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BUSINESS OF THE FEDERATION CHAMBER

Wednesday, 9 September 2015

The Federation Chamber meets at 9.30 am

 

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION REPORTS

Orders of the day

       1    Law Enforcement—Parliamentary Joint Committee Inquiry into financial related crime —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 7 September 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Kelly —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Orders of the day

       1    Murray-Darling Basin Plan—Ministerial statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 14 May 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs K. L. Andrews —That the House take note of the document.

       2    Prime Minister’s Report 2014-Closing the Gap—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 26 February 2014 ) on the motion of Mr Abbott —That the House take note of the document.

         3    Grievance Debate: Question—That grievances be noted—Resumption of debate ( from  7 September 2015 ).

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION REPORTS— continued

Orders of the day continued

       2    National Capital and External Territories—Joint Standing Committee Governance in the Indian Ocean Territories—Interim report: Economic development —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 13 August 2015— Mr Broad ) on the motion of Mr Simpkins —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

       3    Health—Standing Committee The silent disease: Inquiry into Hepatitis C in Australia —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 13 August 2015— Mr Broad ) on the motion of Mr Irons —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

       4    Indigenous Affairs—Standing Committee Alcohol, hurting people and harming communities —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 13 August 2015— Ms Hall ) on the motion of Dr Stone —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

       5    Social Policy and Legal Affairs—Standing Committee From conflict to cooperation: Inquiry into the Child Support Program —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 13 August 2015— Mr Coulton ) on the motion of Mr Christensen —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

       6    Social Policy and Legal Affairs—Standing Committee Reviewing Troubled Waters : Consideration of the Government response to the 2012 inquiry into arrangements surrounding crimes at sea —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 24 June 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Christensen —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

       7    Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade—Joint Standing Committee Partnering for the greater good: The role of the private sector in promoting economic growth and reducing poverty in the Indo-Pacific region —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 24 June 2015 ) on the motion of Dr Stone —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

       8    Infrastructure and Communications—Standing Committee Balancing freedom and protection: Inquiry into the use of subsection 313(3) of the Telecommunications Act 1997 by government agencies to disrupt the operation of illegal online services —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 15 June 2015— Mr Matheson ) on the motion of Mrs Prentice —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

       9    Economics—Standing Committee Review of the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority annual report 2014 (Second report) —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 15 June 2015— Mr Matheson ) on the motion of Mr Alexander —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

     10    Agriculture and Industry—Standing Committee Circumvention: Closing the loopholes—Inquiry into Australia’s anti-circumvention framework in relation to anti-dumping measures —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 1 June 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Ramsey —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

     11    Electoral Matters—Joint Standing Committee The 2013 Federal Election: Report on the conduct of the 2013 election and matters related thereto —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 12 May 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Smith —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 14 September 2015. )

     12    Health—Standing Committee Skin cancer in Australia: Our national cancer —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 24 March 2015— Ms M. L. Landry ) on the motion of Mr Irons —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 14 September 2015. )

     13    Economics—Standing Committee Review of the Reserve Bank of Australia annual report 2014 (First report) —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 25 March 2015— Ms O’Dwyer ) on the motion of Mr Alexander —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 14 September 2015. )

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS

Notice

       1    Dr Stone : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises the courage and sacrifice of the young Australian men who actively served in Bomber Command in World War II;

(2)         requests the creation of a medal for Royal Australian Air Force men who served in action in Australian and British squadrons in Bomber Command in World War II;

(3)         notes that:

(a)         over 10,000 Australians served in Bomber Command, in which over 4,000 of these airmen lost their lives;

(b)         Bomber Command had the highest casualty rate in Australia’s military history;

(c)         a Bomber Command crew member had a worse chance of survival than an infantry officer in World War I; and

(d)         there are fewer than 100 Australians remaining who flew in Bomber Command; and

(4)         calls on the Government to, as a matter of urgency, create a medal to recognise and honour Australian airmen who served in Bomber Command in World War II.

              ( Notice given 4 June 2015. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

Orders of the day

         1    Marriage Legislation Amendment Bill 2015 ( Mr Entsch ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  7 September 2015 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

         2    Perth Freight Link: Resumption of debate ( from  7 September 2015 ) on the motion of Ms MacTiernan —That this House calls on the Australian Government to:

(1)         suspend its commitment to funding the $1.6 billion Perth Freight Link until the Western Australian Government is able to provide credible, substantiated evidence of:

(a)         how and when the Western Australian Government is proposing to fund the missing bridge link over the Swan River and the new proposed tunnel;

(b)         the optimum capacity of the Fremantle container terminal and the projected timing of when that capacity will be reached;

(c)         the planning so far for the development of the new container terminal in Cockburn Sound; and

(d)         how the Western Australian Government proposes to increase the percentage of rail freight into the Fremantle Port when it has failed to make any headway in its six years in office; and

(2)         release all documents relating to the planning and cost benefit analysis of this project.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

         3    China-Australia Free Trade Agreement: Resumption of debate ( from  7 September 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs Griggs —That this House:

(1)         commends the fantastic work that the Minister for Trade and Investment and the Government have done to secure the monumental Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with China, Australia’s largest trading partner;

(2)         acknowledges that the China-Australia FTA provides significant advantages for Australian businesses, particularly by:

(a)         removing tariffs on key agricultural exports such as beef, dairy, lamb and horticulture;

(b)         providing certainty for the resource and energy sector by locking in zero tariffs on major exports such as iron ore, crude petroleum oils and liquefied natural gas; and

