announcement of a Minister with the sole responsibility for Tourism. 

              ( Notice given 25 November 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

    13    Ms McGowan : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that the Government:

(a)         did not provide a ministerial regional impact statement in the 2014-15 budget;

(b)         has not issued a regional statement for Australia;

(c)         has not established a Standing Committee on Regional Australia or a Department of Regional Australia; and

(d)         issued a ministerial statement, Partnership for Regional Growth 2015-16 , in the 2015-16 budget, which outlined key government initiatives in regional Australia by portfolio but did not include a regional impact statement in general or by portfolio;

(2)         calls on the Government to publicly release and table a regional Australia statement together with each budget economic and fiscal outlook report and each mid-year economic and fiscal outlook report; and

(3)         notes that the regional Australia statement should provide information to allow the assessment of the impact of Government policy decisions on regional Australia, and have regard to the:

(a)         economic, social, cultural and environmental impacts of government initiatives;

(b)         economic drivers of regional communities;

(c)         disproportionate effect that government initiatives may have in regional communities due to a lack of infrastructure, including:

                                                          (i)       mobile phone coverage;

                                                        (ii)       reliable internet connections; and

                                                       (iii)       access to public transport;

(d)         lack of access that people living in regional communities have to government services due to cost and long travel distances and times; and

(e)         effect that lack of competition in regional communities has on the:

                                                          (i)       cost of living and doing business in regional communities; and

                                                        (ii)       cost and difficulty involved in complying with regulatory requirements for people and businesses in regional communities.

              ( Notice given 1 December 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

    14    Ms McGowan : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         a recent Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation Rural Industry Futures report, with the CSIRO, explores five megatrends set to affect Australian agriculture over the next two decades;

(b)         the most relevant is the transformative technologies trend, whereby a boom in scientific advances will change the way we do agriculture; and

(c)         the provision of stable, high speed internet to rural and regional Australia is needed to enable farmers to take advantage of these emerging technological trends; and

(2)         calls on the Government to support:

(a)         innovation and entrepreneurship in agriculture by continuing to invest in the development of emerging technological products; and

(b)         farm businesses to get the maximum benefit from technology to increase agricultural productivity in Australia.

              ( Notice given 1 December 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

    15    Mr Perrett : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         prior to the passage of the Parliamentary Privileges Act 1987 the Houses of the Australian Parliament had the power to expel a Senator or Member of the House of Representatives;

(b)         the expulsion of a Member of this House is the most drastic of sanctions;

(c)         on 11 November 1920, the then Member for Kalgoorlie, Mr Hugh Mahon, was expelled from this House; and

(d)         Mr Mahon is the only Member to have ever been expelled from this House;

(2)         acknowledges that Mr Mahon was expelled:

(a)         by a motion brought on hastily and with limited time for debate;

(b)         by a vote of the House on party lines; and

(c)         without the due process and procedural fairness that such an important issue deserves; and

(3)         recognises that:

(a)         it was unjust on the limited evidence for the institution to which Mr Mahon had been democratically elected to reverse the decision of his constituents; and

(b)         the expulsion of Mr Mahon was a misuse of the power then invested in the House.

              ( Notice given 2 December 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

    16    Ms A. E. Burke : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         nuclear weapons are the only weapons of mass destruction not yet prohibited by an international convention;

(b)         140 nations support the goal of a treaty banning nuclear weapons, including 121 nations that have already signed the Humanitarian Pledge to enshrine this goal as part of international law;

(c)         128 nations at a recently concluded session of the United Nations General Assembly’s First Committee voted in favour of an Austrian-sponsored resolution to ‘fill the legal gap’ for the prohibition and elimination of nuclear weapons on the same basis as all other outlawed forms of mass destruction;

(d)         despite this, Australia voted against the latter resolution and also abstained from voting on a Mexican-sponsored resolution to establish a United Nations working group to begin discussing the possible elements for a treaty banning nuclear weapons that will convene this year for three weeks;