(c)         securing new or improved market access for service providers in areas such as banking, insurance, hospitality, health and travel;

(3)         recognises the opportunities that this agreement presents for Australian businesses to grow and create new jobs, providing increased economic prosperity for all Australians; and

(4)         condemns the union movement’s reckless misinformation campaign, backed by Labor, for jeopardising this agreement and the opportunity that it presents to create new jobs for Australian workers.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

         4    Rio 2016 Paralympic Games: Resumption of debate ( from  ) on the motion of Ms Claydon —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         7 September 2015 marks one year to go until the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games;

(b)         the Paralympic Games will bring over 11 days of competition, with more than 4,350 athletes from 178 nations expected to participate in 528 medal events across 22 sports;

(c)         the sports of Para-canoe and Para-triathlon will appear on the Paralympic program for the first time;

(d)         the Australian Paralympic Committee is currently preparing to send an Australian team of more than 170 athletes from every Australian state and territory to compete in up to 15 sports at the Paralympic Games;

(e)         the team will be led by Chef de Mission Kate McLoughlin, who will become the first woman to lead an Australian team at the Paralympic Games;

(f)          Australia has a proud history of success at the Paralympic Games and has competed at every one since the first in Rome in 1960, finishing in the top five at every summer Paralympic Games since the Barcelona Games in 1992; and

(g)         the Australian Paralympic Team is one of Australia’s most important sporting teams, helping shape community attitudes towards disability and assisting Australians with a disability to participate in sport to the level of their choice;

(2)         congratulates:

(a)         the Australian Paralympic Committee and relevant national sporting organisations on their preparation for the Paralympic Games so far; and

(b)         all potential Australian team members for their dedication to their chosen Paralympic sport; and

(3)         calls on all Members of Parliament to support the Australian Paralympic Team in its preparations for the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

         5    Small businesses: Resumption of debate ( from  7 September 2015 ) on the motion of Mr van Manen —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Coalition Government has:

                                                          (i)       started to arrest the decline in the small business environment overseen by the previous Labor Government; and

                                                        (ii)       developed and started to deliver as part of the budget, the largest small business package in the nation’s history—the Jobs and Small Business Package—worth $5.5 billion; and

(b)         as part of the Jobs and Small Business Package, small businesses will be eligible for a 1.5 per cent company tax cut or a 5 per cent tax discount for small unincorporated businesses;

(2)         condemns the Leader of the Opposition for making unfunded announcements to small businesses in his Budget Reply Speech which ignore the two-thirds of small businesses which are not structured as companies; and

(3)         commends the Prime Minister, the Treasurer and the Minister for Small Business on their effective management of the small business economy.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

         6    Students with disability: Resumption of debate ( from  7 September 2015 ) on the motion of Ms O’Neil —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         all students, including students with disability, deserve to be recognised as learners and supported to achieve their best;

(b)         research by Children with Disability Australia shows that as many as one in four children with disability have been denied school enrolment, almost one in five only attend school part time, and 68 per cent of parents believe their children do not receive adequate support at school; and

(c)         the Senate Education and Employment References Committee inquiry into the education of students with disability is underway, giving parents, teachers, students and others with experience and expertise, the opportunity to highlight problems in our school system and identify best practice for the future;

(2)         acknowledges the:

(a)         hard work and dedication of teachers, parents, schools and carers across Australia; and

(b)         many programs and services helping students to achieve their best every day; and

(3)         calls upon the Government to:

(a)         keep its promises on funding and support for students with disability;

(b)         continue working with the states and territories to complete the Nationally Consistent Collection of Data on School Students with Disability program, and implement the Gonski disability loading;

(c)         reverse its cuts to education, including the termination of the More Support for Students with Disabilities program; and

(d)         recognise that supporting students with disability is a long term investment that pays dividends for students and Australia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

         7    Students and heavy school bags: Resumption of debate ( from  7 September 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Simpkins —That this House:

(1)         notes that every school day across Australia, school students are carrying heavy school bags on their way to and around schools and this poses a risk to the long term health of young people in Australia;

(2)         acknowledges that reference sources are an important part of the curriculum and for individual courses; and

(3)         encourages the Australian and state and territory governments to:

(a)         replace hard copy reference books with CD and thumb drive versions of reference materials to lighten the load of students and reduce the incidences of muscular and skeletal injuries to the developing bodies of school students; and

(b)         set a target timeline for the replacement of reference materials for school students.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

         8    Marriage Amendment (Marriage Equality) Bill 2015 ( Mr Shorten ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  17 August 2015 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

         9    New Colombo Plan: Resumption of debate ( from  17 August 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs Prentice —That this House:

(1)         recognises that travelling and living overseas has been a rite of passage for young Australians for many years and has raised awareness of and respect for foreign cultures;

(2)         acknowledges that the New Colombo Plan (NCP) is an innovative scholarship scheme that supports and encourages Australian students to undertake study and internships in the lndo-Pacific region;

(3)         recognises the success of the NCP’s pilot year in 2014, in which 40 scholars and 1,300 mobility students were supported to live, study and undertake work placements in the four pilot locations of Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan and Singapore;

(4)         notes that in 2015 the NCP has been substantially expanded to offer support to 68 scholars and 3,100 mobility students in more than 32 host locations across the region; and