(e)         the World Medical Association declared that it has a duty to work for the elimination of nuclear weapons ‘to preserve and safeguard the health of the patient and to consecrate itself to the service of humanity’; and

(f)          the risks and catastrophic consequences of a nuclear weapon explosion are significantly greater than previously recognised and can only be guaranteed to be avoided by the abolition of all nuclear weapons;

(2)         acknowledges that Australia:

(a)         has made a significant and important contribution towards measures that have enhanced world peace, including helping to form the United Nations;

(b)         has been a strong advocate of the Non-Proliferation Treaty since signing it in 1968;

(c)         signed and ratified the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty 1996; and

(d)         is one of 13 nations that comprise the South Pacific Nuclear-Free Zone; and

(3)         calls upon the Government to support a parliamentary debate on the next steps for Australia to support a time-bound and legally binding agreement to bring all nuclear armed states into the disarmament process and prohibit and eliminate nuclear weapons.

              ( Notice given 2 February 2016. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

Orders of the day continued

         1    National Stroke Week: Resumption of debate ( from  7 September 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs McNamara —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         National Stroke Week:

                                                          (i)       will run this year from 14 to 20 September; and

                                                        (ii)       is about raising awareness to prevent stroke in Australia; and

(b)         the National Stroke Foundation encourages all Australians to:

                                                          (i)       be aware of what stroke is, how to recognise a stroke and what to do;

                                                        (ii)       live healthy to reduce the risk of stroke; and

                                                       (iii)       get a regular health check;

(2)         acknowledges the:

(a)         launch in June 2015, by the Minister for Health, of the Acute Stroke Clinical Care Standard; and

(b)         bi-partisan work done by past governments in the area of stroke; and

(3)         notes the requirement for greater awareness and promotion of the prevention of stroke within the Australian community.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 22 February 2016. )

         2    National Broadband Network: Resumption of debate ( from  7 September 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Ryan —That this House:

(1)         places on the record that:

(a)         the National Broadband Network (NBN) is rolling out too slowly under the current Government, and there are many difficulties being faced by constituents who are trying to access and connect to the NBN;

(b)         areas without the NBN are facing significant obstacles in accessing internet services, including ADSL and wireless;

(c)         Australians are being left in the dark by this Government about when they will have access to the NBN, with some areas being removed from the NBN roll out map without explanation and with no information forthcoming; and

(d)         the Government’s second rate NBN will not be sufficient to meet future demand, and will need to be upgraded in the future at great cost; and

(2)         recognises that access to the NBN is a necessity for all Australian businesses, students and individuals, and Australians deserve better than a second rate NBN.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 22 February 2016. )

         3    Tourism and small businesses: Resumption of debate ( from  7 September 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs Griggs —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the northern Australians working within the tourism industry, which plays a vital role in supporting the northern Australian economy;

(2)         recognises that tourist spending provides further opportunities for local small businesses within the community; and

(3)         notes that:

(a)         the Government is investing in small businesses through its Jobs and Small Business Package released in the 2015 budget; and

(b)         this package provides small businesses, including most businesses within the tourism industry, with much needed assistance to grow and create jobs.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 22 February 2016. )

         4    Trade Marks Amendment (Iconic Symbols of National Identity) Bill 2015 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  14 September 2015 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

         5    7-Eleven employees: Resumption of debate ( from  14 September 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Champion —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the recent media investigation on the ABC program Four Corners about the abuse of 7-Eleven employees;

(b)         complaints against the 7-Eleven franchise included employees being underpaid and forced to breach their visa requirements and work very long hours without a break; and

(c)         these reports and the employment practices of 7-Eleven franchisees have caused significant community concern which must be addressed; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         take immediate action to address the abuse of workers across the 7-Eleven franchise network; and

(b)         ensure that workers that were forced by their employers to breach their visa conditions are not penalised.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

         6    Northern Australia’s economic development: Resumption of debate ( from  14 September 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs Griggs —That this House:

(1)         commends the fantastic work that the Minister for Trade and Investment and the Government are doing to make northern Australia’s economic development a priority;

(2)         notes that the Northern Australia Investment Forum, the next stepping stone in bringing Australia’s broader strengths to northern Australia, will focus on:

(a)         the important initiatives highlighted in the White Paper on Developing Northern Australia to help business capitalise on the region’s strengths by removing barriers to investment; and

(b)         showcase investment opportunities on offer and in prospect in the north; and

(3)         recognises:

(a)         that northern Australia accounts for a significant share of Australia’s exports with more than half of Australia’s sea exports leaving via northern ports;

(b)         that the north will account for 42 per cent of the Australian economy by 2040, up from 35 per cent in 2011; and

(c)         the exciting potential for increased investment, trade, infrastructure and agriculture production in the north and the job opportunities this could create.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

         7    Western Australian economy: Resumption of debate ( from  14 September 2015 ) on the motion of Ms MacTiernan —That the House:

(1)         recognises the failure of the Western Australian and Australian governments to manage the Western Australian economy;

(2)         notes that under the Western Australian and Australian governments in Western Australia:

(a)         unemployment reached its highest rate in 13 years at 6.4 per cent, with 59,000 more Western Australians out of work since the Liberal Party formed government in Western Australia;

(b)         business investment dropped 12.7 per cent over the year to June 2015;

(c)         state final demand fell by 3.6 per cent in the year to June 2015;

(d)         the state’s credit rating was downgraded by Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s;

(e)         business and consumer confidence are at record low levels;

(f)          state net debt has blown out from $3.6 billion in 2008 when the Liberal Party formed government in Western Australia to $30 billion in 2015; and

(g)         cost of living increased sharply by 54.3 per cent; and

(3)         condemns the:

(a)         Australian Government for:

                                                          (i)       cutting $3.1 billion from Western Australian schools and $5.8 billion from hospitals over 10 years; and

                                                        (ii)       removing the level playing field from Western Australia in the manufacture of offshore patrol vessels; and

(b)         Western Australian and Australian governments for squandering the mining boom and failing to diversify the Western Australian economy and create a jobs and growth plan for the future.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

         8    Criminal Code Amendment (Private Sexual Material) Bill 2015 ( Mr Watts ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  12 October 2015 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

         9    Fair Work Amendment (Recovery of Unpaid Amounts for Franchisee Employees) Bill 2015 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  12 October 2015 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      10    Temporary work visas: Resumption of debate ( from  12 October 2015 —Mr Hutchinson, in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Zappia —That this House:

(1)         notes that as at:

(a)         31 March 2015 there were over 106,000 primary Temporary Work (Skilled) (subclass 457) visa holders in Australia;

(b)         31 December 2014 there were over 160,000 Working Holiday (subclass 417) and Work and Holiday (subclass 462) visa holders in Australia; and

(c)         30 June 2014 there were an estimated 62,100 unlawful non-citizens in Australia;

(2)         further notes that:

(a)         in August 2015 there were around 780,000 Australians who were unemployed and that 280,000 of those were aged 15 to 24; and

(b)         the Senate is currently conducting an inquiry, the completion date of which was recently extended to February 2016, into the impact of Australia’s temporary work visa programs on the Australian labour market and on the temporary work visa holders;

(3)         ensures that genuine labour market testing be applied to temporary work visas; and

(4)         calls on the Government to ensure that the Department of Immigration and Border Protection has sufficient resources to properly ensure compliance with Australian visa conditions.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      11    Social Security (Administration) Amendment (Consumer Lease Exclusion) Bill 2015 ( Ms Macklin ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  19 October 2015 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      12    Fair Work Amendment (Prohibiting Discrimination Based On Location) Bill 2015 ( Mr Christensen ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  19 October 2015 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      13    Industry Innovation and Competitiveness Agenda: Resumption of debate ( from  19 October 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Marino —That this House:

(1)         notes that the jobs of the future will require science, technology, engineering and mathematics skills;

(2)         welcomes the Government’s ongoing investment of $9.7 billion in science, research and innovation; and

(3)         acknowledges that the Government is:

(a)         delivering on its promised Industry Innovation and Competitiveness Agenda; and

(b)         putting science at the centre of industry.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      14    Payday lending and consumer leases: Resumption of debate ( from  19 October 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Parke —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         there is considerable evidence that payday lending and consumer leases are not properly regulated and that both financial practices are causing serious harm to low income Australians;

(b)         irresponsible and immoral lending is endemic in the payday lending industry, which is growing rapidly and developing new online opportunities to encourage people to borrow with insufficient consideration of their capacity to bear the exorbitant and poorly regulated interest costs that payday lending involves;

(c)         the Australian Securities and Investment Commission review of payday lending found that 24 per cent of loans were taken out by Centrelink customers and 54 per cent were taken out by customers who had two or more payday loans in the previous 90 days, a clear indication that they are caught in a cycle of repeat borrowing;

(d)         consumer leases can involve an effective annualised interest rate of 240 per cent, and generally mean that vulnerable consumers pay three or four times the value of basic household items like refrigerators or washing machines;

(e)         consumer leases operate with lower consumer protection standards under the National Credit Code, though such agreements are not materially different in effect from credit contracts;

(f)          in 2013-14 nearly half of Radio Rentals’ $197 million revenue was received through the Centrepay system which allows payments to be directly debited from a consumer’s Centrelink account; and

(g)         Senator Cameron has brought a private Senators’ bill that seeks to remove consumer leases from access to the Centrepay system; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         ensure that the recently announced review into the 2013 reforms to payday lending focuses on securing the wellbeing and protection of low income Australians irrespective of the effect this has on the profits of companies that practice this kind of often predatory lending;

(b)         act quickly to stop consumer leases being used to prey on vulnerable and low income Australian households by ensuring that consumer leases are subject to the same standards and controls as credit contracts, and by introducing stricter controls on the currently outrageous and indefensible costs involved in such arrangements, including the requirement to prominently disclose the total cost of all contracts; and

(c)         support Senator Cameron’s initiative in removing access to Centrepay for consumer lease companies and amend section 123TC of the Social Security (Administration) Act 1999 to include a definition of consumer leases for this purpose.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      15    Remembrance Day: Resumption of debate ( from  9 November 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs Prentice —That this House:

(1)         recognises that Wednesday, 11 November marks Remembrance Day, the 97th anniversary of the Armistice which ended World War I;

(2)         commemorates the sacrifice of the more than 60,000 Australians who were killed in World War I, and the 156,000 wounded, gassed or taken prisoner;

(3)         recognises the contribution of the more than 1,000 Indigenous Australians who fought in World War I;

(4)         notes that by the number of deaths and casualties, World War I remains the most costly conflict in Australian history; and

(5)         calls on all Australians to observe one minute’s silence at 11 am, in memory of those who have died or suffered in wars and conflict. 

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      16    International Year of Soils: Resumption of debate ( from  9 November 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Fitzgibbon —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that the United Nations General Assembly has declared 2015 as the International Year of Soils (IYS);

(2)         notes that:

(a)         the IYS aims to be a platform for raising awareness of the importance of sustainable soil management as the basis for food systems, fuel and fibre production, essential ecosystem functions and better adaptation to climate change for present and future generations; and

(b)         the objectives of the IYS are to:

                                                          (i)       create awareness of the fundamental roles of soils for human life;

                                                        (ii)       achieve recognition of the prominent contributions of soils to food security, climate change adaptation and mitigation, essential ecosystem services, poverty alleviation and sustainable development;

                                                       (iii)       promote effective policies and actions for the sustainable management and protection of soil resources;

                                                      (iv)       educate decision makers about the need for robust investment in sustainable soil management activities aimed at healthy soils for different land users and population groups; and

                                                        (v)       advocate for rapid enhancement of capacities and systems for soil information collection and monitoring at all levels (global, regional and national); and

(3)         commits to promoting the importance of healthy soils and encouraging the adoption of regenerative landscape management practices throughout the year, including celebration of World Soil Day on 5 December 2015.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      17    Adhesive arachnoiditis: Resumption of debate ( from  9 November 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Irons —That this House:

(1)         recognises that thousands of Australians received a spinal injection of the chemical dye Iophendylate (marked as Pantopaque and Myodil) and that many now suffer from the painful disease adhesive arachnoiditis;

(2)         acknowledges the recommendations in the report Living with the pain of adhesive arachnoiditis: Report on the roundtable into adhesive arachnoiditis presented by the Standing Committee on Health and Ageing on 11 February 2013 and calls for all recommendations to be implemented; and

(3)         encourages all Members of Parliament to be aware of the condition and support members of their community suffering from adhesive arachnoiditis.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      18    Rural and regional newspapers: Resumption of debate ( from  9 November 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Champion —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the importance of rural and regional newspapers in providing a vital service to the towns and regional communities they cover; and

(b)         that maintaining a viable rural and regional press is in the interest of regional communities; and

(2)         recommends that the Government:

(a)         considers reviewing the amount of government advertising in regional papers;

(b)         recognises the significance of its decisions regarding government advertising and the impact that these decisions can have on regional publications; and

(c)         stops discriminating against newspapers which service rural and regional areas through its changes to government advertising.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      19    Urannah Dam: Resumption of debate ( from  9 November 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Christensen —That this House:

(1)         congratulates the Government on its support of development in north and central Queensland with its White Paper on Developing Northern Australia;

(2)         acknowledges the contribution of the Government to:

(a)         water infrastructure in north Australia through its $500 million National Water Infrastructure Development Fund; and

(b)         key infrastructure in north Australia through its $5 billion Northern Australia Infrastructure Facility;

(3)         congratulates the Government on its support of water projects throughout northern Australia including Nullinga Dam and the development of the Ord River Irrigation Scheme;

(4)         calls on the Government to support the construction of the Urannah Dam;

(5)         notes that the:

(a)         damming of Urannah Creek in the Whitsunday region would open up 30,000 hectares of new agricultural land;

(b)         new agricultural land will have the potential to triple the current cane production industry in the region and double the size of other agricultural production; and

(c)         Urannah Dam will develop water sources and power supplies to service the growing mining and agricultural industries in the Whitsunday region;

(6)         further notes that the:

(a)         development of the project has the potential to double the current agriculture workforce in the region;

(b)         dam has the capacity to generate $323 million over 25 years; and

(c)         development of industry in the region will help to repopulate the Collinsville community; and

(7)         calls for the support of federal, state and local governments in providing supportive policy in order to aid the progress of the Urannah Dam especially in allowing private investment in the project.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      20    Credit Repayment (Protecting Vulnerable Borrowers) Bill 2015 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  23 November 2015 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      21    Privacy Amendment (Protecting Children from Paparazzi) Bill 2015 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  23 November 2015 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      22    Start-ups: Resumption of debate ( from  23 November 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Coleman —That this House:

(1)         recognises the importance of start-ups in driving innovation in the Australian economy;

(2)         notes the critical role that start-ups will play in creating the industries and jobs of the 21st century;

(3)         acknowledges that in order to be internationally competitive in the future, the Australian economy must be agile and fast moving;

(4)         welcomes the close engagement between the Government and the start-up community through events such as the recent policy hackathon; and

(5)         encourages the Government to further build upon its existing innovation agenda through the implementation of additional policies to create a vibrant start-up environment in Australia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      23    White Ribbon: Resumption of debate ( from  23 November 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Watts —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that White Ribbon:

(a)         is a male led campaign to end male violence against women;