(5)         acknowledges the Government’s ongoing commitment of $100 million over five years to the NCP.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      10    Indigenous Marathon Project: Resumption of debate ( from  17 August 2015 ) on the motion of Dr Leigh —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         established in 2010, the Indigenous Marathon Project (IMP) plays a valuable role in promoting healthy lifestyles in Indigenous communities, creating Indigenous role models and inspiring Indigenous people;

(b)         the IMP is part of the Indigenous Marathon Foundation (IMF), a health promotion charity that changes lives through running and that celebrates and showcases incredible Indigenous achievement and resilience;

(c)         through the IMP, young Indigenous men and women aged from 18 to 30 are given the opportunity to unearth their own sense of self-worth and pride by completing a full marathon;

(d)         participants in the IMP mostly train in their communities, attending four one-week training and education camps, and must complete a Certificate III in Fitness, acquire a Sports Aid Certificate and attain both Level I and II Accreditation in Recreational Running Coaching with Athletics Australia;

(e)         the capstone achievement of the IMP is for participants to represent their families and communities and complete the biggest marathon in the world, in the biggest city in the world, the famous New York City Marathon held each November;

(f)          in the last five years, the IMP has successfully graduated 43 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island men and women with 11 more enrolled in this year’s program, coming from remote communities, regional towns and major cities;

(g)         most of these IMP graduates had never run before, but in just six months, had all run a full 42.2 kilometre marathon, with the motto ‘the harder the struggle, the greater the reward’, which builds self-worth and self-belief by setting difficult goals and achieving them; and

(h)         in communities around Australia, graduates of the IMP have continued to run, established running and walking groups and organised hundreds of ‘Deadly Fun Runs’ each year that encourage local communities to lead active lifestyles and help reduce the incidence of disease and social dysfunction; and

(2)         commends the work of Rob de Castella and his team in helping to change lives through the IMF and the IMP.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      11    Free Trade Agreements: Resumption of debate ( from  17 August 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Nikolic —That this House:

(1)         recognises:

(a)         the importance of Australia’s Free Trade Agreements (FTAs), which now include nations in three continents—North America, South America and Asia;

(b)         Australia’s three most recent FTAs negotiated and signed in 2014 with Japan, South Korea and China and the positive security, stability and economic prosperity which will result from each of these mutually constructive agreements;

(c)         the Government’s intention to continue to enhance current and future trade and investment opportunities for the long term advantage of all Australian citizens; and

(d)         the significant personal contribution made by the Minister for Trade and Investment in securing FTAs with Japan, South Korea and China in 2014;

(2)         acknowledges the following advantages of FTAs to Australia as:

(a)         removing potentially billions of dollars of tariff imposts for foreign produced consumer goods (including, clothes, shoes, car components, cars and electronics);

(b)         enhancing capital flows into Australian agriculture, finance, tourism, infrastructure and mining as a result of streamlined approval procedures for foreign state owned investors;

(c)         improving primary agriculture, particularly dairy, beef, lamb, wine and horticulture as a result of overseas tariffs being phased out over time;

(d)         streamlining licensing and reducing restrictions on Australian services firms, including banks, insurance companies, financial fund managers, as well as law, architecture and engineering firms; and

(e)         providing cheaper and more streamlined visa approval procedures, making it easier to undertake reciprocal travel, work and study in Australia and relevant trade partner nations; and

(3)         notes the continuing importance of trade between nations and of Australian formal FTAs in supporting both global and regional stability, as well as Australian long term economic prosperity, all of which are emphasised by Australia’s unique geopolitics.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      12    Lyme disease: Resumption of debate ( from  17 August 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Hall —This House:

(1)         notes that May was Lyme Project month, a time when the Lyme Disease Association of Australia raises awareness and funds to provide ongoing advocacy for people living with Lyme disease;

(2)         recognises that Lyme disease can be debilitating and have a devastating impact on the lives of people living with it; and

(3)         works with the Lyme disease Association of Australia to accept Lyme disease as a disease, undertake research, develop a national plan to collect statistics and develop treatments for people living with Lyme disease.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      13    Small businesses and infrastructure investment: Resumption of debate ( from  17 August 2015 ) on the motion of Mr C. A. Laundy —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         small and medium businesses are the engine room of the Australian economy and employment;

(b)         an effective infrastructure network is essential for small businesses to survive and flourish; and

(c)         investment in improved infrastructure benefits small businesses through economic growth and job creation, and provides a boost to local and regional economies; and

(2)         supports the Government in prioritising infrastructure investment to help small businesses grow and continue their vital contribution to the Australian economy.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      14    Boeing E-7A Wedgetail: Resumption of debate ( from  12 August 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs Griggs —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Boeing E-7A Wedgetail, an airborne early control and warning aircraft, has reached its final operational capability; and

(b)         this aircraft is a significant enhancement for our Australian Defence Force (ADF) and has been a vital asset on Operation Okra in the Middle East region; and

(2)         acknowledges the excellent work done by ADF personnel in carrying out their roles of protecting Australia and its national interests.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      15    Government domestic procurement: Resumption of debate ( from  12 August 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Zappia —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Government spends around $40 billion each year on procuring goods and services;

(b)         the Commonwealth Procurement Rules provide considerable flexibility to Government departments when making procurement decisions;

(c)         considerable economic, social and environmental benefits arise from the Government buying Australian products and services; and

(d)         domestic Government procurement encourages innovation and investment;

(2)         expresses concern at the level of goods and services that are being sourced from overseas by the Government; and