(b)         is now active in over 60 countries around the world; and

(c)         ambassadors around Australia are working to engage men and encourage them to take a leadership role in ending violence against women;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         in 2015 in Australia, approximately two women are murdered each week by a partner or former partner;

(b)         17 per cent of Australian women have experienced violence by a current or former partner in their lifetime;

(c)         men’s violence against women is a symptom of gender inequality in our society; and

(d)         social policy initiatives and law reform addressing gender inequality are central to reducing attitudes that support violence against women;

(3)         recognises that:

(a)         25 November is White Ribbon Day; and

(b)         the white ribbon is the symbol of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women; and

(4)         supports White Ribbon and other organisations to eliminate violence against women.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      24    Meals on Wheels: Resumption of debate ( from  23 November 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs Prentice —That this House:

(1)         recognises that Meals on Wheels has a long and proud history of providing ready-made nutritious meals, as well as a friendly smile and a chat, through its dedicated network of volunteers since 1952;

(2)         acknowledges that Meals on Wheels prides itself on providing ‘More than just a meal’; and

(3)         affirms that the ability of Meals on Wheels to provide meals along with trusted local community outreach is unparalleled, and is worthy of the recognition and continuing support of government. 

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      25    Foreign Acquisitions and Takeovers Amendment (Strategic Assets) Bill 2015 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2015 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      26    Eureka: Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs Wicks —That this House recognises:

(1)         the importance of the events that took place on 3 December 1854 on Eureka Hill at Ballarat;

(2)         the significance of these events in Australia’s history;

(3)         the impact of Eureka on our discussions surrounding free market, individual enterprise and representative democracy; and

(4)         that Australians have interpreted the events in numerous ways that impact and inspire our economic and social frameworks.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      27    Terrorism: Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Christensen —That this House:

(1)         notes the threat of violent extremism to Australian society;

(2)         further notes the:

(a)         acts of terrorism committed by violent extremists within Australia against Australians;

(b)         specific terrorism incidents:

                                                          (i)       the attack on police officers at Endeavour Hills Police Station in 2014;

                                                        (ii)       the siege at Sydney’ Martin Place which resulted in the death of two Australians; and

                                                       (iii)       most recently the murder of Mr Curtis Cheng at Parramatta Police Station; and

(c)         significant number of ISIL recruits coming from Australia;

(3)         commends the Australian police forces for their efforts in countering terrorism;

(4)         notes the numerous acts of terror which have been prevented because of police efforts, in particular the:

(a)         attempt by the ‘Sydney Five’ to commit acts of terrorism in the city of Sydney in 2005;

(b)         Benbrika Group’s planned bombing of various sporting events in 2005 and 2006 as well as a plot to assassinate former Prime Minister the Hon. John Howard; and

(c)         2009 plot to storm the Holsworthy Barracks in Sydney;

(5)         praises the Prime Minister for his statement in response to the recent terrorism incident in Parramatta, that it is not compulsory to live in Australia and if one finds Australian values unpalatable then ‘there’s a big wide world out there and people have got freedom of movement’; and

(6)         calls for continued action in countering violent extremism and in particular, radical Islam within Australia in order to prevent further acts of terrorism within our borders.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      28    World AIDS Day: Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2015 ) on the motion of Ms T. M. Butler —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         1 December marks World AIDS Day, which is held every year to raise awareness about the issues surrounding HIV and AIDS, and is a day for people to show their support for people living with HIV and to commemorate people who have died; and

(b)         the theme for World AIDS Day this year is ‘Getting to zero: Zero new HIV infections. Zero discrimination. Zero AIDS related deaths’;

(2)         acknowledges the roles played by people living with HIV and their friends, family, supporters, AIDS activists and researchers, past and present, in making HIV a disease people can live with; and

(3)         affirms its commitment to support actions which will reduce stigma, prevent new HIV transmissions, and work towards a cure.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      29    Domestic violence: Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Ryan —That this House acknowledges the work of:

(1)         community legal centres in tackling domestic violence;