(3)         calls on the Government to apply a comprehensive value for money test which includes all national benefits which accrue when goods and services are procured locally.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      16    Pacific Women’s Parliamentary Partnerships Forum: Resumption of debate ( from  12 August 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs Prentice —That this House:

(1)         notes that the Pacific Women’s Parliamentary Partnerships Forum (Forum) is funded by the Australian Government and is designed to support women in the region in politics and to assist Pacific parliaments in addressing gender equality issues;

(2)         recognises that the Pacific region has the lowest regional average of women parliamentarians in the world, currently 13.1 per cent female representation in single or lower houses across the region, including Australia and New Zealand;

(3)         recognises that the third annual Forum was held from 29 April to 1 May in Suva, Fiji, with the focus on addressing family violence in the Pacific region; and

(4)         notes that reducing family violence will require a coordinated approach, and that the Forum agreed on a list of priorities for Pacific parliaments to pursue that will raise awareness and encourage action to address the issue.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      17    Baiada Poultry Pty Limited’s Employment Practices: Resumption of debate ( from  12 August 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Champion —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the recent media reports and the Fair Work Ombudsman (Ombudsman) finding about the abuse of employees, including Working Holiday visa holders (subclass 417) and Temporary Work (Skilled) visa holders (subclass 457) by Baiada Poultry Pty Limited (Baiada);

(b)         complaints against Baiada included that employees were being underpaid, forced to work extremely long hours and required to pay high rents for overcrowded and unsafe employee accommodation;

(c)         Baiada and its labour-hire contractors failed to work with the Ombudsman during the inquiry into its employment practices, including:

                                                          (i)       refusing permission for Fair Work Inspectors working on this inquiry to access the factory floor at its worksites;

                                                        (ii)       failing to provide the inquiry with any ‘significant or meaningful’ documentation on the nature and terms of its labour contract arrangements; and

                                                       (iii)       producing inadequate, inaccurate and/or fabricated records to inspectors;

(d)         the findings of the Ombudsman are damning of the governance and employment practices of Baiada; and

(e)         that these reports and the employment practices of Baiada have caused significant community concern which must be addressed; and

(2)         calls on the management of Baiada to immediately address the findings of the Ombudsman and bring its employment practices up to community expectations.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      18    Australian Defence Force Parliamentary Program: Resumption of debate ( from  12 August 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Pitt —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that the Australian Defence Force Parliamentary Program (ADFPP) has enjoyed bipartisan support since its formation in 2001;

(2)         recognises the importance of providing an opportunity for Parliamentarians to experience life working alongside Australian Defence Force (ADF) personnel;

(3)         notes that the ADFPP provides ADF personnel with direct access to Members of Parliament in their own workplace or as a part of the exchange program to Parliament House; and

(4)         expresses gratitude to ADF personnel who make ADFPP a great success.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      19    Funding for science, research and innovation: Resumption of debate ( from  22 June 2015 ) on the motion of Ms MacTiernan —That this House:

(1)         recognises that in its 2015 budget, the Government has slashed investment in science, research and innovation agencies and programs, including cuts of:

(a)         $114 million from the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation;

(b)         $75 million from the Australian Research Council (ARC);

(c)         $27.5 million from the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation;

(d)         $80 million from Cooperative Research Centres;

(e)         $173.7 million from the Research Training Scheme;

(f)          $260 million from the abolition of Commercialisation Australia;

(g)         $84 million from ceasing National ICT Australia funding from 2016;

(h)         $120 million from Defence Science and Technology Organisation;

(i)           $16.1 million from Geoscience Australia;

(j)          $7.8 million from the Australian Institute of Marine Science;

(k)         $263 million from Sustainable Research Excellence for universities;

(l)           $27 million more from the Cooperative Research Centres program; and

(m)       $27 million from its own Entrepreneurs’ Infrastructure Programme;

(2)         calls on the Minister for Education to explain the decision to provide $4 million in funding for the establishment of the Bjorn Lomborg Australian Consensus Centre at the University of Western Australia without any reference to the ARC; and

(3)         condemns the Government for the lack of transparency around the decision to fund the research centre, while at the same time making significant funding cuts to science, research and innovation.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      20    Australian Defence Force and humanitarian aid missions: Resumption of debate ( from  22 June 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs Griggs —That this House:

(1)         commends the role of the Australian Defence Force (ADF) in recent humanitarian aid missions; and

(2)         congratulates:

(a)         the Government on taking the decision to acquire two additional Boeing C-17A Globemaster III aircraft which will assist in future humanitarian and ADF operations; and

(b)         the ADF on its rapid deployment of air assets, including C-17s, which supported the provision of disaster relief in Vanuatu and Nepal in 2015. 

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      21    Imported products: Resumption of debate ( from  22 June 2015 ) on the motion of Ms L. M. Chesters —That this House:

(1)         notes with concern the importation to Australia of goods that:

(a)         breach Australia’s anti-dumping regime; and

(b)         do not comply with Australian standards;

(2)         further notes the:

(a)         injurious effect that the importation of such products has on Australian businesses and Australian jobs;

(b)         risk to consumers of using substandard products and goods; and

(c)         lack of inspection and compliance enforcement of imported products; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         continue to monitor the anti-dumping regime and effectiveness of recent changes;

(b)         strengthen the inspection and compliance enforcement regime for imported goods;

(c)         review penalties for importers who breach their Australian legal obligations and if necessary increase the penalties where they are found to be insufficient, to act as a deterrent; and

(d)         hold an urgent meeting of the International Trade Remedies Forum to address these and related issues.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      22    Vietnamese-Australian People: Resumption of debate ( from  22 June 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Simpkins —That this House:

(1)         notes that it has been 40 years since the Vietnamese began coming to Australia and their arrival has been defined by:

(a)         successful settlement;

(b)         positive integration; and

(c)         their assistance with the development of the Australian economy through their hard work and dedication;

(2)         acknowledges the positive influence in Australia of the Vietnamese-Australian people from:

(a)         the Vietnamese Community Association;

(b)         the Vietnamese parishes of the Catholic Church;

(c)         the Vietnamese Free Buddhist Church;

(d)         other religious groups; and

(e)         clubs and other service providers; and

(3)         commends the Vietnamese-Australian community for its dedication to Australia and determination to provide opportunities and success for Vietnamese-Australian families.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      23    Regional businesses and industries: Resumption of debate ( from  22 June 2015 ) on the motion of Ms McGowan —That the House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         by the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development’s own statistics, two thirds of Australia’s export earnings come from regional industries such as agriculture, tourism, retail, services and manufacturing;

(b)         Australian regional businesses and industries are highly exposed to global market forces whether exporting or not, businesses and consumers alike are influenced and are in turn influencing regional Australia’s future competitive advantage; and

(c)         the future of manufacturing and industry in this country requires extensive skills development, training and employee development in key sectors such as farming, food production, engineering and value-adding; and

(2)         calls on the Australian Government to:

(a)         prioritise investment in regional infrastructure that supports growth in rural and regional industries and manufacturing businesses, such as:

                                                          (i)       improving telecommunications access for rural and regional Australians;

                                                        (ii)       improving passenger rail and freight rail timetables and services; and

                                                       (iii)       simplifying compliance for interstate businesses by reducing cross-border anomalies; and

(b)         provide additional capacity for the regions to design their strategic vision to meet future industry, manufacturing and regional development demands in Australia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      24    Homelessness: Resumption of debate ( from  15 June 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs Elliot —That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         over 105,000 Australians are currently defined as homeless throughout the nation;

(b)         on any given night this translates to 1 in 200 Australians homeless or sleeping rough; and

(c)         great work is done by organisations such as Homelessness Australia and countless local charities in their support for homeless people right across the country; and

(2)         notes that:

(a)         the current Government has made significant cuts to front line youth services putting more young people at the risk of homelessness;

(b)         the current Government has made significant cuts to domestic violence services putting more woman and children at risk of homelessness; and

(c)         more needs to be done to address homelessness in Australia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      25    Small business: Resumption of debate ( from  15 June 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Broad —That this House notes:

(1)         that Australian small business is a major contributor to the national economy and should be acknowledged for its innovation, entrepreneurship and endeavour, as demonstrated by the 15,000 small businesses across the electoral division of Mallee and many small businesses across the rest of Australia; and

(2)         the recent budget must be commended for assisting small business with accelerated depreciation for assets purchased under $20,000.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      26    Live animal exports: Resumption of debate ( from  15 June 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Fitzgibbon —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         that Australia has the most stringent and effective live animal welfare regulatory system in the world that is underpinned by the Exporter Supply Chain Assurance System;

(b)         recent alleged breaches of Australian’s animal welfare standards in the live export sector; and

(c)         the Government’s:

                                                          (i)       abolition of the position of Inspector-General of Animal Welfare and Live Animal Exports; and

                                                        (ii)       failure to increase regulatory and supervisory resources to keep pace with growth in trade; and

(2)         calls on the Government to build public confidence and to protect the sustainability of the live export sector by:

(a)         appointing an independent Inspector-General of Animal Welfare and Live Animal Exports; and

(b)         providing quarterly ministerial reports to the Parliament on:

                                                          (i)       any new markets;

                                                        (ii)       the number of head exported;

                                                       (iii)       any allegations of breaches of animal welfare standards and investigations undertaken; and

                                                      (iv)       any sanctions or other action taken against those who have breached or should have prevented breaches of Australia’s animal welfare standards.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      27    Bowel cancer: Resumption of debate ( from  15 June 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs McNamara —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Bowel Cancer Australia ran an initiative throughout the month of February titled ‘Prevent Bowel Cancer’ to raise awareness of bowel cancer and encourage more Australians to screen for the disease with the tagline ‘Don’t Wait Until It’s Too Late’;

(b)         bowel cancer:

                                                                               (i)       is the second most common type of newly diagnosed cancer in Australia affecting both men and women almost equally;

                                                                             (ii)       is Australia’s second biggest cancer killer after lung cancer with more than 15,000 Australians diagnosed each year; and

                                                                            (iii)       claims nearly 4,000 lives every year; and

(c)         when found early 90 per cent of bowel cancer cases can be successfully treated;

(2)         acknowledges the Government’s free National Bowel Cancer Screening Program initiative and the inclusion of people turning the ages of 70 and 74 in the program; and

(3)         notes the requirement for greater awareness and promotion of available bowel cancer screening tests and the need for people from age 50 to undertake regular screening to prevent this disease.