(2)         the United Nations and its 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence campaign to end domestic violence;

(3)         journalist Ms Sarah Ferguson for her ongoing efforts to educate the public on the key driver behind domestic violence—control;

(4)         the Leader of the Opposition for appointing a Shadow Parliamentary Secretary for Child Safety and Prevention of Family Violence; and

(5)         the Victorian Minister for Women and Minister for the Prevention of Family Violence, for her work on Victoria’s Royal Commission into Family Violence.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      30    Renewable Fuel Bill 2016 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  8 February 2016 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      31    The legal system and the environment: Resumption of debate ( from  8 February 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Christensen —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the importance of a robust and clear legal system that allows for timely judicial review and certainty for investors and the community alike;

(b)         the latest legal challenge brought by the Melbourne based Australian Conservation Foundation to the development of the Galilee Basin is another cynical attempt to abuse due process;

(c)         ongoing ‘green’ lawfare is holding Queensland families to ransom and jeopardising Australia’s reputation as a place to do business; and

(d)         that rather than protecting the environment, the replacement of the Galilee Basin’s lower emission coal by higher emission coal from other countries could instead cause an increase in global emissions; and

(2)         calls on the Australian Labor Party to support legislative amendments to close legal loopholes being exploited by ‘green’ groups.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

      32    Work visas: Resumption of debate ( from  8 February 2016 ) on the motion of Ms L. M. Chesters —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the ongoing media reports and Fair Work Ombudsman (FWO) findings into the exploitation of Working Holiday visa (subclass 417) holders, Temporary Work (Skilled) visa (subclass 457) holders and international students;

(b)         nationwide monitoring by the FWO has uncovered suspected exploitation in 20 per cent of 560 migrant Temporary Work (Skilled) visa (subclass 457) worker cases examined between October 2014 and January 2015;

(c)         the FWO said ‘migrant workers complaints of mistreatment had soared in recent years, and sponsorship breaches were often deliberate acts of exploitation by unscrupulous employers’;

(d)         exploitation by employers has been identified in various industries including but not limited to construction, hospitality, cleaning, food processing, agriculture, the marketing and promotions sector, privately owned childcare centres and kindergartens, shopping trolley collectors and postal service contractors;

(e)         many of these workers are low paid and low skilled, and are on Temporary Work (Skilled) visas (subclass 457), Working Holiday visas (subclass 417) or student visas; and

(f)          this unconscionable conduct is widespread and is creating a sub class of workers that does not just hurt the employees; it puts at risk the pay and working conditions of all Australians;

(2)         acknowledges the:

(a)         recent hard work of the FWO to monitor, investigate, and expose potential breaches of the work visa program and Australian workplace laws; and

(b)         proactive role the Australian union movement has played to highlight and expose unconscionable conduct by some employers and industries exploiting temporary visa workers;

(3)         condemns the Government’s:

(a)         inaction to immediately address and implement the findings of recent FWO reports in relation to this matter; and

(b)         recent moves to relax regulations for bringing in temporary visa workers, instead of toughening the rules; and

(4)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         immediately strengthen the work visa safeguards it has deliberately relaxed to make it easier for companies to hire overseas workers; and

(b)         ensure that Australia’s work visa program has robust safeguards in place to protect all workers and is not being used as a back door avenue to source cheap labour.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 22 February 2016. )

 

 

 

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS has precedence each Monday in the House of Representatives Chamber from 10.10 am to 12 noon; and in the Federation Chamber from 11 am to 1.30 pm (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS has precedence from the conclusion of consideration of committee and delegation business each Monday (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

The SELECTION COMMITTEE is responsible for arranging the timetable and order of committee and delegation business and private Members’ business for each sitting Monday. Its determinations for the next sitting Monday are shown under ‘Business accorded priority for…’. Any private Members’ business not called on, or consideration of private Members’ business or committee and delegation business which has been interrupted and not re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays, shall be removed from the Notice Paper (standing order 42).