And on the amendment moved thereto by Ms Hall, viz. —That the following words be added:

(4)         notes that:

(a)         June is Bowel Cancer Awareness Month (BCAM), during which Bowel Cancer Australia seeks to raise awareness of a disease that claims the lives of 77 Australians every week;

(b)         BCAM has a positive message—saving lives through early detection—as bowel cancer is one of the most curable types of cancer if found early; and

(c)         in 2014, about 16,980 Australians were diagnosed with bowel cancer (9,250 in men and 7,730 in women), and an estimated 19,960 are expected to be diagnosed in 2020;

(5)         recognises that:

(a)         bowel cancer can develop without any early warning signs;

(b)         if bowel cancer is detected before it has spread beyond the bowel there is a 90 per cent chance of surviving more than five years;

(c)         regular screening every two years for people aged 50 and over can reduce the risk of dying from bowel cancer by up to 33 per cent; and

(d)         more than 12,000 suspected or confirmed cancers will be detected through free screening, saving between 300 and 500 lives each year; and

(6)         encourages Members to continue to support efforts to raise awareness of the importance of early detection as well as the signs and symptoms of bowel cancer.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      28    Coastal Shipping Industry: Resumption of debate ( from  1 June 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Claydon —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Australia, as an island nation, has a national interest in fostering an Australian coastal shipping industry for economic, environmental and national security reasons;

(b)         comparable major trading nations have strong regulatory systems in place to support their coastal shipping industries;

(c)         in 2012 the former government put in place a broad package of taxation, regulatory and workplace reform to revitalize Australian shipping; and

(d)         people who perform work in Australia should be paid according to Australian-standard wages and conditions; and

(2)         calls on the Government to act to support and promote the Australian coastal shipping industry, and to actively support Labor’s recent changes to give the industry the certainty it needs to invest in new Australian flagged shipping.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      29    Tasmanian Fruit and Vegetable Industries: Resumption of debate ( from  1 June 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Hutchinson —That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         the Coalition’s Economic Growth Plan for Tasmania dated 15 August 2013, committed the Government to creating a Tasmanian Fruit and Vegetable Industry Taskforce focusing on the growth of the fruit and vegetable sectors in Tasmania;

(b)         the Taskforce will develop an industry-led plan to promote competitiveness, investment and jobs growth in these sectors; and

(c)         the terms of reference prescribing the scope of the Taskforce included reviewing existing work, drawing conclusions and developing a unified and agreed plan for the Tasmanian fruit and vegetable industries to:

                                                          (i)       increase grower returns and reduce their costs;

                                                        (ii)       increase competitiveness, investment and jobs growth across the supply chain; and

                                                       (iii)       develop domestic and export markets;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         the vital importance of the agriculture sector to Tasmania, and for all Tasmanians;

(b)         that Tasmania is an important producer of fruit and vegetables, mainly potatoes, onions, carrots, cherries and other stone fruit, pomefruit and berries;

(c)         that in 2011-12, the gross value production of fruit and nuts in Tasmania was $100.8 million, vegetables $213.4 million, and nursery production (nurseries, cut flowers and cultivated turf) $28.4 million, with Tasmania also being an important producer of the special poppy and pyrethrum crops;

(d)         that in contrast to other states, exporting and direct sales to processors are the predominant sales channels for fresh produce, for example in 2011-12, an estimated 70 per cent of Tasmanian vegetable growers sold their produce directly to a processor (this includes the manufacturing of canned, bottled, preserved, quick frozen or dried vegetable products, dehydrated vegetable products, soups, sauces, pickles and mixed meat and vegetable cereal products, processing and packaging of fresh salads and pan-ready vegetables, as well as bulk packaged and cleaned vegetables) and approximately 10 per cent sold their produce for export, which compares with the national averages of 26 per cent and 4 per cent, respectively;

(e)         that in 2011-12 only 5 per cent of Tasmanian vegetable farms reported selling direct to state capital wholesale, compared to the national average of 62 per cent;

(f)          that Tasmania exports significant volumes of onions and cherries, for example:

                                                          (i)       in the 12 months to June 2013, it exported $44 million of fresh fruit and vegetables, 6.7 per cent of the total value of national exports of fresh fruit and vegetables, and of this, 98 per cent of the fruit were cherries and 94 per cent of the vegetables were onions,

                                                        (ii)       Tasmania accounted for 52 per cent of all cherries and 86 per cent of all onions exported from Australia in 2012-13; and

                                                       (iii)       in 2012 the Australian exports of fresh onions and fresh cherries accounted for 0.9 per cent and 0.4 per cent, respectively, of global exports of these products;

(g)         that an independent assessment of the economic development potential of sectors of the Tasmanian economy found that the wine, dairy and aquaculture sectors had the greatest economic development potential;

(h)         that horticulture also presents opportunities for growth in employment, though not as great as those in the wine, dairy and aquaculture sectors;

(i)           that the challenges and opportunities faced by Tasmania’s fruit and vegetable industry have been well documented and the industry has been subject to many reviews and planning processes; and

(j)          that, to assist the deliberations of the Taskforce, the Commonwealth Department of Agriculture, as the secretariat to the Taskforce, has identified and summarised a collection of previous work and in so doing, is mindful that individual Taskforce members would be familiar with a number of these documents, in some cases contributing directly to their production; and

(3)         notes the continuing importance of investment in the Tasmanian agriculture sector, as a traditional and ongoing source of economic development, including employment, in that state, and one which continues to enjoy a relatively high national and international profile for the reliability and quality of its primary food production.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      30    Inborn Error of Metabolism (IEM) Programme Funding: Resumption of debate ( from  1 June 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Hall —That this House:

(1)         condemns the Government’s decision to cut, without any warning and consultation, all funding from the Inborn Error of Metabolism (IEM) Programme that provides for families and carers with children who suffer from Phenylketonuria (PKU);

(2)         acknowledges that sufferers of PKU require a vital expensive medically prescribed diet, supplemented by the funding, to avoid brain damage, seizures, liver failure, coma and in some cases death; and

(3)         calls on the Government to reinstate the funding to the IEM program.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      31    Terrorism: Resumption of debate ( from  1 June 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Nikolic —That this House:

(1)         recognises the:

(a)         need to destroy, degrade or contain terrorism in all its forms in source or origin countries;

(b)         clear and present threat posed by transnational terrorism in our region;

(c)         sustained efforts of both the Australian Defence Force (ADF) and our civilian national security agencies to identify, attack and degrade foreign or ‘source nation’ terrorist threats at the very earliest opportunity, most notably since the 2002 Bali bombings (which claimed the lives of 202 people, including 88 innocent Australians, and injured a further 209);

(d)         unique geo-political circumstances of Australia which will continue to emphasise the need for cooperative and heightened security vigilance and activity with, by and from our key regional partners and allies, over the long term;

(e)         potential for Australian security forces, both civil and military, to continue to act as effective, practical agents to reinforce, bolster and continually invigorate critical regional partnerships and engagements, toward a stable and prosperous long term regional future, and one which is mutually beneficial to all national participants;

(f)          potential offered by the Government’s holistic approach to home-grown terrorism, to constitute a working model for consideration, adaptation as appropriate, and possible implementation, by equally determined Governments and nations, throughout our region;

(g)         need for sustained vigilance and regional engagement by all like-minded nations in our region;

(h)         need to maintain and support both ADF and civilian security agency capabilities, at the very forefront of counter-terrorist operational capacity and capability;

(i)           need for sustained border protection regimes and procedures; and

(j)          importance of maintaining and sustaining Australia’s traditional defence alliance and treaty arrangements;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         the Government’s active and constructive efforts to do all within its powers to halt terrorism at its source, or points of origin;

(b)         that the Attorney-General’s Department has led and implemented a diverse array of constructive initiatives and measures in support of community safety and resilience, which will further complement ‘offshore’ counter-terrorist initiatives and endeavours;

(c)         that Australian Government actions are in lockstep with sensible international responses to this global trend and challenges; and

(d)         the importance of secure information-sharing with traditional allies and regional partners, to achieve the negation of potentially diverse terrorist threats; and

(3)         endorses and lends ongoing support to the Government’s longstanding efforts to diminish the current and future terrorist threat to all Australians, including the removal of Australian citizenship status from dual citizens who are involved in terrorism in Australia or abroad.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      32    Funding for remote Indigenous communities: Resumption of debate ( from  25 May 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Zappia —That this House:

(1)         notes that both Commonwealth and state governments have historically shared responsibility for the delivery of services to remote Indigenous communities;

(2)         condemns the Government for cutting $500 million from Indigenous programs in the 2014-15 budget;

(3)         notes that contrary to previous assurances by the Minister for Indigenous Affairs, there has been an impact on frontline services;

(4)         acknowledges the disastrous effect these cuts will have on people living in remote Indigenous communities; and

(5)         calls on the Government to restore the funding, and prevent the loss of frontline services.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      33    The Regional Arts Fund: Resumption of debate ( from  25 May 2015 ) on the motion of Mr E. T. Jones —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         as a nation we have some of the world’s best artists, performers and administrators of the arts;

(b)         the recently held Regional Arts Australia Summit in Kalgoorlie-Boulder was a great success;

(c)         the Government:

                                                          (i)       is a strong supporter of the Arts in Australia and recognises the importance art plays in our regional communities; and

                                                        (ii)       continues to make national exhibitions and performing arts companies accessible to regional Australia; and

                                                       (iii)       encourages our national institutions and performing arts companies to have a substantial presence in our regional communities; and

(2)         recognises The Regional Arts Fund provides important funding towards high quality arts projects which leads to strong community engagement.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      34    National Volunteer Week: Resumption of debate ( from  25 May 2015 ) on the motion of Ms T. M. Butler —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         11 to 17 May is National Volunteer Week (NVW);

(b)         the theme for NVW this year is ‘Give Happy Live Happy’; and

(c)         the six million plus Australian volunteers give happiness to others each year; and

(2)         thanks volunteers for their tireless effort and dedication to our community and the enormous contribution they make to our economy and others in the community.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      35    National Palliative Care Week: Resumption of debate ( from  25 May 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Champion —That this House:

(1)         notes that National Palliative Care Week (NPCW) runs from 24 to 30 May 2015; and

(2)         encourages all Australians to use NPCW as a conversation starter, to get together with those close to them, celebrate life and talk about death, in particular the end of life decisions such as:

(a)         how they want to be cared for;

(b)         what values are important to them;

(c)         what types of medical assistance they want to receive;

(d)         whether they wish to be buried or cremated;

(e)         where they want to pass away;

(f)          whether they have appointed a power of attorney; and

(g)         writing an advanced care plan.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 14 September 2015. )

      36    Cruise liner industry: Resumption of debate ( from  24 March 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Laming —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         the cruise liner industry makes a significant contribution to the regional economies of Sydney, Fremantle, Brisbane and Melbourne;

(b)         sulphur dioxide emissions are a significant source of air pollution from cruise liners docked at ports in Australia and are harmful to human health; and

(c)         by 2020 the cruise liner industry will implement new measures to reduce sulphur dioxide emissions from cruise ships docked at ports under the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships; and

(2)         calls on the cruise liner industry to introduce measures ahead of 2020 to reduce sulphur dioxide emissions from cruise liners docked at ports near residential areas including through the use of low sulphur diesel fuels. 

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 14 September 2015. )

      37    Research and development: Resumption of debate ( from  24 March 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Zappia —That this House:

(1)         congratulates the Australian researchers at Monash University and Amaero Engineering Pty Ltd who created the world’s first 3D printed jet engine;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         Australia has a history of punching above its weight when it comes to research and development; and

(b)         huge opportunities are available to create new advanced manufacturing jobs and industries with the right government support for our science, research and manufacturing sectors; and

(3)         condemns the Government’s shortsighted approach to science, research and industry policy, where it has:

(a)         cut $878 million from science and research, including $115 million from the CSIRO;

(b)         recklessly undermined the Australian auto manufacturing sector, risking the loss of millions of dollars annually of investment in research and development;

(c)         failed to support the shipbuilding industry by refusing to guarantee that the 12 future submarines will be built in Australia which would lead to millions of dollars of investment in research and innovation; and

(d)         introduced enormous uncertainty for innovative businesses conducting Australian research and development, with retrograde changes to the Research & Development Tax Incentive that sees the removal of the benefit for expenditure over $100 million and a reduction in the rate of the offset by 1.5 percentage points for all firms across the board.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 14 September 2015. )

      38    Tuberculosis: Resumption of debate ( from  24 March 2015 ) on the motion of Mrs Prentice —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         24 March is World Tuberculosis Day (WTD);

(b)         WTD is a designated WHO global public health campaign and is an annual event that marks the anniversary of the 1882 discovery by German Nobel Laureate, Dr Robert Koch, of the bacterium that causes tuberculosis;

(c)         tuberculosis is contagious and airborne—it ranks as the world’s second leading cause of death from a single infectious agent and left untreated, each person with active tuberculosis disease will infect on average 10 to 15 people every year;

(d)         the theme for WTD in 2015 is ‘Reach, Treat, Cure Everyone’;

(e)         in 2013, 1.5 million people died from tuberculosis worldwide with 40 per cent of deaths occurring in countries in the lndo Pacific region;

(f)          Papua New Guinea has the highest rate of tuberculosis infection in the Pacific, with an estimated 39,000 total cases and 25,000 infections each year;

(g)         the prevalence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis continues to increase worldwide—rising from 450,000 cases in 2012 to 480,000 cases in 2013, with more than half of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases found in our region; and

(h)         tuberculosis is:

                                                          (i)       the leading cause of death among HIV positive people—HIV weakens the immune system and is lethal in combination with tuberculosis, each contributing to the other’s progress; and

                                                        (ii)       considered to be a preventable and treatable disease, however current treatment tools, drugs, diagnostics and vaccines are outdated and ineffective; and

(2)         recognises:

(a)         Australia’s resolve to continue to work towards combatting the challenge of tuberculosis in the region and the need for discovery, development and rapid uptake of new tools, interventions and strategies as recognised in the WHO End TB Strategy;

(b)         the WHO End TB Strategy was endorsed by all member states at the 2014 World Health Assembly and aims to end the tuberculosis epidemic by 2035;

(c)         the Australian Government funding of health and medical research is helping to bring new medicines, diagnostic tests and vaccines to market for tuberculosis and other neglected diseases; and

(d)         the ongoing support for research and development of new simple and affordable treatment tools for tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is essential if the WHO End TB Strategy goal is to be met.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 14 September 2015. )

      39    Brain injury: Resumption of debate ( from  24 March 2015 ) on the motion of Ms Hall —That this House:

(1)         recognises:

(a)         that Brain Injury Awareness Week will be held from 9 to 15 March 2015;

(b)         that over 700,000 Australians live with a brain injury; and

(c)         the work done by the Bouverie Centre in conjunction with the Victorian Department of Human Services to improve services provided to people with acquired brain injury;

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         provide more services to accommodate people with a brain injury; and

(b)         develop a national scale partnership similar to the partnership seen in Victoria which helps people with a brain injury, and their family members;

(3)         further recognises that Acquired Brain Injuries (ABI) can be acquired in many varied and different ways, e.g. as a result of an accident, a stroke, drug and alcohol abuse, tumours, poisoning, and disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Multiple Sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease; and

(4)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         work with Brain Injury Australia to establish a nation-wide policy which will reflect the needs of people with an ABI, as well as the needs of their families;

(b)         undertake a public awareness campaign to inform the public about ABI, its causes, prevention and management; and

(c)         provide more funding for research into ABI.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 14 September 2015. )

      40    Deregulation: Resumption of debate ( from  24 March 2015 ) on the motion of Mr Irons —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the previous Labor Government introduced more than 21,000 additional regulations in five and a half years and as a consequence, Australia:

                                                          (i)       ranked 128th out of 148 countries for burden of government regulation according to the 2013 World Economic Forum Global Competitiveness Index; and

                                                        (ii)       came second last in a 2012 ranking of productivity growth by the Economist Intelligence Unit;

(b)         the Government has a deregulation agenda to cut $1 billion in green and red tape each year;

(c)         on 26 March 2014 the Government held the first ever red tape repeal day, removing over 10,000 pieces and 50,000 pages of legislation and regulation saving over $700 million in compliance costs; and

(2)         commends the Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister for his effective management of the Government’s deregulation agenda.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 14 September 2015. )